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NEWSLETTER


HOA News and Information Dear Residents; The Board hopes everyone is doing well and staying safe. There has been nothing mild about this Winter season and we are not done yet. As of this writing we are anticipating another significant snow event. We are definitely spending the community’s snow budget this year. To date Four D has done a good job of keeping the roads plowed and the driveways and walkways cleared in a reasonable timeframe. Hopefully, there is only another six weeks of snow risk!! For those Setauket Meadows residents in Florida or other mild climates we are jealous. We hope you are soaking up the sun. We look forward to seeing you all in the Spring. The most significant event since the last Setalker is the great progress on the Estate Fence. The stanchions are complete, almost all have granite and sections have been equipped with the aluminum fencing. Again, a great look and upgrade for the approach to Setauket Meadows. To reiterate from last month, once the fence is complete, we need a new survey and further approval from the Town of Brookhaven, then evaluate the cost of landscaping, assess the community and begin the final phase of the Beautification Project. For those that are not aware, Setauket In the Woods or The Setauket Villas are mostly complete and they have started the rental process. The rents are well over the $4,000 price point. The new community looks very nice and an excellent complement to Setauket Meadows. Please remember that we are on winter time and garbage cans do not go out before 4PM on the appropriate days. Finally, with respect to Corona Virus we urge all residents to be vigilant and get the vaccine based on your doctor’s advice. Please stay healthy and well………… The Board Of Directors

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Guess what? You can

President Joe Cerullo Vice President Eileen Duffy Vice President Lou Petix Treasurer Tom Purcell Secretary Deborah Schade

108 Terryville Road Pt. Jefferson Station, NY 11776 HPMLI@aol.com HPM Management Office 631.476.8805 HPM FAX 631.828.1162

learn how to do almost anything with YouTube! Back in the ―olden days‖ (i.e. before we humans had the Internet) learning a new skill was time-consuming and often simply not worth our while. With time being our most valuable asset, we often found it faster (and therefore ―cheaper‖) to simply hire someone who already possessed a certain skill to do that essential, yet onetime job for us instead of taking the time to learn how to do it ourselves. But then along came the Internet, and before we knew it we had countless volumes of information at our fingertips. Google has become the modern day version of Mr. Know-ItAll (or at least Mr. Know-THEM-All), providing instant links to virtually any piece of information we might need. YouTube (which is itself a Google entity) takes that concept even further by offering up videos-on-demand that show us in incredible detail how to do virtually anything worth doing, step -by-step, and in color. Whether you need to learn how to install a light switch, change the thermostat in your vehicle or perform one of thousands of other tasks, you’ll likely find multiple videos that will show you exactly what you need to do in order to get the job done as quickly, efficiently and cheaply as possible. Using YouTube is as easy as using the Google search engine itself. Simply visit www.youtube.com and type a short description of whatever it is that you need to do into the search box. You’ll immediately be presented with a list of available videos on that topic, complete with a photographic ―screenshot‖ from each video. Just click on the screenshots that interest you to watch the videos. As you can see, it’s easy to use YouTube as your very own private ―university/technical school‖. What’s more, the ―classes‖ typically consist of watching just one or two short videos! Bottom line: The next time you need to have your sheep sheared or have the oil in your air compressor changed, don’t just call in an expert. Become one yourself in minutes by ―researching‖ the task on YouTube!

EMERGENCIES ONLY 631.236.8428 The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


