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VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2 - SUMMER | 2011

LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

A DAY ON QUADRA ISLAND

Some Great Ideas For Enjoying Your Visit

ISLAND HISTORY

Potato War In The Comox Valley

BEACH LIFE

Beach Acres Resort Has Lots To Offer

THEATRE REVIEW Steel Magnolias In Chemainus

MOUNTAIN BIKING Tips And Trails

...AND MORE

Ideas For Enjoying Your Summer In Oceanside

Garden Spotlight Black Goose Inn Horseback Riding Whale Watching Health Benefits Of Dandelions

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CONTENTS EXPERIENCE In the summer of 1865, all appeared to be well in the Comox District, but a Potato War was on the horizon

Top Bridge Community Park is featured. The 81-metre-long suspension bridge is more than just an engineering marvel

WAYS WE ENJOY OCEANSIDE The Oceanside region of Vancouver Island covers a lot more territory than one would think

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BRING ON BEACH LIFE Miles of sandy beach beckon visitors to Oceanside’s Beach Acres Resort

A PADDLE AND GO

PARK SPOTLIGHT

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GARDEN SPOTLIGHT Lorne and Cindy Hepting’s garden in Qualicum Beach began 24 years ago on 1.3 acres

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THEATRE REVIEW Live performance of Steel Magnolias at the Chemainus Theatre

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There are a lot of things to do on captivating Quadra Island

Origin at Longwood Retirement Home hosts fashion shows for seniors

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WHALE WATCHING We take a trip to Barkley Sound for a unique experience

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SERVING COMMUNITY The Francis Barkley is a well-travelled classic ship originating in Norway

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POWERING DOWN Parksville leads the way in environmentally Sustainable building construction

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NATURAL REMEDY

PLAY 20

HEAD FOR THE HILLS

FUN FASHION

Horseback riding is easy and accessible on the Island

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OCEANSIDE RIDE

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ROOSEVELT ELK Vancouver Island is home to BC's largest concentration of Roosevelt Elk

EAT

The terrain and climate of Vancouver Island offers some of the best mountain biking

COMMUNITY ISLAND ADVENTURES

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HUNTER'S PIE Signature Recipe from The Black Goose Inn

w w w. i s l a n d t i m e s m a g a z i n e . c a

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First annual paddling competition at the Kingfisher Resort

The many uses of Dandelions

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ISLAND SPOTLIGHT

TEA BY THE SEA

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Take a Timeout for Tea at the Kingfisher Resort

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ISLAND HISTORY

LIVE

ONLINE

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SOUTH CENTRAL COMOX VALLEY/CAMPBELL RIVER WEST COAST

All articles and more available online


Editor's Note Note

Welcome to the summer edition of Island Times Magazine! We have been looking forward to this season all year long. It is our absolute favourite time of year because there is just so much to do on the Island when the weather is this nice. The staff here at Island TImes hope that all of you get out to experience the many things to do and see here on the Island and surrounding areas. We've highlighted just a few of them here in one of the biggest issues of the magazines to date. We've included features on Quadra Island and Oceanside, and covered such activities as mountain biking, horseback riding, and whale watching. You will recognize some new names within this issue, including new writers and new advertisers. We are very fortunate to have support from all of you out there. It is because of you that we are able to produce such a varied magazine that appeals to both locals and visitors. Thank you for the support, and thank you all for reading. This year marked Canada’s 144th birthday. Many of us celebrated the big day either by attending an outdoor concert at Transfer Beach in Ladysmith, catching the parade in Port Alberni, or by watching the fireworks in downtown Victoria. Being Canadian has meant a lot to us all, particularly this year as we anxiously watched the polling stations at the beginning of May and followed the Canucks games up until the end of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Below are a few select things you may not have known about this amazing country: Throughout our history, Canadian inventors have patented over one million inventions. It's popular knowledge that notable Canadians have played key roles in inventing the telephone and the light bulb, as well as the technology to broadcast voices and music over radio waves, but we’ve also created 5-Pin Bowling, Basketball, Lawn Sprinklers, Pacemakers, Imax Movies, Instant Mashed Potatoes, Paint Rollers, Zippers, and yes – Snowblowers. A few other noteworthy items created by Canadians are: Electron Microscopes, Electric Car Heaters, and Goalie Masks. During a brief period, Canada had its own brand of national comic book heroes, dating back to World War II. A foreign exchange crisis led to a ban being placed on the importation of US comics, including popular titles like Superman and Batman. But the demand for graphic stories didn't just disappear, and that’s when Nelvana, Johnny Canuck, and Canada Jack emerged. Story lines had these superheroes battling against the Axis Powers, both abroad and on the home front. The year Canada was born was the same year our postal service as we know it was born, yet its roots go back farther than Confederation. In fact, mail was being delivered in Canada as early as 1693 when the Portuguese-born Pedro da Silva was paid to deliver mail between Quebec City and Montreal. Official postal services began in 1775, under the control of the British Government up to 1851. The first postage stamp entered the scene that same year. Then, in 1867 the newly formed Dominion of Canada created the Post Office Department as a federal government department to provide uniform service. Canada is known for many things, one of which happens to be our large fresh water supply that comes from our extremely large quantity of lakes. The Atlas of Canada says that the number of lakes larger than three square kilometres is estimated at close to 31,752. It would seem there are too many to count. There are also 561 lakes with a surface area larger than 100 km2. For the mathematicians, this means that almost nine percent (891,163 square kilometres) of Canada's total area is covered by fresh water. To visitors, Canadian spelling may seem a bit “off.” This isn't because we are making up our own conventions, it is because we have adopted Canadian English from waves of immigration that spanned two centuries. Just think: Our language has been influenced by First Nations, French Canadians, British Loyalists, and the Irish. We came to favour British spelling in most cases largely because of Canada's first prime minister, John A. MacDonald, who once ordered that government papers be written in the British style.

Contact OUR TEAM SUMMER | 2011 Island Times Magazine Box 956, Parksville, BC V9P 2G9 Ph: (250) 228-0995 Fax: (250) 586-4405 www.islandtimesmagazine.ca

Publisher

Jolene Aarbo publisher@islandtimesmagazine.ca

Editor

Julie McManus julie@islandtimesmagazine.ca

Writer & Photographer

Dona Naylor dona@islandtimesmagazine.ca

Contributing Writers

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2

Dave Bigelow Andrew S. Brown Steve Crabb Brenda Gough Amy Hancock Dave Hobson Wynne MacAlpine Amber Scotchburn

The views expressed by columnists are personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect those of Island Times Magazine. VOLUME 2 ISSUE 5 | 2010

L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E

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Juli e nus a M c M

A PERFECT NEW YEAR'S

Tips on hosting a great New Years Eve party

DID YOU KNOW? HOLIDAY EDITION

Do you know the origins of our Holiday Traditions?

THE REASON WE CALL IT DUNCAN

The beginning and the history of the Cowichan Valley

STORM WATCHING IN TOFINO

Catch the perfect storm and some big waves

RELATIONSHIP WISH LIST

Do you know what you want in your ideal partner?

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r o a t a t o P W

THE COMOX

Photo of British Ship Officers. Courtesy of the BC Archives Collection

by David Hobson

I

n the summer of 1865, all appeared to be well in the Comox District. The crops were being harvested “with vigor, and a more than average yield [was] calculated upon,” according to a Mr. Cave, as quoted in the Nanaimo

Gazette. However, he did note that the “Indians had become very troublesome.” This appears to be the first sign of trouble brewing in the valley. It had been three years since the area at the mouth of the Courtenay River

was first settled officially – in the fall of 1862. The land was described as being fertile and easy to plough. Potatoes were among the first crops sown. The First Nations  K’ómoks (Sathloot) had received the first settlers with friendship, or at least with a degree of tolerance. Life was full of hardships for the first settlers but there was some reason to believe in a brighter future. They hoped for a regular steamship link to Victoria for their produce and mail delivery, maybe eventually a wagon road from Nanaimo and their own representative in the Island Legislature. Things were very slowly improving. The law came to Port Augusta (present day Comox) in July of 1865 with the appointment of W.H. Franklyn, Esq. as the Justice of the Peace and Stipendiary Magistrate at Nanaimo. For Cowichan and Comox, the Anglican Church’s presence was strengthened with the appointment in 1864 of Jordayne Cave Brown Cave, the missionary catechist in Comox. The catechist and the magistrate would each play roles in the drama soon to unfold. Mr. Cave seems to have seen himself more than just the settlers’ spiritual leader. He was a man of action as well! The Governor Arthur Edward Kennedy. Courtesy of the BC Archives Collection 4 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


Indian Totem Chiefs House at Comox. Courtesy of the BC Archives Collection

It seems likely that news of “Indian” troubles in Comox was sent by Mr. Cave to Magistrate Franklyn in Nanaimo. Cave accused the Cape Mudge Lekwiltok people of threatening the settlers and stealing their potato crops. There was an implied threat to the K’ómoks (Sathloot) as well. (The settlers called the Lekwiltok by two different names: ‘Euclataws’ and ‘Yacultas’). The Lekwiltoks had acquired a well-earned reputation of being

IT WORTH KNOWING

1 2

Denman Island, located on Baynes Sound, was named for Rear Admiral Joseph Denman, R.N. Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Station from 1864-1866. Hornby Island, lying next to Denman, was named to honour another Rear Admiral: Phipps Hornby who also served as Commander-in-Chief of the R.N.’s Pacific Fleet

aggressive and bold and therefore not as subservient as required by

from 1847-1851. His son, Admiral Geoffrey Hornby (1825-

the Colonial authorities in Victoria. Thus, we have all the elements for

1895) served in the Royal Navy and was in command of

conflict: two warring First Nations, threatened defenceless settlers,

the HMS Tribune from 1859-1860 and played a crucial role

and, a battle over the settlers’ potatoes.

in preventing the outbreak of war between Britain and the

Magistrate Franklyn wrote to Governor Arthur Edward Kennedy (the Governor of the Crown Colony of Vancouver Island) about what he foresaw as the rising tension on the Courtenay River. The appearance of 150 Lekwiltoks on the Courtenay River seemed to

3

US over San Juan Island (The so-called Pig War). Potatoes are popular on the other coast of Canada as well. By the 1960s, the Canadian Potato Research Centre in

be the final flaunting of Colonial authority when the Lekwiltoks

Fredericton, New Brunswick, was one of the top six potato

refused to leave K’ómoks territory. Mr. Cave himself had attempted

research institutes in the world. Established in 1912 as

to convince the “Indians” to return to Cape Mudge. His pleas only

a dominion experimental station, the station began in

provoked dancing on the beach “in a defiant manner”, according to a

the 1930s to concentrate on breeding new varieties of

deposition given to Magistrate Franklyn on October 18, 1865.

disease-resistant potatoes.

The stubborn Lekwiltoks, camped on the Courtenay River, were confronted at the end of October by HMS Forward – a small gunboat.

4

Potatoes are still grown in the Comox Valley. islandtimesmagazine.ca | 7


The HMS Sutlej at anchor. Courtesy of the BC Archives Collection

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It failed to impress and the Lekwiltoks did not budge. The British Colonist on October 26, 1865 reported a rumour that the “Comox district was in the hands of ‘Indians’, and that the magistrate (Mr. Franklyn) could not proceed there without protection.” A greater demonstration of force was needed. It was high time to call upon Her Majesty’s Royal Navy to quell

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instructed to steam from Esquimalt (the Royal Navy Pacific Station) to

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British equivalent of calling in the US cavalry but without the horses). The response by the H.M. Navy was massive. Three warships were Comox forthwith to save the settlers, the K’ómoks, and of course the potatoes!

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(Valliant-class gunvessel) arrived at Comox Bay on November 7.

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HMS Sutlej, commanded by the Commander -in-Chief of the Pacific Station (Esquimalt) Rear Admiral Joseph Denman, had a crew of over 500 sailors (bluejackets). A fitting demonstration of naval power was readied with the firing of guns and rockets and naval exercises meant to impress the Lekwiltoks. It was not going well for the visitors from

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Cape Mudge, especially after one of their chiefs, Claylik, was held prisoner for 48 hours for having threatened Mr. Cave. On November 13, the Euclataws (Lekwiltoks) left en masse for Cape Mudge.


