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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS’ GUIDE TO LIVING & STUDYING IN THE UNITED STATES


WELCOME TO THE NEW SCHOOL

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome Message ............................................................................................................................................. 4 Contact Information ......................................................................................................................................... 5

ISSS Mission .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Most Common Reasons To Visit ISSS .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Sign up for ISSS News ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7

Programs .......................................................................................................................................................... 8

Conversation Partners Program ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 International Student Mentor Program ................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Join An Existing Club or Start Your Own ............................................................................................................................................................................ 10 International Student Society and Advisory Board (ISSAB) ................................................................................................................................................... 11

Immigration ................................................................................................................................................... 12

Be A Smart F-1 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Be A Smart J-1 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Career Services ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Employment Options for F-1 Students .............................................................................................................................................................................. 15 Employment Options for J-1 Students ................................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Social Security Number (SSN) ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Tax Obligations for Internationals in F-1 & J-1 Statuses .................................................................................................................................................... 19

Academics ....................................................................................................................................................... 20

Possible Differences in U.S. & Other Educational System ................................................................................................................................................... 21 Language Learning Strategies ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Speaking Up In Class .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Tips On Listening & Taking Notes ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Support For Your English ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Academic Dishonesty / Avoid Plagiarism ............................................................................................................................................................................ 30 Students With Disabilities .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 31 2


WELCOME TO THE NEW SCHOOL

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Staying Healthy .............................................................................................................................................. 32

Coping Strategies For Dealing With Culture Shock ........................................................................................................................................................... 33 The New School Counseling Services ................................................................................................................................................................................ 35 Medicine .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Safe Zone ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................36 What Do You Know About HIV/AIDS? ........................................................................................................................................................................... 37

Living In New York City ................................................................................................................................. 40

On Campus Housing ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 41 Apartment Hunting .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 Apartment Hunting Glossary ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 Abbreviations Guide .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Spouses and Children ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 49 Safety Tips ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 51 Avoiding Financial Scams .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 Organizations In New York City ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Useful Websites ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 55 Where to Shop .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 57 World Communities in New York City ............................................................................................................................................................................. 63 Get Connected .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 70 Opening A Bank Account ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 75 Writing A Check ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 77 Keeping A Budget ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 78 Useful Information ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 79 Measurement Systems In The United States ....................................................................................................................................................................... 80 Campus Map .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 81

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WELCOME TO THE NEW SCHOOL

WELCOME MESSAGE Dear International Students,

Welcome to the International Student Guide to Living in the U.S. This booklet is a source of useful information on how to be a successful international student at The New School. A key to being successful is to have a clear idea of what success means to you and to start out with clear goals and ideas of how to reach them. This booklet is designed to help you to answer basic questions about living in and adapting to New York which is another area of learning that you will need to tackle to succeed in your academic studies here. We now have online and print versions so that you can access the information online anytime wherever you are. Look out for our ISS News for updates on events and other changes in the regulations. One of the things we know from our experience of working with internationals is that students who succeed are students who are engaged in the life of the university and their local communities as well as with their classmates and faculty in the classroom. So take advantage of all the activities and make your voice heard through the University Student Senate, the International Student Society and Advisory Board and other groups and if there isn’t one that exists for your interests, start your own! If you have ideas on how to improve your experience here as an international student, please email me at nrim@newschool.edu. We hope that you will have a great experience here and really get to know and enjoy The New School and New York City. Best wishes on your studies here at The New School. Monique Ngozi Nri Senior Director, ISSS

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WELCOME TO THE NEW SCHOOL

CONTACT INFORMATION

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND SCHOLAR SERVICES (ISSS) 72 Fifth Avenue, 3rd Floor New York, NY 10011 Phone: (212) 229-5592 Fax: (212) 229-8992 Email: ISS@newschool.edu Skype: ISS_thenewschool Office Hours (at 72 Fifth Ave.) Monday – Friday: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (Summers: Monday -Thursday) Drop-In Advising Hours (at 72 Fifth Ave) Monday and Wednesday 2:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. Call to make an appointment to see an advisor or stop by anytime during Drop-In advising. Bring all documents related to your questions. Also, for help in planning your trip to the US, we recommend visiting: http://exchanges.state.gov/non-us/travel-living-arrangements

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WELCOME TO THE NEW SCHOOL

ISSS MISSION

International Student and Scholar Services seeks to foster a high level of international educational exchange and to enhance the intellectual, artistic, cultural and social development of students, scholars, exchange visitors, faculty and administrative staff in a welcoming environment. As part of the wider mission of student services at the university, we aim to achieve this by: • Providing expertise and support throughout the U.S. visa application process and offering advisement on the maintenance of U.S. legal status, employment, reinstatement, change of status, program changes and other immigration related matters. • Advising incoming students and scholars on U.S. higher education systems and cultural adjustment issues and supporting U.S. students seeking new lands to explore through Fulbright study abroad programs. • Promoting excellent international programming within the University, which connects with vibrant New York City and global resources, and working towards internationalization. International Student and Scholar Services shares the University Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Policy and the University Social Justice Committee’s mission to combat discrimination, foster inclusiveness and respect differences both within the international community at The New School and between international and domestic students, staff, faculty and the wider NYC community. ISSS actively seeks to include differing perspectives from all regions of the world (Africa, Asia, The Americas, Oceania and Europe) in its programming and to promote inter-cultural understanding and offer its services without discrimination.

Rights And Responsibilities On Campus

http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/rights-and-responsibilities/

Social Justice Blog at The New School http://blogs.newschool.edu/social-justice/

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University Social Justice Committee’s mission http://www.newschool.edu/leadership/provost/social-justice.aspx


MOST COMMON REASONS TO VISTI ISSS

SIGN UP FOR ISS NEWS

• Check-in

ISS News is an e-newsletter aimed at providing important information to international students, professors and scholars at The New School. The newsletter advertises events and workshops on campus, covers recent events and students’ achievements, and announces critical deadlines and changes to immigration regulations.

• Change foreign address • Travel signature • Off-campus employment authorization • Authorization to drop below full-time • Withdrawal from program or leave of absence (with exit form) • Change of major • Change of education level • Extension of program of study • Support letter for Social Security Number (SSN) (only available if student has a job offer and is authorized to work)

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University email accounts are automatically subscribed. If you’re not automatically subscribed, email us at iss@newschool.edu, and we’ll sign you up.


PROGRAMS


PROGRAMS CONVERSATION PARTNERS PROGRAM The Conversation Partners Program provides opportunities for students, faculty, and staff of the New School community to improve language and communication skills in a relaxed non-academic setting. This is a great opportunity for language learners and people who want to learn more about other cultures. Conversation Partners can be degree and non-degree students, faculty, and staff. Participants are expected to have basic conversation skills in the language to be practiced. Partners should also be outgoing, sociable, approachable, and reliable, as well as respectful towards other individuals. Interest in learning and sharing new cultural experiences is essential. Applications to be a Conversation Partner are available at the ISSS office, by emailing ISSevents@newschool.edu

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT MENTOR PROGRAM The International Student Mentor Program is designed to assist new international students in adjusting academically, culturally, and socially to the United States and The New School. Mentors are international or American students who have been at The New School for at least one semester and are truly committed to learning about new cultures, expanding their world vision, and helping new internationals adjust to their lives away from home. Mentees are New School undergraduate or graduate international students who have come thousands of miles to a new land to study, gain insight into a different culture, and share their cultures with others. Applications to be a Mentor or Mentee are available at the ISSS office, email ISSevents@newschool.edu

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PROGRAMS

JOIN AN EXISTING CLUB OR START YOUR OWN Getting involved in clubs and organizations on campus provides students with great leadership opportunities and helps students in building friendships and connections with other New School students. ISSS encourages you to consider starting a club or group for students from your home country. To see if one already exists, or for more information on other New School clubs and how to start a club or organization, please visit: http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/student-development-and-activities/student-organizations/

International Student Society and Advisory Board (ISSAB)

ISSAB is a student led organization that fosters the international community at The New School. Through collaboration with other clubs, outside organizations, and our own activities, we provide immersion into a multitude of cultures. In addition ISSAB acts as a platform to provide feedback concerning ISS services, website, programs, outreach and general effectiveness. For more information, please email: ISSAB@newschool.edu

Korean Student Association

Social and networking opportunities for all students interested in learning and sharing Korean culture. For more information please email: koreanassociation@newschool.edu

Hong Kong Student Association

The Hong Kong Student Association helps Hong Kong students of The New School to create a network of friends from a familiar culture. HKSA strives to help Hong Kong students adjust to New York and provides an introductory platform for students from other cultures to get to know Hong Kong.

Taiwanese Student Association

The mission of this club is to provide opportunities for Taiwanese students at The New School to meet other Taiwanese students in the city, and to provide assistance and advice for adjusting to the life in New York.

Project Africa

The mission of Project Africa is to promote a greater understanding and increase cross-cultural awareness of the continent and its people. Through its efforts, it seeks to inspire students to further their knowledge of Africa through constructive dialogue, personal research, or interdisciplinary engagement.

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PROGRAMS

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD (ISSAB) Google Groups for International Students

International Student and Scholar Services facilitates a virtual environment to bring students from the same country or in some cases from the same region together. We have created country specific Google Groups for the top ten countries and for the other countries that students have requested, which allows students to network and connect with other students from their home countries through an electronic forum. The purpose of this organization is to experience French culture in an informal and engaging way. The group aims to enrich campus life by creating a community that celebrates Francophone culture and language.

New French Connection

The purpose of this organization is to experience French culture in an informal and engaging way. The group aims to enrich campus life by creating a community that celebrates Francophone culture and language.

Hellenic Society

Student body represented by The New School representing the Greek community. We want to collaborate with students from around the greater New York area to promote positive networking platforms for different fundraising organizations in the Greek community and among students themselves.