by Joe Polizzi What did you do Sunday, February 7,2021? I know what I did and for many of the residents at Setauket Meadows I’m almost sure they did the same thing. We watched Super Bowl LV (55 for the Roman Numeral challenged). And I bet many of us could also say that for the past LV years we have watched every Super Bowl. Yes! I have watched all LV Super Bowl games-what a great achievement. I can’t remember too much about many of them but there are some worthwhile memories. I clearly remember the first Super Bowl, roman numerals were not used then. On that Sunday afternoon the Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs 35-10. The game was not that exciting except for reserve player Max McGee catching seven passes and two for touchdowns. The next game of fond memories for me and most New Yorkers was Super Bowl III. That game saw Joe ―Willy‖ Namath, who called the win, and the New York Jets beat the heavily favored Baltimore Colts 16-7. That afternoon Alice and I were newlyweds and we sat in front of our 19 inch black and white TV set in the living room of our second floor two-bedroom apartment in Richmond Hill, Queens, NY. By the way, the rent was $100 a month. At halftime we rolled the TV around to the kitchen so we could eat and watch that historic game. Soon after that game, Super Bowl mania consumed the event. The game was now played two weeks after the end of the regular season. The week before the game is a media and fan fantasy. Fans pour into the city where the game is played. The stadiums have capacities of 100,000 and a 30 second TV commercial cost 5.5 million dollars as compared to 60,000 fans and $42,000 for a 30 second commercial in the first Super Bowl. This hysteria trickled down to every neighborhood in the USA-Super Bowl Party. For example, I remember going over a friends house and paying 50 bucks for wings, ribs, pizza, beer and pool (betting) money. We even hosted such a happening. Now the halftime food became baked ham, six foot heroes, chili and of course beer but now martini’s were added and betting pools were always included. Then tired of having someone host the event we found local pubs or yacht clubs that would have a gala celebration. The game for many, not for me, became secondary. People were more concerned about neighborhood chit-chat, is there enough food and beverage, what are my numbers in the betting pool, what was the best commercial, who was performing at halftime and on and on. Actually after halftime the number of attendees dwindled and the diehard football fans remained to see the last pass or run and finally a champion. Luckily for me one year (2/5/2017 to be exact) I won a nice sum of pool money and when I arrived at Setauket Meadows I circumnavigated the community two-three times tooting my car horn. Maybe you heard me but then it was well after 8PM and Setauket Meadows was locked up and dark. Super Bowl Sunday is such a fun day. Fast forward to Super Bowl LV and a worldwide pandemic. Not wanting to venture out and possibly catch COVID-19, once again Alice and I, now considered an elderly couple, sat down in front of our 65 inch Smart TV in our upscale Setauket Meadows condo and watched Super Bowl LV. Game time is 6:30, a bit late, and we had some chips and dips until halftime. Then we watched the halftime show and split a turkey club sandwich, you know turkey is good for you, and a beer. We then settled back in our recliners to view the last half. The game was not very exciting and occasionally either I or Alice jumped up out of a little snooze and said, ―Did you see that?‖. Half groggy, I said ―No‖. So we rewound the program to see what we missed. On and on we continued until the game was over, then we stumbled into the bedroom, took our Melatonin and snuggled up for a sound night’s rest. As for the game, Tom Brady won his seventh Super Bowl, truly the GOAT (Greatest Of All Time), as Tampa Bay beat Kansas City 31-9,attendance 22,000. Wow have things come full circle. My hope is that next year we’ll be out and about with our Setauket Meadows’ neighbors to enjoy another Super Bowl and of course an amazing Super Bowl Party and a beer. As always stay healthy, stay strong and hitt’em straight...Joe Polizzi The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Know What’s Around You! Disaster and calamity can strike at any given moment. There’s evidence of this every time you go to flip on the morning news. That’s why it’s so important that you are aware of your surroundings every time you leave your home. There are several mental steps that you can take ahead of time so that you’re better prepared if a disaster were to ever happen. These steps can even help you in the workplace, or even when you’re in what you think a safe environment is, such as a home or a house of worship. Here are things for you to keep in mind and why you ought to be more aware of your surroundings. Put Away the Distractions We live in a day and age where we’re more distracted than ever. The next time you’re sitting down at a restaurant take a look around you. You’ll notice that several people are mesmerized by technology. You may be one of them. You can even see people flying down the highway while on their cell phones, paying little attention to what’s going on in front of them. It’s important that we look up from our screens and see the situations that might be developing. Take a look at the big picture and don’t allow yourself to become caught up with distractions. You should be able to close your eyes and accurately describe your surroundings. This can give you a few extra precious seconds to make a wiser decision. Look for an Exit No matter what building you are heading into, whether it’s a school or grocery store, take a look at all the possible exits. It’s not too crazy an idea to come up with a plan of escape if a dangerous situation was to arise. Keep an Eye on the People Around You Wherever you are, stop and take a look at the people around you. What are they wearing, what do they look like, and do they strike you as suspicious? Don’t feel guilty about stereotyping individuals that might pose any type of threat. Avoid Being Predictable Keep in mind that people may be watching you and your daily tendencies. You need to avoid being predictable, which can keep you and your family out of danger. Try heading a different way to work, another time to stop in at the grocery store, or meeting up with friends at different times and destinations. This doesn’t mean you have to live life in a state of paranoia though. Don’t Be An Easy Target One very important thing for you to keep in mind is, avoiding places that make you an easy target, especially when you’re alone. Be careful going for a walk by yourself, heading out into a dark parking garage, or answering your front door in the middle of the night. Don’t allow yourself to be easy prey for wicked and senseless people. . Go With Your Gut Feeling Never ignore your gut feeling. It’s there for a reason. When red flags or alarm bells are going off in your head, or there’s a knot in your stomach about something you’re unsure of, go with your gut feeling. You’ll know when you’ve spotted someone behaving differently or carrying themselves in an odd manner. You shouldn’t feel silly about alerting a manager or security officer so that someone else is aware of what you may be feeling. That keeps more eyes locked in on the situation and may possibly prevent a situation from ever taking place. You also shouldn’t stay in a building or setting if something appears out of place. The intent is not to create anxiety, just to empower you to take charge of your own safety. The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Early 2021 Zoom Events by Ellen Silverman Here's what you can look forward to in the next couple of months PLUS some breaking news: Saturday, February 27 ~ Dr. Godhwani ~ via Zoom ~ Virtual House Call ~ 10 AM Tuesday, March 9 ~ Sal St. George presents ~ via Zoom ~ "The Carol Burnett Story" ~ 7 PM Wednesday, April 21 ~ Rose Feinberg presents ~ via Zoom ~ "Three Funny Women: Fanny Brice, Gilda Radner, Joan Rivers" ~ 7:30 PM If you plan to attend any or all of the above, please let me know. Thanks!

Hot off the Press: Setauket Meadows' 2021 FALL FLING Sunday, October 17 ~ Waterview ~ 5-9 PM Please watch for detailed emails as each presentation/event approaches. Remember our Whatever You Want to Read Book Club on the last Thursday of each month at 1:00! Zoom links will be sent out a day or two before. Ellen S, on behalf of your Social Committee Blwnklfrnd@aol.com 631-476-3077 (landline which links to FL) 631-664-1965 (cell phone)

