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VOL. 18, NO. 12

NEWCASTLE’S LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

N    EWCASTLE

THREE TIMES A TROPHY

NEWS

Liberty swim team brings home its third straight 2A state championship Page 16

Stormwater fee increase approved by council

Budget deliberations continue Dec. 6 BY CHRISTINA CORRALES-TOY ccorrales-toy@newcastle-news.com

GREG FARRAR | gfarrar@newcastle-news.com

Lori and Brian Elworth (left) and Sue Stronk stand at the 12900 block of Southeast 86th Place under the power lines that parallel the petroleum pipeline near their homes in the Olympus neighborhood.

PSE’s Energize Eastside taking its toll on Newcastle residents BY CHRISTINA CORRALES-TOY

ccorrales-toy@newcastle-news.com

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s Olympus resident Sue Stronk lounges on her back deck with the sun shining and not a cloud in the air, she knows she’s lucky. Mount Rainier shines in the distance, and the smell of Evergreens fills the air in her slice of Pacific Northwest heaven.

“Where are you going to find a house like this these days?” she asks. The house, the view, they’re both exceptional, but it’s the community that truly makes it home. It’s a tight-knit cul-desac where the word neighbor is synonymous with family. It’s the kind of place where homeowners go camping together and celebrate each other’s family milestones, said neighbors

Brian and Lori Elworth. They all see this peaceful corner of Olympus as the only place they’d ever want to call home. That’s still very true, but a Puget Sound Energy project to upgrade transmission lines through the corridor has residents like Stronk and the Elworths wondering if it will stay that way.

Newcastle residents will pay about $16 more in storm water fees beginning in 2017. The Newcastle City Council raised the fee 10 percent Nov. 15, which will net about an extra $50,000 for the fund associated with the ongoing maintenance and capital improvements to the city’s surface water system. It’s the same fund that just saw $300,000 withdrawn to pay for the purchase of the Newcastle City Hall building. Councilman John Drescher was just one of the council members who had trouble asking residents to pay more, given the recent City Hall transaction. “It just doesn’t fly,” he said. “It doesn’t fly in the private sector and it shouldn’t fly in the public sector.” But City Manager Rob Wyman insists the increase — with more likely coming in the future — is necessary for ongoing operational costs to a surface water system that has deficiencies. Deferred maintenance and high staff turnover SEE BUDGET, PAGE 31

IF YOU GO The Newcastle City Council will continue discussing the 2017 budget, including a discussion on new revenue sources, at its 7 p.m. Dec. 6 meeting at Newcastle City Hall.

SEE TOLL, PAGE 2

Issaquah district bell times changing for 2017-18 BY LIZZ GIORDANO lgiordano@newcastle-news.com

Beginning in the 2017-18 school year, high school and middle school students can sleep a little longer each morning. In a press release posted on

the Issaquah School District site Nov. 10, Superintendent Ron Thiele announced new bell times that will push back the start time for high schools and middle schools 35 minutes. “I believe that the new bell times strike the right balance for our community and all of our

unique geographic and traffic realities,” wrote Thiele. Next fall, high schools will start at 8 a.m., middle schools at 8:10 a.m. and elementary schools at 9:10 a.m. To accommodate transportation needs, the times might be adjusted slightly, but no school will start

earlier than 8 a.m. or end later than 4 p.m., according to the press release. Thiele said a strong majority of the emails the district received supported the change in bell times. SEE TIMES, PAGE 31

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

TOLL From Page 1

“We’ve been calling each other neighbors for life forever and now here’s this damn power line that may separate us,” Stronk said. PSE’s Energize Eastside project was introduced three years ago this December. The plan is to build a new substation and upgrade about 18 miles of transmission lines from Redmond to Renton in response to the region’s growth. The utility says growth is straining the system, and the upgrades are necessary to keep the lights on. According to PSE, studies estimate demand for reliable power will exceed capacity as early as winter of 2017-18. “It’s really like any kind of machine — if you’re running it past its capacity, if you’re running it hard day after day, it begins to have problems,” Andy Wappler, PSE’s vice president of customer operations and communications, told the Newcastle City Council in his April 2014 introduction to the project. PSE’s preferred route goes through the heart of Newcastle, employing the existing transmission corridor where 110

kilovolt lines now stand. Under Energize Eastside, those would be upgraded to 230 kilovolts. Newcastle neighbors concerns are numerous, among them health issues related to the electromagnetic fields connected to high-voltage lines, property values, the true need for the project and view obstruction. But the No. 1 concern in Brian Elworth’s mind is safety. Can the utility safely do this project in the same corridor that contains a gas pipeline carrying fuel to SeaTac Airport? “To me, it’s the co-location with the pipeline,” he said. “You’ve got a high-energy ignition source and a high-energy fuel source. That is a bad combination.” Neighbors are worried that construction along it could lead to a disastrous accident, Keith Hargus, then-president of the Olympus Homeowners Association, told the council in 2014. He mentioned the 1999 Bellingham pipeline explosion that caused about $45 million in property damages and killed three people. “I think for us that are living along that corridor, we’re very concerned with anything that could happen that’s even close to this kind of magnitude of an event,” he said. But safety is a top priority

ON THE WEB Puget Sound Energy’s Energize Eastside: energizeeastside.com Coalition of Eastside Neighborhoods for Sensible Energy: cense.org Energize Eastside Environmental Impact Statement: energizeeastsideeis.org

for PSE, according to Energize Eastside spokeswoman Diann Strom, and the utility has shared the corridor with Olympic Pipe Line for decades. She added the company is working with a national expert in pipeline safety to develop design parameters for the project. Brian Elworth and neighbors aren’t convinced it can safely happen in the current corridor without condemning homes and breaking up the neighborhood. Though, based on what the utility knows today, Strom said, the project will not require PSE to condemn homes. “It’s the most unsafe route, and it’s not needed,” Stronk said. “When it gets down to those two things, it’s like, what are we doing?” The project’s need has been

NEWCASTLE NEWS a point of contention over the three years. The Coalition of Eastside Neighborhoods for Sensible Energy, a group opposing Energize Eastside, has been vocal in challenging PSE’s estimates for the Eastside’s annual increase in electricity demand. Instead, CENSE advocates a solution that employs smart technologies. “It doesn’t make sense that we wouldn’t be stepping up to higher technologies to provide power without resorting to more poles and a dirty coal plant,” Brian Elworth said. Energize Eastside is absolutely necessary, though, Strom said. The last major upgrade to the backbone of the Eastside’s electric grid was more than 50 years ago in the 1960s. “The Eastside looks very different today,” she said. “We need to make sure we have sufficient infrastructure to meet the load.” The project is currently under environmental review. Led by the City of Bellevue, Redmond, Kirkland, Renton and Newcastle are conducting the Energize Eastside Environmental Impact Statement, a legally mandated process that will critically evaluate potential significant environmental impacts associated with the project and project alternatives.

Strom said PSE hopes to identify a final route in the first half of 2017 and start talking about permitting and construction at the end of 2017. “We’re listening to the community,” she said. “Safety is our top priority and we’re designing our project to be safe.” Stronk and the Elworths estimate they’ve spent hundreds of hours researching Energize Eastside, energy solutions and what other communities have done in similar situations. They never miss an opportunity at council meetings, commission meetings and other public avenues to voice their concerns. Fighting this project has consumed a large part of their lives. “It’s a huge time commitment and we’ve been at it for a few years already,” said Lori Elworth. “We continue at it because we believe it’s wrong.” Brian Elworth’s preferred outcome would be for everyone to use their smarts and come up with new energy technologies making Energize Eastside unnecessary. Stronk sees the whole process eventually ending in a courtroom. “We can’t even believe it has come this far,” Lori Elworth said. “We can’t believe that we’re sitting here right now.”

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

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Newcastle brick monument will be moved ccorrales-toy@ newcastle-news.com

The large brick monument greeting visitors at the north end of the city needs to be moved as development continues on the Newcastle Commons project. Newcastle Commons developer Avalon Bay will pay for the relocation — which will likely include site work and removal by crane — but it cannot stay in its current spot, City Manager Rob Wyman told council members Nov. 1. “It’s definitely going to have to be moved no matter what, how far it gets moved is the question,” Wyman said. The two 8-by-10-foot brick panels depicting a coal trainand-miner vignette were installed and unveiled at the intersection of Coal Creek Parkway and the entrance of the old Mutual Materials brick plant Nov. 1, 2001. City staff members and the Newcastle Historical Society worked with nationally acclaimed artist Mara Smith to plan the project. Smith

TERRA CHAPEK

Late Newcastle historian Milt Swanson (left) gets an up-close look at the Newcastle monument after it was unveiled Nov. 1, 2001. The longtime resident remembered when the scenes of coal miners, loggers and trains that are depected on the monument were a reality.

carved the bricks to depict life in the old coal mining towns of Newcastle and Coal creek. The artists used photographs of the mining period to accurately capture the era. The panels are exactly the size of an

Drew McGougan 206-387-6810

drewmcgougan@BHHSNWRealEstate.com

entrance to a mineshaft, former Newcastle Council member Pam Lee told the Newcastle News in 2001. One panel shows the men coming out of the mines with the bunkers behind them. The

old company store, post office and company house No. 75 are all depicted behind the miners. The other panel pictures the Alki, a steam locomotive which made runs to Seattle with coal in the late 1870s.

“There’s some great detail on that, it’s a really neat piece,” Wyman said. City staff members suggested moving it off Coal Creek Parkway inward toward the Newcastle Commons entrance. In that location, people would have an easier time walking up to it and taking in the intricate details, Wyman argued. Council member John Drescher was less convinced, saying while he didn’t find the monument attractive, it was historically significant and deserved a worthy spot. “It loses 98 percent of its value if it is not on Coal Creek, which is the main entrance into town,” he said. “Newcastle is not (just) the Avalon development, Newcastle is the whole town and I for one don’t believe that’s the right fix.” The decision on its new home must be made within the next month, Wyman said, but the actual move somewhere within the city won’t occur right away. “What we hope to do is ultimately put more traditional markers at the city entrance,” Wyman said.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

OPINION

NEWCASTLE NEWS

Notes From Newcastle

Cast your nominations for the Diamond Awards

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t’s time to honor the Newcastle community’s top contributors. The Newcastle Chamber of Commerce’s Diamond Awards ceremony is set for Jan. 19, 2017, but the time to send in your nominations is now. The chamber is seeking nominations in categories honoring the community’s best in busiChristina Corrales-Toy ness, leadership, customer service, education and more. See all of the categories and submit your nominations by Dec. 17 at newcastle-chamber. org. In the meantime, allow me to throw a few potential names into the ring. Steve Valach The Liberty High School football coach has his Patriots back in the Tacoma Dome, but that’s

SCOTT STODDARD | sstoddard@newcastle-news.com

Liberty football coach Steve Valach (left) high-fives students who traveled to Yakima to watch the Patriots defeat Ellensburg on Nov. 26.

not the reason he’s Diamond Award-worthy. Valach’s focus on the details beyond football is what makes him special. He’s inclusive, caring and inspiring as he teaches young men to be excellent in all areas of their lives. Everyone has a place in Valach’s universe. He welcomes a group of special-needs students who serve as managers and coaches. They play prominent roles on the sidelines and

postgame as Valach integrates them with his own team of coaches. Valach is just one of the good guys, and you know it as soon as you meet him. He’s friendly, attentive and has a big heart and enthusiasm for all things Liberty. Chris Coy If you’ve ever been to a City of Newcastle event, you know the Hazen High School band usu-

ally has some sort of presence. You’ve probably seen the band at Newcastle Days and the jazz band at Earth Day. Attendees can count on the Highlanders to provide a soundtrack as you meander through Lake Boren Park festivals. Coy, the school’s director of bands and orchestras, is a big reason the band is so involved in the community. Last year, Coy was also responsible for reviving the marching band after a long hiatus. Diane Nakamichi The Newport Heights Elementary teacher is bringing the joy of reading to her Newcastle neighborhood. She debuted a Little Free Library on the lawn of her Newcastle home in October, inviting anyone in the community to take a book, leave a book and just enjoy the written word. “I do love to read,” Nakamichi said. “I go to the Newcastle Library all the time and I wanted to do my part to

Reporter’s Notebook

Kids listen, even when our words are abhorrent

I

t’s fair to say a lot of people were disgusted when they read Sandy Ringer’s account of the Liberty-Ellensburg football game in The Seattle Times over the weekend. Unfortunately, not everyone was disgusted, or the story would’ve been written differently. In the fourth paragraph of the story, Ringer talked about

the impact Liberty senior Isaiah Owens had on the game and the adversity he had to fight Neil Pierson through after “he was hit in the mouth and was the target of a racial slur after making a tackle on the Ellensburg sideline late in the third quarter.”