The Chinese Student and Scholar Association

The Chinese Student and Scholar Association aims to enhance the connection between the Chinese community and The New School. It is dedicated to provide support and resources for Chinese students and scholars and serves as a platform for the interaction of the Chinese community. We promote cultural exchange through organized activities. 11


IMMIGRATION


IMMIGRATION

BE A SMART F-1

BE A SMART J-1

Attend orientation • Enroll full-time every semester. • Complete the official “Check-In” form with ISS every semester. • Make sure ISS always has your current contact information and photocopies or scans of your current passport (must be revalidated 6 months before it expires), visa, and I-94 admission record (print at www.cbp.gov/i94 • Notify ISS within 10 days if you move or change your address or contact information. • Obtain a valid travel signature from ISS before traveling outside of the U.S.. • File taxes each Spring during your stay in the U.S (even if you did not receive income from a job)

Attend orientation • Enroll full-time every semester. • Complete the official “Check-In” form with ISS every semester. • Make sure ISS always has your current contact information and photocopies or scans of your current passport (must be revalidated 6 months before it expires), visa, and I-94 admission record (print at www.cbp.gov/i94) • Notify ISS within 10 days if you move or change your address or contact information. • Obtain a valid travel signature from ISS before traveling outside of the U.S.. • File taxes each Spring during your stay in the U.S (even if you did not receive income from a job) • Maintain adequate health insurance

You need to have official permission from an ISS advisor to: • Drop below full-time enrollment • Withdraw from your program • Take a leave of absence • Work off-campus

You need to have official permission from an ISS advisor to: • Drop below full-time enrollment • Withdraw from your program • Take a leave of absence • Work on or off-campus

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IMMIGRATION

CHECK IN

All international students, professors, and scholars must officially check in with ISS each and every time they enter the U.S. and at the beginning of every Fall and Spring semester. All new internationals must bring their immigration documents in person to ISS within 10 days of arriving in the U.S. It is necessary that you update ISSS if any change to your forms is warranted such as a change in contact information, immigration documents or change of foreign address. Step by Step Procedure for Proper Check-In with ISSS: http://www.newschool.edu/international-student-services/international-student-check-in.pdf

New Students

Continuing Students

Check in online at: https://dormpro.newschool.edu/forms/iss_CheckInSheet.html

Check in online at: https://dormpro.newschool.edu/forms/iss_CheckInSheet.html

Please bring originals of the following documents and submit them in person If any of the documents listed at the left have changed, please make a copy at ISSS Check-In. and submit to ISSS as scanned copies via email to iss@newschool.edu; or paper copies via fax to (212) 229 8992 or in person at the ISS office. • Passport and Visa page • I-94 admission record (print at www.cbp.gov/i94) Please put your New School ID, Last name, First name and ‘ISS Check In’ in • Original I-20/DS-2019 the subject line. • Social Security Card if you have one • Copy of health insurance (if not taking The New School insurance) All international students will have holds placed for next semester’s registration if they do not check in. Holds are removed after students have completed the Please note, you will need to know your local U.S. address when you check in. International Student Check-in.

CAREER SERVICES A great resource when it comes to looking for internships, on-/ or off-campus jobs is Career Services. http://www.newschool.edu/center-for-student-success/career-services/ Career Services can provide you with feedback on your résumé and valuable advice on where and how to search for job opportunities.

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IMMIGRATION

EMPLOYMENT OPTIONS FOR F-1 STUDENTS Though the main focus of your time in the U.S. will be on your studies, valuable lessons about the practical application of your studies and understanding U.S. culture can come from volunteering, interning or working. If you are thinking about taking advantage of optional practical training or academic training at the end of your course of study, it is important to start to understand the U.S. workplace and to make links with employers as soon as possible. You can never accept unauthorized employment. Below are the types of employment for students in F-1 Student status. Please note, that jobs that are labeled “Work Study” are only open to U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents. Attend one of our employment workshops where we will give you more information.

On-Campus Employment Students are allowed to work on-campus from the time they arrive in the U.S. in F-1 Student status to attend The New School. On-campus employment does not require any written permission. On-campus work must be limited to 20 hours per week while classes are in session, but can be full-time during official breaks and vacations. To search for available on-campus student jobs visit https://careers.newschool.edu/ and click on “Students” or email the Student Employment Office at seo@newschool.edu

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IMMIGRATION

EMPLOYEMENT OPTIONS FOR F-1 STUDENTS

Off-Campus Employment In all cases, except for on-campus employment, be sure to obtain written authorization first. Contact ISS for further details.

Optional Practical Training (OPT)

Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

Optional Practical Training (OPT) is a type of employment that allows F-1 students the opportunity to obtain full-time work authorization for 12 months in a position paid or unpaid that is directly related to a student’s major. Students usually use this type of employment after completing their programs of study, but some also do OPT before completing their program. In either situation, OPT is limited to a maximum of 12 months. Attendance at an OPT workshop is mandatory before applying for OPT. Be sure to attend a workshop during the semester if you plan to apply.

Curricular Practical Training (CPT) is work off-campus in your field of study that is considered to be ‘an integral part of an established curriculum’. A request for authorization for CPT must be made to International Student Services. The objective of CPT is academic, not employment so your academic department must approve the employment as well. All international students must submit either a completed CPT application form or access and complete the Experience Learning Agreement at https://newschool-csm.symplicity. com/.

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IMMIGRATION

EMPLOYMENT OPTIONS FOR J-1 STUDENTS Though the main focus of your time in the U.S. will be on your studies, valuable lessons about the practical application of your studies and understanding U.S. culture can come from volunteering, interning or working. If you are thinking about taking advantage of optional practical training or academic training at the end of your course of study, it is important to start to understand the U.S. workplace and to make links with employers as soon as possible. You can never accept unauthorized employment. See below for the types of employment that are possible while in J-1 Student status. Please note, that jobs that are labeled “Work Study” are only open to U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents. Look out for our employment workshops where we will give you more information.

On-Campus Employment Students are allowed to work on-campus from the time they arrive in the U.S. in J-1 student status. On-campus employment DOES require written authorization before you may begin working. If you find an on-campus job, you must bring your offer letter to ISS to obtain the necessary authorization. Employment must be limited to 20 hours per week while classes are in session, but can be full-time during official breaks and vacations. To search for available on-campus student jobs visit https://careers.newschool.edu/ and click on “Students” or email the Student Employment Office at seo@newschool.edu

Off-Campus Employment Academic Training (AT) is a type of employment that allows J-1 students the opportunity to obtain employment that is critical and integral to the

student’s academic program of study. You are allowed one month of Academic Training for each month you are enrolled full-time in your program of study. It is limited to a maximum of 18 full months for your entire academic career. However, once students finish all requirements for their PhD, they are eligible for up to 36 months of Academic Training. Most students use this type of authorization after completing their programs of study, but some students may also do Academic Training before graduation. Talk to your International Student Advisor to discuss your options.

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IMMIGRATION

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER (SSN)

Who is eligible for a SSN? Non-immigrant international students and exchange visitors - i.e., internationals residing in the U.S. with F-1, J-1, or J-2 status with proof of work authorization are eligible. To apply for a social security number, you must have a support letter from the ISSS office certifying your employability and a letter from your employer offering employment or a valid Employment Authorization Document (EAD.) For off-campus work, if you do not have a valid EAD, you must also have one of the following: • (For F-1 students only) Curricular Practical Training authorization on the Form I-20; or • (For J-1 Exchange Visitors only) Letter from your Responsible Officer explaining that you are eligible to work.

How do I apply for a SSN? Once you have one of the items listed above, bring the original copy to the ISSS office to request a social security support letter. When you pick up the social security support letter from the ISSS office, we will give you instructions on the locations of Social Security Administration (SSA) offices and a list of supporting documents to take with you. SSA Manhattan office hours are 7:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday. Residents outside of Manhattan can also apply at SSA in your area. You should receive your new Social Security card within four weeks after verification from the Department of Homeland Security.

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IMMIGRATION

TAX OBLIGATIONS FOR INTERNATIONALS IN F-1 & J-1 STATUSES The United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires that you submit tax returns by April 15, and city and state tax offices use this same deadline. In February and March of each year, ISSS arranges special tax workshops for international students. Look for details in upcoming flyers and other announcements about workshops to help you.

All internationals (regardless if they earned income) are required to file Form 8843. All internationals in F-1 and J-1 status who receive any sort of income including tuition reductions, scholarships, fellowships, grants, stipends, salaries, wages, interest, dividends, etc., from U.S. sources are also required to file tax returns with federal, state, and city governments.

When filing tax returns you do all three of the following: • Report all U.S. source income for the entire previous year (January 1- December 31) • Calculate how much tax is owed on that income, • At each of the three levels of government, if you are owed money, request it. If you owe money, pay it. (Most internationals owe nothing or are owed money.) Please note that neither International Student and Scholar Services nor any other office at The New School can offer specific “tax advice.” It is your own responsibility to understand your tax obligations. Unfortunately, the rules are very specific for international students, and it can be very confusing if you are not careful. You should only rely on someone with proper training to help file your taxes. For Federal taxes visit www.irs.gov For New York State taxes visit www.tax.ny.gov/ For New Jersey State taxes visit www.state.nj.us/treasury/taxation

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ACADEMICS


ACADEMICS

POSSIBLE DIFFERENCES IN U.S. & OTHER EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS

In other countries you may find

In The U.S. you usually find

Schools treat international students in a special way or make exceptions for Schools offer little special treatment to international students. They are them. They may have special classes, special exams, or easier requirements graded exactly like everyone else. Also, they do not get any special credit than domestic students. for having studied English in their home countries. Schools use exams as the primary form of evaluation making them the most Schools emphasize writing skills, debate, and discussion of readings. Along important (or often exclusive) part of a student’s grade. with exams, class participation is often counted as a significant part of the final grade. Schools preprogram coursework and schedules. Students know what they will Undergraduates are required to take courses within certain distribution take and when they will take it for the entire degree program. requirements, but otherwise they can choose their own classes. Graduates may have stricter distribution requirements, but they too have choices about elective classes. Students are expected to study in groups or may be assigned to groups in Students choose their classes individually. They may find other students to which they stay for their entire program. study with on an individual basis. Some class professors may assign group projects. In many countries, specialization begins at the pre-university level.

In the first two years, undergraduates are expected to develop a general education. Specialization often begins during junior year when students are expected to begin taking more courses in their area of interest. Note: Certain undergraduates specialize at the freshman or sophomore levels, e.g., engineering, music, natural resources, etc.

Students are often formal with their professors.

Students are often informal with their professors.

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ACADEMICS

POSSIBLE DIFFERENCES IN U.S. & OTHER EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS

In other countries you may find

In The U.S. you usually find

The format is customary in most classrooms.

Lectures are also common, but experiential forms of education may be more likely to be incorporated into the coursework.

Students are expected to raise their hands if they wish to be called upon. If Students accept being called upon at random. Unless it is made obvious that students are unable to answer a question correctly, this may result in loss of they are not paying attention in class, they do not feel shame if they do not face or embarrassment. know an answer. Teachers often ask questions that require an opinion and do not have a right answer. Students often assist each other and have a team approach to study.

Students may work in groups but almost always do many parts of their coursework individually. Also, students often compete.

Students may tend to be more passive in the classroom, where they are Students may tend to be more active in the classroom, where they are expected to be silent even if they know the answer to a question or simply encouraged to express their opinions even if different from their wish to express agreement with the professor. professors’. The evaluation of students is based on memorization, problem solving, and The evaluation of students is based also on memorization and problem possibly participation in discussions. solving, but participation is more likely to be included. Also, creativity is much more likely to be a standard of evaluation. Students may wait a very long time to speak after someone else has spoken Students usually wait a much shorter period of time before speaking. for fear of being rude and interrupting. They may even interrupt others. At times, interruptions may be considered appropriate and desirable because they further intellectual debate. Students may dress formally for class. They may not be permitted to eat or Students may dress very informally for class. They may eat or drink in class drink in class. if allowed by the instructor.