Comox district was in the hands of ‘Indians’, and the magistrate Mr. Franklyn could not proceed there without protection. A greater demonstration of force was needed. All seemed to have ‘gone off’ in a very satisfactory manner, from a British point of view, naturally. However, by November 10, the whole story began to unravel. Rear Admiral Denman began talks with the settlers at Mr. Cave’s mission house and found out to his amazement that most of the settlers actually wanted the Euclataws to remain. The settlers explained that they didn’t feel threatened by the Euclataws, and rather, they needed the labour that they offered – especially at potato harvest time. They also explained to the Admiral that the settlers needed to trade with them for deer meat and salmon. Denman was informed furthermore that the Euclataws had been fishing in the Courtenay River since time immemorial so therefore, had a right to be there. They had not left earlier because they needed time to dry their salmon catch. There had been no intended challenge to British authority after all. 

critical of Mr. Cave for having stirred up the whole trouble in the first place. Rear Admiral Denman spoke to the Euclataws’ Chief, Claylik, chiding him for not having sought permission to enter K’ómoks territory but even this was challenged in a letter to the editor of the British Colonist, dated December 6, 1865.  The rather lengthy letter shone light on the whole farcical affair and ended with the statement: “We consider that the Euclataws have the privileges of British subjects, and as such have as good a right to visit the Comox District as any other men, so long as they behave themselves and it is unfair to punish them thus before they have done wrong.” The letter was signed, Ezekiel. The identity of Ezekiel will likely never be known for sure. As for who stole the potatoes – that will remain an unsolved mystery, I suspect. As a final comment, the expression “Comox Potato War” was coined by Commander Edwin Porcher of HMS  Sparrowhawk  using the bloodless San Juan Island dispute, the so called Pig War (18591872), as his point of reference. Sometimes wars can begin over pigs OR potatoes – even pretend wars. The author wishes to acknowledge the following sources for this article: The Courtenay  and District  Museum, the Comox Archives and the excellent article by Allan Pritchard entitled “The Royal Navy and the Comox Settlement” in BC History Magazine, vol. 40 No 2. IT

Some settlers had even feared that the Royal Navy would attack the Euclataws. At least one of the settlers, James Robb, was highly

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e d i s n a e c O WAYS WE ENJOY

by Dona Naylor

D

on’t’ be mistaken by those blue and white road signs alongside the east coast of Vancouver Island that read “Oceanside Route.” The official Oceanside region encompasses much more. It is the Parksville and Qualicum Beach areas that make up the majority of Oceanside, but the area also includes Nanoose Bay, French Creek, Errington, Arrowsmith Coombs Country, and Lighthouse Country. In total, over 25,000 people live in the Oceanside region, and its annual events and scenic parks make it one of the most visited areas of the Island. As its name suggests, Oceanside is widely known for its extensive coastline, yet this Central Vancouver Island region has so much more to offer locals and visitors alike. For instance, Oceanside has the mildest climate in all of Canada. Oceanside is a diverse area packed with natural beauty like that of beaches, rivers, lakes and waterfalls, and multiple mountain trails. Tourism has increased rapidly each year, not only due to the

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remarkable environment but also because of the multiple events, festivals, accommodation, and attractions that are growing in popularity. A few years ago, a local study revealed just how special visitors consider the Oceanside area. Since then, the amount of visitors to Oceanside area continues to increase. We suspect is has to do with the local businesses paying special attention to each of their visitors. According to the study, in 2002, approximately 516,000 visitors spent 947,000 visitor days in Oceanside (one visitor day is one day spent by one visitor). The study also revealed that for 40 percent of local businesses, tourism spending is either their primary or their secondary source of revenue. Indeed, many goods, services, and activities would not be available to local residents without the support of tourism spending. So what is it beyond the beauty and the great hospitality that attracts people to the area?


In the summertime, the main event that attracts thousands is the Quality Foods Canadian Open Sand Sculpting Competition and Exhibition, a favourite for locals and tourists alike. Enjoy watching world-class sculptors that return each year to create greater than ever sandcastles. They have 24 hours to build their masterpiece, which will be on display for one month. Sit in your lawn chair and watch the kids play in the park or build their own castles with moats and dragons and enjoy Music in the Park every weekend. This year it all begins on July 15. What follows this competition is Parksville Beach Fest, which is held every summer for a few weeks. This year it runs from July 15 to August 14. Aside from the aforementioned Canadian Open Sand Castle Competition, other events include a classic car show, beach volleyball, croquet tournaments, and stage presentations. But, before Beach Fest comes a vintage car show that is not to be missed. Father’s Day is special in Qualicum Beach. Each year, the

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 11


Father's Day Seaside Cruizers Car Show & Shine turns out more and more of a crowd. This year the weekend event took place on June 17 to June 19. It all began at the A&W Restaurant in Parksville. Music from the 50s and 60s filled the streets and the smell of grilled food was too much to resist. Attendees were able to walk the streets and view the restored vintage cars, trucks, hot rods, and more. While in Qualicum there is a special destination known as Milner Gardens, located at 2179 West Island Highway, which is a great spot for those with a green thumb, or those who wish they did! Take a step back in time to discover the unique heritage home and unspoiled natural beauty found within the 70-acre Milner Gardens and Woodland. Stroll through the forest to the woodland garden

with its rhododendron-lined glades carpeted with cyclamen, trillium, and other indigenous plants. Experience the 10-acre artist’s garden surrounding the historic Milner House situated atop a tree framed ocean-side bluff, overlooking Georgia Strait and coastal mountains. On July 16 and 17 at Milner Gardens, there is the chance to meet, mingle and be inspired by local artists at work during the Milner Gardens Art & Photography in the Garden Event. We’ve heard that there will be artists painting, sketching, carving, and photographing the beauty of the gardens. Summer at Oceanside also brings Bard to Broadway from July 4 to August 6. Bard to Broadway Theatre Society presents a summer season of two high caliber live theatre productions. Music, laughter,

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SOME MUST SEES WHILE IN THE AREA: Butterfly World

1080 Winchester Road, Coombs (250) 248-7026 www.nature-world.com

Craig Heritage Museum

1245 East Island Highway, Parksville (250) 248-6966 www.parksvillemuseum.ca

Horne Lake Caves

3900 Horne Lake Caves Rd. Horne Lake, B.C. (250) 248-7829 www.hornelake.com

Milner Gardens

2179 West Island Highway, Qualicum Beach (250) 752-8573 www.viu.ca/MilnerGardens/

Morningstar Farms

403 Lowry's Road, Parksville (250) 954-3931 www.morningstarfarm.ca

North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre romance and intrigue will fill their Village Theatre, in the heart of beautiful Qualicum Beach, across from Quality Foods. Season passes are available. Tickets can be purchased from the B2B box office in Qualicum Beach, and at the Visitor Information Centre in Parksville. However, sometimes you are drawn to a quieter pursuit. Your tastes will be honoured as you view the incredible old growth forest of Cathedral Grove. Or a trail ride offered by a few different stables gives you a different approach to nature. Hiking trails abound as do bike paths. Families may also enjoy a visit Butterfly World, the World Parrot Refuge, or the goats on the roof in Coombs, and the Wildlife Recovery Center in Errington. Wildlife abounds here at Oceanside and there are several opportunities allowing us to get up close. These are just a few of the exciting things coming up in the Oceanside this summer. We hope you enjoy your stay! IT Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. For more information visit www.beachacresresort.com or call 1-800-663-7309 for reservations.

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Tiger Lily Farm

1692 Errington Road, Errington (250) 248-2408 www.tigerlilyfarm.ca

World Parot Refuge

2116 Alberni Hwy, Coombs (250) 248-5194 worldparrotrefuge.org

Bard to Broadway Theatre

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P E AC E , BEAU T Y & T RANQ UIL IT Y

Explore

Milner Gardens An ancient forest and garden oasis by the sea Located in Qualicum Beach

www.milnergardens.org Call: 250-752-6153 2179 West Island Hwy., Qualicum Beach, BC islandtimesmagazine.ca | 13 Milner Gardens & Woodland


LIVING THE

by Chris Robinson

BEACH ACRES RESORT

T

he beach and a forest of arbutus, fir, maple, and cedar trees await guests, encouraging them to immerse completely in nature and be surrounded by diverse natural beauty. The property is 27 acres in size and has 75 units, allowing every guest the space and privacy they seek. A vast amount of lawns encourages games and invites guests to take the 39 steps to the beach. Beach Acres is rich in history; its inception was in 1986. However, the area dates back further with the guest cottages that were used when tourists travelled to the area. Now each cottage is owned individually and has a home away from home feel. A walk through Beach Acres and it is clear that the resort is very accommodating to families. You don’t have to look far to see children building sandcastles, while the slightly older crowd are playing volleyball, basketball, tennis, horseshoes, or shuffleboard. The indoor pool appeals to all ages, and there is also a hot tub and sauna nearby. Moving on into the evening, sun-drenched and exhausted families may opt to play board games and solve puzzles or share a beach fire while marshmallows toast and everyone gathers to watch the sunset. If guests choose to eat out rather than prepare meals in the wellequipped cottages, the Black Goose Pub is mere steps away and welcomes all ages. The pub was once known as The McClure House,

14 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

by Dona Naylor

named after Samuel McClure who was a well-known architect from Victoria who originally built it in 1921. McClure built the home in the style of a Scottish hunting lodge for Evelyn and Matthew Beatty. Now The Black Goose is British-owned with a touch of Scotch thrown in. The food is delicious and abundant with fish and chips being an award-winning specialty. The menu is extensive with nightly choices. One of these is the hunter pie, which is amazing. There is a special room at Beach Acres where guests can gather in larger groups. It comes complete with a kitchen. Or there is a conference room equipped for groups of up to 100. This is an idyllic location and some groups having been known to arrive on the same week, year after year, such as large and small family reunions, office parties, couples’ getaways, and weddings. Beach Acres has it all and welcomes everyone. Beach Acres Resort and The Black Goose Pub are happy to welcome all of their guests and will do everything possible to ensure a delightful and memorable stay. IT Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. For more information visit www.beachacresresort.com or call 1-800-663-7309 for reservations.


Miles of sandy beach beckon visitors to Oceanside’s Beach Acres Resort, located just a few minutes south of Parksville on the eastern shores of Vancouver Island. Beach Acres Resort overlooks the Georgia Strait and the Coast Mountains, and is only 30 minutes north of Nanaimo, 2.5 hours from Victoria, and 45 minutes south of Courtenay.

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 15


a r d a Qu d n a l Is CAPTIVATING

Exploring

by Brenda Gough

16 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

Photo courtesy of Heriot Bay Inn www.heriotbayinn.com


g

Photo courtesy of Discovery Marine Safaris www.adventurewhalewatching.com

S

Quadra Island is a little pocket of the world that is well worth exploring if you are looking for breath-taking coastal scenery and a casual atmosphere.

urrounded by snow-capped mountains that rise from emerald waters, Quadra Island is one of the idyllic Northern Gulf Islands located just a 10-minute ferry ride from Campbell River and is located on the central east coast of Vancouver Island. Covered by forests and blessed with sandy beaches, this island gem offers visitors an outdoor paradise where the list of things to do is plentiful. Whether you enjoy fishing, kayaking, wildlife tours, beachcombing, or just want to settle into a four-star resort, a cozy Bed & Breakfast, or a beachfront campsite, Quadra has it all. The Island is home to an eclectic tight-knit community of people who enjoy a rural lifestyle and the diversity of professions and lifestyles make it a great place to visit, especially during the summer months when locals and visitors mingle at the island’s lodges, inns, and eateries.

WHERE TO STAY

The historic Heriot Bay Inn has stood in various forms for over one hundred years and continues it rich tradition of good times and helping bond the community. Located in the picturesque hub on the east side of Quadra Island, The Heriot Bay Inn & Resort is on five and a half acres of glorious west coast waterfront and provides a wide range of accommodations, from rustic suites to secluded cabins, as well as a campground and RV site. If you can picture yourself waking up in a room with views of a colourful garden and an ocean with a back drop of rugged mountains, then the Heriot is a great place to call home when you are visiting. Other amenities at the Inn include Herons Dining Room, which has a lovely deck overlooking the marina. Live music and dancing is a weekly occurrence in the pub – a popular gathering spot for locals. In fact it is a group of local visionaries who have taken on the challenge of preserving the historical inn, while at the same time keeping it alive and prosperous for the community. In 2008 Community Custodian Concepts purchased the Inn. The group is made up of 22 business-minded folks all with peace-loving attitudes. The group is interested in building and running a business which is successful financially, emotionally, and spiritually. The “custodians” provide economic and analytical diversity similar to Quadra Island as a whole, allowing them to cooperatively implement their vision.