N    EWCASTLE

NEWS Published the first Friday of every month by The Issaquah Press Group 1085 12th Ave. NW, Suite D1 | P.O. Box 1328 Issaquah, King County, WA 98027

Owens, who is black, helped seal the Patriots’ 35-26 victory and a trip to this week’s Class 2A state championship with two fourth-quarter interceptions. As a wide receiver and defensive back, he has been an integral piece for a team that’s 12-0 and faces fellow unbeaten Archbishop Murphy for the title. But he had to control his temper after the alleged

incident as he was flagged for a 15-yard penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct. “I know my team needs me and I couldn’t cost my team,” Owens said. “I had to regain my composure and go out there and do what we prepared for.” It’s puzzling that the Ellensburg player or coach who incited Owens wasn’t penalized

promote reading.” Vickie Baima Olson Baima Olson is arguably the Newcastle Historic Coal Miner’s Cemetery’s greatest advocate. She hosts occasional tours and clean-up parties at the site. The cemetery covers a little more than 2 acres and has served as the final resting place for coal miners and their families since 1878. Baima Olson has family buried in the cemetery, and her father John Baima, along with late Newcastle historian Milt Swanson, worked tirelessly to preserve the site. “He and Milt Swanson were pretty passionate about taking care of this cemetery,” Baima Olson said. “I feel like I am following their wishes, and to me, it’s exciting to see it happen.” Notes From Newcastle is digital editor Christina Corrales-Toy’s column. Email her at ccorrales-toy@newcastle-news.com. Twitter : @ByChristinaCT

HAVE YOUR SAY Something on your mind about your city? Tell us about it. Send letters to the editor via email to editor@ newcastle-news.com. The Newcastle News welcomes comments to the editor about local issues — 300 words at most, please. We may edit them for length, clarity or inappropriate content. Include your phone number (for verification purposes only; it will not be published).

SEE NOTEBOOK, PAGE 15

STAFF Charles Horton.......................................General manager Scott Stoddard...............................................................Editor Christina Corrales-Toy................................ Digital editor Neil Pierson.............................................................. Reporter Greg Farrar.....................................................Photographer Laura Dill............................................................. Advertising CORRECTIONS We are committed to accuracy at the Newcastle News and take care in our reporting and editing, but errors do occur. If you think something we’ve published is in error, please email us at editor@newcastle-news.com.

CONTACT US All departments can be reached at

(425) 392-6434

Fax: (425) 392-1695 Email: editor@newcastle-news.com Online: newcastle-news.com ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS $26 for one year | $50 for two years Add $15 per year outside King County Add $20 per year outside the state of Washington


NEWCASTLE NEWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NEWCASTLE NEWS

Police blotter Noisy engines Police responded to a noise complaint about loud engines or generators at the Hansen Bros. Moving & Storage facility, 6860 Coal Creek Parkway SE, on Oct. 27. One driver contacted claimed his battery would die if he didn’t run the engine periodically, but he agreed to keep his engine off for the rest of the night.

Louis Vuitton gone

A $1,500 Louis Vuitton bag, a Nordstrom tie and Macy’s pillows were among the items stolen from a car in the 9000 block of 143rd Avenue Southeast before 8:45 a.m. Nov. 2. The thief gained entry after the homeowner forgot to close the

garage and left the car doors unlocked overnight.

window of a Mercedes parked in the QFC parking lot Nov. 5.

Makeup motive

Wallet returned

Two Seattle women were trespassed from the Bartell Drugs store at 6939 Coal Creek Parkway SE after one of the two attempted to steal $75 worth of cosmetics Nov. 2.

A black wallet found in Lake Boren Park was returned to its owner Nov. 5 after police found a Liberty High School identification card in it.

While on patrol, police found the word “Trump” scrawled across four Newcastle city roads along the 116th Avenue Southeast corridor Nov. 5. Police filed the report as vandalism. An unknown suspect damaged the front driver’s side

Cleaned out

Close your garage

A neighborhood mailbox in the 7300 block of Coal Creek Parkway Southeast was pried open and bent causing $500 in damage Nov. 9.

Rap fan

You’re fired

A suspicious vehicle seen in the Walkers Run Condominiums parking lot took off from an officer Nov. 13. The

Shattered

recently fired employee refused to leave the shop until he spoke with the owner. He eventually agreed to wait outside until the owner arrived.

A homeowner in the 7800 block of 116th Avenue Southeast left his alarm off and door unlocked for the regular house cleaner to gain entry Nov. 13. Before the cleaner arrived, though, someone came into the house and stole passports, change and jewelry.

Mail mischief

The Donald

officer followed the vehicle onto State Route 900, but lost it. The vehicle reportedly had a large sticker with a lyric from a Tyler, the Creator song on it.

Police responded to a disturbance call Nov. 18 at a business in the 7200 block of 132nd Place Southeast after a

Someone stole a table saw valued at approximately $300 from a garage in the 8400 block of 118th Avenue Southeast before 7 p.m. Nov. 19. One of the residents reportedly forgot to make sure the garage door was closed before leaving.

DUI

A 25-year-old Newcastle man was arrested for DUI after police found him in an idling car in the Newcastle City Hall parking lot Nov. 22.

Commission Corner

Public input vital for new Downtown Strategic Plan

T

he Newcastle City Council has two volunteer advisory boards. The Planning Commission offers advice and makes recommendations on the Comprehensive Plan, development codes and other matters related to development and land use. They meet at 7 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of every month at Newcastle City Hall. The Community Activities Commission advises the council on city-owned park planning, design and construction, park and facility develop-

ment, renovation, trails and paths, recreation programs and special community events. They meet at 7 p.m. on the second Wednesday of every month at Newcastle City Hall. Here’s what the Planning Commission is up to, courtesy of Chairman Tom Magers. The CAC did not submit a report to the Newcastle News this month. Planning Commission In November, our Planning Commission participated in an introduction and overview of the project scope for a new Downtown Strategic Plan,

including updated design guidelines and from residents that utilize downtown development codes in the downtown sec- services. They may speak for pedestrian, tor. This “first take” included discussion bicycle or vehicle users regarding conregarding community involvement in nectivity, safety and related issues. In plan development, project goals and antic- short, everyone will have an opportunity ipated completion dates of project phases. to determine the community’s vision for While the Planning Commission plays our downtown. More information will a significant role in the city’s efforts to be provided through various channels to update development regulations for the solicit your input. We’re looking forward downtown area, it is important to note to a lot of interaction and discussion with that the commission is but seven voices friends and neighbors in Newcastle as for the public. This study will need and this project takes shape. consider voices from stakeholders that Our next Planning Commission meetown property, own a business or manage ing will be held on Thursday, Jan. 12, a a business. Voices also need toLAURA be heard special meeting date. D.ePROOF.SR.CMYK. 49.17922.THU.1201.3X5.LAM

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

Laughing All the Way

Do-it-yourself — at your own risk

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bout 20 years ago after watching too many Martha Stewart programs, I decided to make my own Christmas wrapping paper. I bought all the tools necessary: light brown kraft wrap, sun and star stamps and gold metallic stamping ink. I even bought new pencils and cut tiny stars into the Pat Detmer erasers, just like Martha did. And I had champagne. That did not come from Martha. That was my own idea. I started at noonish on Christmas Eve in a tranquil, warm pool of creativity at the kitchen table. Ambience is important for a task like this! A fire crackled in the hearth, carols played in the background. The Sainted One opened a fresh champagne and pretended to be interested and appreciative. I began my artwork, creating a single 2-foot-by-3-foot sheet at a time, each brilliant, suitable for framing, almost too pretty to fold and tape. There were no gaping holes in the universe of stars that I fashioned, no awkward empty edges, no one stamp used more than the others. Each deserved a fresh press on the ink pad and a special spot

on the paper. I finished three sheets and sent The Sainted One upstairs to bring down gifts: CDs, earrings, watches, ties, pens. I hummed and wrapped. I was flush with personal satisfaction and sparkling brut. A second trip upstairs, and now the gifts

were getting larger. We had gone from trinkets to clothing, and the box size was growing. I was mildly concerned, so I had some more champagne. The most important thing, I told myself, was to stay calm and keep this process in perspective. My very reason for doing it was to rest

in the arms of serenity during the stressful holiday season. Still, one shirt or sweater used a whole sheet, and the clock was ticking. We had to leave for Mom’s at 5 p.m., and it was already 3:30. I proceeded with a fresh determination. By now, my arm was start-

ing to ache. My whole upper body was tight as a drum. The Sainted One gave me a neck massage before he went back upstairs for more gifts. Our grandchildren were small at the time and we shopped at Costco, so you know the kind of parcels that came down those stairs, the ones that took up a shopping cart all by themselves, boxes that could have been used as set decorations in “Land of the Giants.” Boxes you could live in. It was 4:15. Tranquility? Gone. Champagne? Gone. The Sainted One. Gone as well, and can you blame him? My little works of art, my beautiful starry, starry nights began filling with vast empty areas. Wobbly suns, halfhearted stars, and the little pencil erasers had crumbled and were producing ominous amoeba-like shapes. We threw it all in the trunk and headed for Mom’s, where the Detmer Gift-Opening Machinery mindlessly ripped apart six hours of loving labor. My mother, of course, pressed the sheets from her gifts and re-used them until she died. The rest of family … they were and are barbarians! And I never made my own wrapping paper again. You can reach Pat Detmer – who uses a lot of bags in lieu of wrapping paper these days – at patdetmer@aol.com.

