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The Ryoko Project.

We are what we wear


The Ryoko Project.


Abstract. The Ryoko Project will attempt to identify and exhibit the importance of designing a creative system based around co-creation and encouraging the present society to up cycle and to repurpose their daily discarded textile wastes. The concept known as ‘fast fashion’ has played a crucial factor in the reasoning behind the daily increase of textile waste, as well as the constant detrimental impact it has placed on the society and environment. It is through this project where I propose an approach to designing a system formed from the notion of up-cycling, and design methodologies that incorporate/focus on consumer engagement and the relationships we have with our clothes. Wherefore in turn this focus will provide an opportunity to engage the society in repurposing their garments and to reduce textile wastes.


The Ryoko Project.


Contents - The Problem - Stories of Our Clothes - The Ryoko System - What’s Now?


The Problem.


Introduction. The clothing or garments we wear are often seen as best representations of ourselves, as ethical fashion designer Orsola De Castro states “we are what we wear, clothes are our chosen skin”. However within the present society, the rise of consumerism and changes in trends caused by the fashion industry have created new desires and eagerness towards newer garments. Asserting that what we own isn’t sufficient or acceptable in this present world, leaving perfectly fine fashion garments being discarded out even before it starts to deteriorate. ‘The Ryoko Project’ meaning moving forward in Japanese, is a project that brings forth this notion of change in today’s society. The project focuses on challenging the over consumption of fashion garments caused by the concept of fast fashion and to address the rapid rate of which textile waste is being created.

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Introduction.

“Fashion is usually presented to us as ready to wear, as a finished product, something we can choose from, but not engage in. This is not only in the sense of brands restricting the amount of copies in circulation, but in the economy as a whole, where brands and consumers make styles become more rapidly obsolescent” - Otto Von Busch These rapidly obsolescent styles are often specified as ‘fast fashion’ and are the reasoning behind the increasing growth of textile waste


Results of Fast Fashion Australian’s are the world’s second largest consumers of textiles, where every 10 minutes 6000 kilograms of clothes are discarded and thrown into landfill. As individuals, we on average consume 27 kilograms of new textiles/garments each year, where in return we roughly dispose 23 kilograms of these textiles into landfill. Two-thirds of what we discard are manmade synthetic/plastic fibres that may never breakdown.

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Introduction.


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Introduction.

Results of Fast Fashion According to ecological researcher Dr. Mark Browne, he has further shown that synthetic clothes and materials such as polyester are shredding micro plastic particles into the waste water system with every wash, in which then enters the food chain in which we depend on. Thus knowingly making the textile/fashion industry the second most polluting industry after the oil industry.


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The Stories of Our Clothes.


Stories of Clothes.


My Favourite Beanie Hi I’m Chelsea, This is my favourite beanie! I got it last winter, well my mum bought it for me. It’s got my favorite character Winnie on it! I love watching the show everyday after school and singing the honey song! I sometimes wear it to school and my friends love it as well. I’ve had it also when we travelled to japan last year and it kept me warm all trip while it was snowing! I will never throw it out or stop wearing it!

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Stories of Clothes.


Those Black Jeans! I guess in everyones wardrobe, you’ll probably find a black pair of jean. It’s like an essential in today’s society. If you don’t have one, I think you are losing out and I strongly suggest you to get a pair. In general it’s so easy to match with and you don’t have to worry about how you look or anything in my eyes. I’ve own these pair of jeans for about 6 years man, still going strong though. Worn it for god knows how many times or been through how many washes but still looks fine. It has been with me to countless events, parties, gatherings and probably for work aswell. There’s probably stain marks everywhere but you won’t see them unless you look closely. They’ve held up pretty good and I love the way it fits me. So that’s mostly why I’ve worn it so much and will continue to wear it untill it starts to frail I guess.

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Stories of Clothes.


Mother’s Sweater So.. I’ve had this sweater for about 20 odd years, my mother hand knitted it herself. I remeber she went to knitting classes and workshops to learn how to do it and would always practice it while watching tv with the family. There was one winter where she knitted the whole family sweaters and everyone had a different colours or style which was pretty funny. Unfortunately she doesn’t do it anymore as her hands are getting weaker and she wouldnt be able to hold the needles for long. I haven’t worn the sweater for a long time since and the yarn has started to frail. I probably won’t wear it ever again, but will keep it forever as it’s part of a memory.

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Stories of Clothes.