In the words of general manager and custodian Lois Taylor, “Because there is a larger force than us in the history of the property, we understand this part of our community needs to be cared for, not through a sense of ownership, but rather like that of an heirloom to future generations.” Taylor describes the Inn as lively and admits that when tourists come they need to know there is a pub and they can expect happy noises, not a quiet retreat. “We are an authentic working community and we don’t alienate our locals. The Island loves this place. It is the core of the Island. We can be crazy, but we are polite and we offer something for all walks of life and everything in between.”

TAKE A TOUR

Sport fishing has been and remains one of the prime attractions on the Island and the waters around Quadra have yielded some of the largest salmon ever caught on BC’s west coast. During your stay at the Heriot Bay Inn & Resort, talk to the knowledgeable folks at The Island Adventure Centre. They can arrange a choice of outdoor adventures that include orca whale watching, grizzly bear viewing, salmon fishing charters, tidal rapids tours and wildlife eco tours, guided sea kayaking day tours, kayak rentals, bike rentals and Island hiking tours. These tours are a great way for you and your family to enjoy the scenery and wildlife in the Discovery Islands. For those who prefer to explore more of Quadra Island on the water, a four-hour Marine Wildlife/Tidal Rapids Tour with Discovery Marine Safaris will reward you with a voyage of discovery, natural beauty , and awe. During the tour, guests may see three species of dolphins, and also porpoises, whales, bears, seals, sea lions, eagles, and migratory seabirds. Guests can also view tidal rapids, snow-capped mountains, green glacial water, magnificent forests, as well as hear some cultural history with an experienced luxury tour boat in Campbell River with Discovery Marine Safaris. If you prefer to enjoy the charm of Heriot Bay from a cozy chair, check out the fine hospitality at the Inn and the variety of entertainment and events throughout the year which brings life to the Inn islandtimesmagazine.ca | 17

Photo courtesy of Quadra Island Kayaks www.quadraislandkayaks.com


Photo courtesy of Discovery Marine Safaris www.adventurewhalewatching.com

at all times for all people. You can mingle with the locals and enjoy the live music in the pub or kick back on the sunny deck and watch the action out on the water.

KNOW THE HISTORY

The Heriot Bay Inn was established in 1895 by Hosea Arminius Bull and has stood in various forms over the years. This building burned down and was subsequently rebuilt in 1912. In addition to its 19 sleeping rooms, the newly-built hotel boasted a large office where travellers gathered around the fireplace to socialize and tell stories, an upstairs dance hall, and an aviary containing rare canaries. Today, you’ll still find much of the original historic 1912 structure of Hosea Bull’s original Inn. The warm wood panelling, fireplace and singlepane windows found in the office and lounge are a few of the clues to the Inn’s historic roots. The lounge and certain rooms may also be home to some restless lingering spirits. According to Taylor there have been many chilling accounts of a female ghost who resides in the lounge knitting while waiting for her husband to return. “Apparently we have two ghosts. There have been a lot of sightings. It definitely has its history,” she says.

TAKE A HIKE

Quadra Island’s history of logging has left a legacy of old roads and rail beds that have provided a superb network of over 200 kilometres of

Photo courtesy of Discovery Marine Safaris www.adventurewhalewatching.com

hiking trails that range from an easy shoreline stroll out to the end of Rebecca Spit to the strenuous climb up to Nugedzi Lake, one of the last remaining old growth areas of the Island. Local volunteers under the guidance of the Quadra Island Trails Committee maintain the trails providing hikers with an opportunity to meander an extensive trail system that winds through the rain forest offering incredible view points to some of the most spectacular corners of the Island.

OUT ON THE OCEAN

With kayak rentals and tours for people of all ages, ocean lovers can explore the island’s intricate coastline which is dotted with beaches, sheltered coves, protected channels and islets. The dramatic coastal scenery is a paddler’s dream come true. Just ask Jane West, one of the operators of Quadra Island Kayaks. Located on the water in Drew Harbour across from Rebecca Spit provincial park, the company has been offering sea kayaking tours from the beautiful east side of Quadra Island for over 15 years. According to West, sea kayaking is an activity that is accessible to everyone and Quadra Island Kayaks specializes in taking out first-time kayakers. “Everyone can do it. It is low impact and you don’t have to be incredibly fit,” she says. The kayaks are designed for beginners and participants feel comfortable from the get go because each trip they offer includes a thorough kayaking lesson, she adds. “It is surprising

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to people how stable they are once they get in the kayak.” There are different kayak tours to choose from. It depends on how much time you have to spend on the water, but West says each adventure includes a stop at the beach and a snack. She says once you are out on the water there is never a dull moment. “We see a lot of wildlife. There is a colony of Pacific Harbour seals that are playful and follow us. Sometimes we get lucky and se porpoises and dolphins.” The vibrant inter tidal life includes sea urchins, sea stars, and other creatures. West says with two high and two low tides a day, it makes for good viewing. She adds that the protective waters are calm, and you don’t have to worry about the tides or currents. “It’s like being in a fish bowl,” she says. Divers also appreciate the rich waters fed by large tidal exchanges which nourish the abundant marine life. HMCS Columbia was sunk off Quadra’s shoreline in 1996, creating an artificial reef for underwater life. Named one of the top locations for diving in the world by the Jacques Cousteau Society, Quadra offers a variety of dives for people of all ability levels.

LOCAL ARTISTRY

Quadra has many resident artists living and practicing their crafts to various degrees. With all the natural beauty surrounding the island it isn’t surprising that so many islanders are inspired to create. The natural beauty and wonder of the ocean and forest eco-systems are

revealed in much of the art work and the surprising mix of artisans reflects the culture of the Island. While many of the Island’s artists are immersed in their art, they welcome visits to their studios and galleries. If you want to tickle your creative bone, the I Blew It Glass Studio is just the place. Owner, Cherie Hemmingsen, welcomes all visitors to her shop where you can come and create your own one-of-a-kind paperweight. There is no experience necessary but you must be at least 12 years old, wear only cotton clothing, and have a group of three or more. Hemmingsen grew up on Vancouver Island surrounded by artisans. Her mother was a famous quilter and Hemmingsen dabbled in fabric art but she didn’t pursue her glass blowing passion until after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. “I wanted to be a glass blower since I was 20. But I had kids and I couldn’t,” she explains. After the onset of her illness, she decided to get on with the rest of her life and blow glass. “Glass blowing is good therapy for me. I have fun and I donate the proceeds to MS.” It’s easy to spot the beautiful coloured glass art work Hemmingsen has created at various locations on Quadra Island. Her specialty is fish and her aquarium seascapes are a colourful showcase of her spirited creations. For a full list of Quadra Island’s artisans, pick up a studio tour map from the ferry. For a current calendar of coming events, visit www. discoveryislander.ca for all the local news and events. IT

Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca

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for t he

ON A TRAIL RIDE by Dona Naylor

20 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor


Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor

Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor

T

he Parksville/Qualicum Beach region contains miles of trails all shared by hikers, bikers, all terrain vehicles, motorcycles, and horses. Although paths for horses are not abundant as they were in the past, and riding on the road is simply not safe with ever-increasing traffic, Donegal Farm is fortunate to be able to access these trails for the pleasure of an afternoon horseback ride. Donegal Farm is a smaller and more private stable. However, the staff is always pleased to take out couples, small groups, and individual riders up the mountain. Equestrian Coach and Island Times contributor, Dona Naylor is a Certified Level 1 coach with Equine Canada and has taught for almost 20 years. Dona believes in enjoying all aspects of horses including dressage, jumping, and trail excursions. She is the coach at Donegal Farm. It is at the farm where Dona teaches lessons and takes out trail rides and hosts a few small summer camps. One visit out to Donegal and one’s first impression is that the farm is peaceful and the horses there are happy. Freedom is rule number one as you head up the mountain paths with no time constraints. It is possible to ride to Arrowsmith Lake which is the headwaters of Englishman’s River (also the source of the regions water supply), or Rowbotham Lake is also a possibility. You could ride to Victoria if you really wanted. The paths weave through salal, ferns, and vanilla-leafed undergrowth as the horses step over roots and wind between evergreens, maple trees, and alder. There is a large wildlife tree that is between 300 and 400 years old. As for views, you can usually detect snow on Mount Arrowsmith ahead, and the panoramic view of forest and ocean behind. It is the views that truly showcase Vancouver Island’s diversity in nature. The spring season is a lovely time to hit the trails to find wildflowers, bleeding hearts, violets, chocolate lilies, starflowers to name only a few. Each season has its own special features. Riding through the forest is cool in summer and shuffling through autumn leaves is exhilarating. The horses love to get out on the trails also. Crossing creeks and jumping over logs makes sense to them in ways that 20-metre circles in dressage simply do not. A jumping course set up in the ring is not as much fun for the horse as a series of fallen logs. They enjoy each step as much as the rider. “I don’t worry about bears as I have met them several times; they check me out and then ramble off,” Dona says of the dangers of running into other animals on the trails. One time, Dona spotted a cougar that (lucky for her!) vanished immediately, and a wolf pack circled once, but her horse got them out of there quickly. “I love to meet Elk and follow their hoof prints and know where they hang out. The animals are there; I respect them, and let them know I am coming,” she says. Just in case the animals do get too close, Dona is always armed with a wolf whistle and pepper spray. “It is only good up to a very short distance anyway,” she cautions, adding that the wild animals are simply a part of the ride. IT For more information about horseback riding on Vancouver Island, Dona Naylor welcomes your emails at dona@islandtimesmagazine.ca. Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca.

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BY T H E

a e S by Dona Naylor

T

Executive Chef Troy Fogarty and Dona Naylor Photo Courtesy of Dona Naylor

22 | islandtimesmagazine.ca 12 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor

Take a Timeout for Tea at the Kingfisher Resort

he Kingfisher Oceanside Resort and Spa is situated among a forest of old growth trees by the idyllic waterfront on the east coast of Vancouver Island just south of Courtenay. While staying at the resort, guests experience the peace that settles over them as the chorus of waves lap, birds call, eagle and gulls screech, and deer graze; all seeming happy to share the extensive gardened property. A popular activity to partake in while at the Kingfisher is taking an afternoon timeout for tea. Enjoy a cup of tea by the sea before a gourmet meal prepared by Executive Chef Troy Fogarty, who worked for eight years at the famed Butchart Gardens in Victoria before joining the staff at the Kingfisher. From his time at Butchart, Fogarty recalls an old plate once belonging to Jenny Butchart that held a teacup, as well as an assortment of treats for Tea on the Knee, also known as Low Tea. (The alternative, High Tea, would include more meaty snacks like Welsh rarebit, meat pies, and various sweet and savory dishes. High Tea would be served at the dining room table.) Fogarty had a vision of re-creating the Butchart Garden Low Tea tradition at Kingfisher’s restaurant, and so he set the stage. Surrounded by windows that display the incredible panoramic view of the sea, Kingfisher guests are served tea from a lovely selection including Honey Bush, Rooibos, Chamomile, or the more traditional Earl Grey or English Breakfast. Following tea and lavender scones – the lavender being grown on the resort property – a plate of sweet and savory dishes arrives. Guests are treated to a wonderful array of selections while enjoying scent and visual appeal first and then finally, taste. Items like forest mushroom strudel, smoked tuna with citrus aioli, and Belgian chocolate pave are arranged beautifully on a plate that does indeed hold both one’s cup and one’s treats. Chef Fogarty believes in eating with your eyes first. He feels strongly about fine local ingredients, yet, “never at the expense of quality,” he says. Fogarty wants his guests to experience the indulgence and beauty of products from Vancouver Island. Therefore, he shares personal relationships with local growers and suppliers of fresh fruit, vegetables, seafood, meat, and cheese. His excitement for what he does is evident as he tells me he recently bought fresh fava beans from a local grower for the weekend dinner specials. Consider stopping in for Low Tea at the Kingfisher this summer for a relaxing and unique experience that comes complete with a spectacular view. IT