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Sponsored Story The City Wants Your Input on Our New Surface Water Plan

More rain fell in our area during October this year than any other year on record, which means we saw an unusual amount of stormwater runoff. When rain flows across impervious surfaces like rooftops, pavement and sidewalks, it picks up sediment and pollutants before it flows into our stormwater system (a network of catch basins, pipes, detention tanks, vaults, and ponds) and into our natural waterways.

Stormwater runoff has a big impact on Newcastle’s streets, neighborhoods, businesses and the natural environment because it can degrade water quality and cause flooding. The City of Newcastle wants to hear from you about how stormwater has impacted your area of the city. Your input will help us improve the way we manage stormwater and surface water in our efforts to reduce flooding and improve our natural waterways.

The city has started the process of updating its comprehensive plan for managing surface water. This plan is an essential tool and your input is necessary for identifying surface water challenges and creating successful, adaptive solutions. A survey is now available at https://tinyurl.com/ hhaewfz for you to provide your feedback on: • Drainage or flooding concerns around your property, street, or neighborhood • Concerns about water quality in any of our natural waterways • Questions about riparian or aquatic habitat, or critical areas within the city • Ideas or feedback on surface water public education and outreach efforts

• Input for storm or surface water program improvements Newcastle’s Comprehensive Surface Water Management Plan sets a framework for policies, maintenance schedules and surface water capital improvement projects. It includes program goals, and guidance on maintenance action items and operations, development review and inspections, surface water capital improvement programs, education/ outreach programs, as well as regional coordination efforts.

With your participation and partnerships with other governmental agencies, the city can enhance its Surface Water Management Program. Together we can continue to improve both Newcastle’s built environment and the water quality within our drainage basins. In an effort to increase our public outreach and participation efforts, we’re in the process of scheduling an Open House early next year for additonal input on the Comprehensive Surface Water Management Plan. In the meantime, please

give us your feedback by filling out the survey, or contact Audrie Starsy, the city’s Surface Water Program Manager at Audries@ci.newcastle. wa.us or (425) 649-4444 ext. 111.

you are unsure, do not provide any information. You may contact the companies’ help hotlines by checking for those numbers online; do not use a number the caller provides, it may be fake. If you are concerned about the call, you may contact the police and report the information.

And, as always, if you see something, say something. Newcastle Police Officers are committed to responding to any suspicious behavior, and reporting even the smallest unusual activity can sometimes lead to crime prevention.

Survey now available at https://tinyurl.com/ hhaewfz Survey ends Dec. 31st, 2016.

Newcastle Police Holiday Tips With the holiday season upon us, Newcastle Police would like to give our community a few friendly reminders about how to enjoy a carefree and crime-free holiday season. Package Thefts Online retailers made record deliveries last year nationwide of holiday purchases. With this in mind, package thefts have been on the rise in our area. u When possible, schedule the delivery when you will be home. u Have a neighbor watch for the delivery and secure the package. u Use a safe delivery box if possible. u Place security cameras where they will pick up a clear image of someone coming to your home.

If you see someone stealing packages, call 9-1-1 with a suspect description, and a photo or video survaillance if possible. Garage Doors Nighttime garage burglaries have occurred in Newcastle. Thieves are more likely to target houses that provide easy access, and open garage doors are a prime target for easy car prowls and burglaries. Thieves also access the garage by using the garage door opener in a vehicle that was left in the driveway. u Check your garage door to make sure it is closed before going to bed. u Make sure any car left in the driveway is locked and garage door opener is secured. Warming Up Vehicles This is the time of year many people start their vehicle in the morning to warm it up before their commute. We strongly

recommend against this as vehicles may be easily stolen. If you choose to warm up your vehicle, please remember to lock your vehicle or install a remote starter system in your vehicle that prevents the vehicle from being driven without the proximity key fob in the car. Phone Scams Over the past few months, we have had reports of fraudulent calls by people claiming to represent the IRS, PSE, Microsoft, and the King County Courts to name a few. The caller asks for money to be sent to them directly or via gift cards or they ask for banking information or other personal information. Legitimate companies will never ask for personal banking information, social security numbers, or computer usernames and passwords over the phone or threaten you with arrest for not sending money. If

Vacation House Checks If you will be traveling, sign up for vacation house checks,

Thank you for continuing to partner with your police department to keep our city safe, and have a Happy Holiday!

http://www.ci.newcastle. wa.us/police/vacation_ house_check.htm . We will periodically check your home. 49.17028.NN.R


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NEWCASTLE NEWS

Liberty DECA hosts fundraiser for greenway Dec. 9 The Liberty High School DECA chapter will host hypnotist and magician Joe Black at a Dec. 9 fundraiser for the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust. Black will perform a show at 7:30 p.m. in the Liberty auditorium, 16655 SE 136th St., Renton. The community is invited to purchase tickets at the door for $10 with all proceeds going to Mountains to Sound Greenway. The school’s DECA chapter organized the event to support its 2016 community service project of collecting funds for Mountains to Sound Greenway. The nonprofit helps create a sustainable future for the Pacific Northwest through conservation.

Hazen music department hosts holiday gala concert

The Hazen High School music department will perform a holiday concert Dec. 15. The Hazen Symphonic Band, Highlander Jazz Band, Hazen Philharmonic Orchestra, Hazen Chamber Singers and Divina Voce are all expected to partici-

salesmanship, providing a wonderful tree-shopping experience for the community. “They help customers find the right tree, fresh-cut the bottom of the tree, wrap and help tie the tree on the roof of the customer’s car with knots they learned through scouting. Many of our customers return every year.” The Troop 626 Christmas tree lot at the Newport Hills Swim and Tennis Club parking lot, 5464 119th Ave. SE, Bellevue, runs through Dec. 18 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on weekends and 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays.

Friends of Newcastle Library’s holiday book sale is Dec. 2-3 Contributed

Boy Scout Troop 626 transforms the Newport Hills Swim and Tennis Club parking lot into a Christmas tree lot.

pate in the show that begins at 7 p.m. in the school’s auditorium. Tickets are $8 through Dec. 5, increase to $10 through Dec. 14 and go to $12 on the day of the concert. Pre-purchase tickets at hazenboosterclub.org. Free refreshments will be served during intermission and after the concert. A silent auction benefitting the music depart-

ment will occur before the concert and during intermission.

Scout troop opens Christmas tree sale in Newport Hills

Boy Scout Troop 626 is ready to help bring the holiday season to life as the boys host their annual Christmas tree sale at

the Newport Hills Swim and Tennis Club. This is the 34th year Troop 626 has sold trees as their annual fundraiser and many local residents make visiting the lot their family’s annual tradition. “It is a fantastic fundraiser,” said Scoutmaster Barry Chu. “The Scouts learn a great deal about customer service and

The Friends of the Newcastle Library will host a holiday book sale Dec. 2-3. Browse a huge assortment of books from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 2 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3. The Newcastle Library is at 12901 Newcastle Way. Hundreds of books for all ages in a wide-ranging selection of genres will be available for purchase. Funds support Newcastle Library programs. The group is seeking volunteers for set up and take down. Email friendsnewcastlelib@gmail. com to get involved.

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

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2016 READERS’ CHOICE WINNERS Asian Dining

Pizza

Kid’s Store

Insurance Agent (Agency)

Mandarin Garden and Cloud 9 ............................First

Flying Pie Pizzaria .................................First Zeek’s Pizza ............................................... Runner Up Mod Pizza.................................................. Honorable Tutta Bella ................................................. Honorable

White Horse Toys..................................First Small Threads ........................................... Runner Up Carter’s ...................................................... Honorable

Tom Sessions .........................................First Kathy Johnson .......................................... Runner Up Issaquah Insurance Agency ...................... Honorable Dan Gelhaye - Insurance Services Network Honorable

Bakery Nothing Bundt Cakes ...........................First Georgia’s North Bend............................... Runner Up Top Pot...................................................... Honorable Forest Fairy Bakery ................................... Honorable

BBQ Dickey’s Barbecue Pit ...........................First Stan’s BBQ ................................................ Runner Up Rhodie’s..................................................... Honorable The Woodman .......................................... Honorable

Breakfast 12th Avenue Cafe .................................First Issaquah Cafe ........................................... Runner Up The Egg and Us ........................................ Honorable Sammamish Cafe...................................... Honorable

Coffee Issaquah Coffee House .........................First Cafe Ladro ................................................ Runner Up Sammamish Cafe...................................... Honorable Pioneer Coffee North Bend ..................... Honorable

Dessert Ben & Jerry’s .........................................First Nothing Bundt Cakes ............................... Runner Up Scott’s Dairy Freeze .................................. Honorable The Swirl.................................................... Honorable

Fine Dining Jak’s Grill ...............................................First Terra Vista at Snoqualmie Casino ............ Runner Up Wild Fin ..................................................... Honorable Montalcino ................................................ Honorable

Frozen Treat Ben & Jerry’s .........................................First Scott’s Dairy Freeze .................................. Runner Up Yum-E Yogurt ............................................ Honorable Yo Plateau ................................................. Honorable

Customer Service First Impressions Dental .......................First Morgan Motors......................................... Runner Up Sammamish Orthodontics........................ Honorable Issaquah Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Honorable

Place to Work Sammamish Orthodontics ....................First Issaquah Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Runner Up Costco ....................................................... Honorable

Non Profit Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank ...........First Encompass................................................ Runner Up Eastside Baby Corner ............................... Honorable Issaquah Senior Cneter ............................ Honorable

Place to Eat Zeek’s Pizza...........................................First Issaquah Cafe ........................................... Runner Up Scott’s Dairy Freeze .................................. Honorable Sammamish Cafe...................................... Honorable

Shopping Experience Gilman Gallery ......................................First Gilman Village .......................................... Runner Up Costco ....................................................... Honorable Nault Jewelers .......................................... Honorable

Antique Store Gilman Gallery ......................................First Antique Importers .................................... Runner Up Pacific Galleries......................................... Honorable

Appliance Store King & Bunny’s Appliance Store ..........First Albert Lee ................................................ Runner Up Frederick’s Appliances .............................. Runner Up

Hamburger

Consignment Store

Scott’s Dairy Freeze..............................First Triple XXX ................................................. Runner Up Jak’s Grill ................................................... Honorable Sammamish Cafe...................................... Honorable

Double Take Vintage ............................First Small Threads ........................................... Runner Up Revolve Consignment .............................. Honorable

Happy Hour Pogacha.................................................First Sunset Bar & Grill...................................... Runner Up Big Fish Grill.............................................. Honorable Coho Cafe................................................. Honorable

Healthy Eats

Florist Countryside Floral and Garden ............First First and Bloom ........................................ Runner Up Issaquah Floral .......................................... Honorable Cinnamons ................................................ Honorable

Furniture Store

PCC........................................................First Panera ....................................................... Runner Up Bloom Juice .............................................. Honorable

Antique Importers ................................First Issaquah Furniture .................................... Runner Up Gilman Gallery .......................................... Honorable Leathers..................................................... Honorable

Indian

Gas Stations & C Stores

Bukhara Bar & Grill ...............................First Aahaar Restaurant .................................... Runner Up Madras Dosa Corner ................................ Honorable Kanishka Cusisine of India ........................ Honorable

