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THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF KUALA LUMPUR BE ALL YOU ARE

HIGH SCHOOL COURSE GUIDE TWENTY EIGHTEEN TWENTY NINETEEN


​TABLE

ISKL High School No. 2 Lorong Kelab Polo Di Raja 55000, Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Tel: +60 3 4813-5003 Fax: +60 3 4813-5101

OF CONTENTS

​Using the Course Guide Graduation Requirements ​ISKL Courses ​Global Online Learning

Administration & Guidance Jeff Farrington

HS Principal email: ​jfarrington@iskl.edu.my ext: 5271

International Baccalaureate Advanced Placement (AP) Global Action Program (GAP)

Jeffrey Harwood

HS Assistant Principal email: ​jharwood@iskl.edu.my ext: 5273 Cheri Goodwin HS Counseling Dept. Head email: ​cgoodwin@iskl.edu.my ext. 5287 Michael Ortiz HS IB Coordinator email: ​mortiz@iskl.edu.my ext: 5290 Patricia Podorsek HS Teaching and Learning Coordinator email: ​ppodorsek@iskl.edu.my ext. 5278

Independent Learning English as an Additional Language (EAL) English Social Studies Mathematics Science World Languages Physical Education / Health Technology The Arts Visual Arts Courses Performance Arts / Theater Courses Performance Arts / Music Courses Learning Resource Course Registration & Scheduling Considerations GPA and Honor Roll ISKL HS 4 Year Plan Click on the contents.

anytime to return to the table of

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Using the Course Guide ISKL Mission The International School of Kuala Lumpur provides an exceptional education that challenges each student to develop the attitudes, skills, knowledge and understanding to become a highly successful, spirited, socially responsible global citizen. To that end, The International School of Kuala Lumpur is committed to assisting students in developing a program of study that meets their academic, college and career goals, supports a healthy lifestyle, and allows for participation in meaningful activities. Determining which courses will be of optimum value is one of a student’s most important responsibilities. This task requires a determination of both short and long range educational goals. In most cases the advice of parents, counselors, teachers and a preliminary look at college entrance requirements is of essential importance. The purpose of this booklet is to acquaint you with the wide variety of courses available at ISKL and to enable you to wisely plan a program of study. Before selecting a class, you should find out as much about it as you can - its objectives, its requirements, its prerequisites (if any) and its credit value. If used properly, this booklet can effectively help you create or update your personal ​Four-Year Plan​. The information on the following pages should help you answer these important questions: 1. Am I choosing courses that are appropriate to my abilities, interests and career intentions? 2. Am I choosing courses that will keep options open throughout my years at ISKL? 3. Am I choosing courses that will allow me to fulfill the requirements for graduation? 4. Am I choosing courses that will qualify me for admission to the post-secondary institution of my choice? The counseling staff organizes grade level seminars and individual meetings to support students in the development and review of their four-year plans. Additionally, students and parents are encouraged to visit the High School Counseling office in order to become familiar with the services offered. The counselors have information on colleges and universities in the U.S.A., Canada, Australia, U.K., Korea, Japan and many other countries. The office also has computer software, recommended websites and various books for preparing for college entrance tests, selection of universities, and career information.

*NOTE: The Course Guide provides information for course possibilities. In order for a course to run, ISKL must be in a position to provide a qualified instructor AND there must be a sufficient number of interested students.

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Graduation Requirements Graduation Requirements for Grade 12 students August 2018-2019

According to ISKL Administrative Regulations, students must be in attendance for a minimum of two consecutive semesters (one year attendance requirement) preceding the date of graduation. In addition, students must earn a minimum of 5 ISKL credits in order to be eligible for an ISKL Diploma. Subject area requirements for graduation include:

Subject

Minimum Required Credits

Subject

Minimum Required Credits

English

4

Fine Arts

World Language

2*

Physical Health

Social Studies

2.5

Core Electives**

3.5

Math

2

General Electives

2

Science

2

Total Credits

2 Education/

2

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* Students are required to take 2 Consecutive Years of the same language ** Core Electives include courses in English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and World Languages In addition to the requirements listed above, all students in Grade 9, 10, and 11 are required to participate in the ​Global Action Program (GAP)​.

Credit A student will gain one credit (1.0) after successfully completing a course that has met every other day for 80 minutes for a full year. A student will gain one-half credit (0.5) after successfully completing a course that has met every other day for 80 minutes for one semester of the year.

Graduation Requirements for Grade 9-Grade 11 students August 2018-2019 According to ISKL Administrative Regulations, students must be in attendance for a minimum of two consecutive semesters (one year attendance requirement) preceding the date of graduation. In addition, students must earn a minimum of 5 ISKL credits in order to be eligible for an ISKL Diploma.

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Subject

Required Credits

English

4

World Language

2

Social Studies Science Mathematics Fine and Applied Arts

3 3 3

PE / Health

2

Notes Students are required to study the same World Language for two consecutive years to earn 2 credits.

2 3 semesters of PE and one semester of Health are required in grades 9 and 10.

Electives 5 Total 24 NOTES ● At the end of each semester, one-half (0.5) credit is given for each course successfully passed. ● Credit is given only to courses taken in high school (grades 9-12). ● A maximum of two credits earned through an approved online course can apply towards graduation. Prior approval from the principal is required. ● Approved Individual Learning Plans may earn credit toward graduation. ● English as an Additional Language and Learning Resource courses are considered electives. ● Certain circumstances may require a course to be waived at the discretion of the HS administration In addition to the requirements listed above, all students in Grade 9, 10, and 11 are required to participate in the ​Global Action Program (GAP)​.

Credit A student will gain one credit (1.0) after successfully completing a course that has met every other day for 80 minutes for a full year. A student will gain one-half credit (0.5) after successfully completing a course that has met every other day for 80 minutes for one semester of the year.

Class Standing Students will be classified by grade according to the number of credits earned in a year based on the following scale: Grade 9 - first year Fewer than 5 credits Grade 10 - second year Fewer than 10 credits Grade 11 - third year Fewer than 16 credits Grade 12 - last year Sixteen credits or more and can graduate A student who does not meet these credit requirements will remain in the same grade placement until the necessary credits are earned to advance to the next grade. A grade placement review will be conducted at the end of each semester. A change in placement does not occur for the purposes of acceleration towards graduation. Grade 12 students who are new to ISKL (non-IB) must begin classes within the first four weeks of school. Grade 12 IB Diploma candidates who are new to ISKL must begin on the first day of the school year. Grade 11 IB Diploma candidates must start within the first four weeks of school.

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Course Waiver Students requesting an exemption from a graduation requirement may petition the high school counseling office for a waiver. Student/parent initiated requests should take the following steps: 1. A letter signed by the student and parent is submitted to the high school counselor explaining the reason(s) for requesting the waiver. Waived core classes must be replaced with an equivalent number of core electives, and the student must meet the minimum requirement of 24 credits for graduation. 2. When necessary the high school counselor may consult with administration in considering the petition. The student will be notified of the decision on the proposed waiver, and a copy of it will be placed in the student’s file.

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ISKL Courses

IB Diploma Course Theory of Knowledge (TOK) Independent Learning Course Teacher’s Aide Employability 101 Student Support Assistant SWIFT - Searching for Why English as An Additional Language (EAL) Courses EAL grade EAL grade IB English IB English

level English support level Content support B HL1 B HL2

English Courses English 9 English 10 English 10 Plus ENGLISH 11/12 Options / 10-12 ELECTIVES ● Gender in Literature and Media ● The Big Screen: Film & Novel Study ● Creative Writing for Publication ● Speaking Out ● Literature and Performance ● NEW: Heroes in Literature ● NEW: Humor in Language and Literature Publications: Newspaper/Magazine IB English Language and Literature SL1/HL1 IB English Language and Literature SL2/HL2 IB English Literature SL1/HL1 IB English Literature SL2/HL2 IB English B HL1 IB English B HL2

Math Courses Essentials of Mathematics A and B Integrated Math 1 Integrated Math 2 Integrated Math 2 Plus Integrated Math 3 Integrated Math 3 Plus Topics in Mathematics: Real World IB Math Studies SL1 IB Math Studies SL2 IB Math SL1 IB Math SL2 IB Math HL1 IB Math HL2 AP Calculus AB AP Statistics