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Old Man at the Lake An elderly man in Florida had owned a large property for several years. He had a dam in one of the lower paddocks where he had planted mango and avocado trees. The dam had been fixed up for swimming when it was built and he also had some picnic tables placed there in the shade of the fruit trees. One evening the old farmer decided to go down to the dam to look it over, as he hadn't been there for a while. He grabbed a five gallon bucket to bring back some fruit. As he neared the dam, he heard voices shouting and laughing with glee. As he came closer he saw it was a bunch of young women skinnydipping in his lake. He made the women aware of his presence and they all went to the deep end. One of the women shouted to him, 'We' re not coming out until you leave!' The old man frowned, 'I didn't come down here to watch you ladies swim naked or make you get out of the lake naked.' Holding the bucket up he said, 'I'm here to feed the alligators.' Moral: Old men may walk slow, but they can still think fast The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Why Do We Change The Clocks Twice a Year? Here’s the original idea: The main purpose of Daylight Saving Time (called "Summer Time" in many places in the world) is to make better use of daylight. We change our clocks during the summer months to move an hour of daylight from the morning to the evening. If you live near the equator, day and night are nearly the same length (12 hours). But elsewhere on Earth, there is much more daylight in the summer than in the winter. The closer you live to the North or South Pole, the longer the period of daylight in the summer so Daylight Saving Time (Summer Time) is usually not helpful in the tropics, and countries near the equator generally do not change their clocks. A poll conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation indicated that Americans liked Daylight Saving Time because "there is more light in the evenings, I can do more in the evenings." Also, because it led to a saving of energy. Energy use and the demand for electricity for lighting homes is directly related to the times when people go to bed at night and rise in the morning. In the average home, 25 percent of electricity was used for lighting and small appliances, such as TVs and stereos. A good percentage of energy consumed by lighting and appliances occurred in the evening when families were home. By moving the clock ahead one hour, the amount of electricity consumed each day decreased. Also, less electricity was thought to be used because people are home fewer hours during the "longer" days of spring and summer. Most people plan outdoor activities in the extra daylight hours. When people are not at home, they don't turn on the appliances and lights. Idea of Daylight Saving Time The idea of daylight saving was first conceived by Benjamin Franklin during his sojourn as an American delegate in Paris in 1784, in an essay, "An Economical Project‖. The idea was first advocated seriously by London builder William Willett (1857-1915) in the pamphlet, "Waste of Daylight" (1907), that proposed advancing clocks 20 minutes on each of four Sundays in April, and retarding them by the same amount on four Sundays in September. About one year after Willett began to advocate daylight saving time, he attracted the attention of the authorities. Robert Pearce - later Sir Robert Pearce - introduced a bill in the House of Commons to make it compulsory to adjust the clocks. The bill was drafted in 1909 and introduced in Parliament several times, but it met with ridicule and opposition. First there was standard time For millennia, people have measured time based on the position of the sun; it was noon when the sun was highest in the sky. Sundials were used well into the Middle Ages, at which time mechanical clocks began to appear. Cities would set their town clock by measuring the position of the sun, but every city would be on a slightly different time. Standard time begins in Britain Britain was the first country to set the time throughout a region to one standard time. The railways cared most about the inconsistencies of local mean time, and they forced a uniform time on the country.

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Standard time in the US Standard time in time zones was instituted in the U.S. and Canada by the railroads on November 18, 1883. Prior to that, time of day was a local matter, and most cities and towns used some form of local solar time, maintained by a well-known clock (on a church steeple, for example, or in a jeweler's window). The new standard time system was not immediately embraced by all, however. The use of standard time gradually increased because of its obvious practical advantages for communication and travel. Standard time in time zones was established by U.S. law with the Standard Time Act of 1918, enacted on March 19. Congress adopted standard time zones based on those set up by the railroads,. Time zone boundaries have changed greatly since their original introduction and changes still occasionally occur. Early Adaptation into Law Daylight Saving Time has been used in the U.S. and in many European countries since World War I. At that time, in an effort to conserve fuel needed to produce electric power, Germany and Austria began saving daylight at 11:00 p.m. on April 30, 1916, by advancing the hands of the clock one hour until the following October. Other countries immediately adopted this plan. It was not formally adopted in the U.S. until 1918. 'An Act to preserve daylight and provide standard time for the United States' was enacted on March 19, 1918. It both established standard time zones and set summer DST to begin on March 31, 1918. Daylight Saving Time was observed for seven months in 1918 and 1919. After the War ended, the law proved so unpopular (mostly because people rose earlier and went to bed earlier than people do today) that it was repealed in 1919 with a Congressional override of President Wilson's veto. Daylight Saving Time became a local option, and was continued in a few states, such as Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and in some cities, such as New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago. . The Uniform Time Act By 1966, some 100 million Americans were observing Daylight Saving Time based on their local laws and customs. Congress decided to step in and end the confusion, and to establish one pattern across the country. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 (15 U.S. Code Section 260a) signed into Public Law 89-387 on April 12, 1966, by President Lyndon Johnson, created Daylight Saving Time to begin on the last Sunday of April and to end on the last Sunday of October. Any State that wanted to be exempt from Daylight Saving Time could do so by passing a state law. Under legislation enacted in 1986, Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. began at 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday of April and ended at 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday of October. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 extended Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. beginning in 2007.

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Buying A New Apple MAC? By Ray Dawson

Your personal data, financial data, pictures, important documents and other items related to only you may live on your computer. Don’t let anyone else get access to this information. Here’s what to do before you sell, trade-in or give away your Apple MAC. Before you sell, trade in, or give away your Mac, you should back up your computer, disable some features and services, and restore to factory settings by erasing the hard drive and reinstalling macOS (The Apple Operating System). A. Moving to a new Mac? 1. Learn how to move your files to your new Mac. Do this before you erase the hard drive or follow any other steps. 2. Create a backup 3. Be sure you have an up-to-date backup of your important files and data. Learn how to back up your data in macOS. B. Sign out of iTunes 1. Open iTunes. From the menu bar at the top of your computer screen or at the top of the iTunes window, choose Account > Authorizations > Deauthorize This Computer. 2. When prompted, enter your Apple ID and password. Then click Deauthorize. 3. Learn more about deauthorizing your computer using iTunes, including how to deauthorize all the computers you've used with your iTunes account. C. Sign out of iCloud 1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click iCloud, and then click the Sign Out button. a.

A dialog asks whether you want to keep a copy of your iCloud data on the Mac. Because you'll reformat the hard drive in a later step, just click Keep a Copy to proceed.

b.

After you sign out of iCloud, your iCloud data remains in iCloud and on any other devices you've signed into with your Apple ID.