e l d d a P o! &G

by Dona Naylor

Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor

A

First Annual Paddling Competition at the Kingfisher Resort

T

he Kingfisher Oceanside Resort and Spa will be hosting a unique and exciting event this Thanksgiving. Event organizers will be serving up more than the traditional turkey and trimmings. Welcome to a weekend event for all paddlers. General Manager Sean Williams saw potential for racing outrigger canoes when he first arrived at the Kingfisher Resort. Williams belonged to the False Creek Racing Canoe Club prior to coming to Courtenay on Vancouver Island. The Kingfisher Resort will be hosting the first event of its kind and the excitement is already beginning to catch on. The history of the outrigger is based in Polynesia. This watercraft has a separate support structure, the outrigger, for security purposes and to be capable of negotiating rougher water. Outriggers were used for fishing, but also during times of war. Fleets of hundreds would paddle great distances to conquer islands upon islands. Ryan Pogue is the race organizer and owner of Pogue Sports. He will determine the course and divisions along with Don Irvine of the Comox-Strathcona Racing Canoe Club. Pogue and Irvine both teach clinics in Hawaii where the sport is very popular. “It is an event for all paddlers – solo and tandem,” says Pogue. “The location is great and this is new and different with people coming from the island, the mainland, and the Pacific Northwest,” he adds. “This will not be your typical race. Over two days it will be a shorter course. The paddlers will race against tides, winds, currents, and time. Time and points are measured in this challenging test of strength and distance.” Williams adds that paddle racing is not typically a spectator sport. “Once the vessels leave there is time for other pursuits like having a massage, a swim, something to eat, or even a nap,” he says. Indeed, time will be ample time to enjoy the pleasures of the Kingfisher Resort. “Hopefully the water will still be warm. If you spill, or huli, it can be pretty cold and Eskimo roles are not possible in the outrigger canoes,” says Williams. This is a family friendly event and spectators are welcome to stop by the Kingfisher Resort and Spa for Thanksgiving 2011 for the first ever Paddle and Go. IT For more information about this event, contact the Kingfisher Resort at 1-800-663-7929 or visit www.kingfisherspa.com. Read these articles and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca.

Photo courtesy of Dona Naylor

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 23


Whales Watching THE

by Amy Hancock

WE ARE

A PHENOMENAL AFTERNOON OF WHALE WATCHING IN BARKLEY SOUND

T

he Zodiac skimmed along the water as my tour group and I headed into Barkley Sound. Located just south of Ucluelet on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, Barkley Sound is home to the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve’s Broken Group Island – an archipelago of over 100 islands. Spawns of baitfish in these sheltered waters attract a lot of feeding marine life and are perfect conditions for whale watching. Our guide, Brian Congdon of Subtidal Adventures, has been operating wildlife tours out of Ucluelet since the late 1970s. Watching west coast whales for over 30 years has definitely made him an expert. He was the perfect person to introduce us to both the Gray and Humpback whales in Barkley Sound. “The whale watching season kicks off in March with Gray whale migration. Over 20,000 whales pass our coast as they make their way from their birthing grounds in Baja, Mexico to their feeding grounds in the Bering and Chuckchi Seas near Alaska,” said Congdon. The communities of Ucluelet and Tofino celebrate these enormous visitors with the Pacific Rim Whale Festival running annually in late March. “During the peak of the migration we usually don’t have to go far before seeing a whale. In perfect conditions everywhere you look, any time you look, you can see one.” Congdon added, “But this time isn’t the only time to see whales, it’s just the kick off of the season.” Congdon also told us that there are some resident Gray whales that don’t continue to Alaska. They stop feed for the summer in Barkley Sound. In fact, there are whales that Congdon sees year after year. “There is one Gray whale we call The Admiral. He has four large white scars on his body that were caused by a boat propeller years ago. I have been watching The Admiral for over 15 years,” shared Congdon. “One year The Admiral was spotted with a calf, which is very uncommon this far north and also indicates that he is actually a she!” Gray whales are not the only ones putting on a show. After being put at risk by whaling stations in the early twentieth century, Humpback whales started returning to Barkley Sound about 10 years ago. Now, Congdon says Humpback whales are the species they see the most of in the summer months.

24 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

At this point of the tour...it was time for a show! There is little more spectacular than a breaching Humpback whale. There, from our zodiac, we saw the magnificent creature leap two-thirds out of the water, twist his enormous body, and slam back down into the ocean. Just thinking about it now gives me goose bumps. Marine biologists are not certain why whales breach out of the water this way, but most believe it is related to playfulness. They do it because it is fun! The Admiral isn’t the only whale Congdon has befriended over the years. He identified an individual Gray whale near Benson Island in the Broken Group regularly last summer. After he was seen several days in a row, Congdon’s colleague named him Benson – after the island. Around the same time guides saw a Humpback whale hanging out in the same area, day after day. This was peculiar because Gray and Humpback whales have different feeding habits, and diets for that matter. After several more sighting, this Humpback was dubbed Hedges and is easily identified by distinctive markings on his tale. “Whenever we took out a group and didn’t see whales elsewhere, we knew we could visit Benson and Hedges.” Congdon added, “Especially Hedges, he was very dependable.” In addition to Humpback and Gray whales, our tour saw both Stellar and California sea lions barking and bathing in the sun, and bald eagles flying overhead. The boat ride through the Broken Group Islands was breathtaking. We circled islands inhabited only by wildlife, nestled in shallow coves, and dotted with light sandy beaches. Other islands jutted out of the Pacific like fortresses covered by twisted, windblown trees. As we entered the Ucluelet Inlet and returned back to the docks, I thought about whales like The Admiral, Benson and Hedges that call Ucluelet’s waters home. It is important to learn about their unique and significant role in our ocean’s ecosystem so we can protect them and conserve their environment. Watching these whales play is something I will surely remember for many years to come. IT


Serving Communit y by Jolene Aarbo

THE

A UNIQUE

T

WEST COAST ADVENTURE

here is a vibrant community living on the West Coast of Vancouver Island that many people do not know about. This small population of residents live in remote areas off the coast of Barkley Sound and commute mainly by water. This is truly a unique and remote lifestyle than in modern times is very rare. These residents rely heavily on the Lady Rose Marine Services for transport of supplies and as a sea taxi. Riding upon the ship, The Francis Barkely, I was lucky enough to spend the day experiencing the stunning views and learning more about the area and the ship from the helpful crew. I realized for myself how important the Lady Rose Marine Services are to these people. The Francis Barkley is a well travelled classic ship originating from Norway. Originally built in1958, it was commissioned to be used in the Norwegian fleet. The ship set out on a 51-day journey through the North Sea, through the English Channel into the Atlantic, through the Panama Canal, up to San Diego, and finally reached its new home in Port Alberni. This area known as Barkely Sound was named after the historical Charles and Francis Barkley who were the first to discover the area in 1787. Named after Charles Barkley’s wife Francis, The Francis Barkley is still operating with the original diesel motor and is truly a treasured piece of history. Lady Rose Marine Services has daily round trips from Port Alberni to Bamfield on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. There is also a trip which goes to an ideal location for kayakers and canoers. This trip travels to Ucluelet and through the Broken Islands Group on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays during the summer. Rentals are available based at Sechart Whaling Station Lodge. Visit www.ladyrosemarina. com for rates and further information. There is a galley aboard the ship where you can find breakfast and lunch items.

Wildlife sightings including bears and whales are very common for passengers. On our trip up to Bamfield we spotted a big old bear eating his lunch while we had docked to unload supplies for one of the residents in a secluded bay. While aboard, something else to see is the Kildonan Inlet where there are many floating cabins up the coast line. I can image that this would be paradise in the hot summer weather, sitting on the deck then jumping in your boast for a day tour. Shortly after, we arrived at the floating Kildonan Post Office which is the tiniest post office I have ever seen! Lady Rose Marine Services makes regular trips to this post office Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays for the remote and entrepreneurial residents. A couple hours later we arrived in the town of Bamfield. This is a charming little seaside village with little cabins built up on the side of the cliffs – some which are on stilts are quite the structures. While unloading supplies, food and equipment, we exited the boat and took a walk on a wonderful boardwalk along the water right through town. Thank you to all of the staff, including our captain, John Adam, and Mike Surrell. You were extremely helpful and knowledgeable about the area and more than happy to answer any questions we had. The Francis Barkley is a treasured piece of Vancouver Island history. Combined with fantastic views, lots of wildlife sightings including many whale and bear sightings, this place is something you should discover this summer. IT To learn more about Barkely Sound and Lady Roase Marine Services visit www.ladyrosemarine.com or call (250) 723-8313. Boat Moorage is also available. Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca.

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 25


by Steve Crabb

Like skiing, mountain biking can be a dangerously fast and furious sport. Also, like skiing, it can be a relaxed family past time enjoyed by all ages. The terrain and climate of Vancouver Island offer some of the best mountain biking found anywhere in the world. From tip to tip, the island is intertwined with a network of trail systems that attract riders of all skill levels from all over North America. But what exactly is mountain biking? Simply put, it is bike riding on all types of trails instead of roads. Twenty years ago the sport of mountain biking was started by a collection of backyard enthusiasts who rode their modified road bikes at breakneck speeds down bumpy logging roads. They experimented with different materials, borrowed motorcycle and other technology, mixed and matched components, and shared their successes (and failures) with one another. Their cycle (pardon the pun) of “modify, ride, repair and improve� has, in a roundabout way, led to the modern mass-produced mountain bike – a reliable, beautifully efficient, well-engineered piece of machinery. 26 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

Why mountain biking over road riding? As our roads become busier and busier, many people prefer to dodge trees rather than traffic. And it is certainly more enjoyable to take in the smells and tranquility of the forest as opposed to the fumes and noise of automobiles. It is also fun to weave through challenging, twisty trails, wondering where they might take you. Of course, like any sport, mountain biking has its own inherent dangers, so if you are a beginner, ride trails that mesh with your experience, take your time, practice, (cover yourself in bubble wrap if need be) but by all means, get out there and have some fun.


Photo courtesy of Steve Crabb

Photo courtesy of Steve Crabb

What bike should you buy? How much should you spend? It is best to remember the old adage, “You get what you pay for.” There is a wealth of information available online to get you started, but talk to your local bike shop as they are the experts who can help you to determine your needs and navigate the endless minefield of jargon and techie bike talk. The Oceanside area is blessed with several full-service shops whose knowledgeable staff can assist you with all your biking needs. They can help you find the bike you need while still respecting your budget. Mountain bikes, not to mention our bodies, can take a pounding on the trails, so purchase the best quality bike you can afford and at the end of a long ride, your body will thank you. Of course the number one rule for mountain biking (or any riding) is to wear a helmet. It is a fact: helmets save lives. It is also a fact that the Parksville/Qualicum areas contain some of the best riding on the Island. Beginners, families, or those looking for a relaxed fun experience should try the Qualicum Beach Middle School (QBMS) trail system located off Labernum Road in Qualicum Beach. This is a great place to practice your skills on a variety of gently challenging trails. A couple of groups meet weekly to ride these trails. Avid riders, John and Bonnie of Head Over Wheels Cycle and Sport in Qualicum Beach, would be happy to give you the details. Top Bridge Mountain Bike Park (just south of Parksville) offers beginner to intermediate trails. Top Bridge is also featured in another article in this edition of Island Times which contains information on how to get there. The number one draw for serious riders, local and otherwise, is the set of ‘Hammerfest’ trails which border the Englishman River Falls Provincial Park in Errington. Vancouver Islands’ premier mountain bike race is held here annually in May. These trails offer some of the most challenging riding you can do. Twisty, root infested lower trails lead you up and through an assortment of terrain and trail types for a total elevation gain of some 250 metres. Memorable trail names like Hellevator and Barf Bag give you a hint that there might be some work and challenges associated with climbing these technical single-track trails. Fantastic views of the Strait of Georgia make the hard climb worth the effort. Now the fun part: it’s all downhill from here. There are several routes to choose from to take you back down

– some more challenging than others – so choose your path carefully. A word of caution regarding Hammerfest Trails: This writer (and rider) learned first-hand just how easy it is to become separated from the group, lost and miles from where he should be. The trail system is extensive and it is easy to get turned around in the endless network of criss-crossing logging roads and trails, so follow safe riding practices and use the buddy system.