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ACADEMICS Listen Carefully • Attend classes and campus events.

The language skills you will need to succeed academically can be best acquired in class and at campus functions. Campus functions are especially helpful, because they are safe situations in which to use academic English.

• Pay close attention to people you interact with.

Use common sense to understand what is being said. For example, when a waiter approaches your table at a restaurant, you can assume that they are going to ask you to order.

• Listen to talk radio as you do chores around your home.

• Get a speaking partner whose native language is NOT your own.

Help each other explore English. Ask:

“How do you say ___ in English?” “What does it mean?” “How do you pronounce ___?

For instance, the Conversation Partners Program. http://bit.ly/1hC55Fq

Try to understand issues being discussed. National Public Radio offers • Read newspapers, magazines, and short stories in many interesting listening programs such as New York WFUV-FM 90.7, English New York WNYC-AM 820, and New York WNYC-FM 93.9 (Visit www. Choose topics that interest you. Don’t focus on understanding every word npr.org for schedule) and sentence. Instead, try to understand the main ideas before getting to the details. • Watch movies and listen to songs in English. Ask questions of friends and discuss the meanings of new words. • Check your comprehension of assigned readings. Pay special attention to the context of new vocabulary and phrases. Take advantage of the opportunity to check your comprehension by finding a “study buddy”. With your study buddy, you can discuss assigned • SPEAK ENGLISH readings and bring unresolved questions to class (or to your professor • Speak English as often as you can. during office hours). Speak to people at the deli, the laundromat, etc. In other words, talk to strangers! Don’t be shy!

• Use new words and expressions.

Try to memorize new words and expressions and practice using them until they become part of your repertoire.

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ACADEMICS

LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES

Practice Writing • Start writing your papers now.

Don’t wait until they are due. Ask your professors if you can write short papers to prepare for writing the larger assignments.

• Keep copies of your writing as well as a diary of mistakes and corrections so that you learn from them. • Use an all-English dictionary. Avoid pocket bilingual dictionaries. They often offer incomplete or misleading translations.

• Use A Writer’s Reference by Diane Hacker, St. Martin’s Press. It is an excellent reference book to help you write in line with conventional style. It is available at most academic bookstores.

• Correspond via email with friends.

This is a nice low-pressure way to get comfortable with writing. Get help with grammar, proof-reading and sources at the Writing Center (see page 28).

• Keep a record of new vocabulary. Carry a small notebook all the time. Write new words and expressions, including how to pronounce them, a definition, and a sample sentence. For example: To turn down (/t^rndaun/) to deny, not accept an offer:

She was offered a job in Spain but turned it down to stay with him in New York.

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Think About Grammar • Learn from your mistakes. Avoid making the same mistakes over and over by keeping a list of the mistakes and corrections. For example: WRONG: I very much like New York. RIGHT: I like New York very much. WRONG: Did you went to Peru? RIGHT: Did you go to Peru?

• Study grammar on your own.

The New School’s English Language Studies Program recommends that you use Basic Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press. It is available at most academic bookstores. Remember to get the answer key so that you can correct yourself and ask someone questions you might have.


CLASS DISCUSSIONS •

Many courses at The New School include class discussions. In the U.S., and especially at The New School, instructors believe in the value of individual ideas and commonly encourage students to express their beliefs, opinions, and concerns—even if different from their own. The give-and-take of questions is freewheeling, fun, and above all, expected. When your instructors say, “Are there any questions?” they want people to speak up. Never hesitate to accept their invitation to participate.

In most classrooms, there are at least three occasions when it is important to speak up: during class discussions, in discussion groups, and when you are assigned to give an oral presentation.

DISCUSSION GROUPS •

As a member of a small discussion group, you will have certain responsibilities. Volunteer for one of the jobs that may be assigned: facilitator, the person who guides the discussion and reports back to the whole class; recorder, the person who takes notes; and often there is a timekeeper.

Express your own views clearly and honestly. incorporate other people’s ideas as well.

Listen carefully to the views of others. You can learn from other students’ ideas. Be ready to steer others back to the main topic if they drift from it.

Ask for clarification if you do not understand. Don’t be shy. An explanation may help others, too.

Observe the techniques U.S. students use to gain a turn at speaking. In small groups, people rarely raise their hands to get permission to speak. Yet no one interrupts when someone else is talking. Unconsciously, they have learned to use body language, eye contact, and verbal strategies to signal others that they would like to talk.

Acknowledge what other people in the group have said when you make your comments. This makes people feel good because they know that you have heard and thought about their contributions.

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When it is time to come to a consensus, be ready to modify your views or to


ACADEMICS

SPEAKING UP IN CLASS

GIVING A PREPARED TALK The other side of speaking up in class is giving a prepared talk. As you take advanced courses in your major field, you may be asked to give prepared talks more often. The basics of talking in front of a group are similar whether the group is large or small. Unless you are prepared to speak totally “off the cuff,” use small index cards. If you need the security of writing out your entire talk, prepare it in a conversational style. Then practice your presentation so you only need to glance at your notes occasionally. With practice, you will develop your own style of speaking in front of a group. Here are some points to keep in mind:

• Follow a simple structure for your talk. The basic formula for a successful short talk is introduce, elaborate, and recap.

• Make fewer main points than you would in a written report. • Do not strive for perfect grammar.

In an oral report, it is perfectly acceptable to use phrases that are not complete sentences.

• Be conscious of your body language.

Your gestures and poise should contribute to your overall presentation. Stay relaxed, but do not slouch.

• Make eye contact with your fellow students.

A helpful technique is to look for those people who appear receptive and talk to them.

• Try using a podium or lecture stand if one is available.

• Speak conversationally.

• Use illustrations if you speak for more than five to ten minutes. Use a flip chart, write on the blackboard, distribute a

• Involve your audience.

• Remember your audience is friendly, not hostile. Every

You shouldn’t sound as if you have memorized your speech. Find ways to get listeners to share your enthusiasm for the topic.

photocopied handout or make a powerpoint presentation.

student knows it is difficult to speak in front of a group, and everyone is rooting for you to do well.

• Keep in mind the importance of time.

You will lose your audience if your talk goes on too long.

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TIPS ON LISTENING & TAKING NOTES Attending the first course can be scary for anyone, and if your first language is not English it is important to realize that you may miss some material initially, but don’t give up! Keep attending class. At every new class, you will find that you understand more and more. Remember that the rhythm of spoken English in the U.S. tends to be uneven and sounds different from the English spoken in other countries. In some ways it is like the syncopated rhythm of jazz. Each syllable in an English word or sentence has a strong or weak stress. Speakers rush over unstressed syllables and stretch out stressed syllables. Here are some HELPFUL TIPS. Use the ones you think will work best for you!

• Write down assignments for the next class.

If the assignment is not clear to you, ask the professor for clarification.

• Read the assigned material before class.

Preparation is the single most important way to understand key concepts, words, and phrases. Make notes and underline important points, phrases, or concepts you don’t understand.

• Listen for the major points.

Don’t worry if you don’t understand every detail. Keep listening. You are not expected to have perfect comprehension. Hint: some professors repeat major points and emphasize them.

• Learn the phrases that introduce a new topic, signal a change of topic, or summarize what has been said.

Make a list of these types of expressions, such as “Now, we’ll turn to . . .,” “I will give three examples why . . .,” “My point is that . . . .” When you hear them, get ready to write.

• Notice what the professor writes on the blackboard.

Pay close attention and put it in your notes. Be sure to pick up any handouts or materials that are distributed in class.

• Come to class on time, and sit in the front.

You should be in your seat, prepared to concentrate and take notes, before the instructor begins.

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ACADEMICS

SUPPORT FOR YOUR ENGLISH

University Learning Center

71 Fifth Avenue, 9th Floor (212) 229-5121 http://www.newschool.edu/writingcenter/ writingcenter@newschool.edu http://ramon.newschool.edu/ureserve/uwc/ureserve.pl Monday - Thursday, 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Friday, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

New School for Public Engagement Jackie Maffiore English Language Studies (ESL) 68 Fifth avenue, Mezzanine (212) 229-5372 x4174 elsc@newschool.edu maffiorj@newschool.edu

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The New School for Jazz & Contemporary Music Program Dan Greenblatt Director of Acadmic Affairs 55 West 13th Street, 5th Floor (212) 229-5896 x4577 greenbld@newschool.edu

Conversation Partner Program

See page 9 on this guide for information on how to sign up


ACADEMICS

SUPPORT FOR YOUR ENGLISH

The New School for Drama

Parsons The New School for Design

Mannes College The New School for Music

The New School for Social Research

Matthew Kelty Director of Admissions and Academic Affairs 151 Bank Street, Room 102 (212) 229-5859 keltym@newschool.edu

Audrey Axinn Assistant Dean 150 West 85th Street (212) 580-0210 x4836 axinna@newschool.edu

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Julia Dault ESL and Writing Coordinator Art and Design Studies Department 2 West 13th Stree, Room 605 (212) 229-8916 x4086 daultj@newschool.edu

Melissa Monroe Graduate Writing Coordinator The New School Graduate Programs Writing Center (212) 229-5712 x3028 monroem@newschool.edu


ACADEMICS

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY / AVOID PLAGIARISM

What Is Plagiarism? In college courses, we are continually engaged with other people’s ideas: we read them in texts, hear them in lectures, discuss them in class, and incorporate them into our own writing. As a result, it is very important that we give credit where it is due. Plagiarism is using others’ ideas and words without clearly acknowledging the source of that information. It is a very serious offense and some students even fail their classes because of plagiarism. To find out more details about how to avoid plagarism and how to avoid it consult this handout: http://www.newschool.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=99181&libID=99192

When to use citations

Citation resources

Strategies for avoiding plagiarism

Terms to know

To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you Use another person’s idea, opinion, or theory; Use any facts, statistics, graphs, drawings - any pieces of information - that are not common knowledge; Use quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words; or paraphrase another person’s spoken or written words.

Put in quotations everything that comes directly from the text, especially when taking notes. Paraphrase, but be sure you are not just rearranging or replacing a few words. Instead, read over what you want to paraphrase carefully; cover up the text with your hand or close the text so you can’t see any of it. Write out the idea in your own words without looking. Check your paraphrase against the original text to be sure you have not accidentally used the same phrases or words, and that the information is accurate. Talk to your professor and ask his or he preferred citation style. 30

www.mla.org/ www.apastyle.org/ http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ www2.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citmla.htm www2.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citapa.htm www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/Documentation.html http://www.newschool.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&Item ID=57377 If you have questions, speak to your academic advisor, visit the University Writing Center, or speak to an ISS Advisor for assistance.