D. Sign out of iMessage 1. If you're using OS X Mountain Lion or later, sign out of iMessage. 2. In the Messages app, choose Messages > Preferences, then click Accounts. Select your iMessage account, then click Sign Out. E. If you're keeping paired Bluetooth devices, unpair them (optional) 1.If you have Bluetooth devices — such as keyboards, mice, or trackpads — paired with your Mac, and you plan to keep these devices, you can unpair them. This optional step prevents accidental input on the Mac if the computer and the Bluetooth devices have separate owners but remain within Bluetooth range of one another. 2. If you're unpairing an iMac, Mac mini, or Mac Pro, you must have a USB or other wired keyboard and mouse to complete these steps. To unpair your Bluetooth devices 1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Bluetooth. Hover the pointer over the device that you want to unpair, then click the (x) button next to the device's name. When the dialog asks if you're sure, click Remove. 2. If you're using an iMac, Mac Pro, or Mac mini, use a USB or other wired keyboard and mouse to complete the next step. F. Erase your hard drive and reinstall macOS 1. The best way to restore your Mac to factory settings is to erase your hard drive and reinstall macOS. 2. After macOS installation is complete, the Mac restarts to a Welcome screen and asks you to choose a country or region. If you want to leave the Mac in an out-of-box state, don't continue with the setup of your system. Instead, press CommandQ to shut down the Mac. When the new owner turns on the Mac, ―Setup Assistant‖ will guide them through the setup process. Following these steps will ensure that your computer will not reveal your personal information to the new owner. Learn more No matter the model or condition, we can turn your device into something good for you and good for the planet. Learn how to trade in or recycle your Mac with Apple GiveBack.

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Setauket Meadows Has Many Talented People I’ve said in the past that our community has some very talented people. Every now and then I hear of another person who has extraordinary talents that few of us know about. Well that’s about to change. Rhoda Needleman came forth recently to share her talent as an artist. I knew she was an accomplished violinist but I had no idea she was a pastel artist as well. She has her own web site and I would like to share that with all of you. So, please look at her web site and marvel at the unique and beautiful work she has done. Well done Rhoda! https://www.rhodaneedlmanartist.com/

Dancing To The Beat Submitted by Pat Dawson

Do you remember The Pointer Sisters? They were a singing group back in the 80’s who recorded many songs that were fun to dance to. The song in the video is called , ―I’m so excited‖.With that in mind, one of their very popular songs was linked to movie stars and the dance routines they had way back when dance routines in a movie were common. As you watch the video try to identify the movie from which that dance segment came. Did you identify West Side Story, Grease, Seven Brides For Seven Brothers, All That Jazz, Footloose, Hello Dolly and many more. Can you identify the movie stars from those movies including James Cagney, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Sammy Davis Jr., John Travolta, Bob Hope, Mickey Rooney, Ann Margaret, Bing Crosby, Gene Kelly and many others. What amazed me was how the dance routines from movies produced decades before this video was produced matched the beat of the song you hear. Amazing!

Enjoy this video and turn on your speakers.

https://youtu.be/xVuIVP6Pef8 The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Where Is The Best Place To Retire ? By Angelo Trombetta

When the day comes to finally retire, the question one must ask is,‖Where should I retire?‖ Angelo has compiled a list of several states and a few words about what it’s like to live there. Enjoy! You can retire to Arizona where: 1. You are willing to park three blocks away from your house because you found shade. 2. You've experienced condensation on your rear-end from the hot water in the toilet bowl. 3. You can drive for four hours in one direction and never leave town. 4. You have over 100 recipes for Mexican food. 5. You know that "dry heat" is comparable to what hits you in the face when you open your oven door at 500 degrees. 6. The four seasons are: tolerable, hot, really hot, and ARE YOU KIDDING ME?? -ORYou can retire to California where: 1. You make over $450,000 and you still can't afford to buy a house. 2. The fastest part of your commute is going down your driveway 3. You know how to eat an artichoke. 4. When someone asks you how far something is, you tell them how long it will take to get there rather than how many miles away it is. 5. The four seasons are: Fire, Flood, Mud and Drought. -ORYou can retire to New York City where: 1 You say "the city" and expect everyone to know you mean Manhattan. 2. You can get into a four-hour argument about how to get from Columbus Circle to Battery Park,but can't find Wisconsin on a map. 3. You think Central Park is "nature.‖ 4. You believe that being able to swear at people in their own language makes you multilingual. 5. You've worn out a car horn. (IF you have a car.) 6. You think eye contact is an act of aggression -ORYou can retire to Minnesota where: 1. You only have three spices: salt, pepper and ketchup 2. Halloween costumes have to fit over parkas. 3. You have seventeen recipes for casserole. 4. Sexy lingerie is anything flannel with less than eight buttons. 5. The four seasons are: almost winter, winter, still winter, and road repair. -ORYou can retire to The Deep South where: 1. You can rent a movie and buy bait in the same store. 2. "Y'all" is singular and "all y'all" is plural. 3. "He needed killin " is a valid defense. 4. Everyone has two first names: Billy Bob, Jimmy Bob, Joe Bob, Betty Jean, Mary Beth, etc. 5. Everything is either: "in yonder," "over yonder" or "out yonder. ‖ 6. You can say anything about anyone, as long as you say "Bless his heart‖ at the end! -ORYou can move to Colorado where: 1. You carry your $3,000 mountain bike atop your $500 car. 2. You tell your husband to pick up Grandpa on his way home, so he stops at the day care center. 3. A pass does not involve a football or dating. 4. The top of your head is bald, but you still have a ponytail. The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


-ORYou can retire to Nebraska or Kansas where… 1. You've never met any celebrities, but the mayor knows your name. 2. Your idea of a traffic jam is three cars waiting to pass a tractor. 3. You have had to switch from "heat" to "A/C" on the same day. 4. You end every sentence with a preposition; "Where's my coat at?‖ -ORFINALLY you can retire to Florida where… 1. You eat dinner at 3:15 in the afternoon. 2. All purchases include a coupon of some kind - even houses and cars. 3. Everyone can recommend an excellent cardiologist, dermatologist, proctologist, podiatrist, or orthopedist. 4. Road construction never ends anywhere in the state. 5. Cars in front of you often appear to be driven by headless people

Contributed by Pat Dawson

TheCloud-explained1.mp4

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When March Was the First Month March has not always been the third month in a year. In early versions of the ancient Roman calendar, the year began with March or Martius. Because the month coincides with the time of the March equinox and the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, where the calendar originated, March was considered to be a month of new beginnings. The months of January and February did not feature in earlier versions of the Roman calendar. They were added to the end of the year around 700 BCE and became the first months of the year around 450 BCE, pushing March to its currently held third position. March Equinox: Beginning of Spring and Fall In areas north of the equator, astronomical spring starts on the equinox in March when the day and the night are of equal length, which is on either March 19, 20, or 21. In the Southern Hemisphere, it is the opposite. Here, the March equinox is the autumnal equinox and marks the first day of fall.