First Climb For people who don’t know what they are, they’re boulding shoes made for climbing. I’ve started climbing when I was around 18 years old, straight out of highschool and being an energetic person I wanted to learn a new hobby to do in my spair time, plus I loved hiking and outdoorsy stuff anyways, so it kind of made sense. These were my first pair that I got and I remeber wearing them to countless bouldering sessions in the beginning and injuring myself many times cause of slipping or falling down boulders. There was one time where I fell pretty awkwardly and broke my ankle in the first year which took forever to heal. Like I’m 28 now and whenever I rotate my ankle I can still hear my ankles click cause of that injury. I still love climbing and bouldering to this day though and don’t regret anything at all. I don’t wear these anymore cause the sole of the shoe is all cracked and the rubber is all peeling off, but I still keep it cause it reminded me of where I started.

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Stories of Clothes.


Killer Boardies I know, they look awesome don’t they! best investment ever made in my eyes hahaha. I remeber getting them at a Bondi store but I think they don’t make them anymore which is pretty sad cause I want another pair. It’s the colours I tell you that make it for me mate! They just look so sick dude! like I’ve worn them for about 4 years or so and I still recall the time I wore it to my first secret garden music festival. There was a dress up theme that year and I had the matching top with it and every person I meet was like “That’s a Killer outfit!” They’re my goto pair now for any music festivals I head to, like I’ll sometimes wear them to beaches cause they are boardies after all .

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Stories of Clothes.


Acadia National Park One of the most beautiful places that I’ve ever visted is the Acadia National Park in Bar Harbour, Maine USA. A few years back I went on exhange to Montreal and during a weekend a group of friends and I roadtriped down to Maine to do some hikes and exploring. It had been one of the best trips I’ve been on and will remeber for a long time. It was also during the fall season at that time so all the leaves were turning yellow and orange so every scenery we visted was just gorgeous. It was on the way back where I bought this t shirt from the national park store and it’s been one of my favourite garments since then. Everytime I wear it, it always remind me of that time and the moments I’ve shared with my friends and mates forever!

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Stories of Clothes.


Marathon Runners I’ve had these runners for about 6 years already, I don’t wear them anymore as the sole had deteriorated over time now. I’ve kept on to it as it was the first pair that I ran City to Surf with, which I’ve attended every year since. I remeber being not much of a runner at first and being so proud of that moment when I actually finished the marathon. I still wear these now and then just on daily walks and chores, but I don’t run in them anymore. Probably will keep a hold of them for ages.

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Stories of Clothes.


Hand Crafted Scarf This is one of my favourite scarfs that I knitted a couple years back. I used to travel quite far to work everyday and knitting was just something I would do to keep me occupied. I still wear it during winter every year and being wool, it’s kept me very warm and cozy, probably to cozy sometimes I would just fall alseep. I’ve knitted quite a few garments now for my family and I remember a time where I ended up knitting gloves for everyone as we were going to New York during winter. I know the scarf has started to frail a bit and threads are slowly pulling out so I’ll probably need to pull it apart soon and rethread it and to get it ready for another winter soon!

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Stories of Clothes.

WE ARE WHAT WE WEAR The clothing or garments we wear are often seen as best representations of ourselves, as ethical fashion designer Orsola De Castro states: “we are what we wear, clothes are our chosen skin�


What is Your Own Story?

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Stories of Clothes.

Write Your Story


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The Ryoko System. A system based upon the notion of slowing down fast fashion through Up-Cycling and Repurposing discarded textiles. Gather, Cut, Fill, Repurpose and Reinvent .


Ryoko System

Step 1 - Gather Gather all your scrap clothing and discarded garments.


Step 2 - Cut Cut them all up into small fragments of fabrics and pieces to act as a filler.

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Ryoko System

Step 3 - Fill Box up the pieces of fragments you have cut up and send them to Ryoko where we will create a new garment with it. or Repurpose them yourselves by using it as upholstery for furniture or by following Ryoko’s manual guide to creating your own puffer vest.


Step 4 - Repurpose / Reinvent With the piece of scrap fragements, we use it as an insulated filler and we stuff/sew it into a new puffer jacket/vest, thus repurposing your old garments and creating a new garment that will keep you warm during winter.

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Ryoko System

Overview


Ryoko Vest (Filled with discarded textiles) 43.


Ryoko System

Ryoko Vest (Filled with discarded textiles)


What Now? Revive, Adapt, Make


What now?

What Now? Revive – Keep a hold of your discarded textiles and engage in exchanging, swapping or adapting processes. Adapt – Refashion, upcycle and repurposing/creating new garments from the old. Make – Embrace home sewing as a life skill, value handmade clothing


Ryoko Project


fast fashion slow fashion

Ryoko Project. Jason Chang

The Ryokō Project  

The Ryoko Project will attempt to identify and exhibit the importance of designing a creative system based around co-creation and encouragin...

The Ryokō Project  

The Ryoko Project will attempt to identify and exhibit the importance of designing a creative system based around co-creation and encouragin...

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