Quotation: using someone else’s exact words. When you quote, place the passage you are using in quotation marks and document the source according to a documentation style (e.g. MLA or APA). Citation: a reference to a book, article, web 1x, or other published item, with sufficient detail to identify the item. Paraphrase: using someone else’s ideas, but putting them in your own words. This is probably the skill you will use the most when incorporating sources into your writing. Although you use your own words to paraphrase, you must still acknowledge the source of the information.


ACADEMICS

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES In keeping with the university’s policy of providing equal access for students with disabilities, any student with a disability who needs academic accommodations should contact Student Disability Services (SDS). Reasonable accommodations are made for individual students, based on the need(s) presented and appropriate disability documentation. These services can include but are not limited to: • Classroom modifications, such as preferential seating or the use of a tape recorder • Testing adjustments, such as extended exam time or enlarged text • Providing physical access to programs and services • Registration assistance • Sign language interpreters • Referrals to other resources, such as counseling, health services, and rehabilitation agencies • Training on how to communicate effectively with instructors and others on disability-related needs For further information please email studentdisability@newschool.edu or call (212) 229-5626

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STAYING HEALTHY


STAYING HEALTHY

COPING STRATEGIES FOR DEALING WITH CULTURE SHOCK Having culture shock is a natural process when adjusting to a new environment. Don’t worry. Learn how to deal with it! And remember, there is always someone or some service available to help you. Here are a few tips to help you cope:

• Never confuse your ability to speak the new language with your intelligence. • Focus on getting through the transitional period. • Maintain confidence in yourself. Follow your ambitions and continue your plans for the future. • Pay attention to relationships with your family and friends. They will be a great source of support for you in difficult times. • Allow yourself to feel sad about the things you have left behind: your family, friends, etc. • Develop a hobby. Try to keep busy. • Don’t forget the good things you already have and train yourself to look for the best, not the worst, in situations. • Arrange for something pleasant to look forward to. • Be patient with yourself and others—adjustment to a new culture takes time.

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STAYING HEALTHY

COPING STRATEGIES FOR DEALING WITH CULTURE SHOCK

• Start a journal of the new things you come across every day and your reactions to them. Writing things down will help you keep them in perspective, and can be funny to look back on. • Try to keep your sense of humor no matter how hard it is. • Don’t try too hard! • Learn to integrate regular forms of aerobic physical activity in your routine. Relaxation methods and meditation can be helpful during periods of stress. • If spiritual customs & practices are important to you, maintain these if possible now, as well. • Maintain contact with your ethnic group. This will give you a sense of belonging and reduce feelings of loneliness and alienation. (See World Communities in NYC on p. 36) • Maintain contact with your new culture. Learn the language. Get involved in community activities that allow you to practice English.

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STAYING HEALTHY

THE NEW SCHOOL COUNSELING SERVICES Counseling Services offers short-term individual counseling, group counseling, psychiatric consultations, crisis intervention, referrals and workshops. All services are free to students who have paid the Health Services Fee. All services are confidential and any contact with this program will not be part of your academic record. New School faculty and staff are prohibited from discussing a student’s record with outside parties without the student’s permission.

Counseling Services 80 Fifth Avenue, 3rd Floor (212) 229-1671 option 1 SHS@newschool.edu

Office Hours

(closed on university holidays, limited summer hours) Monday - Wednesday, 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Thursday, 9:00 a.m- 9:00 p.m. Friday, 10:00 a.m- 5:00 p.m. Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Walk-In Hours

Monday to Friday, 1:45 p.m. — 2:45 p.m. You can walk in and see a counselor during these times. If you need immediate assistance or you have an emergency outside the business hours, please call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

35


STAYING HEALTHY MEDICINE In the United States, there are roughly two types of medications: Over-the-counter-drugs (OTC) and Prescription drugs. OTC drugs are the medications that you can buy at drug stores without prescriptions. Some OTC medications have side effects. Read the symptoms and directions carefully. If you have questions, ask a pharmacist. Prescription drugs can be purchased at pharmacies and pharmacy counters in drugstores. Make sure to bring your insurance card. Depending on your insurance coverage, you are usually required to pay a “co-payment�, which is a fixed amount of money you need to pay when you use the insurance. Any amount more than the co-payment will be covered by your insurance, until you use up to the maximum coverage for the year.

SAFE ZONE The aim of the New School Safe Zone program is to assemble a voluntary network of faculty, staff, and student allies to LGBTQI people to increase safety and create a more supportive campus environment for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) community at The New School. The New School is dedicated to creating a welcoming environment for all members of the university community regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, culture, language, gender and gender expression, sexuality, religious and political beliefs, age, and ability. The university stands against all forms of discrimination and oppression, whether directed against individuals or groups. After the introductory Safe Zone training, students, faculty, and staff display a Safe Zone sign on their lockers, desks, backpacks, or office doors; this signifies support for LGBTQI people and identifies those displaying the signs as Allies who can be safely approached for support or guidance. To become an Ally or receive more information on Safe Zone, email safezone@newschool.edu or call (212) 229-1671, option 4. The Safe Zone Team publicizes the program and distributes materials, provides introductory training to those who wish to become involved, and educates the larger community about the meaning of the signs and the importance of building safe and inclusive spaces for all students. For more information visit the Safe Zone website: http://www.newschool.edu/student-health-services/safe-zone/

Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Policies and Procedures http://www.newschool.edu/hr/training-and-development/sexual-harassment/policies-procedures/

Sexual Assault Policy http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/rights-and-responsibilities/sexual-assault-policy/

Institutional Policies & Procedures Manual http://www.newschool.edu/forms/hr_institutional_policies.pdf 36


STAYING HEALTHY

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HIV/AIDS?

What Exactly Is HIV? What is AIDS? The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) causes the progressive weakening of the body’s immune system. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (“AIDS”), is the final stage of the weakening of the body’s immune system. People infected with the HIV virus are known as HIV+. Many who are HIV+ have no symptoms for years. People with AIDS may become sick because their bodies can no longer fight off infections. No cure is available, but early detection and treatment of HIV infection can delay the onset of AIDS and provide years of healthy living.

What Is High-Risk Behavior That Can Cause Me To Be Infected By HIV? HIV cannot be transmitted in the same everyday way as viruses that cause colds, influenza, or many other contagious illnesses. You can become infected with HIV only if it is introduced into your bloodstream via certain body fluids of an infected person: • BLOOD • SEMEN • VAGINAL SECRETIONS or • BREAST MILK. Any behavior that allows for the introduction of some-one’s semen, vaginal secretions, or breast milk into your bloodstream is high risk. Most HIV+ people became infected by practicing “unsafe sex”—that is, anal or vaginal intercourse or oral sex without a condom—with an HIV+ partner. Many others became infected by sharing needles (for injecting drugs, acupuncture, tattooing, or piercing) with someone who is infected.

37


STAYING HEALTHY

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HIV/AIDS?

How Do I Protect Myself If I Choose to Have Sexual Intercourse or Oral Sex with Another Person? • Always use latex condoms or dental dams. Latex condoms and dental dams are available at pharmacies and at the Student Health Services Center. If you do not know how to use a latex condom or dental dam, don’t be shy—ask. It is better to ask than to participate blindly in what might be risky behavior. Pamphlets are available to guide you, and you can always ask a practitioner at the Student Health Services Center.

• Get to know and communicate with your partner. Learn about your partner’s history and behavior. Remember that it takes time to get to know someone well and to trust him or her. Always be open, honest, and protect yourself first.

• Remember that alcohol and drug use can lead to risky behavior

Other Things to Think About • Cuts, acne, abrasions, or any other damage to your skin might provide an opportunity for infection—especially during sexual activity that might bring these areas into contact with another person’s blood, semen, vaginal secretions, or breast milk. • Most methods of contraception including oral contraceptives (“the pill”), diaphragm, IUD, or sponge DO NOT protect against the spread of HIV. Only latex condoms and dental dams can protect against HIV. • Safe sex is not a one-person activity. To truly protect yourself, safer sex is something that must be practiced by both you and your partner.

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STAYING HEALTHY

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HIV/AIDS?

How Do I Protect Myself If I Choose to Get Tattooed, Pierced, or Take Drugs Intravenously? DO NOT SHARE NEEDLES. If you inject drugs or steroids, seek help from a physician, nurse, counselor, or community agency specializing in alcohol and drug treatment. If you choose to get tattooed or get yourself pierced, be certain that only sterile needles are used. Receive acupuncture only from a qualified medical practitioner who uses sterilized needles.

Get More Information THE NEW SCHOOL STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

Free and strictly confidential HIV testing Mondays from 4:30—6:30 p.m. 80 Fifth Avenue, 3rd Floor SHS@newschool.edu Health Education (212) 229-5687 x4605

Counseling Services (212) 229-1671 Option 1 If you prefer to seek information anonymously, call the Center for Disease Control’s Hotline:

CDC NATIONAL STD & AIDS HOTLINE

39

Free HIV testing for everyone 446 W 33rd St New York, NY 10011-2601 (212) 367-1000 (www.ghmc.com)

APICHA - Asian & Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS

Medical Services (212) 229-1671 Option 2

Main Line (24 hrs) TTY (10 a.m. — 10 p.m.)

Gay Men’s Health Center (GMHC)

800.CDC.INFO 800.232.6348

http://www.apicha.org Free and Confidential HIV testing(results in 30 minutes 400 Broadway New York, NY 10013 Toll-Free: 1.866.APICHA.9 (Available in English, Urdu, Bengali, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Tagalong, and Chinese.)


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

ON CAMPUS HOUSING

International Student Services strongly recommends that you consider on-campus housing. On-campus residence halls are staffed with trained professionals to provide services and programming in support of a healthy student environment and academic success. Many graduates of U.S. academic institutions look back happily on their lives in the residence halls; the time they spent there is typically among their fondest memories. If you choose to live off-campus, then you are choosing to omit an enriching tradition of the U.S. educational experience. Specific information is listed about the different residence hall options and their rates and fees at the Housing Office website: www.newschool.edu/studentservices/housing Be aware that once you have signed a contract with University Housing, you are required to pay fees for the academic year. This is just like a lease on any apartment, so read the contract carefully before you sign up.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

APARTMENT HUNTING

Dormitories and university housing?

Pro: Protected environment, make friends, sense of community, often furnished, and close to school, no additional responsibilities, e.g. paying utilities Dorms have meal plans if there is no kitchen. Con: Difficult to have a private space, some dormitories do not have kitchens.

Apartment share?

Pro: Make friends and freedom to establish your own rules with your roommates Con: Successful shares can be difficult, there is less privacy, and you may need to adjust your life style. How do they share: e.g., garbage disposal, how to pay for household supplies, who and how to clean the common area, guest policy, pet policy, smoking or nonsmoking etc…

Temporary housing and residences?