North Bend Shell ..................................First Jackson Pine Lake..................................... Runner Up Newport Hills Chevron ............................. Honorable Newcastle Shell ........................................ Honorable

Italian

Gift Shop

Niccolino ...............................................First Montalcino ................................................ Runner Up Tutta Bella ................................................. Honorable Pogacha .................................................... Honorable

Lucky You ..............................................First Paula’s Hallmark ........................................ Runner Up Carousel .................................................... Honorable Nault Jewelers .......................................... Honorable

Lunch

Home & Home Remodeling

Sammamish Cafe...................................First Mandarin Garden and Cloud 9 ................ Runner Up Issaquah Cafe ........................................... Honorable Taqueria La Venadita ................................ Honorable

Mediterranean Garlic Crush...........................................First Pogacha .................................................... Runner Up Tantalus Greek Bistro ................................ Honorable Mediterranean Kitchen............................. Honorable

Mexican Las Margaritas ......................................First Agave Cocina ........................................... Runner Up La Casita.................................................... Honorable Taqueria La Venadita ................................ Honorable

Interior Expressions ..............................First Lucky Home .............................................. Runner Up Steven Ray Construction .......................... Honorable Kitchen Plus .............................................. Honorable

Home Decor Lucky Home ..........................................First Gilman Gallery .......................................... Runner Up

Jewelry Store Nault Jewelers ......................................First Marlow’s Fine Jewelry............................... Runner Up Plateau Jewelers ....................................... Honorable Albert’s Jewelers ....................................... Honorable

Mattress or Bedding Store The Sleep Store.....................................First The 6 Day Mattress Store ......................... Runner Up

Meat/Seafood Market Fischer Meats........................................First Gemini Fish Market .................................. Runner Up B&E Meats ................................................ Honorable IGA, Snoqualmie ...................................... Honorable

Music Instrument Store Moore Brothers Music ..........................First Henry Bischofberger................................. Runner Up NW Guitars ............................................... Honorable

New/Used Car Sales Evergreen Ford.....................................First Chaplain’s .................................................. Runner Up Michael’s Toyota of Bellevue .................... Honorable Evergreen Chevrolet................................. Honorable

Pet Store Earth Pet ...............................................First All the Best Pet Care ................................ Runner Up Pet Place Market....................................... Honorable Pet Pros Klahanie ...................................... Honorable

Shopping Center Gilman Village .......................................First Bellevue Square ........................................ Runner Up Grand Ridge Plaza .................................... Honorable Meadows Shopping Center ..................... Honorable

Automotive Repair Morgan Motors.....................................First North Bend Les Schwab........................... Runner Up Newcastle Shell ........................................ Honorable Gilman Auto Body .................................... Honorable

Chiropractic Care Front Street Chiropractic......................First Issaquah Family Chiropractic ................... Runner Up Whole Health Chiropractic ....................... Honorable Cottrell ...................................................... Honorable

Dentist First Impressions Dentistry ..................First Modern Family Dentistry.......................... Runner Up Oleg Shvartsur .......................................... Honorable W Dentistry ............................................... Honorable

Massage North Bend Therapeutic Massage .......First InSpa Issaquah .......................................... Runner Up Bliss ........................................................... Honorable Elements Massage ................................... Honorable Tiffany Cottrell .......................................... Honorable

Orthodontist Christian Manley Orthodontics ............First Sammamish Orthodontics........................ Runner Up Tingey Orthodontics ................................ Honorable Hawkins ..................................................... Honorable

Pet Care & Boarding Jax Dog Drop........................................First VCA All Critters Animal Hospital.............. Runner Up Riverdog.................................................... Honorable Animal Hospital of Newport Hills............. Honorable

Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Issaquah Nursing & Rehabilitation Center First Peak Sports and Spine Physical Therapy . Runner Up Proliance ................................................... Honorable ATI Physical Therapy................................. Honorable Quest ........................................................ Honorable

Realtor Bob Richards .........................................First Carmen Halstrom | Windermere .............. Runner Up Thomas L Macy......................................... Honorable Tim and Maggie Vreeburg ....................... Honorable

Retirement Communinty Red Oak North Bend ............................First Regency Newcastle .................................. Runner Up Bellewood ................................................. Honorable Providence Point....................................... Honorable

Spa InSpa Issaquah ......................................First Bel Viso ..................................................... Runner Up Salish Lodge ............................................. Honorable Pelage ....................................................... Honorable

Veternarian Annotto Bay Veterinary Clinic ..............First VCA All Critters Animal Hospital.............. Runner Up Issaquah VCA............................................ Honorable Meadows Cat Hospital ............................. Honorable

Art Gallery

Gym, Fitness, Weightloss

artEast ...................................................First UP front ..................................................... Runner Up Art By Fire ................................................. Honorable

Issaquah Fitness ....................................First YMCA Sammamish................................... Runner Up Gold’s Gym Issaquah ................................ Honorable Snoqualmie Valley Weight Loss ............... Honorable

Mt Si Golf Course ................................................First

Hair Salon for Women Acacia Salon ..........................................First Sorella Salon and Spa............................... Runner Up Gina Mary ................................................. Honorable Innversions ................................................ Honorable

Home Services Bussiere Contracting and Painting .......First Interior Expressions .................................. Runner Up Armadillo Painting .................................... Honorable Mr K’s Construction North Bend .............. Honorable

Hospital or Medical Center Swedish Hospital and Medical Center .First Overlake Hospital and Medical Center ... Runner Up Virginia Mason Issaquah........................... Honorable Snoqualmie Valley Hospital...................... Honorable

Hotel Issaquah Holiday Inn .............................First Hilton Garden Inn ..................................... Runner Up Homewood Suites .................................... Honorable Salish Lodge ............................................. Honorable

Golf Course The Golf Club at Newcastle ..................... Runner Up Cascade Golf Course ............................... Honorable

Local Attraction Snoqualmie Casino................................First Tiger Mountain Family Nudist Park ......... Runner Up Gilman Village .......................................... Honorable Cougar Mountain Zoo .............................. Honorable

Music Lessons School of Rock Issaquah .......................First Moore Brother’s Music ............................. Runner Up Eastside Music Company ......................... Honorable Kaleidoscope School of Music ................. Honorable

Music Venue Snoqualmie Casino................................First Cougar Mountain Zoo .............................. Runner Up Issaquah Concerts on the Green ............. Honorable Village Theater.......................................... Honorable

Place for Family Fun Funtastic Playtorium .............................First Cougar Mountain Zoo .............................. Runner Up YMCA Sammamish................................... Honorable Village Theater.......................................... Honorable

Travel Agency AAA Issaquah........................................First Issaquah Travel Agency ............................ Runner Up Expedia Sammamish ................................ Honorable

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Thai Ginger ............................................... Runner Up 12 Moons Bistro at Snoqualmie Casino .. Honorable


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

Students and Teachers of the Month

Andressa Chan

Julie Schroeder

HAZEN October Student of the Month

HAZELWOOD October Teacher of the Month

Sarah Menaul

NEWCASTLE NEWS

The Issaquah and Renton Rotary clubs honor local students and teachers every month.

Samantha Kelderman

Sabrina Suen

HAZEN LIBERTY LIBERTY October Teacher October Student October Student ofNEIL.noPROOF.NN.CMYK.PDF the Month of the Month 1123 LAM of the Month

Han Xia

Ethan Smith

Brittany Toombs

Harkirian Singh

Theresa Nguyen

HAZEN November Student of the Month

McKNIGHT November Teacher of the Month

LIBERTY November Student of the Month

LIBERTY November Student of the Month

HAZEN December Student of the Month

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Hazelwood PTSA announces Reflections winners The Hazelwood Elementary PTSA announced the following students are moving on to the Renton PTSA Council Reflections competition. VISUAL ARTS Primary 1, Asher Johnson; 2, Roland Collette; 3, Elena Rolfs-Moore Intermediate 1, Mia Allison; 2, Josie Marti; 3, Joy Yoo LITERATURE Primary 1, Anya Magnuson; 2, Preston Miele; 3, Ethan Jimenez Intermediate 1, Jotroop Kaur; 2, Sophia Miele PHOTOGRAPHY Intermediate 1, Sophia Miele

The Reflections program allows students to showcase their creative talents through original artistic works. Do you have Newcastle Elementary’s finalists? Email them to newcastle@isspress.com.

Newcastle welcomes new police officer

Officer Devon Edwards joined the Newcastle Police Department last month. She fills the position vacated by Officer Chris Leyba, who is now the city’s detective. He took over for Christy Marsalisi. Edwards worked in

the Cannon Beach Police Department in Oregon for almost four years, and then transferred to the King County Sheriff’s Office in July 2015. In Cannon Beach, she primarily worked patrol, but also had detective training. She handled a lot of community meetings and training. She also wrote grants that secured funding for Cannon Beach for equipment and programs.

County budget includes funds for park dock

King County’s 2017-18 budget includes funds for restoration of the Lake Boren Park swimming dock. The county set aside $45,000 for the City of Newcastle project, according to a press release from Reagan Dunn, who represents the city on the King County Council. “Once again, the King County Council is supporting needed infrastructure updates within our City,” Mayor Rich Crispo said in a statement. “The residents of Newcastle greatly appreciate the helping hand that has been so graciously offered.” The Coal Creek Family YMCA will also receive $5,000 to support youth sports programming.

Cash buyers at Market Value for your land or fixer upper home.

Paul F. Mackay Jr. John L. Scott-KMS paulm@johnlscott.com | www.johnlscott.com/paulm

Call 206-920-0399 #1 Sales Broker in 98056 and 98059 zip codes* *according to Zillow 5-23-16

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

LAURA F.ePROOF.NN.CMYK.PDF 1123 LAM 49.17146.FRI.1202.6x13.45.LAM

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

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The finest meat shop in the Issaquah Washington area is Fischer Meats. We also serve the entire Seattle metro area including Bellevue, Redmond, Renton, Kent and Auburn.

THANK YOU for voting us BEST MEAT MARKET It’s all about Quality: Fischer Meats offers its customers the finest cuts of meat and specializes in Certified Black Angus beef, all natural Washington grown chicken and locally grown pork, lamb and veal. The USDA federally inspects Fischer Meats to ensure the safety and quality of their products.