Social Studies Courses World Studies 1 World Studies 2 AP World History Global Issues, Local Solutions Southeast Asian History Malaysian History US History Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Geography: People, Environment and Global Issues AP US History IB History SL1/HL1 IB History SL2/HL2 IB Business and Management SL IB Economics SL1/HL1 IB Economics SL2/HL2 IB Geography SL1/HL1 IB Geography SL2/HL2 IB Psychology SL1/HL1 IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL1 IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL2 World Language Courses IB Language ab initio SL1 IB Language ab initio SL2 Bahasa Malaysia 1 Bahasa Malaysia 2 Bahasa Malaysia 3 IB Malay B SL1 IB Malay B SL2 French/Spanish 1 French/Spanish 2 French/Spanish 3 IB French B SL1 / IB Spanish B SL1 IB French B HL1 / IB Spanish B HL1 IB French B SL2 / IB Spanish B SL2 IB French B HL2 / IB Spanish B HL2 Chinese 1 Chinese 2 Chinese 3 Chinese 4 IB Chinese B SL1 IB Chinese B SL2 IB Chinese B HL1 IB Chinese B HL2 Chinese Language Arts 1 Chinese Language Arts 2 Korean Language Arts 1 Korean Language Arts 2 IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish/Japanese A: Language and Literature SL1 IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish/Japanese A: Language and Literature HL1 IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish A: Language and Literature SL2 IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish A: Language and Literature HL2

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Science Courses

Visual Arts Courses

Integrated Science 1 Integrated Science 2 IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL1 IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL2 IB Biology SL1 IB Biology SL2 IB Biology HL1 IB Biology HL2 IB Chemistry SL1 IB Chemistry SL2 IB Chemistry HL1 IB Chemistry HL2 IB Physics SL1 IB Physics SL2 IB Physics HL1 IB Physics HL2 Environmental Science Marine and Terrestrial Ecology of Malaysia Human Anatomy & Physiology Sports Science

ART I: Visual Art Foundations ART I: Photography ART I: Ceramics ART II: Visual Arts ART II: Graphic Design ART II: Photography ART II: Ceramics ART III: Visual Arts ART III: Photography ART III: Ceramics Additional Visual Arts Courses: Publication Design Yearbook Introduction to Design Technology Design Technology 2 IB VISUAL ARTS: IB Visual Arts SL1/HL1 IB Visual Arts SL2/HL2

PE/Health Courses Grade 9 Physical Education Elective Physical Education Lifeguard Training Creative Movement Personal Fitness Health Technology Courses Publications: Magazine Interactive Multimedia Video Production Publication Design Yearbook Film Making Web Page Design Introduction to Design Technology Design Technology 2 Computer Science in the Modern World Introduction to Robotics Robotics II AP Computer Science A IB Computer Science HL1 IB Computer Science SL2

Performance Arts / Theater Courses ISKL Players Theatre Tech Team IB Theatre Arts SL1/HL1 IB Theatre Arts SL2/HL2 Music Courses Music Technology The Sound Project Songwriting Rock Band Concert Band Symphonic Band Wind Ensemble String Ensemble Chamber Players Concert Choir Chamber Choir​ - Soprano/Alto Chamber Choir​ - Tenor/Bass ISKL Singers

Learning Resource Courses LR Core Support Effective Study Skills

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Global Online Learning We are excited to announce a new online curriculum offering for ISKL students to supplement their traditional high school experience. In an effort to offer broader course offerings and introduce technology-based education, we have partnered with ​Global Online Academy to make online courses available to our grade 10-12 students in August 2018. Please see ​this document​ for detailed information about GOA. We have chosen Global Online Academy as the provider due to its international reputation as the leader in online education. GOA works with a large number of reputable international schools with a focus on promoting student passion and providing students with learning opportunities that help develop key 21st century skills. Their courses are lead by expert teachers. You can access the Global Online Academy courses here in their ​course catalogue​. ISKL has thoroughly evaluated this online program as an option for students. Member schools include Jakarta International School, Singapore American School, International School of Beijing, Hong Kong International School, and American School in Japan. Global Online Academy is a recognized Candidate for Accreditation with the ​New England Association of Schools and Colleges​. The following criteria apply: -students may take a semester course from the GOA course catalogue not offered by ISKL. Students will be scheduled for this course in place of their elective class in their school timetable for a regular course load. -students will receive a report card from GOA with the grade achieved in the course. -credit for a GOA class will be granted as a transfer credit from GOA as a Pass on the ISKL documents. The GOA class grade will NOT be used in the GPA calculation on the transcript. -the cost of any GOA course paid to GOA is at the expense of the parent ($600 USD/course). Please have a conversation as a family about the options available by taking advantage of the ISKL/GOA partnership. Students interested in this option should: -go to the GOA site and research course options -determine which GOA course is of interest to study -determine which ISKL elective course would not be taken -make the appropriate selection during course sign up in PowerSchool

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International Baccalaureate The IB Diploma Program is a challenging two-year pre-university curriculum that leads to a qualification widely recognized by the world’s leading universities. For many universities, such as in Europe and Australia, the IB Diploma serves as an entrance requirement, while most North American universities will grant university credit and/or advanced standing for strong results in higher level courses. As the IB Diploma is the most challenging academic program offered at ISKL, successful pursuit can enhance the student’s university application. Diploma candidates study six subjects selected from 5 subject groups and an elective course, together with the DP core: creativity, activity, service (CAS); the Extended Essay (EE); and theory of knowledge (ToK). Normally three subjects are studied at higher level (HL) and three at standard level (SL), along with the three parts of the core. At the end of the two-year program, students are assessed both internally and externally in ways that measure individual performance against stated curriculum objectives for each subject. Is the IB for Me? We have an open enrollment policy at ISKL, which means that any student may choose to pursue the IB Diploma, as long as course prerequisites have been met. Successful candidates show a positive and consistent academic work ethic and a commitment to managing their time well. While we believe that pursuing the full IB Diploma has significant advantages for university preparation, there are many legitimate reasons why some students do not choose the full IB. In some cases the student may not be ready for the academic rigors of HL courses. In other cases, students may choose to focus their energies in other areas, such as theatre production or athletics. Regardless of the reason, we have had many excellent students pursue and achieve the IB Diploma, and we have had many excellent students who did not pursue the full IB Diploma. In some cases, particularly in Europe and Australia, the universities may require international students to complete an IB Diploma program, often giving conditional offers of acceptance based on attaining a particular Diploma score. Please check with universities of interest for their policies on the IB Diploma. In the US, acceptances are given prior to the issue of results, and so it is the challenge of the academic program and the level of success the student achieves in that program that is of the most significance when applying for university admission. Furthermore, students often earn college credit for good IB scores, particularly in HL subjects. It is not uncommon for successful Diploma students to enter as second-year students in their university, depending on scores and school policy for credit. Students who are considering the Diploma program should speak to their teachers if they have any questions about course selection. Students who choose not to pursue the full IB Diploma are encouraged to take individual IB courses in subjects for which they are recommended. Meeting the Challenge of the IB Diploma Programme Although the IB Diploma is an academically challenging program of study, we encourage students to be involved in alternate activities that match their interests and talents. It is a stated goal of the IB program that students maintain ​balanced​ lives, and through CAS, that students also participate in activities that may be novel to their experience. Robust

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opportunities exist in theatre, music, athletics, community service, and through these offerings, we invite students to broaden their high school experience. With such an array of activity and academic demand, students can become overwhelmed with options. It is advisable that students are judicious in their decisions, such that they are able to maintain both school and social commitments. To meet the challenge of the IB Diploma program, successful students show characteristics that include (but are not limited to): ● ● ● ● ● ●

being realistic about themselves and their aims demonstrating responsibility and self-discipline being organized with course demands and extracurricular commitments working hard and on a consistent basis seeking assistance when necessary anticipating and planning for deadlines and social activities.

Course Selection for the IB Diploma The six subject groups of the IB Diploma include: Group Group Group Group Group Group

1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6:

Studies in Language and Literature Language Acquisition Individuals and Societies Sciences Mathematics The Arts

When selecting subjects for the Diploma, one subject from each of Groups 1-5 must be chosen together with a sixth subject from either Group 6 or from Groups 2-4. At least three and not more than four subjects must be at higher level (HL) and the others at standard level (SL). One or two subjects at standard level (excluding languages ab initio) can be completed at the end of the first year of the Diploma Program. All HL courses must be completed at the end of the second year. The interdisciplinary standard level Environmental Systems and Societies meets the requirements of groups 3 and 4 through a single subject. Two additional subjects must be chosen to meet the requirements of the Diploma, which may be chosen from groups 1-4 or from group 6. A candidate may choose a second group 1 instead of a group 2 subject. A bilingual Diploma will be awarded for successful completion of two group 1 subjects with the award of a grade 3 or higher in both.