Pro: Flexible lease, often furnished, and make friends. Con: Possibly some regulations and restrictions, less privacy and likely for a short term. Ask what you cannot bring into your room e.g., electrical appliances, up to how long you can stay, if the meal is included, if you can cook, guest policy, etc…

Subletting?

Pro: Your own place with less rent, possibly with some furniture. Con: Successful subletting depends on tenants and you. It’s often temporary. Subletting is not always formally announced to the landlord which means that you could be evicted. Ask how they (and you) pay for the rent, utilities, how long you can stay there, about the security deposit, if the landlord knows about the subletting.

Living by yourself?

Pro: Have your own space and privacy. You are the boss! Con: Have a commitment (lease), it’s more expensive, usually unfurnished, and you might need a guarantor. Before moving in, check the apartment and if there are any problems, document them with photos, or before you move in, walk through the apartment with the superintendent or the landlord to check the condition of the apartment to prevent a problem when you move out. Check what’s included in the rent and what’s not, especially utilities (heat, hot water, gas, electricity, etc.) 42


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

APARTMENT HUNTING

Areas in New York New York City has five boroughs; Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. New Jersey is across the Hudson River. Each area is divided into smaller areas (Chelsea, Greenwich Village, Astoria, etc.) • Check if the location is safe, easy to commute. From easy to shop, easy to do laundry, etc. • The rent often depends on the area, securities and amenities (e.g., doorman buildings, elevators, walk-ups). • Before you begin viewing apartments, make sure you have enough withdrawable money in your bank account to pay the initial fees (e.g., first month’s rent, security deposit, and broker’s fee if you use one)

Best ways to find apartment listings • University off-campus housing office—send an e-mail to get available listings: universityhousing@newschool.edu • Local Newspapers • Word of mouth • Look for “For Rent” signs—walk around the neighborhood you want to live in and talk to residents to learn about safety, stores, etc. • Internet resources • Local brokers (realtors)—you may need to pay a broker fee. Depending on the broker and the rent of the apartment, expect to pay about a month’s rent or more for the broker.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

APARTMENT HUNTING

Local Newspaper Sites

General information sites

New York City Rent Guidelines Board: www.housingnyc.com/ New York Daily News: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/real-estate • Help Yourself to Housing (By One To World): www.metrointl.org/programs/housingbooklet/index.html New York Post: http://www.nypost.com/realestate/ • The New School’s housing page: The New York Observer: http://observer.com/channel/real-estate/ www.newschool.edu/studentaffairs/housing/ The Village Voice: http://newyork.backpage.com Either stop by or contact with the University Housing office at 79 Fifth Silive.com for Staten Island listings: www.silive.com/realestate/ Ave. 5th floor. Universityhousing@newschool.edu Jersey City Reporter: http://www.hudsonreporter.com/ 212-229-5459. The Epoch Times: www.epochtimes.com

• New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/pages/realestate/index.html • • • • • • •

(look for the classified listings in print and on the web)

Internet classified listing sites

• NYU’s off-campus housing guide: www.nyu.edu/housing/offcampus/guide.htm

• Metropolitan Council on Housing - Know Your Rights http://metcouncilonhousing.org/

• Craigslist, New York: http://newyork.craigslist.org/ • eBay Classifieds, New York http://www.ebayclassifieds.com/ Although internet sites are very useful for apartment hunting, there are some scam listings and pay sites. Try not to pay the fee in cash, and if you are asked to pay in cash, ask them for a receipt. When you go check apartments, bring your friends with you. Try to have a written agreement, not a verbal one. If you have questions, ask the landlord before renting (paint the wall, installing the air-conditioner, parking a bicycle, how and by when to pay the rent, etc.) Housing discrimination? -- Housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability is illegal by federal law. If you are a victim of housing discrimination, contact www.hud.gov/complaints/housediscrim.cfm

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

APARTMENT HUNTING GLOSSARY Alcove studio: A 1 or 2 room apartment with a separate alcove which can be used as a sleeping or dining area. Broker: A person who, for a commission or a fee, brings you and a landlord together and assists in negotiating contracts between the two. Cooperative (co-op): A co-op is a housing community that is jointly owned and managed by those who live in it. Each member buys shares in this community, attends regular meetings, social events, etc.

Credit report: A report prepared by a credit reporting service that describes a person’s credit history for the last seven years (often international students do not have enough history to submit). Eviction: A court-administered proceeding for removing a tenant from a rental unit because the tenant has violated the rental agreement or did not comply with a notice ending the tenancy.

Guarantor: A person who is legally obligated to pay the rent in case the tenant is unable to. Some landlords will ask for a guarantor when tenants do not earn enough to meet the landlord’s minimum salary requirements. Lease: A contract between a landlord and tenant (you) which contains the terms and conditions of the rental—review this document before you sign. Open House: In order to market and promote a property, the listing broker or owner of a property may hold an open house to promote interest in the premises over a short period of time. Railroad Apartment: An apartment where the rooms connect to one another in a line, and the entrances are at opposite ends of each room, like cars

on a train.

Referral: A recommendation made to a client about the services of a particular agent or firm.

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STAYING HEALTHY

APARTMENT HUNTING GLOSSARY Rent Control: Laws that regulate the amount of money that is charged to rent out space. Rent Stabilization: New York City has a system of rent regulation known as “rent stabilization.” Rent stabilized apartments are those in buildings of six or more units built between February 1, 1947 and January 1, 1974. Tenants in buildings of six or more units built before February 1, 1947 and who moved in after June 30, 1971 are also covered by rent stabilization. Renter’s Insurance: Insurance protecting the tenant against property losses, such as losses from theft or fire. This insurance usually also protects the tenant against liability (legal responsibility) for claims or lawsuits filed by the landlord or by others alleging that the tenant negligently injured another person or property. Security Deposit: A payment by a tenant, held by the landlord during the lease term and kept (wholly or partially) on default or destruction of the premises by the tenant. Shares: When one purchases an apartment in a cooperative building he or she is actually purchasing the shares in the cooperative. They represent the

proportion of the building owned by the unit owner based on the size and value of the apartment.

Sublease: A separate rental agreement between the original tenant and a new tenant to whom the original tenant rents all or part of the rental unit. The

agreement between the original tenant and the landlord remains in force, and the original tenant continues to be responsible for paying the rent to the landlord and for other tenant obligations.

Super/Superintendent: A super is someone who maintains the apartment building. The super cleans the common areas and makes repairs in the tenants’ apartments, usually in exchange for living in one of the units for free. Many supers and their family live in the building they take care of.

Studio: 1 or 2 rooms with combined living and sleeping areas. Tri-state region: Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Walk-up buildings: Generally the least expensive type of housing in NYC and the quality can vary widely. Usually these are 4 to 5 story buildings with

no doormen and no elevator.

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STAYING HEALTHY

ABBREVIATIONS GUIDE When browsing through apartment offers you will be confronted with many abbreviations. In the next two pages we have gathered the most common ones for you.

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STAYING HEALTHY

ABBREVIATIONS GUIDE

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

SPOUSES AND CHILDREN

Bringing your family with you can be a fulfilling experience for all. It will allow you to share a wonderful experience with your family members as well as expose them to a new environment and facilitate the learning of English.

HOUSING

The New School does not have family housing accommodations so you will have to look for off-campus alternatives. See page 39 in this booklet for more information on apartment hunting.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Any child between 5 and 21 is entitled to attend public school free of charge. You will need to present a copy of the child’s birth certificate, proof of required immunizations and residential address.

NYC Department of Education http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

Inside Schools

http://insideschools.org/

Great Schools

http://www.greatschools.net/

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

SPOUSES AND CHILDREN

PRIVATE AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS Independent and Catholic schools are also available. For these schools, students must to go through an application and testing process. For more information on these options see:

Independent schools

www.nais.org/admission/schoolSearch.cfm

ACTIVITIES FOR SPOUSES

If your spouse is not fluent in English, it is a good idea for him/her to get involved in activities that allow them to practice their English as much as possible. ISS has a number of events and programs that can help spouses practice English and meet other students. The Conversation Partners program provides the opportunity to practice the language in an informal setting (see page 9). International Education Week is a week long event that celebrates international education and gives international students the opportunity to share their perspectives, food and culture with other students, faculty and staff. Spouses are invited to volunteer and actively participate in all the events. For more information email iew@newschool.edu

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

SAFETY TIPS

While the city has become much safer in recent years, it is always important to be alert and follow general safety rules. • Avoid dimly lit and deserted streets if you are walking alone. • When riding the subway late at night, wait on the platform near the station booth and ride in the cars in the middle near the conductor. • Always have a little cash in hand to take a taxi, just in case. Be careful when taking livery cabs (privately owned, non-yellow taxis)outside of Manhattan. • Do not take out money or count your money in public places. • Hold on to your personal belongings; keep purses shut and always keep them close to you. • Avoid parks after dark. • Try not to look lost (even if you are). Do not open maps in public places as that can identify you as a target. • Begging, or “panhandling” on subways is illegal. Never feel pressured to give money to panhandlers, even if they are aggressive. • Keep the door to your apartment or dorm locked at all times. Never open your door to someone without knowing who they are. • When you come home, have your keys ready. Never stand outside looking for your keys. • If you lose your keys, get your locks changed immediately. • Make sure your apartment is equipped with a smoke detector. Your landlord is required by law to provide it. Check the batteries. • If you are moving into an old building, double check for pests. (bedbugs, mice, rats and coach roaches ect.)

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

AVOIDING FINANCIAL SCAMS

Students should be aware of the existence of scams. These can target anyone, including international students, in an attempt to trick them out of their money. Here are the best ways to avoid becoming a victim of a scam or a financial scheme. • Never send money by wire, Western Union, bank transfer or check to an individual or an organization that you do not know well. • Never pay a deposit for an apartment without having seen the apartment first and without having spoken to the owner, landlord or Management Company in person. Check that the building is zoned for residential use: www.nyc.gov/html/dob/html/bis/bis.shtml • Never respond to ads or emails promising a high pay-off or a financial award if you tell them your personal information such as your bank account number, or if you are asked to make a payment first. • Never give cash or a personal check to someone in exchange for a larger amount check from them. Likely, the check is false and you will lose the money you gave them. • If you do receive a check and deposit it, wait at least 7 business days, but preferably 11 business days to see if the check cleared. Contact your bank to see what the status of the check is. • When faced with an employment or financial opportunity, keep good notes about who contacted you, along with any phone calls, e-mail, or other correspondence you may have exchanged. Remember that internationals may not work off campus unless it is approved and related to your degree program. • Do not do any work for non-locals or anyone you have not met in person. • Ask any potential employer for references and check them. • An offer that is “too good to be true”… is. Walk away from a deal if you find yourself unsure about the people you are dealing with or the circumstances of the deal.