We do specialty cuts so if you come into our store and don’t see the particular cut of meat that you want, just ask us and we’ll take care of you. As a full service shop, we’re here to provide you with highest quality of meat in the cuts that you want. Our Motto:

“If we don’t carry it, we’ll get it.” 49.17146.NN.R


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

Democrats ride victory by Wellman to sweep in 41st

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Litzow wished Wellman well and thanked his supporters in a message The 41st District has posted on his campaign a new state senator. Facebook page Nov. 28. Democrat Lisa Wellman “While I’m disappointed unseated incumbent Sen. to no longer have the Steve Litzow, a Mercer opportunity to serve you in Island Republican who has the Senate, I am humbled held the seat since 2010. and thankful for the last “Because of you and a six years,” he wrote. community of volunteers, Wellman’s win made Progressive organizations, it a clean sweep for the inspiring elected officials, Democrats in the 41st family, and friends, I District. Incumbents Tana am headed to Olympia,” Senn and Judy Clibborn Wellman wrote on her were easily re-elected to campaign Facebook page their House seats. Nov. 10. “There we will fight Smith wins comfortably to hold and advance the U.S. Rep. Adam Smith line on education funding, won re-election to his 9th reproductive rights, environmental protections, Congressional District seat. Smith has held his seat sustainability, family wage since 1997. Before that, he jobs, and more.” was a prosecutor and state Wellman, who edged senator. Smith, who has Litzow with 51.8 percent lived in the 9th District of the vote as of Monday, his whole life, said he’s began her career as a committed to finding public school teacher solutions to better the before entering the business world where she district for all. He defeated Republican held management roles challenger Doug Basler at Apple Computer and with more than 72 percent other tech companies. of the vote as of Monday. In her voter statement, Wellman said it’s time Reichert defeats Ventrella for accountability and Voters sent U.S. Rep. results in the Legislature Dave Reichert back to when it comes to funding SCOTT Z.ePROOF.NN.CMYK. Washington, D.C., for his education and fixing PDF 1020 LAM seventh term. traffic problems. 45.14742.THU.1104.1X2.LAM The Auburn Republican defeated Democratic challenger Tony Ventrella, a Newcastle Community Activities Commissioner, in the 8th Congressional $ $ District race. Simple Simple Ventrella, a Democrat Cremation Burial who hoped to fund his campaign without having Bellevue Federal Way 425-641-6100 253-874-9000 to ask for large donations, online arrangements available stepped aside at the end of cascadememorial.com

Newcastle News and The Seattle Times

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DIRECTIONS: I-90 Westbound take Exit 31 (North Bend and follow the signs to the reservation. I-90 Eastbound take Exit 27 turn left (North). Follow North Bend Way around curve.

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ELECTION RESULTS

Results of the Nov. 8 general election as reported by the Secretary of State through Nov. 28. LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 41 SENATE

Lisa Wellman (D) 37,096 51.9% Steve Litzow (R) 34,429 48.1% HOUSE (POSITION 1)

Tana Senn (D) John Pass (R)

45,075 64.5% 24,807 35.5%

HOUSE (POSITION 2)

Judy Clibborn (D) 43,061 61.6% Michael Appleby (R) 26,782 38.5%

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 9 Adam Smith (D) 205,089 72.3% Doug Basler (R) 76,290 27.1%

June, but jumped back into the race after advancing past the primary in August. Reichert is a former King County sheriff. Sound Transit 3 passes Sound Transit 3, the $54 billion plan to finance light-rail, commuter-train and bus-line extensions over a quarter-century, has passed despite Pierce County voters’ rejection of the measure. The measure, also known as Proposition 1, was logging 58 percent approval in King County as of Monday. Overall, in the three-county Sound Transit district, 54 percent were voting to approve. In September, the Newcastle City Council passed a resolution recommending voters reject Sound Transit 3.


NEWCASTLE NEWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NOTEBOOK From Page 4

or ejected. The likely explanation seems to be that officials didn’t hear them. Another Liberty player backed up Owens’ account of what happened on the field. “Ellensburg is BY FAR the most disrespectful team we have ever played,” senior Dulin Hayden, who is also black, wrote on Twitter. “When you call the other team (the N-word) you need to rethink your program.” It’s not just a shame that African-Americans living in 21st-century America have to face such cruelty — it’s also sickening. But maybe it’s not so surprising considering the politics of Klickitat County, where Ellensburg is located. Our president-elect received 53.8 percent of the vote for president in Klickitat County. And I personally witnessed many campaign signs

supporting him while driving through there prior to the election. One of the important lessons to be taken from this presidential election is that experts vastly underestimated the power of the rural voter. I won’t call them the silent majority because I don’t believe they are the majority — just look at the results of the popular vote. Voting for Donald Trump doesn’t mean someone is racist. But it shows that his countless offensive remarks about blacks, Latinos, Muslims and gays weren’t a dealbreaker. And they should’ve been. It’s encouraging that 63 percent of voters under age 30 cast their ballots for someone other than Trump, a sign that our future leaders have differing attitudes. But the ugliness Owens and his Liberty

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teammates say they faced exists, and it’ll continue to be emboldened as the president-elect chooses people like Steve Bannon to influence his policies. The best thing we can do is teach our kids to reject that thinking. They’re listening to what we say. Email reporter Neil Pierson at npierson@newcastlenews.com. Twitter : @eastside_neil Reporter’s Notebook is an occasional column by members of the Newcastle News staff. The viewpoints expressed do not necessarily represent the editorial views of the newspaper.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWS TODAY CALL 425-392-6434 19.14933.NN.R

Regency Newcastle 7454 Newcastle Golf Club Road • Newcastle, WA 98509 (425) 453-1508 • www.regencynewcastle.com

END OF YEAR Please call 425-453-1508 for more information!

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MOVE-IN SPECIALS

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

SPORTS NEWCASTLE NEWS

Photos by GREG FARRAR | gfarrar@newcastle-news.com

Liberty’s Abby Russell swims the backstroke leg of her 200-yard individual medley race to a first-place finish in 2 minutes, 5.90 seconds at the state 2A championships.

155 points

PULLMAN

FIFTH PLACE

158 points

NORTH KITSAP

FOURTH PLACE

185 points

ANACORTES

THIRD PLACE

260 points

PORT ANGELES

SECOND PLACE

322 points

LIBERTY

FIRST PLACE

UNBEATABLE LOCAL PREP SPORTS COVERAGE AT NEWCASTLE-NEWS.COM

SEE STATE, PAGE 18

Liberty senior Belle Wong has only been diving for three years, but her background in gymnastics certainly paid off at the Class 2A girls swimming and diving championships on Nov. 12. Wong overcame a deficit of 16.15 points to Port Angeles’ Cassii Middlestead after the semifinals, sticking her final three dives for first place in the 1-meter diving competition at Federal Way’s King County Aquatic Center. And it was Wong’s final dive that did the trick. She landed an inward 1 ½ somersault with barely a splash, eliciting three 8.0 scores from the judges and 113.60 total points. That pushed her past Middlestead by a slim margin, 338.80 to 335.25. Her performance keyed a third straight 2A team championship for the Patriots and coach Kris Daughters. Liberty won titles in two other events as the 200-yard freestyle relay squad set a new meet record and junior Abby Russell upset the favored Taylor McCoy of Pullman in the 200 individual medley. “I was seeded third and I was really nervous about it because it was senior year and all the seniors before us had graduated,” said Wong, who began doing gymnastics at age 4 but didn’t start competitive diving until her sophomore year.

npierson@newcastle-news.com

BY NEIL PIERSON

Wong’s near-perfect dive pushes Patriots to third straight swim crown

Liberty senior Belle Wong, who won the 1-meter diving competition shoots a selfie with her teammates as they hold the trophy and share in the third consecutive 2A state championship victory for the Patriots at the King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way on Nov. 12. Liberty dominated the team standings, outscoring second-place Port Angeles, 322-260.

CLASS 2A STATE SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

THREE-PEAT!

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NEWCASTLE NEWS

Liberty’s Reegan Weber swims her 200-yard freestyle race to a third-place finish of 1 minute, 54.82 seconds at the state 2A championships Nov. 12.

STATE From Page 17

Photos by GREG FARRAR | gfarrar@newcastle-news.com

Liberty senior Belle Wong’s inward 1½-somersault dive with a 2.2 degree of difficulty earned her scores of 6, 8, 6.5, 7.5, 8, 8 and 5.5 from the second judges on her way to winning the state 2A diving championship.

“I was just excited to come here, place top five, help my team. It’s really slim, the gap between first- and second-place teams, so being able to move up in spots and contribute to the total is everything I wanted.” Wong also looked sharp with two other tries on Saturday, sticking a back dive and a back 1½-somersault. But it’ll likely be her superb last dive she’ll always remember. “Just being able to go high and then letting my body do the flip and do the jump correctly, it was a dream,” she said. “Three 8s, I’ve never heard of that. It was so exciting.” Daughters said she was surprised with Wong’s clutch performance. “She came from behind and Belle has, in the past, had a few issues with consistency,” Daughters said. “But she totally turned that around today because her last three dives were super consistent – probably the best that she could possibly do.” In the end, Liberty finished well ahead

of runner-up Port Angeles, 322-260. The Patriots battled with North Kitsap in the relays, winning one and finishing second in the others, including the 200 medley relay to start the day. In that race, Liberty was sixth after Alexa Hoeper’s first leg, moved up to third on Russell’s second leg and solidified second (1 minute, 51.31 seconds) with Sydney Hartford’s freestyle anchor leg. Russell turned in a virtuoso performance in the 200 IM, upsetting McCoy, a WSU recruit and U.S. Olympic Trials qualifier who later became a four-time state champion in the 100 backstroke. Russell did the unthinkable, denying McCoy the distinction of eight individual titles, the maximum for any swimmer. McCoy was leading handily after the backstroke, the second leg of the IM, but Russell owned the breaststroke and freestyle to win in 2:05.90. “I dropped, I think, 3 seconds from prelims to finals and it was just a total surprise,” Russell said of her first individual state title. “I just went out as hard as I could and I did not expect it at all. I think I was just SEE LIBERTY, PAGE 20

5-Chamber Networking Breakfast December 2nd, 2016 Breakfast 7:15am – 8:30am Join Us! Friday, December 2nd at University House in Issaquah for a great Chambers of Commerce networking event! Members from Issaquah, Mercer Island, Newcastle, Sammamish and Snoqualmie Chambers will all be there. The Winter FAB 5 Chamber Networking Breakfast is a place to exchange ideas and network among all memberships! Reminder — we will be at University House, which will provide the advantage of a hot breakfast. The event features round-table networking. Door Prizes will be awarded! – Register Now!

11:00am – 12:30pm Tapatio Mexican Grill. Join Us! for our December luncheon at Tapatio Mexican Grill with guest speaker Bill Stainton, 29-time Emmy Award winning TV producer. For 15 years Bill was the Executive Producer of KING-TV’s legendary comedy TV show, Almost Live! He led his team to more than 100 Emmys of their own, and 10 straight years of #1 ratings. Along the way, Bill learned quite a bit about producing better business results through leadership and creative thinking.

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Newcastle Chamber of Commerce December Luncheon December 14, 2016


NEWCASTLE NEWS

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NEWCASTLE NEWS

GREG FARRAR | gfarrar@newcastle-news.com

Liberty swim coach Kris Daughters presents the medals to her own 400-yard freestyle relay team for its second-place finish in a time of 3 minutes, 41.91 seconds. The relay was the last event of the evening, giving the Patriots their third consecutive state 2A team championship.