IB Subjects Offered at ISKL

Group 1:

Higher Level

Standard Level

English A Literature

English A Literature

Chinese A Language & Literature English A Language & Literature Korean A Language & Literature Spanish A Language & Literature

Chinese A Language & Literature English A Language & Literature Korean A Language & Literature Spanish A Language & Literature

Chinese B

Chinese B

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Group 2:

English B (EAL students only) French B Spanish B

French B Malay B Spanish B French/Malay/Mandarin/Spanish ab initio

Group 3:

Group 4:

Economics Geography History Psychology

Business and Management Economics Environmental Systems and Societies Geography History Psychology

Biology Chemistry Computer Science Physics

Biology Chemistry Computer Science Environmental Systems and Societies Physics

Mathematics

Mathematics Math Studies

Theater Arts Visual Arts

Theater Arts Visual Arts

Group 5:

Group 6:

Examples of IB Diploma Subject Choices: Student 1:

Student 2:

Student 3*:

HL

SL

HL

SL

HL

SL

-English A Lit -History -Theater Arts

-French ab -Biology

-Spanish B -Mathematics -Visual Arts

-English A Lang & Lit

-Korean A Lang & Lit

-Environmental Systems & Societies -Theater Arts

-Economics -Physics

-English A Lang and Lit -Chemistry -Mathematics

-Mathematics

*Successful results in two Language A courses leads to a Bilingual IB Diploma.

The IB Core The ​Extended Essay (EE) ​is an in-depth study of a focused topic chosen from the list of approved Diploma Programme subjects—normally one of the student’s six chosen subjects for the IB diploma. It is intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity. It provides students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of their own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor. The essay has a prescribed limit of 4000 words. The interdisciplinary ​Theory of Knowledge (ToK) ​course provides an opportunity for students to reflect on the nature of knowledge. The task of ToK is to emphasize connections between areas of knowledge and link them to the knower in such a way that

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the knower can become aware of his or her own perspectives and those of the various groups whose knowledge he or she shares. ToK, therefore, explores both the personal and shared aspects of knowledge and investigates the relationships between them. Participation in CAS is organized around the three strands of ​Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS)​ defined as follows: ● ● ●

Creativity—exploring and extending ideas leading to an original or interpretive product or performance Activity—physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle Service—collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need

Through CAS, students are encouraged to be involved in artistic pursuits, sports, and community service work, which complement a challenging academic program and provide opportunities for self-determination, collaboration, accomplishment and appreciation of life beyond the academic arena. More detailed information about the IB at ISKL is found on the ​IB/AP webpage​.

IB Courses for non-Diploma Students Students who do not wish to participate in the full IB Diploma Program but would like the challenge of the curriculum in particular subjects can enroll in up to six IB courses of their choice if it fits their schedule. Students may select up to 4 advanced program courses (IB HL and/or AP). Students in IB courses are expected to sit for the external exams.

Individual Learning Plan (ILP) for IB Languages Students in an international community often have different and varied world language needs. While ISKL has a number of languages offered in our curriculum, it is not possible to offer all the different languages the IB has available for study. In meeting the needs of a diverse community, ISKL allows students to study other IB languages with a teacher or tutor outside of ISKL. Usually such requests are for the purpose of maintaining and further developing a mother-tongue language, or for such needs as university admission in a home country of origin. The following expectations apply: ● ● ●

students must have a high degree of competency in the language (native or near-native proficiency) to be able to take a group 1 course. parents are responsible for finding an appropriate language teacher or tutor, who must then be approved by the IB Language Coordinator. financial arrangements between the family and the teacher or tutor is the responsibility of the family and is not covered by ISKL tuition.

Students in grades 9 or 10 may consider a one or two-year pre-IB ‘training period’ in preparation for IB language A in grades 11 and 12. Students who have this interest must first speak with their guidance counselor. More detailed information about ILP for IB Languages is found on the ​IB/AP webpage​.

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Guidelines for Entry into The IB Diploma Program Although the IB Diploma is an academically challenging program of study, we encourage students to be involved in alternate activities that match their interests and talents. It is a stated goal of the IB program that students maintain balanced lives, and through CAS, that students also participate in activities that may be novel to their experience. Robust opportunities exist in theatre, music, athletics, community service, and through these offerings, we invite students to broaden their high school experience. To meet the challenge of the IB Diploma program, successful students show characteristics that include (but are not limited to): ● ● ● ● ● ●

being realistic about themselves and their aims demonstrating responsibility and self-discipline being organized with course demands and extracurricular commitments managing workload and deadlines seeking assistance when necessary anticipating and planning for deadlines and social activities.

Grade 11 students who are entering the IB Diploma program and are new to ISKL are required to begin classes within the first four weeks of school. However, we strongly recommended that students begin classes from the first day of school so as not to miss course content or fall behind in academic workload. New Grade 12 students who are transferring from an IB program of another school should also begin ISKL classes on the first day, so as not to miss course content or fall behind in academic workload. Furthermore, all grade 12 transfer students must communicate with the IB Coordinator of both the old and the new school to ensure IB assessment and registration information is transferred appropriately. Communication prior to the opening of school is strongly recommended, so as to determine which, if any, gaps in curricular differences need to be addressed.

Expectations to Maintain Standing in the IB Program To continue positive standing in the IB Diploma program, students are expected to maintain a level of achievement (as indicated by course grades) that demonstrates a good chance of success in earning the IB Diploma. IB Diploma students are also expected to keep pace with the IB Diploma program by completing major IB assignments on time (as indicated by meeting major IB assignment due dates).

Regarding Achievement in IB Courses: Students who show three or more D or NC grades (1-3 under the new reporting system) in IB courses at the half or end of a semester will be referred to the HS counselor to consider academic support interventions. Students who show three or more D or NC grades (1-3 under the new reporting system) after two successive nine-week grading periods may be withdrawn from the IB Diploma program. Any decision to be withdrawn from the IB Diploma program may be appealed to the High School Principal. Students who show a semester grade of NC (1-2 under the new reporting system) for any IB class will meet with the HS Counselor to identify further support, or to consider suitability of the course or program of study.

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Meeting Major Assignment Due Dates: The IB due date calendar is designed to provide structure for Diploma students who will have multiple major assignments for various IB courses throughout the year: Internal Assessment (IA) work, written tasks, orals, an extended essay, uploads. They have been thoughtfully spaced to avoid multiple tasks being due at the same time. We believe it is valuable for students to adhere to these deadlines, as they have been set to support students in managing the variety of responsibilities they encounter during the two years of the program, both in and out of class. Due dates can be found on the ​IB/AP webpage​. Students who have not submitted a major IB assessment on time will meet with their teachers to discuss the missing work and establish a date of completion. The teacher may require the student to attend one or more preps and/or after school sessions until the work is complete. Co-curricular activities may also be suspended pending completion of the work required. Students who demonstrate a pattern of missed IB deadlines will meet with the HS counselor to identify further support, or to consider suitability of the course or program of study.

IB Exam Registration and Fees Students who intend to take an IB exam must register for the exams in October of the school year in which they intend to sit for the exam. For example, if a student intends to sit for an exam in May 2018, registration occurs in October 2017. For the May 2018 exam session, the registration fee is RM 715 per student and the exam fee is RM 510 per exam. Currently, a full diploma student will incur a total cost of RM 3775 over the two years of the program. These fees are subject to change due to increases by the IBO and currency fluctuations.

IB Diploma and ISKL Graduation Requirements An IB Diploma candidate will earn the necessary credits for the ISKL Diploma concurrently with the IB Diploma. Grade 11 and 12 students who are new to ISKL do not need to meet all ISKL graduation requirements if pursuing the full IB Diploma. New grade 11 and 12 students who complete the full IB Diploma program will be awarded an ISKL Diploma as well.

IB Diploma Course Theory of Knowledge (TOK) Two semesters; One credit; Grade 11 (Semester 2), Grade 12 (Semester 1) Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Regular Prerequisite: Full IB Diploma candidate Homework: Average The purpose of TOK is to enable students to critically assess and unify the knowledge they have acquired throughout their schooling. Through reflective writing, oral presentations, and group discussions on “knowledge issues,” students evaluate the degree to which knowledge claims may be termed reliable, certain, and universal. At all points, students must attempt to relate relatively abstract TOK concepts to “real world” contemporary issues and concerns, some of which may involve reappraising the value of 14


knowledge attained in classroom settings. This is a two-semester program, which begins in the second semester of 11th grade. The course will be structured around analyzing eight Ways of Knowing and examining the following Systems of Knowledge: Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Human Sciences, History, Art, and Ethics.