For more tips on how to avoid scams visit these websites: www.mahalo.com/how-to-avoid-craigslist-scams www.ehow.com/how_4845594_avoid-job-scams-craigslist.html www.poorerthanyou.com/2009/07/13/moving-8-tips-to-avoid-scams-on-craigslist/ www.helium.com/items/1908841-how-to-avoid-scams-on-craigslist

If you find yourself the victim of a scam – it is a crime and you should file a complaint with your local police. Also, you can get assistance from the ISS office or the Office of Student Support and Crisis Management at (212) 229-5900 x3710 or x3189. 52


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

ORGANIZATIONS IN NEW YORK CITY

One-to-World

McBurney YMCA

Is a private, not-for-profit organization, with a mission to create global Discount gym membership is available for The New School students, faculty learning opportunities for students, educators, and the community in New and staff. York City and beyond. 285 West Broadway, Suite 450 (between Canal & Lispenard Streets) New York, NY 10013 Tel (212) 431-1195 Fax (212) 941-6291 www.one-to-world.org

International House

125 W 14th St (between 6th & 7th Ave) New York City, NY 10011-7302 Phone: (212) 912-2300 http://www.ymcanyc.org/mcburney/

New York City Department of Parks and Recreations

Is a residence and program center for graduate students, interns and trainees. Official page—find out about bicycling, parks, recreation centers, and more They host a variety of activities from lectures, to trips, festivals and social in the city. events. Non-resident paid memberships are available to full-time graduate www.nycgovparks.org students. 500 Riverside Drive New York, NY 10027 Tel (212) 316-8400 www.ihouse-NYC.org Another alternative is to volunteer at one of the multiple organizations available in the New York City area. For a list of organizations and their options email issevents@newschool.edu.

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STAYING HEALTHY

ORGANIZATIONS IN NEW YORK CITY

The New School Office of Student Development and Activities (OSDA) Sponsors events throughout the year for students and has movie tickets available to students at a discounted price. Also contact them for Student Organizations on-campus: 90 Fifth Avenue, Room 209 (212) 229-5687 New York City, NY 10003 http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/student-development-and-activities/ studev@newschool.edu

The New School Office of Recreation & Intramural Sports Hosts weekly recreation programs and intramural team sports in addition to outdoor activities and special events. 79 Fifth Avenue, Room 532 (212) 229-5166 x3801 http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/athletics-and-recreation/ recreation@newschool.edu

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

USEFUL WEBSITES

Books and DVDs

Information on New York City

• www.amazon.com Online site to buy books, DVDs, and more.

• www.mta.info Public transportation maps, including bus and subway.

• http://www.barnesandnoble.com/ Online site to buy books, DVDs, and music.

• www.hopstop.com Allows you to enter your starting address and destination address, to find out the best routes via subway or bus.

• www.bookfinder.com Online book and textbook store – helps find the textbook you need at the lowest price. • www.bigwords.com Textbook price comparison • http://www.half.ebay.com/ Discount textbooks. • www.netflix.com Online movie streaming and DVD rental. • www.chegg.com Online book rental website for school books • www.hulu.com Watch current TV shows online.

Free Local Newspapers and Magazines • The L Magazine (event guide) www.thelmagazine.com • The Village Voice www.villagevoice.com • AM New York www.amny.com • Metro http://www.metro.us/newyork 55

• www.ridethecity.com Bike transit Guide. Allows you to enter a start address and a destination address with multiple route options in order to find the best way to bike anywhere. • www.nypl.org New York Public Library locations and hours and also allows you to renew or reserve a book online. • www.bigonion.com New York City walking tours. • http://newyork.craigslist.org/ Classified advertisements for apartments, roommates, and other information. • www.dailycandy.com a free daily e-mail, insider’s guide to New York City. The Weekend Guide, published every Thursday, includes new restaurants, sales, and events. • http://flavorpill.com/newyork Gives a listing of galleries in New York City. • www.menupages.com NYC Restaurant Guide with restaurant and menu information. • http://www.nycgo.com/ New York City’s official tourism website.


STAYING HEALTHY

USEFUL WEBSITES AND APPS

Information on New York City

Free Useful Apps

• www.newyork.citysearch.com Reviews and directions to top restaurants, events, night clubs, shops, services and more, in New York City.

• iTrans NYC, Embark NYC, and Hopstop Useful for getting around the city

• www.opentable.com Restaurant listings and reservations online. • www.sheckys.com The comprehensive online guide to bars, clubs and lounges, shopping, nightlife, beauty, food and more in New York City. • www.yogatothepeople.com Yoga Studio located at 12 St. Marks Place. • www.roommate.com Connects and helps people find roommates. • www.bigapplegreeter.org Free tours of New York City • http://nymag.com/ Listings of fashion events and sample sales

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• Urbanspoon and Ness Useful for discovering food in the city • Seamless and GrubHub Use these for food delivery or pickup • iTranslate and Google Translate Easy to use translate apps • Scoutmob Find deals on local restaurants, stores, and events • Eventbrite Great way to find events and classes around the city


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Books & Music Barnes & Noble Booksellers www.barnesandnoble.com (university bookstore, show ID for no-tax:) 105 Fifth Ave (E 18th Street) (212) 807-0099 Mon - Fri 9 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Sat 9:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Sun 11 a.m - 7 p.m Barnes & Noble @ Union Square 33 East 17th Street (212) 253-0810

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Shakespeare & Co. Bookstore Strand Bookstore http://shop.shakeandco.com/

716 Broadway @ Washington Place 212.529.1330 Mon-Fri 10 a.m. – 11 p.m. Sat, Sun 12 p.m.– 9 p.m.

St. Mark’s Bookshop www.stmarkbookshop.com 31 Third Ave (212) 260-7853

(New & Used books) www.strandbooks.com

828 Broadway (at 12th St) (212) 473-1452 Mon - Sat 9:30 am –10:30 pm Sun 11a.m. – 10:30 p.m


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Art Supplies

Fashion Supplies

Office Supplies

New York Central Art Supply

DaVinci Artist Supply

Staples (office)

www.nycentralart.com/ 62 3rd Ave. (11th St) (212) 473-7705 Mon - Sat 8:30 a.m. - 6:15 p.m.

Pearl (art)

www.pearlpaint.com/ 308 Canal Street (212) 431-7932

Utrecht (art) www.utrechtart.com/ 111 4th Avenue (Btw 11th & 12th St) (212) 777-5353 237 W 23rd Street (Betw. 7th & 8th Ave) (212) 675-8699

Dick Blick Art Materials www.dickblick.com 1-5 Bond Street

A.I. Friedman (art) www.aifriedman.com 44 West 18th Street

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www.davinciartistsupply.com 132 W 21st (btw 6th & 7th Ave) 137 E 23rd (Lexington Ave)

Fashion Design Bookstore (art and sewing supplies) www.fashiondesignbooks.com 250 West 27th St (212) 633-9646

Rosen & Chadick Textiles (fashion) 561 Fashion Ave, 2nd floor (40th St. btw 7th & 8th Ave.) (212) 869-0142

www.staples.com/ 5-9 Union Square West (212) 929-6323 Mon: 7am – 12 a.m Tues - Fri 12 a.m - 12 a.m Sat: 12 a.m – 9 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.

East Side Copy

www.eastsidecopy.com (copy center) 15 E 13th St (212) 807-0465 Mo - Fri 8 a.m - 10 p.m. Sat 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Sun 12:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Groceries Whole Foods Market

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/ 4 Union Square (at 14th St) (212) 673-5388 Daily 8 a.m. — 11 p.m. Whole Foods Market (Chelsea) 250 7th Avenue (at 24th St) (212) 924-5969 Daily 8 a.m. — 11 p.m.

Trader Joe’s

http://www.traderjoes.com/ 142 E. 14th St. (Btw 3rd & 4th Ave.) 212.529.4612 Daily 9 a.m. — 10 p.m.

The Food Emporium

http://www.thefoodemporium.com/ 10 Union Sq. (14th St & Park Ave) Mon - Sat 7 a.m. — 12 a.m. Sun. 8 a.m. - 12 a.m. (212) 353-3840 475 6th Ave (at W 12th St) (212) 242-9763 M - F 7 a.m. — 12 a.m. Sat & Sun 7 a.m. — 10 p.m.

D’Agostino

341 3rd Ave (212) 686-0619 http://www.dagnyc.com/

Gristedes

25 University Place (at 8th St) (212) 353-1330 Daily 7 a.m. — 12 a.m. 3 Sheridan Square (W 4th St) (212) 229-3893 Daily 7 a.m. — 12 a.m.

Morton Williams Supermarket 278 Park Avenue South (22nd Street) (212) 982-7326

Gourmet Garage

http://www.gourmetgarage.com/ 117 7th Ave South (10th St) (212) 699-5980 Daily 7 a.m. — 10 p.m.

675 6th Ave. (btw 21st St. & 22nd St.) 212.255.2106 Daily 8 a.m. — 10 p.m.

Westside Market

Garden of Eden

Some supermarkets offer shopping club cards (reward cards not credit cards) for discounts. Memberships are usually free of charge. Many stores and occasionally restaurants have student discounts, make sure to present your ID and ask for it.

(Gourmet Market) 7 E 14th St (btw 5th & Union Square) Daily 7 a.m. — 12 a.m.

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177 7th Ave # 1 (btw 14th &15th St) (212) 807-7771


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Specialty Food Markets

Electronics

Chelsea Market

Best Buy

Guitar Center

Citarella

60 W 23rd St (at 6th Ave) (212) 366-1373

P. C. Richard & Son

(food and restaurants) 75 9th Ave (betw. 15th & 16th St) (212) 255-7990

www.bestbuy.com/ 52 E 14th St (212) 466-4789

424 6th Ave (at 9th St) (212) 874-0383

GameStop

7 E 14th St (betw 5th & Union Square) (212) 255-4200

(video game retailer) www.gamestop.com 32 E 14th St (212) 242-2567

Farmer’s Market

B&H

Garden of Eden

Bway & E 17th St @ Union Square Mon., Wed., Fri., Sat. 8am-6pm

Union Square Natural Food

Integral Yoga

229 West 13th Street (betw 7th & 8th St) (212) 243-2642

Murray’s Cheese Shop 254 Bleecker St (212) 243-3298

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(photo and video) www.bhphotovideo.com 420 9th Ave (betw. 33rd & 34th St) (212) 444-6615

J&R

(electronics) www.jr.com 23 Park Row (across from City Hall Park) (212) 238-9000

(music instruments) www.guitarcenter.com 25 W 14th St (212) 463-7500

(electronics & appliances) www.pcrichard.com 120 E 14 St (betw 4th & 3rd Ave) (212)979-2600

TekServe

(Apple specialist) www.tekserve.com 119 W 23rd St (betw. 6th & 7th Ave) (212) 929-3635

Apple Store

401 W 14th St (at 9th Ave) www.apple.com (212) 444-3400 Mo - Sat 9:00 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sun 9:00 a.m. - 7 p.m.