LIBERTY From Page 18

Liberty’s Sydney Hartford comes up for one breath of air while sprinting to a fourth-place finish in the 50-yard freestyle with a time of 25.01 seconds at the state 2A championships.

really pumped to try and win the team championship.” “She was tough at the end of that race,” Daughters added. The Patriots entered the day as the No. 2 seed in the 200 free relay, about 1 second back of top-seeded North Kitsap. But they got a tremendous third-leg swim from Reegan Weber, giving them a lead North Kitsap couldn’t overcome. Liberty anchor Sydney Hartford had to hold on at the finish, though, out-touching Vikings star freshman Eleanor Beers – the 2A Swimmer of the Meet – by 0.39 seconds. Both teams broke the previous 2A meet record, with Liberty winning in 1:39.45. The relay victory pushed the Patriots’ lead to 38 points over Port Angeles with three events remaining. In the 200 freestyle, Reegan Weber took third (1:54.82) and the Patriots got consolation points from Rachel King (13th, 2:05.23) and Chloe Weber (14th, 2:05.85). Daughters was impressed with the way her athletes keep rising to the challenge in important meets. “They surprised me, that’s for sure,” the coach said. “We went in with a slight edge, but 17 or 20 points can go either way. Port Angeles did such a good job this year and their coach is one of the kindest guys.”


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12 down, 1 to go LIBERTY 35, ELLENSBURG 26

Patriots charge into the state title game, where Archbishop Murphy awaits

Photos by SCOTT STODDARD | sstoddard@newcastle-news.com

Liberty players dash toward their fans waiting in the stands at Yakima’s Zaepfel Stadium as they celebrate their 2A football state semifinal victory over Ellensburg on Nov. 26. The 12-0 Patriots defeated the Bulldogs 35-26 and advance to Saturday’s 1 p.m. championship game at the Tacoma Dome against 13-0 Archbishop Murphy,

BY MICHAEL ANDERSON Special to the Newcastle News

Liberty’s Isaiah Owens swoops in to recover the second-half kickoff, which Ellensburg’s Nate Andaya (31) fumbled. The Patriots scored on the next play to extend their lead to 35-7.

Taking advantage of four big plays and dashing to a 35-7 lead, the Liberty Patriots advanced to the Class 2A state title game with a 35-26 win over Ellensburg at Yakima’s Zaepfel Stadium on Nov. 26. The Patriots (12-0) will face Archbishop Murphy (13-0) in the title game at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Tacoma Dome. The Wildcats, who won five games by forfeit this season, handled Lynden, 52-14, in the other semifinal game. The win sends the Patriots to the title game for the fourth time, the first since 2009. Liberty’s lone championship

2A FOOTBALL Nov. 26 Liberty 35, Ellensburg 26 Archbishop Murphy 52, Lynden 14 Saturday Liberty (12-0) vs. Archbishop Murphy (13-0) at Tacoma Dome, 1 p.m.

came in 1988 when the Patriots defeated Cheney, 31-0. “They made it hard. Even at 35-7 I knew with a team like them they were going to come back and battle,” Liberty coach Steve Valach said. “Their QB made all kinds of big plays after they stopped us a couple of times. SEE FOOTBALL, PAGE 22


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

NEWCASTLE NEWS

FOOTBALL From Page 21

“In a game like this against a team like that, it’s the little things that can make a difference. And they got back in it.” Actually, in the first 25 minutes, it was the big things that put Liberty in control of the contest. On the first play of Liberty’s second possession, Cameron Spaeth took a handoff on a simple dive play at the Patriots’ 25-yard line — and with Ellensburg jamming eight players within a couple yards of the line of scrimmage — once Spaeth cleared the line there was no one in his way. “Cameron’s huge run, oh man, we needed that,” quarterback Austin Regis said. “That boosted our confidence right away.” And on Liberty’s next drive, Regis found Dulin Hayden wide open on a second-and-13 play. By the time two Ellensburg defenders wrangled Hayden to the ground at the Bulldog 5-yard-line, Liberty was in business again. One play later, Jacob Thoresen dashed into the end zone around the right end and after the PAT, the Patriots led 14-0 against an Ellensburg team that had allowed just 16 points in its two previous playoff games. More importantly, according to Regis, the confidence of the offensive unit was sky-high. “The big pass really set the tone and sparked everything,” Regis said. “Our other guys just fed off that and it helped us a lot.” Regis also said the team believed Ellensburg’s defensive

Photos by SCOTT STODDARD | sstoddard@newcastle-news.com

Liberty’s Ryan Richards clamps on to Ellensburg quarterback Mason Sherwood during the second half of the Patriots’ win in Yakima.

SEE PATRIOTS, PAGE 24

LIBERTY (12-0) Sept. 2 Sept. 9 Sept. 15 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 19 Nov. 26

Cedarcrest Mercer Island at Roosevelt Cleveland at Nathan Hale at West Seattle Ballard at Sammamish Blaine Steilacoom River Ridge at Ellensburg

W, 42-7 W, 42-21 W, 19-6 W, 48-10 W, 38-0 W, 63-27 W, 48-0 W, 51-0 W, 27-24 W, 20-13 W, 21-14 W, 35-26

ARCHBISHOP MURPHY (13-0) Sept. 2 Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 22 Oct. 28 Nov. 5 Nov. 11 Nov. 19 Nov. 26

Issaquah W, 73-0 at Bishop Blanchet W, 59-0 King’s W, 38-0 at South Whidbey W, 2-0* at Sultan W, 2-0* Granite Falls W, 2-0* Cedar Park Christian W, 2-0* Olympic W, 48-0 at Cedarcrest W, 2-0* Burlington-Edison W, 55-6 at North Kitsap W, 34-0 at Tumwater W, 48-10 Lynden W, 52-14

*denotes forfeit

Khalil Manning (left) celebrates with Liberty teammates Dulin Hayden (8), Jake Wright (29) and Isaiah Owens (9) after returning an Ellensburg fumble 36 yards for a touchdown with 10:37 left in the second quarter. The ensuing PAT gave the Patriots a 21-0 lead.


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SCOTT STODDARD | sstoddard@newcastle-news.com

Liberty’s Cameron Spaeth leaves the Ellensburg defense in his wake as he races for a 75-yard touchdown run to open the scoring in the Patriots’ 35-26 victory over the Bulldogs.

MORE PHOTOS ONLINE AT NEWCASTLE-NEWS.COM FOLLOW OUR LIVE COVERAGE OF SATURDAY’S TITLE GAME ONLINE AT NEWCASTLE-NEWS.COM, ON TWITTER (@NEWCASTLENEWSWA) AND ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

PATRIOTS

LIBERTY IN PAST STATE FINALS

From Page 22

1980: Centralia 39, Liberty 26 1988: Liberty 31, Cheney 0 2009: Bellevue 23, Liberty 17

utes tense. He scored the final two Ellensburg TDs but uncharacteristically threw interceptions on two other possessions. Ellensburg cut the deficit with a 10-play drive that covered 51 yards. Helgeson started the drive with a 15-yard-pass to Andaya and kept it alive with a 13-yard dash on third-and-seven at the Patriot 22 before hitting Christian Mcdonnell with a 5-yard pass for the score. Liberty’s only real mistake wiped another TD off the board early in the fourth period. After Manning’s second fumble recovery of the day, Spaeth broke free and dashed 46 yards for an apparent score. The play came back due to a penalty and the Patriots went three and out. Owens seemed to SCOTT STODDARD | sstoddard@newcastle-news.com be everywhere Liberty Liberty’s Reily Larson (25) eludes the grasp of Ellensburg’s Major Moffat (5) on a scoring drive late in the first half. needed him to be. The senior defensive back had his feet and his arm, hit on 11 plays with help from some trickeration to start side and after the PAT, the two later interceptions in hulking tight end Major an Ellensburg late hit. the third period. Patriots had a 35-7 lead. addition to his key fumble Moffat on a five-yard pass Regis, who as a senior Kicker Holden Kooiker “We do that all the time recovery. for the score. is benefiting from his perfectly placed a bloop and they just didn’t play it “Isaiah Owens, I’m Liberty answered in the baptism by fire in the 2015 kickoff between lines of right,” Valach said, noting really proud of him,” remaining time, methodi- playoffs when Nate Solly Ellensburg’s receiving that when practice started Valach said. “He took a cally marching 63 yards was hurt, powered in on team and Isaiah Owens this season he didn’t know shot on the other sideline third-and-goal from the made his first of a handful who Kooiker was. “He’s and his mouth was bleeding. He was over spitting 1-yard line. of big plays, recovering been unreal. He’s a total out blood on the sideline Knowing Ellensburg a fumble by Ellensburg’s self-starter.” and he came up with two could score quickly and Nate Andaya at the 7-yard Helgeson got the huge, huge interceptions wanting to stretch his line. Regis carried for the Bulldogs moving quickly LAURA D.ePROOF.NN.CMYK.RVS1 1116 LAM. for us.” lead, Valach went with TD on a sweep to the right and made the final minPDF 1121 LAM 49.18084.THU.1202.2X4.LAM

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philosophy would give his unit some chances. “We have some really good running backs,” he said. “When the inside was jammed up, we were able to bounce it outside and get some yards.” Not to be outdone, the Patriot defense contributed its own first-half big play — there would be others in the second half — when Khalil Manning scooped up a Mason Sherwood fumble on the third scrimmage play of the second period and zipped 34 yards for another touchdown. Manning said that after handling his primary assignment — filling a gap on the weak side of Ellensburg’s line — he saw the ball squirt loose after a teammate clawed it from Sherwood. “We practice that drill every day on defense,” he said with a smile, noting that it was the first time the practice emphasis had paid off in a game. Ellensburg drove 68 yards in just under seven minutes for its first score. Sherwood did the majority of the work, carrying the ball 10 times. Quarterback Bryce Helgeson, who would give Valach some serious second-half indigestion with

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Liberty’s battle for state title ends in shootout loss BY STUART MILLER smiller@newcastle-news.com

A hard-fought, physical match ended in a loss for the Liberty girls soccer team Nov. 19. The Patriots finished their season as the second-best 2A team in Washington after losing in a penalty-kick shootout to Columbia River in the state championship match in Shoreline. “I do believe that the two best teams played tonight,” Liberty coach Tami Nguyen said. Right out of the gates, both teams took it to one another. Liberty had several close chances in the first five minutes of the game and kept bringing the pressure well into the first half. About midway through the half, the Chieftains struck first when Julia Skimas booted a corner kick to Sophie Landers, who headed the ball in for a goal. Liberty tied it up with a family connection 28 minutes into the half. Makena Carr crossed a ball in from the end line, and then Myka Carr cleaned up a deflection for the Patriots’ first goal. For the remainder of the first half, the two teams battled each other in an attempt to break the stalemate. Liberty goalie Sophie Mendoza saved an uncontested shot by the Chieftains with 10 minutes remaining, diving and gobbling up a hard ground-hugger from less than 15 yards out. The Chieftains’ 6-foot-5 goalie Emma Fisk loomed large

Photos by GREG FARRAR | gfarrar@newcastle-news.com

Liberty freshman forward Nikayla Copenhaver (8) gets a foot to the ankle as she vies for the ball against Columbia River senior forward Katie Anthony during the first half of their state 2A soccer championship match.

in the net, staving off several Patriot attacks. Liberty forward Nikayla Copenhaver said the Chieftains’ physicality was hard to overcome for the younger, smaller Patriots. “They’re a very big, strong team,” Copenhaver said. Liberty has only one senior, Callen Mackey, on its varsity team, while Columbia River has six. Despite the size and age difference, Liberty

played hard on defense, with several strong stops by defenders Cassidy Rimmer and Taylor Elfstrom. The first half ended deadlocked at 1-1. Liberty wasted no time scoring as the second half opened. Two minutes into the half, Copenhaver booted a long shot from about 20 yards out toward the tall Chieftain goalie. The shot had plenty of hang SEE SOCCER, PAGE 27

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Members of the Liberty girls soccer team are able to smile, although some through tears, as they pose with the state 2A championship second-place trophy, having been beaten in a shootout by Columbia River after finishing tied in regulation and overtime.