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Advanced Placement (AP) Advanced Placement (AP) courses offer ISKL students the opportunity to do college-level work while still in High School. The courses are available to qualified, motivated students primarily in grades 10, 11 and 12. Students who desire to earn university credit must register for and successfully pass the examinations administered in May. Students enrolled in an AP course at ISKL are expected to sit the AP exam, and pay for the cost of the exam charged by College Board. Enrollment in AP classes at ISKL requires: • Meeting the established course prerequisites • Teacher and counselor recommendations • A commitment to academic achievement • An understanding and acceptance of workload expectations Students can sit an AP exam without enrolling in the specific course. It is strongly advised that students pursuing this option arrange outside tutoring assistance.

AP courses at ISKL: AP AP AP AP AP

Calculus AB Computer Science A Statistics United States History World History

AP Exam Registration and Fees Students who intend to take an AP exam must register for the exams in January of the school year in which they intend to sit for the exam. Students who are sitting for an AP exam are obliged to pay for the exam fees. For the May 2018 exam session, the fee is RM 540 per exam. This fee is subject to change due to increases by the College Board and currency fluctuations.

IB and AP Credit at US and Canadian Universities Students can be awarded university credit or advanced standing for strong IB and AP test results. Many universities will grant credit for scores of 5 or above on IB Higher Level exams or with scores of 4 or above on AP exams. As university policies vary for IB or AP credit, for accurate information, please visit the undergraduate admissions website for any university of interest.

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Global Action Program (GAP) Philosophy “People discover their abilities, values, passions, and responsibilities in situations that offer adventure and the unexpected. These leaps are bridges to highly successful, socially responsible global activists.” Kurt Hahn, founder of the student learning programs, Outward Bound & Round Square

The Global Action Program engages all grades 9, 10, and 11 students in action-based travel teams where "curiosity is sparked, vision cultivated, and action inspired" through a week of full-on personal and group challenge. The aim is for students to support each other as team members: ● ● ● ●

deepen their understanding and commitment to collective community action develop confidence in their physical abilities and emotional resilience explore the diverse culture and geography of our Asian neighborhood discover and celebrate the power of contributing to a highly functioning team

Learning Goals Collaboration Each student will develop his/her ability (1) to work effectively and respectfully with diverse team members; (2) to take responsibility for his/her role in achieving common goals; and (3) to contribute ideas and consider others’ viewpoints as critical thinkers.

Resilience Each student will enhance his/her ability to persevere when encountering obstacles and the unknown and to approach challenges as opportunities to strengthen skills.

Commitment to Connect Each student will deepen his/her understanding and appreciation of the ecological, social, economic and political issues that challenge communities and contribute to our partner communities in ways that support global well-being.

Program Structure Students and parents consider a variety of grade level travel team options, nominating 4 that align with student interest and parental support. Travel learning teams are built as heterogeneous grade level groups of 16-18 students, led by 2 ISKL Trip Leaders. All teams travel during the same one-week period in late October or early November, depending on the parameters of the HS calendar.

Academic Requirement and Fees Successful participation in the Global Action Program is an annual academic/ graduation requirement for Grade 9, 10 and 11 students. Students and parents have an opportunity to review trip options, learning goals/itineraries, and costs; and register trip preferences.

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The cost of each travel program varies due to differential costs in flights, visas, and land programs. Trips between RM 3000 and RM 4000 are the median range. The lowest cost is RM 2000-2800. More remote destinations cost RM 4500-5900. This fee is inclusive of all learning activities, shared accommodation, chaperones/guides with first aid and safety training, community project supplies, daily meals/afternoon snack/unlimited drinking water, emergency medical insurance, air and ground transportation, airport transfers, and arrival visas. Spending money for snacks, souvenirs, and miscellaneous group expenses is not included. Billing structure is as follows: Families deposit RM 3000 in May/June as part of the first semester tuition to cover airline and land package bookings; the remaining trip balance (which varies by trip) is assessed in late November with second semester school fees. Note: Because annual participation is a graduation requirements, students unable to travel (due to a serious medical or family emergency) participate instead in the second semester Habitat for Humanity Travel Build that is usually during Chinese New Year or the March Break. Average cost of the Habitat for Humanity build is RM 4,000-5,000 per student and that includes the building materials for the house project

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Independent Learning Independent Learning Plans (ILP) Independent Learning Plan (ILPs) are opportunities for students to create and complete coursework outside of the regular course offerings at ISKL, at the expense of the parents. An ILP usually includes material that is not offered at ISKL. However, an ILP can cover ISKL course material if the student cannot take the ISKL course due to a scheduling conflict. Taking an accredited online AP or IB course could be an option for an ILP. The deadline for starting an ILP is by the end of the first 8-day cycle of the semester and students may have a maximum of one ILP per semester. Information about ILP in non-curricular languages for IB Diploma can be found in the IB section of this guide. Any High School student can initiate an ILP. The ILP form is available in the Counseling Office, and must be completed and submitted in the first eight days of the semester. The student must write up the ILP form with help from the mentor and the parents. To gain ISKL approval the submitted ILP form must contain the following elements: ● A specific, clearly stated goal for the plan. ● A clear statement of why this plan is important and necessary to the student. ● A specific step-by-step timeline indicating exactly how the student will accomplish the goal of the ILP. ● A clear listing or explanation of the resources needed to accomplish the goal. ● Identification of a specific adult mentor or teacher to work continuously with the student in completing the ILP. ● Signed approval from a parent, the teacher or mentor, the counselor, and the Advanced Programs Coordinator.

Grading and Credit ILPs are graded on a Pass (P) / No Credit (NC) basis. Students may earn 0.5 credit per semester when passed. The Pass/ No Credit grade is not included in ​the ​GPA calculation on the student transcript.

Independent Learning Courses Teacher’s Aide One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: None Homework: Light Students are assigned to work with an ISKL teacher or staff member and are asked to perform work related tasks. Grades are assigned on a Pass (P) /No Credit (NC) basis.

Employability 101 One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: None Homework: Light This course is for students wanting to become a teaching assistant for a particular course/teacher. We will meet for the first 3-4 weeks to prep for their placement, and then students will be mentored by classroom teacher. Mentor teachers will provide feedback to instructor of this course, as they will be the direct supervisor. Grades are assigned on a Pass (P) /No Credit (NC) basis. 19


Student Support Assistant One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: None Homework: Light In this course you will be partnered with a student that may require academic or social support in order to be successful in one of their elective classes (art, theatre, PE, music, etc.). Indirectly, you will provide support to the course instructor by working one-on-one with this student. Academically, you may help a student create study tools, create a timeline for completing a project, or help practice a presentation so they may gain more confidence. Socially, you may aid them in working with others in a group or even encouraging them to advocate for themselves. This is a pass/no credit course and you will be supervised by the classroom teacher and the student’s Learning Resource teacher. The ultimate goal of this course is to provide the student with more independence from adults and at the same time provide opportunities of social interaction with a peer.

SWIFT - Searching for Why: Interests, Fulfillment, and Tribes One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light No one in this class will ever ask, “Why am I learning this?” SWIFT is a course that allows students to explore their own personal interests, whether they be investing in the stock market, yoga, stand up comedy, professional basketball, country music, or the use of media by communist regimes. Students can explore their own personal “why”: WHY they are in school, WHY it is important to consider all options in front of them, and WHY they should choose one life direction over another, in the hopes of gaining a greater understanding of themselves and how they can live a fulfilling life. Students will analyze their own interests and develop skills in research, networking, time management and communication to help them find and keep suitable mentors and their “tribe” of people who share their interest. With the help of teacher direction and support, students will be expected to set their own learning targets, make their own plans, execute those plans to the best of their ability and reflect on their results. By the end of the semester, students will share their learning, not necessarily as a project in the traditional sense, but as a process of personal growth.

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English as an Additional Language (EAL) Introduction / Overview

The EAL department endeavors to develop English language competency to meet grade level, subject specific and school expectations. The EAL department scaffolds content and academic concepts to support students so they can access the mainstream curriculum. Specifically, our EAL department develops English language competency through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. All ISKL school divisions have adopted the WIDA (World Class Instructional Design and Assessment) MODEL (Measure of Developing English Language) English language proficiency assessment to assist in measuring student English proficiency levels. This assessment is considered with other sources of student performance in making decisions for required levels of EAL language support. The exit criteria for EAL service is based on the WIDA language acquisition test along with academic success in the mainstream classes. All EAL students are placed in their grade level mainstream English course, and partnered with an EAL English support appropriate to their level of language acquisition. Additionally, students are placed in their grade level History and Science courses and partnered with EAL Content support in History and Science by grade level as appropriate to their level of language acquisition. EAL Content Grade 11/12 Support will be a general resource due to wide variety of courses available.