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Drug Stores

Home Furnishing

Duane Reade

Temp Paper

www.duanereade.com 52 E 14th St (betw. Broadway & 4th Ave) (212) 358-8206

Rite Aid

www.riteaid.com 501 6th Ave (at 13th St) (212) 727-3720

Walgreen’s

www.walgreens.com 145 4th Ave. (Union Square) (212) 677-0214

CVS

www.cvs.com 215 Park Ave South (at 18th St) (646) 602-8237

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http://www.tempaperdesigns.com/ Janovic Paint & Decorating Center 511 6th Ave (betw. 13th and 14th St) (732) 489-1737

Kmart

www.kmart.com 250 West 34th Street (Penn Station) (212) 760-1188

TJMaxx

www.tjmaxx.com 620 6th Ave. (btw 18th & 19th above Bed Bath and Beyond) (212) 229-0875

Bed Bath and Beyond

www.bedbathandbeyond.com 620 Sixth Ave (betw. 18th & 19th) (212) 255-3550


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WHERE TO SHOP

Fashion & Apparel Daffy’s

(designer discount) 1311 Broadway &34th St (212) 736-4477

Forever 21

40 E 14th St (212) 228-0598

American Eagle

19 Union Square West (at 15th St) (212) 645-2086

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Burlington Coat Factory (designer discount) 707 6th Ave (betw. 23rd & 22nd St) (212) 229-1300

Loehmann’s

(designer discount) 101 7th Ave (at 16th St) (212) 352-0856

Club Monaco

160 5th Ave (betw. 20th & 21st St) (212) 352-0936

H&M

111 Fifth Ave (at 18th St) (212) 539-1741

Macy’s

(department store) 151 W 6th 34th St (btw. 6th & 7th Ave) (212) 695-4400

Paragon Sports

(sporting appliances) 867 Broadway (betw. 17th & 18th St) (212) 255-8886


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY Brazilian Consulate

Consulate General of Canada

Community

Community

Stores and Dining

Canada in NY: www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/uppernorthside/

1185 Ave of Americas (917) 777-7777 http://novayork.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/

Little Brazil (btw 5th & 7th Ave on W 45th and 46th St) NYC

SOB’S 204 Varick St, NYC (at Houston), (212) 243-4940 Delicia Restaurant 322 W 11th St, NYC (212) 242-2002 Casa 72 Bedford St, NYC (212) 366-9410

Media

Verde Amarelo www.verdeamarelo.net

1251 Avenue of the Americas, #C1-15, NYC (212) 596-1628 http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/new_york/index

Canadian Association of New York www.canadianassociationny.org/

Stores and Dining

Canadian Sweets www.canadiansweets.com Tim Hortons 1286 Broadway Avenue www.timhortons.com

Media

CTV http://www.ctv.ca/ CBC News http://www.cbc.ca/


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China

520 12th Ave (212) 244-9392

Community

Colombian Consulate General 10 E 46th St (212) 798-9000 www.consuladodecolombiany.com/

Chinese American Planning Council 150 Elizabeth St, NYC (212) 941-0920 www.cpc-nyc.org

Community

Chinatown in Manhattan: Lower East Side of Manhattan around Canal Street (closest subway station: JNQR - Canal Street)

Pollos Mario 8302 37th Ave, Jackson Heights (7 Line to 82nd St) (718) 457-8800

Chinatown in Flusing, Queens: take 7 Subway to Flushing--Main Street

Jackson Heights, Queens Take the 7 to 82nd St - Jackson Heights

Stores and Dining

Brooklyn Chinatown: located along Eight Avenue from 62nd to 42nd Street (Take N train to the 8th Avenue stop)

La Pequeña Colombia 83-27 Roosevelt Ave, Jackson Heights (718) 478-8700

Stores and Dining

Media

Deluxe Food Market 79 Elizabeth Street, NYC (212) 925-5766

Media

SinoVision (Mandarin) (WMBC-TV) Daily 11:00 p.m. The Epoch Times www.epochtimes.com (bilingual newspaper)

Colombia.com www.colombia.com Colombia fm http://colombiafm.com/#videos


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany

Consulate General of India in New York

Community

Community

871, United Nations Plaza (212) 610-9700 www.germany.info/newyork

Deutsches Haus 42 Washington Mews, NYC (212) 998-8660 http://deutscheshaus.as.nyu.edu/page/home

Stores and Dining

Hallo Berlin - Food, Wine & Beer Hall 626 10th Ave (betw. 44th & 45th St) (212) 977-1944 www.halloberlinrestaurant.com Wechsler’s Currywurst - German sausage & Beer http://www.currywurstnyc.com/ 120 1st Ave (Corner of E 7th St) (212) 228-1170 Landbrot Bakery & Bar http://landbrotbakery.com/ 185 Orchard St (212) 260-2900

Media

German in NYC www.germanyinnyc.com

3 E 64th St (betw. Madison & 5th Ave) (212) 774-0600 www.indiacgny.org/

Murray Hill (Curry Hill) in NYC Lexington Ave. btw 27th & 29th East Sixth Street between 1st & 2nd Ave Jersey City (Little India) Newark Avenue between Kennedy Boulevard and Tonnelle Avenue (Take PATH train to Journal Square.)

Stores and Dining

Banjara 97 1st Avenue (212) 477-5956

Jackson Diner 34-47 74th St (Jackson Heights) (718) 672-1232

Media

India Abroad www.indiaabroad.com WMBC-TV (free programs) NAMASTE AMERICA Sat 11:30noon & Sun 10:00 a.m. www.wmbctv.com/ethnic/south_asian.html


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY Consulate General of Israel

Consulate General of Japan

Community

Community

800 Second Ave (212) 499-5400 www.israelfm.org

Jewish Community Center 334 Amsterdam Avenue (646) 505-4444

Stores and Dining

J. Levine Books & Judaica 5 West 30th St (212) 695-6888 Eretz Kosher Speciality Store 692 Columbus Ave (212) 865-0833

Media

Israelim.com www.israelim.com Judaica Online http://www.tallitstore.com/ The Jewish Week (New York local paper) www.thejewishweek.com

299 Park Avenue, 18th Floor (212)371-8222 www.ny.us.emb-japan.go.jp/

East Village- 9th & St. Marks between 2nd & 3rd Ave. Japanese American Association 15W 44th St, 11th Floor (212) 840-6942 www.jaany.org/

Stores and Dining

Sunrise Mart 4 Stuyvesant St. (212) 598-3040 *Book-Off 14 East 41st 212-685-1410

Panya (Japanese Bakery) 10 Stuyvesant St. (near 9th St. & 3rd Ave.) (212) 777-1930

Media

U.S. Benri-cho www.us-benricho.com


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY General of the Rep. of Korea

Mexican Consulate-General

Community

Community

460 Park Ave. 6FL (646) 674-6000 http://usa-newyork.mofat.go.kr/korean/am/usa-newyork/main/index.jsp

Korea Town: betw. 32nd & 34th St and 6th Av & Park Av Korean American Association of Greater New York 149 West 24th St, 6th Floor (212) 255-6969 www.nykorean.org Korean Cultural Service 460 Park Ave.(57th St.) (212) 759-9550 www.koreanculture.org

Stores and Dining

DO Hwa (Korean dinning) 55 Carmine St (212) 414-1224 www.dohwanyc.com Koryo Bookstore 35 W 32nd St (betw. 5th Ave & Broadway) (212) 564-1844

Media

Korea.Net http://www.korea.net/

27 E 39th St (212) 217-6400 http://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/nuevayork/

Mexican Cultural Institute of New York 27 E 39th St (212) 217-6478 http://www.lavitrina.com/

Stores and Dining

Tehuitzingo Deli Grocery 695 10th Ave New York, NY 10036 (212) 397-5956 Dos Toros Taqueria 137 4th Ave (212) 677-7300 www.dostoros.com Rosa Mexicano 9 E 18th Street (212) 533-3350 www.rosamexicano.com

Media

Univision: www.univision.com


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY Honorary Consulate General of Sweden 445 Park Avenue, 21st floor (212) 888-3000 http://www.swedenabroad.com/

Community

Swedish Seamen’s Church 5 East 48th Street, New York (212) 832-8443 American-Scandinavian Foundation 58 Park Avenue (38th Street) 212.879.9779 http://www.scandinaviahouse.org/

Stores and Dining

Fika coffee break 41 W 58th St (212) 832-0022

Media

Sweden Abroad www.swedenabroad.com

Turkish Consulate in New York 821 United Nations Plaza (212) 430-6560 http://newyork.cg.mfa.gov.tr/

Community

Turkish Student Association at Columbia University www.columbia.edu/~sss31/Turkiye/lokanta.html

Stores and Dining

Manhattan Halal Meat Market 7919 5th Avenue (Brooklyn, Bayridge) (718) 680-5057 Zeytinz (dining &gift items) 24 West 40th Street (212) 575-8080 Beyoglu 1431 3rd Ave (corner of 81 St) (212) 650-0850

Media

Turkish Times http://www.turkishtimes.co.uk/


WORLD COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY South Africa Consulate General

333 E 38th St (212) 213-4880 http://www.southafrica-newyork.net/consulate

Community

NY NJ Springbok Club http://www.nynjspringbok.org/

Stores and Dining

Madiba Restaurant 195 Dekalb Avenue Brooklyn (718) 855-9190 Braai Restaurant 329 West 51st Street (212) 315-3315

Media

Global South Africans http://globalsouthafricans.net All Africa http://allafrica.com/southafrica/

For more consulates in NYC, visit: www.citidex.com/252.htm Email issevents@newschool.edu to add resources!

Consulate General of Spain in New York

150 E 58th St, 30th Floor (212) 355-4080 http://www.exteriores.gob.es/Consulados/NUEVAYORK/en/Pages/inicio. aspx

Stores and Dining

Sevilla Restaurant 62 Charles St. ( W 4th St) (212) 929-3189 El Charro Espa単ol Restaurant 62 Charles Street (entrance at corner of W 4th St) (212) 242-9547 Spain Restaurant 113 W 13th St (212) 929-9580

Media

Spanish New York http://www.spanishnewyork.com/spanish-newspapers-in-spanish.html Spanish Broadcasting http://www.spanishbroadcasting.com/


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

GET CONNECTED

Six types of major telephone services Local Service

You must subscribe to local service to get a telephone line into your home. There is a monthly fee for this access. There are a number of companies that offer service in NYC. Some options are Verizon www.verizon.com, Time Warner www. timewarnercable.com, Vonage www.vonage.com, or RCN www.rcn.com.