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The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Spring is the season of new beginnings. Fresh buds bloom, animals awaken and the earth seems to come to life again. Farmers and gardeners plant their seeds and temperatures slowly rise. The timing of these changes varies depending upon location. What most people call spring relies on the astronomical definition of the word. Spring is generally considered the period between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Defined by the angle of Earth's tilt toward the sun, astronomical spring relies on equinoxes and solstices to define it. Equinoxes are special days during the year when day and night are almost equal. There are two equinoxes, one in the spring and one in the fall. The spring, or vernal, equinox occurs around March 20 in the Northern Hemisphere and around September 22 in the Southern Hemisphere. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), spring is one of two times when the Earth's axis is not pointed toward or away from the sun. In the Northern Hemisphere, the North Pole is tipped at its greatest angle toward the sun during the summer solstice, which occurs around June 21. In the Southern Hemisphere, around December 21, it is the South Pole's turn to be nearer. As such, in the Northern Hemisphere, astronomical spring runs from March 21 to June 21, while in the Southern Hemisphere it encompasses September 21 to December 21, thought the dates may shift slightly from year to year. The air may lose its winter chill before the middle of March or September, though. Weather forecasters define meteorological spring as a three-month period based on rising temperatures. North of the equator, meteorological spring takes place in March, April and May, while in the south it is characterized by the months of September, October and November, according to NOAA. Spring awakening In the hemisphere that is tilted closer to the sun, temperatures become warmer. Warmer temperatures means the ground, which may have frozen over the winter months, grows softer and more yielding to plants. Spring is often marked by increased rainfall, which helps to water the infant seeds taking root in the ground. Animals that spent the winter in hibernation come out of their dens, while those that traveled to warmer regions return. Many animals give birth in the spring. Winter coats are shed by those that sported them, and some animals may change coloration to blend in with their new surroundings. The rising rainfall of spring may bring with it an increase in flooding as melting snow overwhelms rivers. Spring may also boast storms, as warm air from the equator combines with still-cool air farther north or south. Tornadoes are common during the spring in the United States as air of different temperatures combine A time of celebration Many cultures celebrate the return of spring, the blossoming of nature or the rise of the vernal equinox. In Japan, the annual blossoming of cherry trees has become a significant national event. Hanami, or cherry blossom viewing, is a time for festivals and gatherings at parks and shrines, according to the Japan National Tourism Organization. Cherry blossoms, or sakura, symbolize the transience of life, which is a major theme in Buddhism. People of the Jewish faith celebrate Passover, which commemorates when the Jewish people were freed from slavery to Egypt, according to History. The day falls on the first full moon after the northern spring equinox and lasts for seven days. Spring in many countries with a strong Christian tradition is marked by Easter, which celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ and his triumph over physical death. However, it has roots in older traditions. "Easter is derived from a much older celebration of fertility and rebirth, the Celtic festival of Ostara," Cristina De Rossi, an anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College in London, told Live Science. "The bunnies and the eggs are symbolic of fertility and reproduction."

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Learn To Live In The Present Moment To a large degree, the measure of our peace of mind is determined by how much we are able to live in the present moment. Irrespective of what happened yesterday or last year, and what may or may not happen tomorrow, the present moment is where you are always! Without question, many of us have mastered the neurotic art of spending much of our lives worrying about a variety of things - all at once. We allow past problems and future concerns to dominate our present moments, so much so that we end up anxious, frustrated, depressed, and hopeless. On the flip side, we also postpone our gratification, our stated priorities, and our happiness, often convincing ourselves that "someday" will be better than today. Unfortunately, the same mental dynamics that tell us to look toward the future will only repeat themselves so that "someday" never actually arrives. John Lennon once said, "Life is what's happening while we're busy making other plans." Our children are busy growing up, the people we love are moving away and dying, our bodies are getting out of shape, and our dreams are slipping away. In short, we miss out on life. Many people live as if life were a dress rehearsal for some later date. It isn't. In fact, no one has a guarantee that he or she will be here tomorrow. Now is the only time we have, and the only time that we have any control over. When our attention is in the present moment, we push fear from our minds. Fear is the concern over events that might happen in the future we don't have enough money, our children will get into trouble, we will get old and die, whatever. To combat fear, the best strategy is to learn to bring your attention back to the present. Mark Twain said, "I have been through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened." I don't think I can say it any better. Practice keeping your attention on the here and now. Your efforts will pay great dividends.

Wanna hear a joke about construction? I’m still working on it. How many tickles does it take to make an octopus laugh? Ten tickles. A magic tractor was driving down the road when it turned into a field! What’s the scariest plant in the field? Bam-BOO A piece of string walks into a bar and orders a drink. The bartender looks at him and says, ―We don’t serve string here.‖ So the string goes outside, twists himself up a bit, kind of roughs up his ends and walks back into the bar and orders a drink. The bartender looks at him and says, ―Aren’t you that little piece of string that was in here a few minutes ago?‖ The string says, ―No sir, I’m a frayed knot. Why can’t you explain puns to kleptomaniacs? They always take things literally. A man tells his doctor, ―Doc, help me. I’m addicted to Twitter!‖ The doctor replies, ―Sorry, I don’t follow you…‖ What kind of exercise do lazy people do? Diddly-squats. What does Charles Dickens keep in his spice rack? The best of thymes, the worst of thymes Why should the number 288 never be mentioned? It’s two gross. What rhymes with orange? No it doesn’t.