Need more information? A Victoria-based cartographer turned author, who also happens to be an expert mountain bike rider, has just released the second edition of his book Mountain Bike Vancouver Island which gives extensive and comprehensive information on mountain biking the south and central island. Daniel Cammiade’s love for the sport has translated into this guide which includes trails from Victoria through to Campbell River. Daniel Cammiade has been riding, mapping and gathering details about mountain biking on Vancouver Island for the past 20 years. His book contains tips and expert advice on the do’s and don’ts of riding as well as maps he has created using his personal GPS surveys. He is a respected member of the mountain biking community who advocates for the sport by lending his expertise to local clubs and by promoting stewardship of local riding areas. Mountain Bike Vancouver Island is an impressive guidebook designed to conveniently fit in your Camelback pack and is endorsed by (and will be available at) local Oceanside bike shops. IT For more information or to order your copy online, email freakmaps@shaw.ca. Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca

Cycling services in the Oceanside area include:

Head Over Wheels Cycle and Sport

Suite D-130 Second Ave W Qualicum Beach, BC (250) 752-0027

Island Cycle

5 114 Hirst Ave, Parksville, BC (250) 248-0647 www.icyclebc.com

Arrowsmith Bikes

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Hastings House C O U N T RY H O US E H OT E L islandtimesmagazine.ca | 27


CENTRAL

RiverRuns

A

Photos courtesy of Steve Crabb

VANCOUVER ISLAND PARKS

I

Through it

n close proximity to Parksville is one of the most popular day-use parks in the Oceanside area. Top Bridge Community Park really does have it all. It showcases the Englishman River and offers fabulous swimming holes, miles of hiking trails, a mountain bike park, and a diversity of natural beauty that includes old growth forests, a river gorge, marshes, and interesting rock formations to name a few. Do you want a quick stroll through a beautiful setting that is minutes from town? Are you looking for a place to enjoy a quiet picnic lunch and perhaps a swim? Or do you wish to engage in a longer day hike through vast natural surroundings? This park can fulfill your requirements. There are several ways to access the park, including walking, cycling, or driving. The Regional District of Nanaimo website at <www.rdn.bc.ca> can provide you with access details that best suit your needs. The parking lot entrance is off Chattel Road, approximately two kilometres south of the Serious Coffee location at the south end of Parksville. Once in the Top Bridge parking lot you will notice the cable bridge (for pedestrian and cyclist use only) from which the park derives its name. There is an information kiosk and washrooms located across the PORT HARDY

CAMPBELL RIVER COURTENAY QUALICUM BEACH PARKSVILLE TOFINO

NANAIMO

UCLUELET NORTH ISLAND CENTRAL ISLAND PACIFIC RIM SOUTH ISLAND

28 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

DUNCAN VICTORIA

by Steve Crabb

bridge. A sandstone shelf below the bridge is a great place to spread out a blanket for a picnic lunch or to soak up the sun after a refreshing swim in the Englishman River. One can reflect upon the natural beauty and ponder how many centuries it must have taken the river to carve out the formations found in this gorge. The 81-metre long suspension bridge is more than just an engineering marvel. It is a gateway that connects three parks: Top Bridge Mountain Bike Park on the east side of the River, the RDNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top Bridge Community Park, and Englishman River Regional Park on the west side of the River. These three parks contain miles of well-travelled trails that parallel the river. While there are the usual roots and rocks to contend with, the trails are signed, well maintained, relatively flat, and easy to negotiate. There are old growth giants, glades with ferns, as well as trilliums and many other local wildflowers to look at. Hiking at a leisurely pace for two hours along the river path will lead you to a fish hatchery that offers an interesting look at efforts taking place to enhance salmon habitat along the Englishman River. The mountain bike park is on your right as you drive down the hill towards the parking lot. It offers a medium distance, and beginner to intermediate trails. More information on local mountain biking can be found earlier on in this issue of Island Times. Please take advantage of this great local park but be sure to read and adhere to local usage advice and warnings posted at the kiosk. Enjoy your visit. IT Please visit the BC Parks website for more information. Visit www.islandtimesmagazine.ca to read this article and more about other Vancouver Island parks. Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca


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islandtimesmagazine.ca | 29


Powering Down I N PARKSVI LLE by Wynne MacAlpine

Parksville leads the way in environmentally sustainable building construction.

30 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

E

veryone knows the three “R’s” of green living: reduce, reuse, and recycle. In our consumerdriven society, the first of these principles, reducing consumption, is the hardest. It’s affirming to buy products made from re-used materials, and it’s satisfying to lift a full recycling bin to the curb. By comparison, reducing consumption seems self-denying and passive. Who ever got a thrill from not buying something? Fortunately, reducing home energy consumption comes with its own reward in the form of lower utility bills. And EnerGuide Canada and BC Hydro’s Power Smart Program work together to make it even easier. For example, the Power Smart New Home Program provides information and incentives to help builders and developers design and build for energy efficiency. It also gives buyers the information they need to evaluate the efficiency of a new home. Each new residence qualified through the program receives an EnerGuide for New Houses label and an Energy Efficiency Evaluation Report. These tell prospective buyers the specific energy rating achieved by the design and building elements of the home, and certify that it was tested by a qualified third party. BC Hydro’s Power Smart New Construction awards also recognize builders and developers who make energy conservation a priority. Parksville’s Corfield Glades Development Limited, developers of Creekside at Corfield, achieved a Power Smart Gold Star rating for each of its 20 strata duplex town homes (60 are planned), but incorporated additional energy-saving elements that made them Power Smart Finalists for Builder of the Year 2010. According to Daniel Duggan, Construction Manager at Corfield Glades, the most significant feature in achieving the Gold Star rating is having buildings that are airtight. At Creekside at Corfield, that means weather stripping around windows and doors, R40 insulation in the ceiling, R20 in the walls, and B3 rated windows treated with a low-emissivity coating and filled with insulating argon gas. And to qualify as Power Smart, the building envelope of each unit was blower door tested by a certified Power Smart Energy Advisor. Other energy saving features at Creekside are natural gas “on-demand” hot water heaters, timer-controlled fans and Energy Star appliances. With 40 units yet to come, Corfield Glades is also discussing the possibility of building them solar ready; that is, wired, plumbed and laid out for photovoltaic or solar hot water installations. While daylighting – the illumination of building interiors using sunlight – is not essential in Power Smart or EnerGuide ratings, it is one of the major design elements at Creekside at Corfield. The units are awash in natural light, with floor-to-ceiling windows, privacy-enhancing


For those inspired to power down, help is at hand The provincial LiveSmart BC Efficiency Incentive Program provides information on saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions at home, at work, during travel, and in doing business. Homeowners and businesses can find qualified Energy Advisors and may also qualify for a range of product incentives offered through the program. Visit www.livesmartbc. ca for information or call (866) 430-8765. Last April, the Regional District of Nanaimo introduced several energy conservation incentives for residents, including a $60 rebate on energy assessments for existing homes. These assign an EnerGuide rating and also suggest priorities for those taking steps towards home energy conservation. See www.rdnrebates.ca or phone (250) 390-6510 for more details.

textured glass and glass blocks, vaulted ceilings, skylights and dormers throughout. Says Duggan, “The first thing people notice coming into any of our buildings is the natural lighting. The rooms are beautifully illuminated quite naturally, and of course the vaulted ceilings and dormers add tremendously to the ambience.” A gentle warmth underfoot is not just courtesy of the sunshine. All units are heated entirely using radiant in-floor systems by Parksvillebased Vondella Mechanical 2000 Limited. These are hydronic, natural gas systems, meaning water heated by a gas-powered hot water heater circulates through a closed loop of tubing embedded in the concrete foundation, warming it. The result is an even, long-lasting heat that rises continuously from the floor, right where you need it. “There’s an old saying that if your feet are warm, your body is happy – happy feet, happy body – and it really is the truth,” says Duggan. “With the heat rising from the floor, it changes the whole atmosphere of the building. It’s quite wonderful.” The tubing is arranged into independently controlled zones, so occupants can regulate the amount of heat in each part of the house. Zoning and the natural circulation of the warm air make radiant in-floor heating an energy efficient option, and with an abundance of natural light, there’s little need to flip a switch during the day. One owner at Creekside reports averaging $1,500 per year for gas heat and hot water for a 1,448 square foot unit, and about $400 per year for electricity. In fact, according to BC Hydro, houses that achieve the EnerGuide rating of 80 or above required for a Power Smart Gold designation will typically use 30 per cent less energy than a standard new house. Reduce energy use, reduce utility bills, and maximize comfort. That first “R” is looking better already. IT Visit www.creeksideatcorfield.com to learn more. Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca

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islandtimesmagazine.ca | 31


Garden Feature

The

Heptings

at Home

by Dona Naylor Photos courtesy of Dona Naylor

L

orne and Cindy Hepting’s garden in Qualicum Beach on Vancouver Island began 24 years ago on a 1.3-acre piece of property surrounding their heritage home. The cottage style house was built in 1935 and has matching outbuildings. “The style is similar to the old forestry buildings,” says Cindy. Woods and a ravine border the entire property. At the time it was built, the family desired structure, privacy, and solitude. The garden evolved over time as Lorne and Cindy’s knowledge and love of plants continued to grow. Both artists, Cindy says, “Lorne doesn’t see himself as the artist in the garden but his sense of layout has a natural and creative outcome. It is informal chaos.” Cindy finds the garden to be a continual source of inspiration for her rug and bag designs. “It is a wonderful place to sit and do my work,” she says. Once the garden became fully established after about 10 to 12 years, Lorne maintained the design and replaced plants as necessary. The major portion of the garden is Rhododendrons. Initially, everything was planted in manure from their own horses because the soil was so poor they decided to remove it before planting. As true gardeners, the pair is always on the lookout for new and interesting plant material. Their property is bordered by forest, which brings its own challenges to caring for the gardens. Deer, insects, and slugs tend to invade. Lorne has since created makeshift barriers and fencing to challenge the deer and deter them from accessing the property, and the weevils have to be chased down at night. Had the family realized the extent of what they created, they may have done things a little differently. For anyone considering their first garden project, Lorne and Cindy suggest starting small unless you are prepared to dedicate time, effort, and finances into a larger garden. “If I knew then what I know now…” Cindy says with a laugh. However, she adds, “Experience is the best teacher. Large gardens are a lot of work, so Lorne is very dedicated.” IT Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca

32 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


Garden Celebration Feature

A

by Amber Scotchburn

OF LIFE, LOVE, AND LAUGHTER

B

eing that I have been transplanted from the big city of Toronto to the little town of Nanoose Bay, I often find myself reminiscing about the wonderful opportunities that living in a big city offers when it comes to enjoying an evening out. When I was presented with an invitation to go and see a live performance of Steel Magnolias, I assumed the show was playing in Vancouver, so I started calculating the time and money to travel to the big city. Well, you know what they say about assuming. Imagine my delight when I discovered that the show was at the Chemanius Theatre Festival, right here on the Island! The Chemanius Theatre is located in Chemanius, which is on the east shore of Vancouver Island. The theatre is a late 19th century opera-style house that serves a popular buffet dinner during professional theatre. As Chemainus is recognized as Canada's largest permanent outdoor art gallery, when you go to the theatre, do allow yourself some extra time to walk through the town to enjoy the murals painted on the sides of the buildings. The dining experience was delightful. Athough it was a buffet, you are served warm bread and the offering of soup upon your arrival. This allowed the opportunity to relax as opposed to feeling rushed to go straight to the buffet. There was a wide range of cuisine options and in keeping in theme with Steel Magnolias, there were traditional Southern dishes offered. This invited conversation and a connection to the performance. Upon sitting down from attending the buffet line up, I was struck by the vast differences of items on my plate, and those that were on my partner's plate. We were both able to eat delicious dinners and fulfill our own desires.