Regional Service

This is for calls made outside of New York City proper but still in the metropolitan area, including most of lower New York State and northern New Jersey.

Long-Distance Service

Calling Cards

Calling cards are good for local and long-distance calls (both domestic and international). Some cards charge connection fees, maintenance fees and/or have expiration dates.

Cellular Service

There are various local wireless providers in New York City. See next page for more details.

Skype

Low cost international calling using a computer, monthly plans and pay as you go are available.

For long-distance calls (both domestic and international) you have the option www.skype.com. of choosing from many different services and long-distance service providers. Some companies that provide local service also have long distance.

The telephone system in the U.S. is based on a three-digit area code and a seven-digit phone number. Note that the standard format for writing phone numbers is: (area code) phone number (212) 229 5592 Dial “1� before you dial the area code and phone number. Within the New York City Five Borough Area proper, five area codes are now in use: 212, 646, 718, 347, and 917.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

GET CONNECTED

Useful Information 411 - Directory Assistance (service fee will be charged)

Dialing 411 will connect you with an operator who will be able to direct your call or give you a phone number for a person or a business.

311

Is the phone number for New York City government information and non-emergency services.

911

Is the emergency number - police, fire, ambulance, etc.

Toll-Free numbers

800, 888, 877, 866, 855, 844, 833 and 822 are toll free numbers; your call will not be charged. These numbers are often used by companies.

Alphabet phone numbers

Sometimes companies use letters instead of numerals for toll-free numbers. For example, “1.800.T Mobile” means, 1.800.866.2453 by following letters on the key pads of the phone.

Pound Key

When you are using automated touch tone services, you may hear, “enter your phone number followed by the pound key.” This means, press your phone number followed by #.

Star Key

When directed to press the ’Star Key’ press *.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

GET CONNECTED

Local Wireless Providers AT&T

www.wireless.att.com Call 1.800.342.3212 AT&T requires all customers who cannot provide a social security number to pay a deposit that will be returned at the end of the first year. To call world-wide, it is better to sign up with the AT&T WorldConnect速 (extra $3.99 a month) to get a discounted rate

SPRINT NEXTEL

www.sprint.com/ 1.888.211.4727 Sprint does not require a Social Security Number (just fill in 000-00-0000 for the column) so long as you can provide a valid passport and visa in addition to a school ID and a valid U.S. address. Students need to go to a Sprint/Nextel store to open the account in person.

T-MOBILE

www.t-mobile.com 1.800.T Mobile (1.800.866.2453) T-Mobile has options for students without a Social Security Number (SSN) that do not require a deposit. You must show your passport with a student visa as well as your school ID.

VERIZON

www.verizonwireless.com 1.800.350.2830 Verizon requires all customers who cannot provide a SSN to pay a deposit that will be returned at the end of the first year.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

GET CONNECTED

Prepaid Phone Options There are monthly and pay-as-you-go plans. Compare plans! You can purchase prepaid phones and prepaid phone cards for those phones at electronics stores, drugstores, supermarkets, etc.

AT & T

www.wireless.att.com Get a GoPhone account, a prepaid monthly plan, with a major credit card (billing address and phone shipping address must be the same), a U.S. address (dorms are OK if you have proof that you live there), and a passport.

VIRGIN MOBILE

www.virginmobileusa.com Purchase any Virgin Mobile phone; no credit card or annual contracts are required. Choose your plan and activate your phone. You can either register a credit or debit card or buy top-up refill cards at any drugstore.

TRACFONE

http://www.tracfone.com/?lang=en Purchase a phone at a drugstore or a supermarket and activate your phone either from a landline phone or the Internet. Then, purchase “airtime,” (prepaid card) and add the card to your phone to use it.

METRO PCS

www.metropcs.com Offers one flat monthly rates without signed contracts or activation fees. Offers unlimited international calling for a flat rate to some countries.

AMERICAN TELECOM SERVICES

http://amtelservices.com/ Pay N’ Talk!* is just like a home phone. Bring one home, plug it into your jack, you are then immediately connected to a telecom representative who will activate the account number on your phone.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

GET CONNECTED

Internet Connection Providers There are four different types of connections:

Cable Connections

Some cable and internet providers are : Comcast www.comcast.com Time Warner www.timewarnercable.com

WI-FI Services

Wireless Internet access through Wi-Fi spots around the city such as hotels, cafes, and other public spaces. Boingo www.boingo.com Time Warner http://www.timewarnercable.com/socal/learn/hso/wifi/

DSL

DSL is a form of Internet provider that uses over the wires of a local telephone network. This requires a phone line. DSL providers include Verizon http://www22.verizon.com/home/highspeedinternet/

New School Wireless

A map of hotspots on-campus can be found at www.newschool.edu/at/network/wireless/hotspots.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT

CHECKING OR SAVINGS ACCOUNT? A checking account allows you to deposit and withdraw money frequently and is a great way to pay your monthly bills. When you open a checking account, it usually comes with checks and a bank card and allows you to use them to make purchases and pay bills. Often there are minimum monthly balance and service fees, which may vary by the type of checking account you open. Savings accounts are for long term deposits for earning interest. The interest, minimum balance, and service fees vary from bank to bank. It also depends on the amount of money you deposit. Savings accounts are not for immediate use of funds. ATM (Automated teller machine) is a computerized device that provides customers of a bank with access to financial transactions in a public space without the need for a bank teller. Usually banks will not charge extra fees when you are using your bank’s ATM; however, when you use an ATM in a store or at other banks, you may be charged an extra transaction fee. International students should inquire about their specific requirements for opening a new account. Most commonly international students must present all or some of these: • Valid Passport, I-20 or DS-2019 • Enrollment verification letter on The New School letterhead showing the local address (can be obtained at the Registrars office) • Proof of residency in the United States (documents that show your address in the United States. e.g., utility bills, apartment contract…) • A second piece of individual identification • Recognized credit card (this may be issued in the home country) • Foreign Driver’s License • Bank issued debit card • Student photo ID • Submit Form W-8BEN to Your Bank Form W-8BEN is also called the Certificate of Foreign Status of Beneficial Owner for United States Tax Withholding. This form certifies that the sole purpose of opening a bank account is to transfer funds to support your stay as a non resident - not for any business purposes. Filling out the W-8BEN now means you will have a much easier time doing tax returns and you might decrease your tax liability for the following spring.

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT

CITIBANK

79 Fifth Avenue (at 16th St) 212) 242-5380

TD BANK

90 Fifth Avenue (at 14th St) 212) 381-7900

HSBC

769 Broadway (at 9th St) (800)975-4722 15 Union Square East (at 15th St) (800)975-4722 AMALGAMATED BANK 10 E 14th Street (at Union Sq West) (212) 727-6027

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BANK OF AMERICA

CHASE

32 University Place (at 9th St) 116 Fifth Avenue (at 17th St) (212) 533-0554 (212) 633-7505 69 Fifth Avenue (at 14th St) 240 Park Avenue South (212) 255-8121 (at 25th St) (646) 794-1060


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

WRITING A CHECK

In the United States, you will find many opportunities for writing a check. You can pay your bills and shop using personal checks from your bank. The amount will be deducted from your checking account. Here’s a sample of a check. To cash a check, be sure to sign on the back of the check, under the “endorse here”, before you deposit it.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Date Your Name & Address Payee - person/business to whom the check is written Signature line Written amount - the amount written in numbes Legal amount - the amount written in words Check number Banking information Routing number & Account Number

Back of the check  

Endorse  Here     X    

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

KEEPING A BUDGET ANNUAL INCOME

ANNUAL EXPENSES

MOVING EXPENSES

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Scholarship/ Grant $__________ Loan $__________ Employment Income $__________ Personal or Family Funds $__________ Total Annual Income $__________

Apartment Broker’s Fee $__________ Apartment Security Deposit $__________ Telephone and Cable Installation $__________ Moving Costs $__________ New Locks $__________ Furnishings $__________ Total Moving Expenses $__________

CURRENCY CONVERTER www.oanda.com

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Tuition $__________ Fees $__________ Books $__________ Other $__________ Total Annual Charges $__________

Rent $__________ Electric Bill $__________ Gas Bill $__________ Telephone Bill $__________ Groceries $__________ Laundry $__________ Entertainment $__________ Transportation $__________ Personal $__________ Household Items $__________ Miscellaneous $__________ Monthly Expenses x 12 $__________


LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

USEFUL INFORMATION

Time Zones

The United States officially has 9 standard time zones; 1. Atlantic, 2. Eastern, 3. Central, 4. Mountain, 5. Pacific, 6. Alaska, 7.Hawaii-Aleutian, 8. Samoa, 9. Chamorro *NOTE: New York is located in the Eastern Time Zone

Daylight Savings Time

In order to use daylight more efficiently the United States adopts Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time starts at 2:00 am on the second Sunday in March and reverts to standard time at 2:00 am on the first Sunday in November. In March, add one hour to the standard time, so 2:00 am becomes 3:00 am. Spring forward, Fall back!

Measurement System In The U.S.

The U.S. system of measurement is different from the metric system. For example, the inch, foot and yard are the basic units of length. If you are accustomed to the metric system, you can find a converter on the internet. Metric Conversion Site: www.worldwidemetric.com/metcal.htm

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LIVING IN NEW YORK CITY

MEASUREMENT SYSTEM IN THE UNITED STATES

Sample Measurements Weight

Fluid Ounces (FL OZ) = Ounces (dry) = 1 gram (gm) = 1 pound (lb) = 1000 grams =

29.57 grams = 28.35 Grams 0.035 Ounce 452.59 Grams = 2.2 Pounds

30 milliliter almost 1/2 kg

Volume

1 cup = 240 milliliter(ml) 1 quart = 946.4 milliliter 1 liter = 0.26 gallon 1 gallon = 3.8 liters 1 pint = 473 milliliters = 16 FL OZ ½ gallon = 1.89 litters = 64 FL OZ

Length

1 inch = 2.54 centimeter (cm) 12 inch = 1 foot = 30.48cm 3 feet = 1 yard (yd) 1 mile = 1.6 kilometer (km) = 1760yard

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THE NEW SCHOOL CAMPUS MAP 79 Fifth Avenue...........................A University Housing International Student Services Career Development

Recreation & Intramural Sports

80 Fifth Avenue..........................B Office of Student Development & Activities Study Center

72 Fifth Avenue...........................C Student Financial Services Registration and Records Student Employment Office

90 Fifth Avenue..........................D Medical Service Counseling Services Disability Services Student Health Insurance

63 Fifth Avenue.........................E University Centre

Mannes College 150 W 85th St ............................F International Student Services Student Financial Services Registration and Records 81


International Student Guide to Living and Studying in the United States