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Want to get in on the newest craze? Try hot chocolate bombs! These popular chocolate concoctions are small chocolate spheres filled with hot cocoa mix that explodes into a steamy, dreamy cup of hot chocolate when hot milk is poured over the top. What You Need to Make Hot Chocolate Bombs at Home Hot chocolate bomb molds Melting chocolate; we used Ghirardelli Silicone pastry brush Hot chocolate mix of your choice Mini marshmallows Sprinkles, crushed candy canes, cookies, or other favorite toppings Step 1: Melt your chocolate according to package directions. Be sure to watch the chocolate carefully; if you're using a microwave, heat it in 30-second increments and stir frequently. If you heat the chocolate too long, it can seize and become hard to work with. Step 2: Coat the hot chocolate bomb molds with melted chocolate. Place your hot chocolate bomb mold on a muffin pan to provide a stable workspace. Using a pastry brush, coat the inside of the candy molds with the melted chocolate. You want the chocolate to be thick enough to maintain its integrity but thin enough to melt when hot milk is poured over the top. Step 3: Freeze the chocolate. Place the chocolate-coated mold in the freezer and let it set for 10 minutes. Once the chocolate has hardened, it should pop out of the silicone mold easily. Step 4: Fill the hot chocolate bomb molds. Once you've removed the chocolate from the hot chocolate bomb molds, set half of them open-side up between the cavities of an inverted muffin tin and fill with one serving of hot cocoa mix, plus a few mini marshmallows and any other mix-ins you desire. Step 5: Seal and decorate your bombs! Brush the edges of the remaining chocolate shells with a bit of melted chocolate, and invert on top of each filled cavity. Press gently to seal together. Brush the top with a bit more melted chocolate and add sprinkles, crushed candy canes, cookies, or other toppings. Your imagination is the only limit! Step 6: Enjoy your hot chocolate bomb. Place each hot chocolate bomb in its own mug, pour hot milk over the top, and watch the magic as the shell dissolves and the marshmallows float to the top. Stir, and enjoy delicious homemade hot cocoa bombs!

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How often should I change my air filter at home? How regularly you should replace your air filters could depend on the following:  Air filter model  Total indoor air quality  Number of pets  Household size Air pollution levels and construction around the residence For basic 1"–3" thick air filters, manufacturers typically tell you to replace them every 30–60 days. If you suffer from light to moderate allergies, you could install a better air filter or replace them even more regularly. Or, if you live a more rural spot or less occupied residence (like a vacation residence) and there are fewer cars around, yearly could be regular enough. Here are averages that may help you know how regularly you should get a new air filter at your residence:  Vacation house or one occupant and no pets or allergies: every 6–12 months  Ordinary suburban home without pets: every 90 days  One dog or cat: every 60 days  More than one pet or if anyone has allergies: 20–45 days The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Want to Live Like the Golden Girls? How Home Sharing Offers Seniors Health, Financial Benefits Nationwide programs provide companionship and support for people who choose to age in place or who have special needs. Are you nearing retirement age and living alone? Nearly 11,000 people a day turn 65 in this country, according to the AARP, and the Population Reference Bureau notes that the U.S. Census Bureau projects that number will nearly double from 52 million in 2018 to 95 million by 2060. And the vast majority of American seniors plan to remain in their homes, or age in place, according to a 2014 AARP survey. Yet according to the National Council on Aging, 1 in 6 older adults who live alone face physical, cultural, and geographical barriers that isolate them from their peers and communities. An earlier study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reported both social isolation and loneliness are associated with a higher risk of mortality in adults ages 52 and older. Loneliness has been linked to: Elevated blood pressure and cortisol Heightened inflammatory responses to stress Increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality What Toll Does Loneliness Take on Our Health? Home-sharing programs can be an effective way to remediate this reality for seniors who live alone. This rapidly growing trend is gaining national recognition as an affordable housing opportunity that provides financial relief and much-needed security for seniors who want to age in place. Both home-sharing participants (host and guest) experience lower housing costs with the added health benefit of companionship that diminishes the social isolation and loneliness many often experience. It’s important to note, however, that home sharing does not replace home healthcare services, such as nursing care, physical and occupational therapy, appropriate Medicare plans, and social work, when they are needed. According to Homeshare International, there are over 40 home-sharing programs in the United States, some of which have been around for over 30 years. How Strangers Can Become Housemates When Kathy Fahy, 65, retired in Boston and wanted to relocate near her son in Colorado, she discovered Silvernest. The Denver-based company pairs boomers, retirees, empty nesters, and other older adults with compatible housemates for long-term rent arrangements. Homeowners get to remain in their homes longer, while earning extra income and keeping isolation at bay. After meeting several members, Fahy found Sandy Selleck, 81, in Fort Collins, and the two hit it off immediately. ―I wanted to supplement my income,‖ says Selleck. ―When I met Kathy, it was a perfect match. Plus, she adds so much security by living with me.‖ Fahy now pays Selleck a flat monthly fee that includes utilities, and she helps out with the chores and pets. More importantly, the two women enjoy the benefit of 24/7 companionship.

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How Does Home Sharing Work? After filling out an application, including your preferences for home sharing, the service will find a ―match‖ based on behavioral profiles and demographic preferences. If accepted, guests sign a contractual agreement with hosts to pay a monthly contribution for household services and other expenses. Each home-sharing agency has different age requirements for prospective hosts and guests. Silvernest says the average age of its homeowners is 62, and the average age of renters is 40.