Steel Magnolias

For a well-rounded theatre experience, I was also invited to interview Sarah Cale who plays Annelle in the show. This interaction taught me about the career options of an actor. For example, actors can apprentice, just as one does in a more traditional occupation, such as a mechanic or plumber. I had no idea! It was also fascinating to speak with her as we got to meet the beautiful and confident Sarah, the person, and then see her transform into the non-descript and shy Southern accented Annelle, the character. This certainly added depth to the performance. Steel Magnolias is the story of six women who work at, and patronize, Truvy's Beauty Salon. It is based on the work of Robert Harling and is a warm-hearted play about friendship and camaraderie, love and compassion, and heart break and healing, all offset by humorous one liners. One might think it is only engaging for a female audience, but upon looking around at the mixed gender audience and their reactions, everyone was engaged and you could hear the whole audience laughing out loud together. Not a lot of action happens onstage besides hairdos and manicures, but through the strong performances, the audience gets to know Harling's well-crafted characters. The cast handles the blend of comedy and pathos with tender style and certainly these southern magnolias are indeed made of steel! IT Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca islandtimesmagazine.ca | 33


n o i h Fas GREAT

AT ANY AGE

by Dave Bigelow

ATTENTION ACTIVE SENIORS EXTENDED STAY SUITES IN NANAIMO IN A 55+ COMMUNITY

Origin at Longwood is an Active Lifestyle Community catering to seniors in Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. We are pleased to now offer Extended Stay Suites to seniors across Canada who are looking to discover the west coast lifestyle with a resort-style ambiance. Origin is nestled in a tranquil, forested setting with elegant dining, wellness spa featuring a fitness centre and salt-water pool, among many other amenities.

ASK ABOUT OUR SUMMER STAY SPECIALS!

6205 Oliver Road, Nanaimo, BC

250-751-7755

ACTIVE LIFESTYLE COMMUNITY 34 | islandtimesmagazine.ca

Toll Free: 1-877-951-7755 www.originlongwood.ca


"With over-the-top glamour replaced by a modest pageantry of dignified women, the show highlighted something important – real clothes for real people. I left Origin feeling a shared inspiration with all the women at the show. It was a quiet, confident feeling that although I’m getting older, nothing is going to stop me from looking terrific."

H

igh end fashion shows are spectacles featuring creative inspirations of top designers. Razor thin waifs sporting avant-garde hairdos, nude chiffons and thigh-high velvet boots stroll along the catwalk. Flashbulbs fire constantly and heart-pounding music pumps up a crowd of jet-setting fashonistas. Such shows are exciting affairs. But sometimes these shows lack relevance because most of us live in a world where we simply want to look good and feel comfortable. I recently attended a different kind of fashion show that was held at Origin at Longwood in Nanaimo. Now “fashion” might not be the first word that springs to mind when hearing the term “retirement living community”. The media delivers a message that fashion is the domain of young hipsters and I am as susceptible to this message as anyone. So when asked to attend the spring show at Origin, I must confess to being a tad sceptical. But after some thought I realized that people of all ages enjoy stylish clothes and a chance to look their best. Don’t many older women present themselves with a unique flair and a graceful grandeur? My curiosity was piqued and I laid aside my preconceived notions. I’m glad I did. The show was organized by the KC Boutique. It attracted about 50 people and the appreciative crowd smiled and applauded throughout the 45-minute affair. The stage was set in the Harvest Dining Room; a bold, stately room with tall ceilings, impressive windows, and a fireplace. It was refined without being overstated. Chandeliers, augmented with pot lights, teased out the true colours of the clothes and highlighted subtleties of various fabrics. Many of the outfits were modelled by Origin residents who appeared relaxed and comfortable as they strutted their stuff on the runway. Afterwards we were treated to tea and goodies and the always accommodating Origin staff gave me a tour of the facility. My guides were obviously proud to be working in an environment that gives people everything they need in retirement – a feeling of security, a sense of independence, a lot of laughs, and a whole lot of tender loving care. We rarely acknowledge the beauty of older women and it was a treat to see stylish clothes being modelled for a mature audience. With over the top glamour replaced by a modest pageantry of dignified women, the show highlighted something important – real clothes for real people. I left Origin feeling a shared inspiration with all the women at the show. It was a quiet, confident feeling that, although I’m getting older, nothing is going to stop me from looking terrific. Located in North Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, Origin at Longwood is designed to promote an envigorating lifestyle with dedicated and attentive staff to maximize your choices for enjoyment, new friendships, engaging activities and care that will cater to your special way of life. IT Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. For more information visit www.origin.ca/longwood or call (250) 751-7755. islandtimesmagazine.ca | 35


Roosevelt Elk by Dona Naylor

HERE TO STAY

Vancouver Island is home to BC's largest concentration of Roosevelt Elk. Once on the verge of extinction, these majestic creatures have made a welcome comeback.

36 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


WORTH KNOWING

O

ur horses’ manes blew softly in the warm Vancouver Island breeze. My daughter Meg and I rode the mountain paths to her favourite trail, where the ferns grew higher than her pony. We were crossing the creek when my mare spooked. I trusted her instincts that something must be up ahead and I grabbed Meg’s pony to keep them close. Inching forward, we rode slowly past two massive Roosevelt Elk Bulls. They stood side by side, off the trail and under a leafy canopy of maple shoots; their eyes following us. Roosevelt Elk are impressive to see up close. These Elks are named for Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States who was instrumental in preserving these magnificent animals. They are larger at maturity than their relatives, the Rocky Mountain Elk. Females range in weight from 575 to 625 pounds while males weigh 700 to 1,100 pounds. The males also sport a lordly set of antlers. Brown with ivory tips, with five or more points on each side, they are a muchdesired prize for trophy hunters. Westward expansion and over-hunting once brought the elk to the verge of extinction. Even on Vancouver Island, where they have always enjoyed relative protection, at least in sparsely settled central and northern regions, a harsh winter in 1969 reduced their population to approximately 2,500. However, in recent decades improved hunting regulations, breeding programs, and forestry practices have caused their numbers to rebound. Biologists now estimate the population of Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island is at 4,200 – the largest concentration in BC. On Vancouver Island, Roosevelt Elk are mostly found in the Cowichan, Nanaimo, Campbell River, and Gold River basins. Highly sociable animals, they tend to band together. Adult females and yearling calves stay together while bulls prefer to remain separate in small bachelor herds. During the rut in September mature bulls can defend a harem of up to 30 cows. According to Kim Brunt, a Nanaimo-based Senior Biologist for Environment Canada, and author of Ecology of Roosevelt Elk, "Bulls bugle, to challenge rivals during rut, and emit a series of grunts and high-pitched squeals. When bulls are equally matched, they use their antlers, in a pushing match, to establish who is the strongest." The growing number of Roosevelt Elk on Vancouver Island has made encounters with humans increasingly likely. Becky Martens, an equestrian coach in Coombs, 153 kilometres northwest of Victoria, often rides in the area. "A couple of friends and I rode out of the bush into the opening of a field, where we saw a massive black bear galloping towards us. I wondered what he was running from, or to, when my horse spooked. To my immediate right, hidden by the border of trees on the perimeter of the field, a huge bull elk screamed the strangest sound I have ever heard,” she recalls.

1 The Shawnee Indian name is Wapiti. 2 Elk are the largest member of the deer family, except for the moose. Columbia has two sub-species, the Roosevelt and the Rocky 3 British Mountain elk. drop their antlers from late February to early April, and the 4 Elkoldestbullsanimals shed their antlers first. New antlers reach full size by August.

before European explorers set foot in BC, the Elk was 5 Long an important part of the First Nations subsistence economy.

Elk products provided food, clothing, implements, weapons, decoration, and a medium of exchange.

These facts have been taken from the British Columbia’s Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks, Ecology, Conservation and Management.

"I thought the elk was going to charge my horse, so I jumped off. My two friends took off across the field, and my horse followed. So there I was, a huge black bear galloping toward me, and a screaming bull elk to my right. I ran. My friends were having a great laugh. Luckily the bear kept running, and the elk watched from his vantage point, probably chuckling to himself." According to Brunt, animal predators are a threat to the elk. "Wolves currently account for most of the predation, with calves being the most taken, as they are more easily captured than adults." In addition, Vancouver Island has a strong population of cougar which can also be a threat. Winter climates also remain a potential enemy; severe cold in combination with heavy snow can reduce the elks' numbers, as they require increased nutrients to survive the extreme temperatures. That's not to say humans are no longer a threat. In March 2010, two pregnant elk cows were shot by poachers in the Cowichan Valley and left to die. The killings outraged the community. As local Wilderness Watch co-ordinator Denis Martel told the Cowichan Valley Citizen, "Cow elk can usually give birth to a calf each year of her life. Elk cows can live up to 20 years old. So then, if you shoot five cows from the same herd, you have just decimated 100 elk." Brunt adds that eight cows were found illegally shot in 2009. The state of the butchered carcasses suggested it was for the meat. I, however, will only shoot with my camera. Elk fascinate me, and I feel honoured and privileged to share this remarkable island with them. Unfortunately, the only one I've seen recently was made of wood and held a large sign that said, "Welcome to Strathcona Park." I suspect a lot of people have shot that one. IT More facts avaialble online. Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. islandtimesmagazine.ca | 37


Photos courtesy of Dona Naylor

Hunter'sPie by Lisa Garvie

IS IT TIME

Signature Recipe

The Black Goose Inn

3 4 FILL PASTRY:

1 MAKE FILLING:

Spread mustard on top of pastry

2 lb pork sausagemeat 2 green apples 1 onion diced Bread stuffing

2 PASTRY:

1 cup flour 1/3 cup butter Salt and pepper Cut butter into flour until resembles breadcrumbs Mix dough with water Line loose bottom flan tin approx 8 inches in diameter

5

Fry onions in butter Put sausage meat into pastry shell Slice apples thinly and arrange Place onions on top of apples Arrange stuffing on top of onions Bake at 400 F covered with tin foil for one hour. Remove foil and bake another 15 minutes.

Jan Fuller is the owner of Beach Acres Resort and the Black Goose Inn in Parksville. Contact Jan if you would like to host an event at the Inn. See other recipes on www.islandtimesmagazine.ca. Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca 18 38 | | islandtimesmagazine.ca islandtimesmagazine.ca


MANY USES OF by Andrew S. Brown

Dandelion

Don't Overlook the Nutrition of This Common Plant

I

t’s hard to look down any street, in any neighborhood, and not

Nutritionally, dandelions are very high in iron, calcium, and

see yellow-headed flowers growing liberally on nearly every lawn.

vitamins A, C, E, K, and several of the B vitamins. They are also a rich

The dandelion is considered a weed in North American culture –

antioxidant.

pristine lawns being the goal of most urbanites – but in other parts

As medicine, dandelions have been used for many years. Its roots

of the world, the dandelion is revered for its nutritional and medicinal

are a registered drug in Canada, and are usually brewed in water to

benefits, and it can even be turned into wine.

be used as a diuretic, but the root is also effective as a digestive aid

The flower is used so much that people actually cultivate rows

when taken before meals. It is used as a liver tonic, and to treat kidney

of them in garden beds for ease of harvesting. They propagate

disease, and may even help prevent some forms of cancer. Dandelion

extremely easily, and once the taproot is established in the soil,

can also be applied topically. The milky liquid that secretes from the

leaves will continue to re-grow after each harvest. Dandelions also

broken flower stem can be rubbed on insect bites and burns to help

make good companion plants, as they attract beneficial insects to the

soothe them, and will also act as a natural mosquito repellent.

garden and add nitrogen to the soil.

While dandelions grow practically everywhere around us, it is

Asians and Europeans often incorporate dandelion leaves into

important to be aware of any herbicides that have been sprayed to

salads, sautéed with garlic or onion, or lightly blanched to remove the

try and control them over the past several years. The safest way to

bitterness and served as a side. They are probably most comparable

procure dandelion greens or roots is to either plant and cultivate

to mustard greens in texture and in culinary uses. Dandelion greens

them in garden beds, or allow your garden bed to have a single

were also a traditional food of Native Americans. The taproots can be

spring crop before preparing the soil for your vegetable garden. IT

harvested and dried, then ground up to be used as a coffee substitute, or tea. When brewed into wine, the flowers are often combined with citrus fruits and other ingredients, and then fermented into a

Read this article and more at www.islandtimesmagazine.ca Send your comments to comments@islandtimesmagazine.ca

delicious beverage.