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

Patriots settle for second at state cross country meet BY JEFF MORROW

Special to The Seattle Times

Both Liberty crosscountry squads earned team trophies at the state meet in Pasco Nov. 5 In Class 2A, top-ranked Liberty fell short in the girls team race, placing second with 101 points. Selah won with 92 points. Senior Brigette Takeuchi led the Patriots

with a ninth-place finish at 19 minutes, 15.7 seconds. Liberty had taken the team title in 2015, but coach Mike Smith was ecstatic with his team’s second-place finish. “We focused on beating Sehome and Selah got the title,” said Smith, whose boys finished third in their team race. “But this is as good as it gets. Look

around. It’s been raining in Seattle and we’ve got sunshine out here. It doesn’t get any better.” In the girls’ race, Liberty’s scoring five included senior Samantha Kelderman (12th, 19:17.3), senior Kelsey Takeuchi (16th, 19:28.4), senior Dhamanpreet Kaur (39th, 20:15.9) and junior Siri Christopherson (57th, 20:42.3).

On the boys’ side, the Patriots got top finishes from brothers Jake and Luke Knoblich, who were 15th and 18th, respectively, just two seconds apart, leading the team to a third-place finish. Sophomore Rory McClelland (36th, 16:50.8), sophomore Alexander Hartford (71st, 17:32.6) and senior Tyler Deaver (77th, 17:30.5) were Liberty’s

other scorers.

(82nd, 20:04.5), sophomore Rachel Dennis (90th, 20:13.2), junior London Jensen (93rd, 20:15.2), sophomore Erin Yee (129th, 20:58.6), sophomore Keara Daley (148th, 21:37.8) and freshman Clare Morris (150th, 21:44.0) rounded out the pack.

Hazen The Hazen girls team finished 11th overall in its very first Class 4A state cross country meet. Sophomore Shannon Gifford captured a podium finish for the second straight year, earning 11th with a time of Reporter Christina Corrales18:36.2. Toy contributed to this Senior Daniela Reyna report.

Hazen, Liberty athletes make all-league teams Listed below are allleague selections from the Class 4A North Puget Sound League (Cascade Division) and the Class 2A/3A KingCo Conference.

Only players from Hazen and Liberty are listed. Coaches select the allconference teams. Send any omitted Liberty teams or individual selections to

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npierson@newcastle-news. com. FOOTBALL Hazen Defensive Lineman of the Year: Joe Tryon, senior Nominee(s) to all-state football game: Joe Tryon, senior First team (defense): DL Joe Tryon, senior Second team (defense): DB Corbin Walker, sophomore Honorable mention (defense): LB Bryce Jenkins, senior First team (offense): TE Joe Tryon, senior Second team (offense): OL Daniel Lee, junior; WR Corbin Walker, sophomore Honorable mention (offense): QB Julian Santos, senior Honorable mention (punters): Chase Fjetland, senior First team (special teams): Coverage Bryce Jenkins, senior GIRLS SOCCER Hazen First team: FWD Nia Johnson,

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GIRLS CROSS-COUNTRY Hazen First team: Shannon Gifford, sophomore; Keara Daley, sophomore Second team: Rachel Dennis, sophomore Liberty First team: Brigette Takeuchi, Kelsey Takeuchi, Samantha Kelderman

BOYS TENNIS Hazen All-Division selections: Marcus Lee, Dylan Kittay Honorable mention: Sohil Shah All-Tournament academic honors: James Chen (4.0 GPA), William Eng (3.95 GPA) GIRLS SWIMMING Liberty Coach of the Year: Kris Daughters Second team: Abby Russell, Reegan Weber, Belle Wong Honorable mention: Alexa Hoeper BOYS GOLF Hazen Second team: Derek Hahn Honorable mention: Zach Dea Liberty Medalist tournament champions: Liberty First team: Chase McIntosh Second team: Jack Hultquist GIRLS GOLF Hazen Second team: Emma Ledbetter, Kayla Smith Honorable mention: Jade Egan

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sophomore; MF Amy Warmenhoven, senior; MF Madison Kem, sophomore Second team: MF Meagan Kelly, sophomore; DEF Rae Gerking, freshman Honorable mention: FWD Madison Taylor, sophomore; DEF Taylor Marks, freshman Liberty Sportsmanship Award: Liberty First team: M Makena Carr, junior Second team: D Cameron Nelson, sophomore Honorable mention: GK Taylor Thatcher, junior; D Taylor Elfstrom, freshman; M Kalyn Gill, junior; F Nikayla Copenhaver, freshman

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SOCCER

to scratch out a gamewinning final goal. The Chieftains found themFrom Page 25 selves with a yellow card of time, and Fisk was able to their own before the game shuffle her feet and adjust went to a penalty-kick for a leaping save attempt shootout. — which failed as the ball Columbia River’s Fisk soared right between Fisk’s blocked three hard Patriot outstretched hand and the shots, and Mendoza saved goal’s crossbar. a shot as well, but the Columbia River came Patriots finally lost the back minutes later with game after five rounds of a long ball of their own. penalty shots. Forward Katie Anthony While the championship sent a long, high ball game ended in a stinging from midfield toward the loss for the Patriots, it was Patriots’ net. After a high a victory in itself for the bounce, the ball landed young team to make it that inside the net for an unasfar. sisted goal with 33 minutes “Not one of us believed remaining in the half. we’d be in this game at the “We were poor in the air start of the season” Nguyen on challenges and were said. “We earned it.” letting too many balls Mackey echoed that bounce,” Nguyen said. statement, saying the Yellow cards were pulled Patriots lost a large group on two Patriots in the clos- of seniors last year and ing minutes of the half, and had less than a half-dozen the second half expired returning varsity players. with the score 2-2. She is likely the only player Two intense, physical who won’t be returning to overtime periods followed the team next year. as both teams battled “I’m so happy to be part

Liberty’s Nikayla Copenhaver (8), Chloe Winn (15), Makena Carr (9) and Myka Carr (4) celebrate after the Patriots score their first goal against Columbia River Nov. 19 in the state 2A soccer championship. GREG FARRAR gfarrar@ newcastle-news. com

of this team,” Mackey said. “I can’t emphasize enough how proud I am of them.” Mackey was presented a sportsmanship award after the game, and she said soccer will always be part of her life. “If I’m not playing it, I’ll be watching it. And if I’m not watching it, I’ll be

thinking about it,” Mackey said. The Patriots’ future looks bright next season. Nguyen said the young players will grow from their experience in the finals this season. “I want to win next year,” Copenhaver, a freshman, said. “We want to come back and redeem ourselves.”

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Liberty Rugby Club to host international match The Liberty Rugby Club will host one of the world’s best rugby programs in a friendly match at 6 p.m. Dec. 3. New Zealand’s Trident High School will play the Patriots in one stop on its three-week tour of the United States.

“We have hosted several international teams, most recently a team from England this past summer,” said Scott Wright, Liberty Rugby Club’s director of communications. “We’ve traveled overseas for many matches, and want to

provide that kind of international rugby exposure to our club members and community families.” There’s a long history of friendship between the two rugby clubs. Liberty has visited Trident during its own international tours

and the two have hosted player exchanges. Trident’s 25 players will stay with Liberty families during their time in Washington. The Dec. 3 match will be held at Liberty High School and is free to attend.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

THE BEAT

NEWCASTLE NEWS

By students, for students

HUMANS OF ISSAQUAH

TORI McBRIDE By Isobel Taylor Issaquah High School Counselors are on the front lines helping students who are struggling with poor mental health. Issaquah High School counselor Tori McBride shares some of her thoughts on teen mental health. Go to theeastside.news/the_beat for additional comments from Issaquah counselor Hanine Castro. Question: Which aspect of mental health do you encounter most? Answer: At Issaquah High School I encounter both depression and stress/anxiety the most. Q: How do you help students who are dealing with schoolrelated stress or depression? A: I provide brief counseling/ intervention and, if needed, referral to a therapist in the community for ongoing treatment. Q: What would you say is the most important aspect of keeping a healthy state of mind? A: I think this can be different for each of us and will vary, but a good place to start is by taking care of your basic needs such as getting enough sleep, eating nutritious meals and having healthy relationships and activities in your life. These things are key to being able to cope with stress as it enters our lives.

CALL FOR STORIES Email issaquahpressbeat@gmail. com with story suggestions and nominations for the Humans of Issaquah feature, spotlighting extraordinary people in the community.

PHOTO OF THE MONTH Everyone is deserving of care and treatment. If you are struggling in any way, please consider reaching out to any one of the resources above.  By Erika Kumar | Skyline High School

The realities of mental illness By Alex Camai Skyline High School

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early 20 percent of all Americans suffer from mental illness at some point in their lives. Each illness is a real disease, commonly accepted to be a serious medical condition. If left untreated, it can lead to mortal harm to self and others. The important thing to take away is these diseases are highly treatable. Depression is a prolonged sadness and loss of interest that interferes with everyday life. Contrary to many people’s beliefs, depression can even cause physical symptoms such as back pain and headaches in an otherwise completely healthy person. It is the most common illness among Skyline

students, with a symptom rate of around 20 percent, according to the Washington Healthy Youth Survey. Bipolar disorder is an episodic disorder resulting in unusually extreme swings of mood and energy. People with bipolar disorder often have to seek treatment their entire lives. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an illness mocked by many of us, but its effects are serious. People with OCD have persistent and unsettling thoughts. They control the resulting anxiety through repeated activities or rituals (compulsions). Panic disorders are characterized by several sudden periods (attacks) of debilitating fear. These attacks are accompanied by the usual sympathetic nervous response, including rapid heartbeat, sweating and paleness. Panic attacks seem to be heritable, and are often one-time occurrences.

Social anxiety disorder is an unreasonable fear of social encounters. This is often accompanied by the feeling of being watched, self-consciousness and anxiety. Post traumatic stress disorder develops after a traumatic experience or threat of physical harm. People suffering from PTSD often are jumpy, emotionally numb or have flashbacks triggered by particular stimuli. Identifying and treating poor mental health, even if it does not fit the diagnostic criteria of a mental illness, is important to maintain your well-being. There are several online resources for people suffering from mental illness. At mentalhealth.gov, visitors can get tips on signs of illness and ways to seek treatment. The National Alliance on Mental Illness has a helpline (800-950-6264) and campaign to stop the stigma behind mental illness on its website nami.org, just to name a few.