EAL Courses EAL grade level (9/10/11) English support, by acquisition level One semester; 0.5 credits (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-11 Prerequisites: Placement Test Homework: Light This Pass (P)/No Credit (NC), credit-bearing class is designed to support the EAL student who is enrolled in grade level English class. The focus of this class is to provide support for mainstream English assignments, as well as language acquisition lessons for developing reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

EAL grade level (9/10/11/12) Content support One semester; 0.5 credits (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: Placement Test Homework: Light This Pass (P)/No Credit (NC), credit-bearing class is designed to support the EAL student with academic language in content-area courses. The focus is to build content-specific vocabulary, to teach reading strategies for a range of content texts, and to further develop speaking, note-taking, and writing skills. 21


IB English B HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: English 10 and teacher recommendation Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence designated for non-native English speakers. It fulfills the IB English B HL requirement, Year 1 and ISKL graduation requirement in English. Students will develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading (of both literary and non-literary texts) and writing. Through a variety of themes, students will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. Students will study two literary works in depth, building on a sound knowledge of the basic and complex structures and vocabulary of the language. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

IB English B HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: English B HL1 and teacher recommendation Homework: Heavy This course is the final year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence designated for non-native English speakers. It fulfills the IB English B HL requirement, Year 2 and ISKL graduation requirement in English. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will continue to explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language through the study of selected themes. Students will study a variety of text types, including at least two literary works in depth and write for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading and speaking solely in the target language in preparation for the IB HL examinations in May. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

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English Overview

**IB and AP students are expected to purchase copies of all novels on the reading list after confirming with instructor. Owning novels will benefit any student, and it is suggested that non-IB/AP students purchase prescribed texts as well.

English Courses English 9 One year; One credit; Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average In English 9, students study novels, poetry, plays, speeches and short stories. They learn the importance of both social and historical context in the study of various literary works. Students develop the skills of literary analysis, research and composition. In addition to the course syllabus, students are also expected to read independently outside of class over the course of the year. There is a focus on vocabulary, annotation and essay writing. Collaboration is fostered through the preparation of oral presentations and Socratic seminars. Students learn to appreciate language and literature through making connections between self and text. Units for this course include a Shakespearean play, an argumentative writing unit, a short story unit, poetry and novel studies.

English 10 One year; One credit; Grade 10 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average Students continue to develop their reading and writing skills by working with literary and non-literary texts. Students explore the short story, novel, non-fiction texts, poetry and plays. Reading skills will focus on understanding narratives, textual analysis, vocabulary development, ​and cognitive strategies to construct meaning from texts. Writing skills will involve research, the development of commentary and editorial writing, and the refinement of essays about literature. Students will work on the craft of their own writing and the use of voice as well as develop meaningful independent reading choices for themselves.

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English 10 Plus One year; One credit; Grade 10 Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation; student passion for English & commitment to rigor Homework: Heavy This class is designed for students who are skilled in and passionate about English, and are ready for an intense challenge. Students explore similar texts and develop similar skills as the English 10 course, but are expected to operate at a very sophisticated level in their reading and writing, and will analyze at a rigorous pace. The course will explore the short story, novel, non-fiction texts, poetry and plays. Skill focus will be on understanding narratives, textual analysis and annotation, research, commentary writing, and essays about the literature. Students will work on their writing craft and the use of voice as well as develop meaningful independent reading choices for themselves.

ENGLISH 11/12 Options [ALSO AVAILABLE AS ELECTIVES FOR GRADE 10] One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average Students in grades 11 and 12 have the opportunity to design their own English studies program. All semester-long 11/12 options are carefully constructed to continue honing skills in critical reading (a variety of text types), writing (for a range of audiences and purposes), listening, speaking and research. Students will be challenged to refine their analytical skills and flex their creative muscles in each course. Not all courses will run each semester; which courses are offered will depend on the number of students interested in each.

Gender in Literature and Media This course will consider issues of power, education, body image, loneliness, relationships, and violence related to gender in literature and media. Students will analyze novels, short stories, advertisements, and film. They will read contemporary essays and speeches that look at how media and culture affect our expectations for men and women. Students will write personal reflections, essays, and create media works; they will discuss and collaborate with classmates in their research and in socratic seminars.

The Big Screen: Film & Novel Study What is the narrative structure of a great story? How are characters developed to make a powerful film and novel? Classics like Hitchcock’s thrillers, modern Hollywood dramas, and documentaries will be viewed, analyzed, and debated. Students will consider the effectiveness of language, plot devices, characters, and setting. Students will write film reviews and editorials; they will look at the effects of stereotypes, and consider the themes and social norms presented in film and relate that to personal experience. Students will look at elements of a great story, reading from a selection of novels and short stories, then write their own stories after studying effective narrative writing. A final movie project will demand creativity and knowledge of key aspects studied in the course.

Creative Writing for Publication Students of creative writing will explore, through reading and writing, multiple genres and workshop their own pieces to the point where they are ready to send out for possible publication. Students will engage in a constant cycle of seeking inspiration, creation, modification, analysis and finally publication. Students will read a wide range of texts, including many diverse literary publications, with an eye on gaining insight into authors’ techniques and genre styles. Pieces for publication are the products. Creative writers working together is the process. A deeper understanding of literature is the point. Come join us. 24


Speaking Out: No Fear Public Speaking In this course students will learn the importance of becoming a skilled presenter, and the techniques to develop their abilities in this area. Students will focus on research and organizational skills in preparing speeches for various situations and audiences. They will develop critical listening skills, as well as practice delivery techniques to improve their performances for the classroom and to prepare them for formal speeches in the future.

Literature and Performance Literature comes alive in this course! Imagine Romeo in a modern day setting, or the characters of a short story portrayed on a stage. This new elective option aims to explore the relationship between literature and theatre. ​Students discuss the meaning, form and style of works of fiction, but at the same time, explore their imaginative impact through creative work with performance opportunities. In short, we will read, discuss and perform literature in unique and inventive ways.

Heroes in Literature “I need a hero”, or so says the 1984 hit song “Holding out for a hero”. Thing is, we’re all holding out for a hero, if you go by literature and mass media. And those heros have a lot in common. Most heroes in fiction follow a pattern, what Joseph Campbell called “the hero’s journey”. This applies to Greek heroes, to graphic novels, to superheroes, and contemporary “everyman” heroes. What changes is: the degree to which the hero (protagonist) is in fact “heroic”, the setting, the type of conflict, and the cultural context in which the hero has been crafted. In this course, students will analyze and write about how heroes are built in different times and places. We’ll even reflect on real life heroes who they are and why we see them as such.

Humor in Language and Literature Want to laugh your way through English class? Want to find out what makes something funny and why different people laugh at different things? Why some types of humour might be considered taboo, crass, inappropriate, or insensitive? In this course, you will learn about the different types of comedy and the “comedy ladder”. You will analyze comedic techniques used by writers to tickle the funny bone of their readers. You will read short comedic non-fiction and fiction pieces from writers such as Bill Bryson, David Sedaris, Tina Fey and even Matt Groening (creator of ​The Simpsons​). You write about the writer’s craft with regards to humour and even try writing a little humour of your own!

Publications: Magazine Prerequisite: EAL students must have a WIDA score of 5.6 or higher. Participants must demonstrate grade-level proficiency with writing in English. Students will gain experience with non-fiction writing for specific purposes, including the writing of news, features, photo captions, editorials, and reviews. Articles will be published online on OurTAKE and printed once a semester in TAKE magazine. Students will experience the different needs of online publishing and print. TAKE magazine, will help students demonstrate knowledge by designing layouts and submitting ready-for-print writing. OurTAKE, the online magazine, will focus on different forms of magazine writing skills and will work to tighter deadlines. Students are encouraged to take this course for the entire year. The course may be taken for as many as 8 semesters. Participants must demonstrate proficiency with writing in English.

IB English Language and Literature SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Accelerated 25


Homework: Heavy The first year of the Language and Literature course introduces the student to critical literacy: the creation of meaning in a variety of texts, as well as the influence of culture upon meaning. Through both literary and non-literary works, including mass media, students develop a sensitivity to the intricate relationship between themselves, their society, and the larger world. Analytical skills are strengthened through a variety of practices, such as presentations, commentaries, cross-textual analysis, and formal composition. Possible themes for the course include crime and society, and the power of language in the media. Students are expected to write and read at an advanced level. How the SL and the HL differ: The model for language and literature is the same at SL and HL, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. For example, in the literature sections the number of texts prescribed is greater at HL than at SL. In the language sections students are generally expected to cover many more texts of all kinds at HL than at SL.