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 39


SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND EVENTS

ISLAND

Adventures

DRALION BY CIRQUE DU SOLEIL

SATURDAY, JUNE 25TH, 2011 – SUNDAY, JUNE 26TH, 2011 Fusing the 3000-year-old tradition of Chinese acrobatic arts with the multidisciplinary approach of Cirque du Soleil, Dralion draws its inspiration from Eastern philosophy and its never-ending quest for harmony between humans and nature. The show's name is derived from its two emblematic creatures: the dragon, symbolizing the East, and the lion, symbolizing the West. In Dralion, the four elements that govern the natural order take on a human form. Thus embodied, each element is represented by its own evocative colour: air is blue; water is green; fire is red; earth is ochre. In the world of Dralion, cultures blend, Man and Nature are one, and balance is achieved. http://www.selectyourtickets. com/dralion.php

THE OTHER EMILY – REDEFINING EMILY CARR EXHIBIT, ROYAL BC MUSEUM

TUESDAY, MAY 24TH, 2011 - MONDAY, OCTOBER 10TH, 2011

The exhibition draws on the Royal BC Museum’s vast Carr collection to mount the first-ever exploration of the artist’s life before she became famous – from her teenage years to just before her emergence on the national art scene in 1927. This new story of her life includes twenty of Carr’s masterpieces, including one painting recently acquired by the Royal BC Museum and on public display for the very first time. Royal BC Museum, 675 Belleville Street, Victoria. Visit www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/TheOtherEmily/default.asp for more information. 40 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


VICTORIA SUNDAY MARKET IN THE SQUARE

Sundays through to Sept. 25th 11:00 am to 4:30 pm Centennial Square Douglas & Pandora, Victoria (250) 598-2593

BUTCHART GARDENS SUMMER FIREWORK SATURDAYS

Saturday Evenings through to Sept. 3rd Butchart Gardens, 800 Benvenuto Avenue, Victoria (250) 652-4422 http://www.butchartgardens.com/ entertainment/fireworks/fireworks.html

AN INCREDIBLE EVENING OF MUSIC

MICHAEL BUBLE IN CONCERT

August 6th, 8 pm Save on Foods Memorial Centre 1925 Blanchard Street, Victoria www.selectyourtickets.com

SHAKESPEARE IN THE SUMMER! July 5th - Aug.t 13th Camosun College-Lansdowne Campus 3100 Foul Bay Road, Victoria http://vicshakespeare.com

FOLKWEST MUSIC FESTIVAL 2011

Aug. 20th - Aug. 21st Royal Athletic Park 1014 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria http://folkwest.ca

25TH ANNUAL VICTORIA FRINGE THEATRE FESTIVAL

July 23rd & 29th, Aug 5th, 12th & 19th Victoria Conference Centre 720 Douglas Street www.magicinvictoria.com

Aug. 25th - Sept. 4th Metro Studio 1411 Quadra Street, Victoria (250) 383-2663 www.intrepidtheatre.com

VICTORIA INTERNATIONAL BUSKERS FESTIVAL 2011

2011 CANADA DRY VICTORIA DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL

July 23rd - July 24th Various Venues, Victoria http://victoriabuskers.com

15TH ANNUAL CANADIAN GLASS SHOW July 31st - Sept. 30th West End Gallery 1203 Broad Street, Victoria www.westendgalleryltd.com

Aug. 13th - Aug. 14th,

(250) 704-2500 www.victoriadragonboat.com

GOOD TIMBER: SONGS AND STORIES OF THE WESTERN LOGGER Aug. 8th - Aug. 27th, Royal BC Museum 675 Belleville Street, Victoria www.otherguystheatre.ca

CLOWNFEST

Aug. 13th, 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Galey Farms, 4150 Blenkinsop Road, Victoria (250) 477-5713 www.galeyfarms.net

GALIANO ISLAND WINE FESTIVAL Saturday, Aug. 13th, 2011 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lions Hall -Burrill Road, Galiano Island (250) 539-3117 http://galianowinefestival.com

FOLKWEST 2011

Aug. 20th - Aug. 21st Royal Athlectic Park 1014 Caledonai Avenue, Victoria http://folkwest.ca

MURDER ON THE ORIENTAL RUG DINNER THEATRE

July 8th - Aug. 26th Travelodge - Gorge Road 229 Gorge Rd East, Victoria, www.victoriadinnertheatre.com

SUMMER SOUNDS

July 10th - August 21st Sidney Bandshell, 2546 Beacon Ave., Sidney

www.peninsulacelebrations.ca/events/ sidney-summer-sounds/

This is a listing of just some of the events on Vancouver Island. Visit harbourliving.ca for even more events. Submit your events to events@islandtimesmagazine.com

2011 TASTE: VICTORIA'S FESTIVAL OF FOOD AND WINE

SATURDAY, JULY 23RD, 2011 – SUNDAY, JULY 24TH, 2011

Not just a wine festival, this culinary tourism experience is an extra long weekend of tastings, seminars, and events! The 2011 schedule of events will be spiced up with even more indulgence. Taste uncorks with The Main Event on July 21st abiding the tradition of fresh and local cuisine and wine in abundance. Stay tuned for a full listing of events in the new year at: http://www.victoriataste.com

VICTORIA INTERNATIONAL BUSKERS FESTIVAL

SATURDAY, JULY 16TH, 2011 - SUNDAY, JULY 24TH, 2011

One of the world’s most unique festivals! We will feature a range of performers from around the world on event stages along our downtown Inner Harbour, in Bastion Square and in Centennial Square. Our festival is a family oriented, free-to-attend event featuring busker acts from Australia, the US, Europe, and from across Canada. Tips to busker hats welcomed and appreciated! To see an evetns schedule and learn more about the performers, visit: http://victoriabuskers.com/

islandtimesmagazine.ca islandtimesmagazine.ca || 41 23

SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND EVENTS

SALT SPRING SATURDAY MARKET IN THE PARK

Saturdays through to Sept. 24 Centennial Park - Saltspring Island (250) 598-4497 www.saltspringmarket.com


CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND EVENTS

ISLAND

Adventures Image courtesy of Destination Nanaimo

CHEMAINUS THEATRE FESTIVAL PRESENTS FIDDLER ON THE ROOF JUNE 17TH TO SEPTEMBER 3RD

Book by Joseph Stein, Music by Jerry Bock, Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick Based on Sholom Aleichem's stories Tradition, Matchmaker, If I Were a Rich Man and Sunrise, Sunset are just a few of the endless reasons to love Fiddler on the Roof. Winner of nine Tony Awards, this smash hit musical has won the hearts of people around the world. It is the ultimate classic. For tickets, visit http://www.chemainustheatrefestival.ca/tickets.html

THE GRAND PRIX D'ART PAINTING RACE SATURDAY, JULY 23RD QUALICUM BEACH, 11:00 AM TO 3:00PM Watch competing artists complete a painting en plein air in the space of three hours. Artists pick a location out of a hat in the picturesque town of Qualicum Beach. The painting must be inspired by something that is visible from the assigned location. Pick up a map at The Old School House Arts Centre and participating businesses so you can stroll around town and watch the artists at work. Paintings for sale at the end of the day at the arts centre. Visit http://www.theoldschoolhouse.org/events2.htm for more information. 42 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


SAVE ON FOODS NANAIMO DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL

Sunday, July 10th Maffeo Sutton Park 50 Arena Street, Nanaimo (250) 668-4521 www.nanaimodragonboat.com

39TH ANNUAL ST. MARK'S FAIR

Saturday, July 23rd, 2011 8:30 am to 3:30 pm St. Mark's Fair Memorial Ave. and Veteran's Way, Qualicum (250) 752-7971

QUALITY FOODS FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS FIREWORKS Saturday, July 23rd 10:05 pm to10:30 pm Swy-A-Lana Park, Waterfront, Nanaimo www.qualityfoods.com

COOMBS BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL 2011 July 30th - July 31st, July 29: 7:00pm July 30: 12:00-10:pm July 31: 11:00-10:00pm Coombs Rodeo Grounds, Coombs (250) 752-0383 www.coombsbluegrass.com

VIEX 2011: FUN FOR THE WHOLE HERD!

August 19th - 21st Beban Fairgrounds 2300 Bowen Road, Nanaimo www.viex.ca

BARD TO BROADWAY THEATRE: ANNE OF GREEN GABLES

July 30th - July 31st Sun. Mat @ 2:00 pm Mon-Sat @ 7:30 pm

Village Theatre, 110 West 2nd Avenue, Qualicum (877) 752-6813 www.b2btheatre.com

NANAIMO MARINE FESTIVAL AND INTERNATIONAL WORLD BATHTUB RACE

July 21st - 24th Various Venues - Nanaimo (250) 753-RACE (7223) www.bathtubbing.com

THE PORT THEATRE PRESENTS: GOOD TIMBER BARD TO BROADWAY THEATRE: MURDERED TO DEATH A ROLLICKING MUSICAL REVUE

Saturday, July 23rd - 24th Matinee and Evening Shows Port Theatre Ticket Centre www.porttheatre.com

August 1st - August 2nd Sun. Mat @ 2:00 pm Mon-Sat @ 7:30pm

Village Theatre, 110 West 2nd Avenue , Qualicum (877) 752-6813 www.b2btheatre.com

MUSIC BY THE SEA 2011

July 19th - July 17th

Rix Centre for Ocean Discoveries Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre, Bamfield www.musicbythesea.ca

6TH ANNUAL SUMMERTIME BLUES!

August 26, 27 & 28, 2011 Maffeo Sutton Park, 50 Arena Street, Nanaimo

www.nanaimobluesfestival.com/festival.htm

8TH ANNUAL SUMMER BY THE SEA STREET MARKET Tuesday, August 2nd 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm Craig Street, Parksville 250-248-3613 www.parksvillechamber.com

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES 2011

Wednesdays, all summer Various Venues and times - Nanaimo www.harbourliving.ca

MS GOLF TOURNAMENT CENTRAL ISLAND 2011

August 31st, 11:30 am to 8:00 pm Nanaimo Golf Club, 2800 Highland Blvd (250) 754-6321 http://chapters.mssociety.ca/

GABRIOLA THEATRE FESTIVAL

August 20th - August 21st , Aug19-21 Folklife Village 575 North road, Gabriola Island 250-247-7363 www.gabriolatheatrefestival.ca

This is a listing of just some of the events on Vancouver Island. Visit harbourliving.ca for even more events Submit your events to events@islandtimesmagazine.com

QUALITY FOODS CANADIAN OPEN SANDSCULPTING COMPETITION & EXHIBITION

SUNDAY, JULY 17TH - SUNDAY, AUGUST 14TH COMPETITION JULY 16 - 17 GATES OPEN JULY 16 AT 2PM EXHIBITION JULY 17 - AUGUST 14 OPEN 9 AM UNTIL 9 PM DAILY

Master Sand Sculptors travel from all corners of the globe to participate in our remarkable competition and exhibition in Parksville, British Columbia, Canada. Sculptors have 24 hours over three days to create their masterpieces from just sand and water (and a lot of ingenuity!) The 2011 QF Canadian Open Sand Sculpting Competition and Exhibition is located in Parksville's Community Park, next to the Lion's Venture Land Playground and Water Spray Park.