NEWCASTLE NEWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

Eating disorders and adolescents By Misty Liao Skyline High School In a world filled with mass media and ideals of the perfect body, the issue of eating disorders is becoming more prevalent among teens and adolescents. In fact, according to the Mirasol Eating Recovery Center, anorexia, one of a few eating disorders that plague teens today, is the third-most common chronic illness among adolescents. The most common risk factors that are known to contribute to the onset of

eating disorders are genetic vulnerability, psychological factors and various sociocultural influences. However, socio-cultural influences, such as the body expectations that have been established through social media and photoshopped celebrities, seems to have contributed the most to the increase in eating disorders among teens. These unrealistic standards often provoke extreme dieting and poor eating habits among teens, which is significantly detrimental during this period of physical development in

their lives. If you suspect or know of someone who may be dealing with an eating disorder, take the time to educate yourself more on the disorder and the symptoms and risk factors involved. Then, talk to them and let them know that you are free to talk and care about what they are going through before taking the steps to helping them recover. The National Eating Disorders Association offers a helpline (1-800931-2237) and resources at nationaleatingdisorders.org.

ARE YOU INTERESTED in gaining real-world journalism experience and having your work published for thousands of readers? We are looking for punctual, creative Liberty, Hazen and Newport high school students with excellent communication skills and concise writing abilities to join the 2016-17 staff of The Beat. Apply at tinyurl.com/BeatApplication.

TEEN TALK

WHAT DOES GOOD MENTAL HEALTH LOOK LIKE TO YOU? Issaquah

ABBIE COFFING “Good mental health can vary from person to person. As a society we need to respect the relativity of good mental health, and celebrate each person’s journey to be as happy as possible.”

Anxiety in our students Anxiety, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, affects countless high schoolers. Though it may manifest itself in different forms — from stress before a test to fear of social interactions — we have all felt anxious at some point. This recognition of our shared experience with anxiety is a humbling reminder to sympathize with those who suffer from anxiety disorders.

Mental disorders often create negativity because they are not visible conditions. However, just because anxiety cannot be easily observed does not make it any less real than a broken arm or sprained ankle. In fact, this makes mental health awareness even more important. Since anxiety is often a hidden affliction, we need to make an effort to be sensitive to those around us. You never know who is struggling with a mental illness. The National

Alliance on Mental Illness is championing this with its #IStopStigmaBy campaign. Overall, it is important to remember that anxiety is subjective: Each individual has different symptoms and stressors that contribute to feelings of anxiety. Because of this, we must remember not to compare our struggles to those of people around us. Instead, let’s try to offer compassion rather than judgment for our peers dealing with anxiety disorders.

ALICIA MIGLIA Freshman

“I think it looks like a person that is focused and hardworking.”

Liberty

KATRINA FILER Junior

“Good mental health is being satisfied with who you are and confident in where you’re going. Often the most mentally healthy can help others find their place, in anything from friends, to trust, to hope for a brighter future.”

ERIC FONG Junior

Depression in youth By Rohan Vaidya Issaquah High School Depression is something that affects many youth and adults around us. Many believe that depression is the fault of the victim. However, this is not the case. Scientifically, depression is “the feelings of severe despondency and dejection,” and it is caused by the abnormal activity of neural circuits. When one is taking an antidepressant — a tricyclic antidepressant, for example — the purpose of the drug is to bal-

ance the neurotransmitters in the brain. Globally, 350 million people suffer from depression. Often times, you may witness a friend, family member or even yourself depressed, and it is important to recognize and address the situation. Depression is not something that one can just “snap out of” just by the sheer power of will. Rather, it should be recognized and addressed with the same seriousness and gravity as other serious illness. After recognizing the signs of depression (bleak outlook on life, not caring about anything

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WRITE FOR THE BEAT

Senior

By Christina Tuttle Liberty High School

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“Good mental health is about maintaining good relationships with your family and friends.”

anymore, sleeping more or less, eating more or less), you should immediately consult with a certified medical professional. The most important part is to recognize the situation so it leaves no chance for the situation to escalate into something worse. For more information on recognizing, treating and preventing depression, talk with your school counselor or speak with a trusted adult. You can also find resources through the local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness at namiwa.org.

Skyline

NICKI COX

Junior

“Good mental health is accepting yourself and the life that comes with it. It doesn’t mean that you’re always having the best day but that you find good in each one”

NEHA ALLATHUR Junior

“I would say that good mental health is having the well-being and confidence to accept who you are. If you can do that, then you can really start to appreciate others and accept who they are.”


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

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NEWCASTLE NEWS

TIMES From Page 1

“While this change does not fully meet the recommendations of the medical community, starting our secondary schools 35 minutes later will be a positive, healthy change for our students,” Thiele wrote in the press release. An initial proposal in 2015 would have inverted elementary and high school start times, but Thiele was unable to get a consensus from the community and teaching staff on whether to make the change. Thiele said last month one of the challenges the new plan presents is bus transportation. He estimated a change to the three-tier system would cost $600,000. Currently, the school district has one tier for high school and middle school students and the other two for

BUDGET

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2016

ISSAQUAH SCHOOL DISTRICT’S NEW BELL TIMES FOR 2017-18

drivers remains our biggest concern,” he said.

Parents, students react Many students and parents are thrilled with the change in Start Dismiss school times. Elementary schools 9:10 a.m. 3:35 p.m. “Every minute counts,” said High schools 8 a.m. 2:52 p.m. Sophie Kirkegaard, a sophoMiddle schools 8:10 a.m. 2:35 p.m. more at Issaquah High who The estimated start time for Grand Ridge Elementary would be must catch her school bus each about 8:55 a.m. with a dismissal time of about 3:20 p.m., and morning at 6:40 in order to be in Wednesday times will be similarly adjusted. her first-period class by 7:25 a.m. LATE START WEDNESDAYS “I think it’s a great step in the right direction,” said Robin Start Dismiss Hodder, a parent to a sophoElementary schools 9:10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. more at Issaquah High. High schools 10:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m. Parked outside the school Middle schools 10:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m. waiting for classes to let out, Source: Issaquah School District Hodder said her daughter starts each school day at 5:30 a.m. With school activities and homework, elementary school routes. The Thiele said the transportation her daughter is left with little new bell times would collapse department has solved the bus time to decompress before going the second and third tiers into issue by retaining eight buses in to bed at 11 p.m. one, requiring a ramp-up of the its fleet rather than designating “It’s also just psychological — number of buses and drivers them as surplus. setting your alarm for 6 rather needed to make that happen. “So really, the number of than 5:30,” Hodder said.

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS AND FRIDAYS

a mechanism that allows local governments to levy less than the maximum From Page 1 increase in property taxes has the city behind in without losing the ability its management of the to levy higher taxes later, if system, which is driven necessary. by the federally manDue to a clerical error, dated National Pollutant though, that increase came Discharge Elimination out of Newcastle homeSystem permit. When citowners’ pockets anyway ies do not meet the water in 2016. Households were pollution requirements, incorrectly charged roughthey can incur significant BOB CERELLI | Cerelli Photography ly $7 to $10 too much. fines. The money remained in The Newcastle City Council (from left) Mayor Rich Crispo, “It’s really hard to get a protected account until Council member Linda Newing, Council member Allen Dauterman, Deputy Mayor Gordon Bisset, Council your footing when you the council decided how to have that kind of turnover, member John Dulcich, Council member Carol Simpson and move forward. Residents Council member John Drescher will continue deliberations won’t be assessed a new but we know what we on the city’s 2017 budget at its Dec. 6 meeting. need to do,” Wyman said. 1-percent increase in 2017, “We just need to keep fundinstead, the city will use ing the operations so this costs. next year. At that time, the approximately $40,000 doesn’t happen again.” But Drescher, who was residents can likely expect erroneously collected over City staff initially recthe lone dissenting vote, another increase, Wyman 2016. ommended an increase was not completely buying said. more than double the that. “What (the residents) get Looking ahead agreed-upon amount, but “I hope in this process out of this is a system that While the stormwater council members decided that you at least have the meets the federal and state fee and property tax matters are locked in, the rest in a 5-1 vote to approve the intellectual honesty to requirements,” Wyman of the 2017 budget could more modest 10 percent admit that when you take said of the increase. look quite a bit different increase. $300,000 out of a fund it after Dec. 6. “It’s a little irritating,” doesn’t simply not matter,” Fixing the property tax That’s when the council Councilman John Dulcich he said during the meeting. error will do the majority of its said of the initial proposal. The new rate effective The Newcastle City additions and subtractions, “I might have changed Jan. 1, 2017, will increase Council voted to bank a 1 but a bulk of the discusmy decision on City Hall the residential rate by $1.33 percent property tax levy sion will likely fall on the knowing that you’d be per month or $15.94 for increase in 2017, essencoming for a 29.5 percent a full year. The previous tially fixing this year’s col- city’s need for new revenue options. increase.” annual rate was $159.36 lection error. City staff is recommendThis was coming even and the new one is $175.30. “I know our city needs without the purchase of While lower than his revenue, but we can’t do it ing the council implement City Hall, though, Wyman proposal, Wyman said the this year,” Councilwoman a new revenue source, such as a utility tax or a busiargued. 10 percent is enough to get Carol Simpson said. ness and occupation tax in “The increase isn’t to the city through 2017 in its Last year, the group 2017. backfill taking money out stormwater management. decided against assess“That’s the elephant in for purchase of the buildA new study examining ing the state-allowed 1 the room,” Wyman said. ing,” he said, rather it’s for Newcastle stormwater fees percent increase. They “This is the point we’ve the ongoing operational going forward will happen instead voted to bank it,

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Sleep deprivation negatively impacts physical and mental health, safety and learning, said Dea Barnett, an adolescent psychiatrist and Issaquah School District parent. She called the decision by the superintendent “great news for kids.” “Thirty-five minutes is a significant difference,” said Barnett, chapter leader of the Start School Later Issaquah initiative. “I think kids will be happier and we will have more productive students.” Barnett said ideally start times would be later, but this change was a good compromise. In June, the American Medical Association adopted a policy encouraging middle and high schools to start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. Reporter David Hayes contributed to this report

been projecting for a long time that the lines cross and we don’t have enough revenue.” In the past, Wyman likened city finances and operations to a threelegged stool. All cities have property and sales tax as two of the three legs, and most use something such as a utility tax as their third. The City of Newcastle has used development revenue as its third leg, a risky move considering the lack of long-term stability it yields. It is in jeopardy going forward as the recent development boom slows down in Newcastle. That, coupled with increasing public safety costs, has future Newcastle budgets, starting as early as next year, seeing red. “The time has come and we just have to be honest about what it really costs to run a city,” Wyman said. Imposing a significant new tax deserves public outreach and discussion before moving forward, though, something that hasn’t happened, Dulcich argued. That’s why at the very end of the Nov. 15 meeting, he passed out a proposal making several 2017 cuts elsewhere, including funds for proposed new employees, parks maintenance and more. “The type, amount, or need for a new tax needs

to be further studied by the council and possibly a citizens advisory committee prior to its implementation,” he wrote in the proposal. “If a new revenue source is determined a necessity, then we need have it coincide with an increase of (level of service). This current budget does not increase our LOS.” Council members will likely go over Dulcich’s budget proposal in detail at its Dec. 6 regular meeting.

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