IB English Language and Literature SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors (SL2)/Advanced (HL2) Prerequisite: IB English Language and Literature SL1 or HL1 Homework: Heavy The second year of the Language and Literature course continues to develop the students’ critical literacy: the creation of meaning in a variety of texts, as well as the influence of culture upon meaning. Through both literary and non-literary works, including mass media, students further examine the relationship between themselves, their society, and the larger world. Analytical skills are strengthened through a variety of practices, such as presentations, commentaries, cross-textual analysis, and formal composition. Possible themes for the course include language and literature of war, language and taboo, and gender roles. Students are expected to write and read at an advanced level.

IB English Literature SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Plus Homework: Heavy The first year of the Literature course introduces the students to literary criticism: the analysis of meaning in a variety of texts, as well as the understanding of culture through literature. Through the study of different genres, students develop insight into themselves, the literature and the world they inhabit. Literary skills are developed through formal essays, commentaries and oral presentations as well as Socratic seminars and class discussions. Close analysis of the texts is emphasized throughout the course. Possible themes include language and film, human relationships, and postcolonial literature. Students are expected to write and read at an advanced level. How the SL and the HL differ: The model for language A: literature is the same at SL and HL but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. For example, SL students are required to study 10 works whereas HL students are required to study 13. In addition, two of the assessment tasks for SL are less demanding than the comparable HL tasks.

IB English Literature SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors/Advanced Prerequisite: IB English Literature SL1/HL1 Homework: Moderate/Heavy As the completion of the second year of the IB English Literature program, this course is for students who love the challenge of sophisticated literature and writing. Students focus on spoken assessments during the first semester and study texts considered to be

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classics. Semester two turns to preparation for the IB exams (paper I and paper II) and the aligned texts. The direction turns form oral response to written. Students continue to explore texts and refine their analytical skills. Students continue to build and grow subject specific lexicons while learning to apply terms appropriately in their written work. Throughout the year various teaching approaches are explored and assessments vary between formative and summative. In Higher Level, students continue to analyze text closely and refine their analytical skills with the aim of become accomplished exegetes. HL students are expected to write not only expositions, but personal narratives, poetry, and write in various pastiche forms.

IB English B HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: English 10 and teacher recommendation Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence designated for non-native English speakers. It fulfills the IB English B HL requirement, Year 1 and ISKL graduation requirement in English. Students will develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading (of both literary and non-literary texts) and writing. Through a variety of themes, students will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. Students will study two literary works in depth, building on a sound knowledge of the basic and complex structures and vocabulary of the language. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

IB English B HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: English B HL1 and teacher recommendation Homework: Heavy This course is the final year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence designated for non-native English speakers. It fulfills the IB English B HL requirement, Year 2 and ISKL graduation requirement in English. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will continue to explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language through the study of selected themes. Students will study a variety of text types, including at least two literary works in depth and write for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading and speaking solely in the target language in preparation for the IB HL examinations in May. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

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Social Studies Overview

   

  *Students who wish to take AP US History in Grade 10 need to meet with their counselor.

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Social Studies Courses World Studies 1 One year, One credit; Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average The ISKL core course of study in the social studies is spread out over two, one-year courses: World Studies 1 and World Studies 2. The framework of the course incorporates a variety of disciplines including history, geography, political science and economics. As an inquiry-driven class, we will focus on themes related to the early history of humanity until the Age of Exploration and connect those events of the past to current issues of today. As a foundational course, World Studies 1 will systematically work with students to ensure that they acquire the necessary social studies skills such as critical reading, note-taking, analytical writing, and research.

World Studies 2 One year, One credit; Grade 10 Prerequisite: World History 1 or similar course in another school Homework: Average The ISKL core course of study in the social studies is spread out over two, one-year courses: World Studies 1 and World Studies 2. The framework of course incorporates a variety of disciplines including history, geography, political science and economics. This inquiry-driven class will focus on themes related to the modern world from the Scientific Revolution until the end of the Cold War and connects those events of the past to current issues of today. As a foundational course, World Studies 2 will systematically work with students to ensure that they acquire the necessary social studies skills such as critical reading, note taking, analytical writing and research. World Studies 2 will conclude with a simulation of an international decision-making forum.

AP World History One year, One credit; Grade 10-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: World History 1 or similar from another school; Teacher Recommendation Homework: Heavy For those students looking for a more intensive World History experience, this one-year course is a more challenging alternative to World Studies 2, covering the material needed to prepare students to sit for the AP World History Test--a survey of world history from 10,000 BCE to present. Drawing on historical activity from all parts of the globe, the content focuses on historical concepts and trends, NOT on places, names and dates. The skills assessed by the AP World test include essay writing (two different formats) as well as document analysis.

Global Issues, Local Solutions One semester, 0.5 credit, Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average This class begins with an exploration of the global issues (environmental, social, economic and political) that pose the greatest challenge to our world today. Student interest and inquiry will drive the particular topics of focus, and student creativity and design thinking will guide the development of action plans to address these issues on a local level. Students should expect to engage in a variety of authentic, interactive and community-based learning experiences both during and outside the school day. They will also employ skills in research, critical thinking, and reflection; grow as leaders; and strengthen life skills in an environment that leads to success in school and beyond. (Grade 10 students may take this social studies elective in addition to, but not in place of, World History 2.) 29


Southeast Asian Studies One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: World History 2 or teacher permission Homework: Light From Myanmar to the Philippine Islands, Indonesia to Vietnam - You live in Southeast Asia--why not learn more about it? This course will explore the region’s geography, culture, history, politics, economics and current events through lecture, film, as well as a variety of group learning activities including: games, mapping, graphic images, and research tasks. Active participation to sample a bit of local food, visit important sites in Kuala Lumpur and see a Malaysian horror film is required! Throughout the course students will develop writing, research, thinking and study skills to help with future academic success.

Malaysian History One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: World History 2 or teacher permission Homework: Light Why is Malaysia referred to as the “crossroads� of the east and the west? In one semester, students will be introduced to this fascinating land that spans insular and mainland Southeast Asia and which has seen its history and people impacted by a number of forces. Students will understand the origins of the people who inhabit Malaysia and the manner in which their cultures, societies and history have adapted to its unique geography and climate. With units that cover Malacca and the early Sultanates to colonialism, the British, nationalism and the post-independence era, students will gain a sound understanding of how both diversity and unity have shaped Malaysia, with an eye toward assessing its present and future challenges. The units are explored in a variety of group and partner learning activities such as games, mapping, graphic organization, videos, reading and source analysis, Internet research and presentation activities. The course emphasizes writing, oral presentation and study skills that will help students be successful in social studies courses that they will experience at the university level.

US History One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: World History 2 Homework: Light This two-semester survey of U.S. History facilitates an understanding of the political, economic, intellectual, cultural, diplomatic, and social development of the United States from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes reading, note taking, writing, and oral skills, including formal presentations, debates, essays and a research paper.

Introduction to Psychology One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: World History 2 or teacher permission Homework: Average Psychology is defined as the systematic and scientific study of human behavior. This course will serve as a general introduction to the concepts and methodologies of psychology. A survey of the following topics, with a variety of hands-on activities, will include: the history of psychology, methods of psychology, learning and memory, sensation and perception, motivation, altered states of consciousness, developmental psychology from birth to death and theories of personality. Significant contributions of major psychologists will be discussed. The primary objective is for students to become aware of the complexities of the human mind and the central issues involved in studying human behavior. 30


Introduction to Geography: People, Environment and Global Issues One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: World History 2 or teacher permission Homework: Average Geography is about what is on, above and below the earth’s surface. Geography is a dynamic science that seeks to find out and explain how places and people influence each other. Students learn factual knowledge and also learn about the processes at work in the world around them (i.e. why things happen). Geography is all about trying to make sense of the complex real world – both natural and cultural. This is achieved by developing and using many different skills and concepts. Geographical knowledge and skills play a key role in understanding current local and global issues such as climate change and world trade. The broad range of knowledge, skills and ideas is one of the strengths of Geography – it is a very useful subject to study at school because it complements many different subject and career choices. This introductory course involves four areas of study: 1. Physical Geography–focusing on natural environments and natural hazards 2. Human Geography–focusing on population, resource and development issues 3. Local Studies–finding out about our local environment e.g. the geography of Kuala Lumpur including urban processes and tourism development 4. Global Issues–focusing on global warming; biodiversity and ecosystem losses; deforestation; water deficits; poverty; global infectious diseases among others. There will be exciting opportunities for fieldwork in this course. A one-day trip studying urban processes in Kuala Lumpur will be undertaken in Semester 2, plus there will be an optional trip to Pulau Redang (studying coral reef ecosystems, impacts of climate change and issues of tourism development).

