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ISM MUSIC JOURNAL SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

‘ An important message of the programme is that there are a variety of jobs in the creative industries’ started to compose their own music in response to the research they had been undertaking. Other schools have also been using Pop4Schools in a variety of ways. A Hertfordshire secondary school used the programme as the basis of a project looking at the evolution of the music video, engaging pupils in dance and music. A school in Cornwall used the films illustrating jobs in the recording industry in the Pop4Schools’ resource as a tool for teaching the BTEC Music qualification. All these examples show the different ways in which teachers can use Pop4Schools to engage their pupils in learning a wide variety of subjects and in boosting their self-esteem. Our figures show that students’ confidence improves by around 20 per cent over the course of using Pop4Schools, as they engage with their peers and adults when creating and promoting their piece of music. An important message of the programme is that there are a variety of jobs in the creative industries, and while a pupil may not necessarily be the best performer in the world, they could still enjoy a career working with music. This increases pupils’ self-esteem and raises awareness of the world of work, something that will benefit them regardless of what career they eventually choose to pursue. It also helps them understand that many different people’s jobs are dependent on the legitimate sale of music, not just the performer behind the microphone. At the same time, Pop4Schools encourages team building, emotional intelligence and mutual respect, benefits that are felt long after the formal programme has concluded. By using a fun and engaging tool to teach skills such as mathematics and literacy, schools can also generate improved academic results.

Chelsea and Westminster. We are also talking to strategically placed Music Hubs in other parts of the UK, as well as piloting the programme in the Republic of Ireland. We have created our own Quality Mark and are working with the Official Charts Company to recognise participating schools and students in a new awards programme that has been endorsed by a range of bodies including The BRIT School, the Innovate Teaching School Alliance, The Good Schools Guide, Birmingham City University and MusicTank/Westminster University. My ambition is that every child in Britain, and many beyond, will have the opportunity to experience Pop4Schools, whether in class, at an after school club or as a school holiday course. Bringing the music industry and education world together has been an enormously exciting project and a steep learning curve. I believe we have created a great programme based on teachers’ professional judgement of what pupils need and the in-depth knowledge of the sector that can only be provided by those in the music industry. As a consequence, Pop4Schools’ benefits are far reaching and will give pupils a foundation of self-confidence, a sense of respect for others and ability to collaborate with them, as well as an understanding of the world of work that will stand them in good stead throughout their lives. It will also give them a better understanding of why it is important to respect the rights of those that help create the music they love. Ruth Katz, Founder, Pop4Schools

As the new academic year gets underway, we are seeking to expand the Pop4Schools programme further and bring its benefits to more staff and students. We have recently been accepted as a partner for the new ‘Tri-Borough Music Hub’, incorporating the London Boroughs of Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington &

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Profile for Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM)

Music Journal September-October 2012  

magazine of the Incorporated Society of Musicians

Music Journal September-October 2012  

magazine of the Incorporated Society of Musicians