MILNER GARDENS ART & PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE GARDEN

SATURDAY, JULY 16TH - SUNDAY, JULY 17TH, 10:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Milner Gardens Art & Photography in the Garden July 16 and 17, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm (last entry at 4:30 pm). Meet, mingle, and be inspired by local artists at work, painting, sketching, carving, and photographing the beauty of this Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden. Bonsai artists, potters, and live music. Artwork silent auction in support of the Gardens. Hand stamp allows re-entry Sunday. Tea Room opens early from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm for homemade soups and scones. For more information, call (250) 752-6153 or visit http://www.milnergardens.org

islandtimesmagazine.ca | 43

CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND EVENTS

MUSIC BY THE SEA 2011

July 9th - July 17th Rix Centre for Ocean Discoveries Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre, Bamfield (250) 728-3887 www.musicbythesea.ca


CO M OX / CO U RT E N AY / C AM P B E L L R I V E R VA N CO U V E R I S L A N D E V E N TS

ISLAND

Adventures Image courtesy of Destination Nanaimo

2011 VANCOUVER ISLAND MUSICFEST SATURDAY, JULY 9TH - SUNDAY, JULY 10TH FRIDAY 3 PM - MIDNIGHT, SAT 9 AM - MIDNIGHT SUN 9AM - MIDNIGHT : WWW.ISLANDMUSICFEST.COM Vancouver Island MusicFest offers six fully programmed stages, over 75 concerts and workshops, on-site riverside camping, kids activities, workshops, and so much more all at a stunning natural venue in the beautiful Comox Valley. 2011 Performers announced to date include Randy Newman, Arrested Development, Red Horse, Rodney Crowell, Jon Anderson (The Voice of Yes), BettySoo, The Atomic Duo (Fat Man and Little Boy), e.s.l, Ordo Sakhna, Rani Arbo & Daisy Mayhem, Corwin Fox, MarchForth Marching Band, The Night Train Music Club and many more!

HORNBY FESTIVAL 2011

JULY 28 - AUGUST 6

Established in 1982, the Hornby Festival has grown into an acclaimed 10-day event. Our programming includes classical, jazz, world beat, and traditional genres of music, modern dance, childrens' programming, theatre, and spoken word. Join us for Festival 2011 as we continue to bring leading and innovative world class artists to our stages. Aeroplan Magazine puts the Hornby Festival amongst the top five festivals in Canada in 2010. Maclean's Magazine lists the Hornby Festival in the top five cultural happenings in BC in 2009. For more information as it becomes available, visit http://www.hornbyfestival.bc.ca. 44 | islandtimesmagazine.ca


T'SASALA CULTURAL GROUP TRADITIONAL NATIVE DANCE PERFORMANCES

June 30 - August 11 Alert Bay (250) 974-5475

41ST ANNUAL MARKET DAY

Saturday, July 16th, 2011 9:00 am to 7:00 pm Downtown Courtenay www.downtowncourtenay.com

FILOMI DAYS 2011

July 16th - July 17th

Various Venues - Port Hardy (250) 949-2650 http://www.filomi.com/

ALERT BAY SEAFEST 2011

Friday, July 22nd Saturday, July 23rd, 2011

(250) 974-5024 www.alertbay.ca

29TH ANNUAL FILBERG FESTIVAL July 29th - Aug. 1st Fri - Sun 11am to 8pm Mon 11am to 6pm (250) 334-9242 www.filbergfestival.com

53RD ANNUAL COMOX NAUTICAL DAYS FESTIVAL

July 30th - August 1st Marina Park, 1809 Beaufort Avenue, Comox (250) 338-1120 www.comoxnauticaldays.ca

NORTH VANCOUVER ISLAND HORSE ASSOCIATION GAMES & GYMKHANA

Comox Valley Fairgrounds Courtenay, Courtenay (250) 337-2327 www.nvihagameandgymkhana.webs.com

CUMBERLAND'S 3RD ANNUAL MOTORCYCLE ROUNDUP

August 6th - August 7th 2pm - 5 pm www.cumberlandmotorcycleroundup.com

FARMERS Island MARKETS SOUTH DUNCAN'S FARMERS MARKET IN THE SQUARE

Saturdays to October 24, 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Moss & Fairfield, Victoria www.mossstreetmarket.com

Saturdays to October 29 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM Downtown Duncan (250) 748-0122

Saturdays to September 24, 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM Centennial Park - Saltspring Island www.saltspringmarket.com

Wenesdays to September 7 11 AM to 4:30 PM Waterwheel Park, Chemainus www.chemainus.bc.ca

MOSS STREET MARKET

SALT SPRING SATURDAY MARKET IN THE PARK

TUESDAY FARM & FOOD MARKET

Tuesdays to October 25th, 3:00 PM to 7:00 PM Centennial Park - Saltspring Island (250) 537-5220

NORTH SAANICH FARM MARKET

Saturdays to October 22 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM St John's United Church Gardens - Saanich www.northsaanichfarmmarket.ca

CHEMAINUS WEDNESDAY MARKET

HONEYMOON BAY OUTDOOR MARKET

Saturdays to October 8 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Southshore Road, Honeymoon 250-749-7772

CENTRAL

PORT ALBERNI FARMERS MARKET

SOOKE COUNTRY MARKET

Saturdays to October 29 Alberni Harbour Quay 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM www.bcfarmersmarket.org

THE JAMES BAY COMMUNITY MARKET

Fidays to October 7th 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Pioneer Waterfront Plaza, Front St., Nanaimo www.nanaimofarmersmarket.com

METCHOSIN FARMER'S MARKET

Saturdays to September 24 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM 1390 Errington Rd, Errington www.erringtonfarmersmarket.ca

Saturdays to October 29 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Sooke Community Hall, 2037 Shields Road www.sooke.org/countrymarket Saturdays to October 29 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM Legislature Buildings, Victoria www.jamesbaymarket.com

Sundays to October30 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM 4450 Happy Valley Road, Metchosin www.metchosinfarmersmarket.blog.com

NANAIMO DOWNTOWN FARMERS MARKET

ERRINGTON FARMERS' MARKET

QUALITY FOODS CANADIAN OPEN SANDSCULPTING COMPETITION & EXHIBITION QUALICUM BEACH FARMER'S MARKET

Saturdays GOLDSTREAM STATION MARKET SUNDAY, JULY 17TH - SUNDAY, AUGUST 14THto December 10 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM Sundays to October 22 COMPETITION JULY 16 - 17 GATES OPEN JULY 16Community AT 2PMHall, 644 Memorial Avenue Qualicum Beach 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM (250) 228-0258 Bryn Maur Road (off Goldstream), Langford EXHIBITION JULY 17 - AUGUST 14 OPEN 9 AM UNTIL 9 PM DAILY www.goldstreamstationmarket.ca BOWEN FARMERS' MARKET in our Master Sand Sculptors travel from all corners of theROAD globe to participate Wednesdays to October 12 SIDNEYremarkable THURSDAY EVENING MARKET competition and exhibition in Parksville, British 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM Columbia, Canada. Thursdays to August 25th Sculptors have 24 hours over three days to create their masterpieces from Road just sand Beban Fairgrounds, 2300 Bowen 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM Downtown 390.5199 Open Sand Sculpting and Sidney water (and a lot of ingenuity!) The 2011(250) QF Canadian www.sidney.ca Competition and Exhibition is located in Parksville's Community Park, next to the

GABRIOLA ISLAND FARMERS' MARKET PENINSULA MARKET Saturdays Lion'sCOUNTRY Venture Land Playground and Water Spray Park.to October 29

Saturdays to October 8 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saanich Fairground, 1528 Stellys Cross Road, www.peninsulacountrymarket.ca

10:00 AM to 12:00 PM 465 South Road, Gabriola Island www.gabriolaisland.org

2011 NANAIMO MARINE FESTIVAL AND FARMER BILL'S SUNDAY MARKET INTERNATIONAL WORLD BATHTUB RACE VICTORIA DOWNTOWN FARMERS' MARKET Sundays to October30

Sundays to August 28 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM SATURDAY, JULY 23RD, 2011 - SUNDAY, JULY 24TH, 2011 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM 7666 Pacific Rim Hiway, Port Alberni of a first time bathtub race (250) 43 years ago, the Nanaimo to Nanaimo Market From Square,the 560confusion Johnson Street, Victoria 724-3775 www.marketsquare.ca "Great" INTERNATIONAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP RACE &MARKET 4 day Nanaimo PIER BATHTUB STREET FARMERS

This is a listing of just some of the events on Vancouver Island. Visit harbourliving.ca for even more events. Submit your events to events@islandtimesmagazine.com

to activities Septemberfor 25 the young, old VICTORIA SUNDAY MARKET THE SQUARE Marine Festival hasIN evolved. Four full days ofSundays fun and AM to 2:00 PM Sundaysand to September 25 family oriented and held in 9:00 in-between, NANAIMO, the Sun-Porch of Canada, Pier Street, Campbell River 11:00 AM to 4:30 PM the Jewel of the West and the Bathtub Racing Capital of the World, during the always www.pierstreet.com/id1.html Douglas & Pandora, Victoria

sunny month of July. So come join us JulyFARMERS 21st to July 24th, 2011 COBBLE(well HILLalmost SUNDAYalways) MARKET COMOX VALLEY MARKET

Sundaysand to December 25 World's Cleanest Sport, Bathtub Wednesdays to September 25 take in the Racing and the 43rd running of the 9:00 AM"Great" to 2:00 PM 9:00 BATHTUB AM to 2:00 RACE PM & Nanaimo Marine INTERNATIONAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP Watson Ave, Cobble Hill 4835 Headquarters Rd Festival and another bonus most of the eventswww.comoxvalleyfarmersmarket.com and activities are FREE. (250) 701-7647 islandtimesmagazine.ca | 29 | 45 islandtimesmagazine.ca


GIRLS AND CURLS ~ SURF CAMP

August 12th - August 14th 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Various Venues - Tofino (250) 245-9580 www.elementstravel.com

FULL MOON KAYAKING TOUR

Saturday, August 13th, 2011 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM Various Locations, Parksville and Nanaimo Elements Women's Travel info@elementstravel.com (250) 245-9580 www.elementstravel.com

SPIRIT SQUARE CRAFT MARKET

Sunday, August 28th, 2011 9:00 am to 2:00 pm Harbour Quay Southside, Port Alberni (250) 724-5674

WEST COAST PLAY

Friday, Aug. 12th July 22nd - 25th, Aug12th - 15th Various Venues - Tofino (250) 245-9580 www.elementstravel.com

ALBERNI FOREST FEST AND THE WORDS IN THE WOODS WRITERS FESTIVAL

July 30th - July 31st McLean Mill National Historic Site Port Alberni (250) 723-2638 www.forestfest.ca

SUNDAY CRAFT MARKET

Sunday, August 14th, 2011 9:00 am to 2:00 pm Harbour Quay, Southside, Port Alberni (250) 724-5674

This is a listing of just some of the events on Vancouver Island. Visit harbourliving.ca for even more events. Submit your events to events@islandtimesmagazine.com

BROKEN GROUP ISLANDS SEA KAYAKING TOURS

WEST VANCOUVER ISLAND EVENTS

July 25th - 29th, Aug.1st - 5th Aug. 29th - Sept 2, Sept 19th - 23rd Pacific Rim Park, Ucluelet (250) 245-9580 www.elementstravel.com

2 tickets to a Chemainus Theatre Performance 2 nights Accommodation in an Oceanview Studio and a Grotto Day Pass for Two sponsored by

Adventures M

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Go Online to Register for your chance to win

www.isla ndtim esm a g a z i n e . c a

ISLAND

UKEE DAYS SATURDAY, JULY 23RD - SUNDAY, JULY 24TH

An amazing 72 hours of action packed festivities for the entire family. Our normally sleepy(ish) seaside town explodes into a summery haze of excitement. Jamie’s Whaling Station, along with the Ucluelet Chamber of Commerce, will be hosting a sunset cruise on the Lady Selkirk from 6 pm-9 pm on the Eve of Ukee Days. Feel free to dress up in your best pirate/wench attire. Tickets will be sold at the Ucluelet Chamber for $45 and this includes appetizers, music, and door prizes. A Cash Bar will be open and you must be 19 or older to cruise. Arrren’t you going to join us matey’s? For more information, contact the Ucluelet Chamber of Commerce at (250) 726-4641 or email info@uclueletinfo.com. Visit http://ukeedays.wordpress.com/ for more info.

CARVING ON THE EDGE FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 15TH - SEPTEMBER 25TH Carving on the Edge Festival 2010 will showcase traditional and contemporary explorations of west coast wood carving with exhibits, forums, feasts, family programs and demonstrations. Come join the celebration! A Carving Festival Map will let you explore the best of west coast carvings at carvers markets, gallery demos, studio tours, and public art. Sites are planned in Tofino, Ucluelet, and Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Visit http://carvingedge.wordpress.com for more information. Contact the Festival Director at carvingfest@gmail.com.

islandtimesmagazine.ca 4630| |islandtimesmagazine.ca


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7 - Summer 2011 - Island Times Magazine  

Island Times Magazine Sumer 2011 Issue

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