AP US History One Year; One credit: Grade 10*-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Homework: Heavy AP US History provides an enriched and intensive survey of American history from 1491-2001. It focuses on political, economic, social, cultural, religious, technological, and demographic changes and continuities during this time frame. An emphasis is placed on developing students’ writing skills and reading comprehension in preparation to experience success on the College Board external exam held in May. Students continually practice analytical skills with a focus on analyzing a variety of different kinds of sources and documents and creating persuasive arguments supported by extensive facts and evidence. This challenging course requires a great deal of reading and effort. *Students wishing to take AP US History in Grade 10 need to meet with their counselor.

IB History SL1/​HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: none Homework: Regular/Heavy IB History SL is a two year examination of some of the major events and characters that have shaped our modern world. In the first year of the course students examine Paper 2 topics on the Causes and Effects of 20th Century War (WW1 and WW2), and the Authoritarian States of Mussolini, Stalin and Hitler. The Paper 1 topic, The Move to Global War, is covered in the European sphere by looking at Italian and German expansionism in Europe and Africa leading into WW2. In year one, SL students will be given time to work on their Internal Assessment on a topic of their choosing. ​HL Students cover one Paper 3 topic, focusing on Japan from 1912-1990. In addition, both HL/SL students are given time to research their IA topic.

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IB History SL2/​HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors / Advanced Prerequisite: IB History SL1 or IB History HL1 Homework: Regular/Heavy IB History SL is a two year examination of some of the major events and characters that have shaped our modern world. In the second year of the course students examine Paper 2 topics on the Causes and Effects of 20th Century Wars (Chinese and Spanish Civil Wars), and the Authoritarian State created by Mao Zedong in China. The Paper 1 topic, The Move to Global War, is covered in the Asian sphere by looking at Japanese expansionism in Asia leading into WW2. Students will complete the Internal Assessment work early in year 2 to provide ample time for review in anticipation of the final external exams in May.

IB Business and Management SL One year: One credit; Grade 11–12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: None Homework: Moderate This IB course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic business environment. It involves the study of business organization and environment, human resources, accounts and finances, marketing and operations management. In order to apply their knowledge and skills to real world situations, students examine case studies. An important component of this course is a written commentary, which allows the students to demonstrate the application of business and management tools, techniques and theories to a real business issue or problem.

IB Economics SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Heavy From global economic crises to demonstrations in opposition to globalization and the World Trade Organization, and from the volatility of world foreign exchange markets to the apparently widening gap between rich and poor around the world—each of these phenomena serves as a reminder that the study of economics represents a vital discipline of study in the twenty-first century. The decisions made by current and future political and business leaders concerning such diverse issues as investment in infrastructure, protection of our environment, education, healthcare, and poverty all are inseparably intertwined with economic concepts and considerations. These courses will provide students with a theoretical grounding in the basic foundations of economics. It will allow them the opportunity to apply such knowledge to current real world examples. Students will study essential microeconomic and macroeconomic arguments in year 1 HL and SL economics. Students taking HL economics will be required to cover more content in both the microeconomic and macroeconomic syllabus. Additionally, students taking HL economics will cover a mathematical component of the syllabus not required by SL students.

IB Economics SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: ​Honors / Advanced Prerequisite: IB Economics SL1 or IB Economics HL1 Homework: Heavy According to the World Bank’s World Development Report, “Development is the most important challenge facing the human race.” This course will analyze the unique

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problems and issues confronting the developing countries like Malaysia with a particular focus on international issues like trade, foreign investment, exchange rates and globalization. Students will learn theory and apply it to current events. In addition, this course will prepare students to take the IB Higher Level Economics Exam in May. To that end, students will practice communicating their economic understanding in data response questions, quantitative questions, and essay questions. Students will also complete a portfolio of commentaries on articles from current event periodicals. The International section of the syllabus involves a few higher level topics not included in the SL syllabus. Additionally, the HL students will be taking a Paper 3 exam in May that will assess their quantitative and analytical skills.

IB Geography SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Homework: Heavy Geography is a dynamic subject that explores the interactions between people, places, spaces and the environment. The IB Geography course integrates both physical and human geography and because of this examines concepts and ideas from a wide variety of academic disciplines. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas. Geography helps students in analysing contemporary issues and challenges, and in developing a global perspective of diversity and change. Key global issues such as poverty, sustainability and climate change are examined through examples and case studies at a variety of scales from local (e.g. Ampang) to regional, national and international. Fieldwork is an important component of the course and students will be examining the urban environment of Kuala Lumpur to meet their IB internal assessment requirements. There could also be an optional trip to Pulau Redang (studying coral reef ecosystems, impacts of climate change and issues of tourism development). Practical skills such as interpretation and analysis of graphics and maps will be taught, and the use of technology will be integrated throughout the course. This course provides an excellent foundation for any future college-level social studies course and there is a huge range of of careers involving geography and its related fields. The SL1 and HL1 courses are the same in Year 1. The HL course differs from the SL course only in Year 2 where there are two additional topics taught. The IB Geography HL Exam assesses an extra topic in Paper 1, and has an additional Paper 3 (on Global Interactions).

IB Geography SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: ​Honors / Advanced Prerequisite: IB Geography SL 1 or IB Geography HL1 Homework: Heavy Geography is a dynamic subject that explores the interactions between people, places, spaces and the environment. The IB Geography course integrates both physical and human geography and because of this examines concepts and ideas from a wide variety of academic disciplines. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas. Geography helps students in analysing contemporary issues and challenges, and in developing a global perspective of diversity and change. Key global issues such as poverty, sustainability and climate change are examined through examples and case studies at a variety of scales from local (e.g. Ampang) to regional (e.g. KL), national and international. Practical skills such as interpretation and analysis of graphics and maps will be taught, and the use of technology will be integrated throughout the course. This course provides an excellent foundation for any future college-level social studies course and there is a huge range of of careers involving geography and its related fields.

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The HL course differs from the SL course only in Year 2 where there are two additional topics taught. The IB Geography HL Exam assesses an extra topic in Paper 1, and has an additional Paper 3 (on Global Interactions).

IB Psychology SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average ​The IB Psychology course is the systematic study of behaviour and mental processes. Year one of IB psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour. The overall aim of the course is to give students a deeper understanding of the nature and scope of psychology. Understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB Psychology. IB Psychology takes a holistic approach that fosters intercultural understanding and respect. The HL course will have additional material in each of the levels of analysis in the core including animal research, cognitive processing in the digital world and influence of globalization on individuals.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Homework: Average This is the first year of a two-year course. Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) is an complex interdisciplinary course, requiring a diverse set of skills from its students. It is firmly grounded in both a scientific exploration of environmental systems in their structure and function and in the exploration of cultural, economic, ethical, political, and social interactions of societies with the environment. As a result of studying this course, students will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world. The interdisciplinary nature of the course requires a broad skill set. The students’ learning experiences include diverse activities such as presentations, lab work, the use of modeling, simulations, investigations and participation in philosophical discussion. The Internal Assessment is an important aspect of the course and enables the students to plan an ecological investigation or research document on a topic of their choice. A required field trip to Tioman Island is an integral aspect of the course for students to gain valuable field work. The course requires a systems approach to environmental understanding and problem-solving, and promotes holistic thinking about environmental issues. It is recognized that to understand the environmental issues of the 21st century and suggest suitable management solutions, both the human and environmental aspects must be understood. Students should be encouraged to develop solutions from a personal to a community and to a global scale.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Homework: Average This is the second year of a two-year course. Students develop further the relationship between environmental systems and human impact of societies on these systems. The topics studied include: biodiversity, conservation, soil systems, agriculture, atmospheric systems, pollution, climate change and energy and population dynamics. The impact of government, non-government and intergovernmental organisations will be studied. Students will use a wide variety of references including academic papers, magazine

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articles and current affairs in the news; both political and ecological. The key assessments are the completion of the Internal Assessment and final IB two paper exam.

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Mathematics Overview

Note: All math courses require the T184 Plus Calculator

Courses in Math Essentials of Mathematics A and B One year each; one credit each; Grades 9 -12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light Essentials of Mathematics is comprised of two year-long course segments - Essentials A and Essentials B - which are offered in alternating years and can be taken in any order. Each course is designed for students to experience mathematics in the context of the real world and takes a “hands on� approach to the content by focusing on activities and projects that take the student out of the classroom both figuratively and literally. Both Essentials A and Essentials B cover four key mathematical content strands each year: Number Sense; Ratios and Proportional Relationships; Expressions, Equations, and Functions; Geometry; and Statistics and Probability. Although the order and depth of the content may vary slightly depending on student need, over the course of two years, students will investigate integer and fraction operations, proportional relationships and percents; one- and two-step equations; linear relationships; area and perimeter; surface area and volume; as well as univariate statistical analysis and simple probability.