To participate in the home-sharing program offered by the New York Foundation for Senior Citizens (NYFSC), one of the match mates must be 60 or older. Finding a Reputable Home-Sharing Program There are several services and directories available to help prospective hosts and guests find the right homesharing program. Among them are:  Senior Homeshares offers a free nationwide online search.  Silvernest provides homeowners with a range of tools and services for a monthly membership charge. Renters can also browse listings on the website.  The National Shared Housing Resource Center (NSHRC), a network of independent nonprofit homesharing programs across the nation, provides a state -by-state list of home-sharing programs. Remember that not all home shares are alike. Each arrangement needs to address the specific needs and capabilities of that particular host and guest. The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


Having alone time is super necessary – learning to just hang out with yourself is something that everyone needs to do. However, it can be a little difficult to think of things to do especially if you’re not that used to having alone time. Here are 15 activities to do by yourself that are actually fun. 1. Make A Bullet Journal Bullet journals are an amazing way to keep organized, and there’s so many different ways you can customize your own bullet journal. Open Pinterest, get inspired, then get all your craft supplies together and go crazy making your very own organizational diary. 2. Give Yourself A Manicure If your nails are looking a little worse for wear, giving yourself a proper manicure is a great way to treat yourself and kill some time. Make a DIY nail soak, put on one of your favorite movies and just relax, file and paint your nails. 3. Practice/Learn An Instrument Playing a new instrument is a great way to have fun alone, as it means you can learn your favorite songs and jam out by yourself. Since you’re alone, you don’t need to worry about anyone overhearing you, so you don’t need to be anxious that you’re not good enough. This is something completely for you, so just have fun! 4. Treat Yourself To A Nice Dinner You can do this by staying in or going out – either way, get yourself some nice food and just have a nice, long evening relaxing. You can either make your dinner, order in, or dine out but either way this is a great way to spend some alone time as it means you can eat whatever you want, and really enjoy having it. This is one of the nicest activities to do by yourself! 5. Get Started On Your Reading List If you find yourself alone, this is the perfect opportunity to get reading all those books you’ve always said you would. This can be anything – Wuthering Heights, Harry Potter, even 50 Shades Of Grey – just curl up with a nice drink and the book of your choice and spend an evening getting lost in it. 6. Take Up A Crafting Hobby Taking up a crafting hobby, for example knitting, is a great way to have fun alone, as it means you can make loads of cute/pretty things whilst just chilling out and listening to music or watching a movie. Since crafts are meant to be done alone,

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7. Bake Something Baking is a great activity to do alone, as it always ends with a tasty treat for you to enjoy. Plus, it allows you to be more experimental as, since you aren’t sharing your creations with anyone else, you get to make them exactly how you want and you don’t need to worry about whether or no they look pretty. This is one of the activities to do by yourself that is quite rewarding! I mean who doesn’t like a baked good? 8. Go See A Movie If there’s a movie you really want to see, but no one else wants to see it with you, just go see it by yourself! There’s no need to go to a movie with someone else, especially since you can’t talk to anyone in the movie theatre anyway. So treat yourself to a drink and some popcorn, and watch the latest flick, all by yourself. 9. Take A Long Drive Long drives are perfect for just gong wherever you want and really clearing your mind. They’re a great opportunity to spend some quality time alone with yourself, blasting your favorite tunes and getting a bit lost in the best way. 10. Give Yourself A Facial Pampering yourself is an amazing way to spend an evening, and a great thing to do alone, as you don’t want many people to see you when you have colorful goop on your face. If you’re someone who’s more into homemade facemasks, go rooting through your cupboards and make up your very own custom facemask. If you’re a more out-of-a-bottle kind of gal, treat yourself to your favorite brand and go all out. 11. Go Exploring If you’re the outdoorsy type, then going for a hike and going off the beaten path is a great way to spend some time alone. Obviously, you should keep yourself safe and not go anywhere dangerous or away from established paths, but you can still have a fun adventure just walking by yourself and having a great time. Bring along your phone, listen to some great tunes, and take a walk on the wild side. 12. Make A Piece Of Art If you’re crafty, then making art is a lovely way to spend some time by yourself. Making art can be literally anything, painting, drawing, making crayon art, decoupage – as long as it makes something that you like. The best thing about crafting is that you can make something and listen to music or watch a movie at the same time, so you can get totally absorbed by what you’re doing. 13. Binge A TV Show Let’s be real, some days you just don’t fancy doing much, especially if the weather is bad. On those days, it’s perfect to get your favorite snacks, get in your comfy clothes and just snuggle up by yourself and start watching. This is one of the best activities to do by yourself! 14. Go Shopping Going shopping alone can be great, especially if you’ve been searching for one specific thing for a while. You can take as long as you want to, look in whichever shops you like, and try on as many clothes as you want without worrying that you’re holding people up. Your shopping mission can be completely for you. 15. Do A Random Act Of Kindness This can be anything – donating to a charity, buying a homeless person a meal, paying for someone else’s food – as a little act of kindness can go a long way. This is best done alone, and not shared with anyone else – that way you know you’ve made someone’s day better just to make it better, and not for getting credit for it. The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


MARCH 2021

BIRTHDAYS

ANNIVERSARIES

MAR 2.. Joan Famularo

MAR 11.. Frances & Alvin Miller

MAR 3.. Janice Cerullo

MAR 14.. Bill & Virginia Ehlers

MAR 3.. Tony Forte

MAR 16.. Allen & Barbara Frawley

MAR 4.. Marilyn Ebert

MAR 16.. Frank & Ellen Silverman

MAR 4.. Virginia Harley MAR 7.. Carol Zanca MAR 8.. Pam Rice MAR 10.. Joseph Pleva MAR 12.. Alice Bradin MAR 12.. Gerry Holly MAR 14.. Mario Carravetta MAR 17..Carole McTigue MAR 19.. Diane DeRosa MAR 19.. Nick DeRosa MAR 19.. Joe Sarro MAR 22.. Joan DeMaio MAR 24.. Karen Maddas MAR 24.. Joe Pereira MAR 26.. Joe Polizzi MAR 31.. William Connors

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Submitted by Rich Lester

The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


By Pat Dawson

This delicious chicken dish is exquisite and easy to prepare. The light and luscious lemon sauce really pops without being too acidic; it is simply divine. Serve it with herb-roasted potatoes or lemon-rice pilaf.

Ingredients…...This recipe yields 4 servings. 3 large skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - cut into 1/2-inch medallions..salt and pepper to taste ..½ cup all-purpose flour..2 tablespoons vegetable oil, or as needed ..1 clove garlic, minced ..1 cup low sodium chicken broth ..½ lemon, thinly sliced..¼ cup fresh lemon juice..2 tablespoons capers, drained and rinsed..3 tablespoons butter..2 tablespoons minced Italian (flat-leaf) parsley• • Directions Preheat oven to 200 degrees F (95 degrees C). Place a serving platter into the oven to warm. Season the chicken breast pieces with salt and pepper and dredge them in flour. Shake off excess flour. Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet; pan-fry the chicken pieces until golden brown on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Work in batches and do not crowd skillet, adding oil as needed . Place the chicken pieces onto the warmed platter in the oven. When finished with all the chicken, drain most of the oil from the skillet, leaving a thin coating on the surface of the pan. Cook and stir the minced garlic in the skillet until fragrant, about 20 seconds. Pour in the chicken broth. Scrape and dissolve any brown bits from the bottom of the skillet. Stir in the lemon slices and bring the mixture to a boil. Let cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce reduces to about 2/3 cup, 5 to 8 minutes. Add the lemon juice and capers; simmer until the sauce is reduced and slightly thickened, about 5 minutes more. Drop the butter into the skillet and swirl it into the sauce by tilting the skillet until the butter is melted and incorporated. Add the parsley; remove from heat and set aside. Arrange the chicken medallions on serving plates and spoon sauce over each portion to serve.

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Curl Up With a Good Book Killer Graces by Steve Melen This is a journey of adoption, cancer, addiction, and breakthrough living. In his late thirties, Steve Melen thought he had it all – until a diagnosis of Stage IIIB stomach cancer brought it all to a screeching halt. Steve battled his demons and the fact that he only had a 15 percent chance of survival. Killer Graces is not just another cancer tale. It is a revelation, exposing how cancer can shine a spotlight on things that people prefer not to think or talk about. It is a story of both weakness and strength as Steve navigates a world of pain, drugs, alcohol, marital problems, and anxiety. Join Steve on his journey of self discovery.

Up the Creek by Alissa Grosso An unsolved murder. Disturbing dreams. A missing child. Caitlin Walker hasn’t had a dream in nine years. But now nightmares torture her son Adam and awaken in Caitlin buried memories and a dark secret. Her husband Lance has a secret of his own, one that his son’s nightmares threaten to reveal. In Culver Creek, newly hired detective Sage Dorian works to unravel the small town’s notorious cold case, the grisly murder of a young girl. How are Caitlin and Lance connected to the horrific crime? How far will they go to make sure their secrets stay hidden? Find out in this riveting thriller.

Synchronicities on the Avenue of the Saints by Deborah Gaal Physicist Noah Friedman is bipolar and is racing against time before the experimental drug hi takes steals his mind, then his life. His deranged psychiatrist is aiming to clear $10 million on the sales of this drug and has become Noah’s enemy. As Noah starts his quest to free himself from the drug and the doctor, he soon finds himself with a coterie of odd compatriots. Together they work to stop the worldwide launch of the drug. Can Noah right the wrongs of his ancestors in time to heal himself and also prove that love creates a synchronicity with what and who is loved?

Her Mother’s Grave by Lisa Regan When two young boys discover human bones buried beneath a tree in a trailer park, Detective Josie Quinn races to join her team at the scene. Josie’s past crashes into her present when it is confirmed that the bones belong to Belinda Rose – a teenage foster child who was murdered thirty years ago. Just as Josie gets closer to uncovering a secret that will shatter her world, another body is uncovered. It’s clear someone close to Josie will stop at nothing to keep the truth buried forever. As she battles her past demons, can Josie stop this killer before another life is taken?

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CALLING ALL GARDENERS One of the hardest decisions a gardener must make is where to buy their garden seeds, plants and supplies, especially when so much is now available online. Here are 5 high quality places to begin your gardening journey. #1 Park Seed One of the most popular garden seed catalogs is Park Seed. They always have a great selection of both flower and vegetable seeds, and some great herbs as well. Prices are affordable, and seed packets have plenty of seeds. Seed is always fresh, and we get good to excellent germination rates from them. Shipping is fast, usually just a couple of days from order to in my mailbox! They also offer some live plants as well. #2 Burpee Seed Catalog Burpee has always had one of the most colorful catalogs, and a wide selection of seeds. They are especially good at their vegetable selections, so all you veggie gardeners, take note! Their new varieties are the ones to beat each year! Besides Burpee’s seeds, they also offer plants and garden supplies. #3 Annie’s Heirloom Seeds Annie’s has over 600 varieties of Non-GMO, organic heirloom seeds. They carry both flower and vegetable seeds, and have fast shipping if you are anxious to get started! We are big believers these days in organic foods, and we love anything that carries a history with it. #4 Johnnys Selected Seeds Johnny’s has an extensive seed catalog, they have lots of tips and resources there as well. Johnny has a longstanding reputation as a quality company in the gardening community! Oh, and it’s an employee owned company! #5 Pinetree Garden Seeds .They specialize in smaller packets for the average home gardener, at smaller prices. Most of us will never need the hundreds of seeds in the average seed packet, so why pay for it? They have a good selection, fast shipping and good customer service

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The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


The Homeowners Association Does Not Endorse Any Advertiser or Product In This Publication


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