Integrated Math 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-11 Prerequisite: Grade 8 Math or Essentials of Math Homework: Average

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Through the frequent use of technology, students will discover the fundamental concepts of algebra, geometry, statistics, and probability. Students will apply these concepts to practical and complex problems. The algebra content of the course will develop proficiency in fundamental skills in algebra: computational rules, solving equations, inequalities, factoring, exponents, and linear equations including graphs of lines. The geometry content of the course will develop a strong foundation of introductory geometry: defining basic terms, triangle and polygon properties, congruence, similarity, areas, volumes, circles, and transformations. The statistics content will introduce students to basic statistical measurements: presentation of data, measures of central tendency, and simple measures of spread. The probability content will introduce students to basic probabilities of a single event: theoretical and experimental probability, sets and Venn diagrams. The interconnectivity between the branches of mathematics and their application to real world problems is a constant theme in the course.

Integrated Math 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-11 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 1 Homework: Average Through the frequent use of technology, students will extend their knowledge of the concepts of algebra, geometry, and probability. Students will apply these concepts to practical and complex problems. The algebra content of the course will develop proficiency in more complex skills in algebra: linear equations and inequalities, properties of exponents, quadratic equations including their graphs and factoring and the introduction of functions. The geometry content of the course will develop knowledge of further geometry: coordinate geometry, right triangle trigonometry, congruent triangles, properties of special triangles, and an introduction to proofs. The probability content will introduce students to probabilities involving two events; including Venn Diagrams and two-way tables. The interconnectivity between the branches of mathematics and their application to real world problems is a constant theme in the course. Students who successfully complete this course will proceed to IB Math Studies SL1, Integrated Math 3, or Integrated Math 3 Plus.

Integrated Math 2 Plus One year; One credit; Grade 9 Prerequisite: Department recommendation based on diagnostic testing Homework: Average-Heavy Students who have displayed a high degree of competency in math and wish to pursue a more challenging program may request this course. The core of the course is the same as Integrated Math 2, with core topics covered in more depth and breadth. Students who successfully complete this course will move onto IM3 or IM3+.

Integrated Math 3 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 2 or Integrated Math 2 Plus Homework: Average Integrated Math 3 is the final course in the integrated math series, which provides the solid foundation necessary for further study in mathematics. The first semester will review and strengthen much of the algebra and geometry studied in the IM2 course, and extend students’ understanding of functions. The second semester will focus on more sophisticated content such as functions, trigonometry of the circle and logarithms. Students who successfully complete the course normally proceed to IB Math SL1 or IB Math Studies SL1.

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Integrated Math 3 Plus One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 2 with a grade of A or better or Integrated Math 2 Plus with a grade of B or better and teacher recommendation. Homework: Average-Heavy Students who have displayed a high degree of competency in math and wish to pursue a more challenging program may request this course. The core of the course is the same as Integrated Math 3, with topics covered in more depth and breadth. Students who successfully complete this course will be better prepared for IB Math HL1 and IB Math SL1. (Grade 9 students who successfully complete this course will be recommended to take AP Calculus in Grade 10. In Grade 11, they would continue to IB Math HL1 and take IB Math HL2 in Grade 12.)

Topics in Mathematics: Real World and Practical Applications One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 or IB Math Studies SL1 Homework: Average This course is designed for students majoring in the liberal arts or other fields that do not have a specific mathematical requirement. Upon completion of the course students will have a better appreciation of the variety of subjects studied within mathematics along with many real world applications. The course intends to help students think logically and critically about mathematical information that abounds in our society.

IB Math Studies SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 or Integrated Math 2 with teacher recommendation Homework: Average This course is designed for students who will use mathematics in their future studies but are not planning to enrol in a university program that requires a sophisticated level of abstract mathematics. With its emphasis on fundamental skills, modeling and statistics, this course is a good preparation for areas of study such as the social sciences, life science, the arts and business. Topics studied in this first year of the two-year program typically include sequences and series, trigonometry, financial mathematics, statistics (including some sophisticated techniques) and a wide range of functions. An emphasis on project work helps maintain a focus on applicable mathematics. Students successfully completing this course normally proceed to IB Math Studies SL2.

IB Math Studies SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Math Studies SL1 Homework: Average This second year of the Math Studies program typically includes probability, set theory, logic and calculus. There is some emphasis on completion of a major project (the internal assessment) and exam preparation. The internal assessment is a 2000-word report that typically involves research, data collection and sophisticated analysis.

IB Math SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 (with a grade of B- or better) or Integrated Math 3 Plus Homework: Average This course is designed for students who possess firm knowledge of basic mathematical concepts and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for further studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration. Content includes the study of quadratic, logarithmic, 38


exponential, and trigonometric functions, and their composition and transformations. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of functions and their graphs to create mathematical models, including regression analysis to describe situations that are best modeled by the above functions. Students learn to appreciate the power of functions and develop models to describe complex relationships. Students will also study statistics, probability, and probability distributions, as well as topics in trigonometry. Students successfully completing this course normally proceed to IB Math SL2. Some students may continue onto AP Calculus with teacher recommendation.

IB Math SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Math SL1 or IB Math HL1 Homework: Average-Heavy This course is intended to provide a sound mathematical basis for those students planning to pursue studies in such fields as the sciences, computer science, business, or economics. The course provides a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability for those not wishing to take AP Calculus or IB Math HL2. It is a demanding course since it contains a variety of mathematical topics and requires a strong mathematical background. ​Course content will include additional coverage and revision of the topics begun in IB Math SL1 or IB Math HL1 in addition to new topics covered in the second year (Vectors, Differential Calculus, and Integral Calculus). All students will also complete a mathematical exploration (internal assessment). ​Students who complete this course will normally sit for the IB Math Standard Level Examination.

IB Math HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 Plus with a grade of B+ or better, or Integrated Math 3 and teacher recommendation. Homework: Heavy This course is intended for students with a strong background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. It provides a sound mathematical basis for further studies in fields such as mathematics, engineering, physics or economics. Students who choose this subject should be highly motivated and enjoy the challenge of applying mathematics in unfamiliar problems. Course content will include sequences and series, functions and transformations, trigonometry, complex numbers, vectors in three dimensions, differential and integral calculus. Following this course, students normally proceed to IB Math HL2 or AP Calculus.

IB Math HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Math HL1 with a grade of B or better and teacher recommendation Homework: Heavy This course completes the second year of the IB Mathematics Higher Level program, and is intended for those students who have exceptional mathematical ability. Students should be highly motivated and enjoy the challenge of applying mathematics in unfamiliar problems. It continues to provide a sound mathematical basis for further studies in fields such as mathematics, engineering, physics or economics. Course content will include combinatorics, probability distributions, differential equations, convergence of infinite series, power series and Taylor polynomials. Students will also produce a short research paper that explores the mathematics of a topic of choice. Material of the first year will also be reviewed in preparation for the IB Math Higher Level exam in May.

AP Calculus AB One year; One credit; Grade 11-12*

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Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Math SL with a grade of B or better and teacher recommendation. Homework: Heavy This course is designed for students with a strong ability and interest in mathematics. Objectives of this course are to develop the student’s computational powers and insight into the process of analysis, to provide an insight into the broad spectrum of the application of differential and integral calculus, and to provide an incentive to pursue a further study of mathematics. Students will apply their understanding of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions to concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Those who complete this course will normally sit for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Examination. *Grade 9 students who successfully complete Integrated Math 3 Plus will be recommended to take AP Calculus in Grade 10.

AP Statistics One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Math SL1 or Integrated Math 3 or IB Math Studies SL1 with teacher recommendation. Homework: Heavy AP Statistics offers students a non-calculus-based course in statistics. AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts of collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Depending on the student’s choice of university, students who successfully complete the course and external examination may receive credit for a one-semester university statistics course. The course will study the four major concepts of statistics. In the first area, Exploring Data, students will interpret, summarize, and compare graphical displays of distributions of univariate data. The students will also explore bivariate data and categorical data. In the second area, Planning a Study, students will consider data collection, surveys, conducting experiments and generalizing their results. In the third area, Anticipating Patterns, students will study probability as relative frequency, the laws of probability, normal distribution, and sampling distributions. Finally in the fourth area, Statistical Inference, students will consider confidence intervals, significance tests, and the special case of the normal distribution.

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Science Overview

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Science Courses Integrated Science 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average Integrated Science 1 is based on the premise that teaching, learning and science are commonly grounded in the process of inquiry. Four compelling real-world contexts drive hands-on laboratory experiences spanning: Environmental Dynamics, Genetic Unity and Diversity, Food, Nutrition & Fitness, and The Quest for Energy. Within these contexts, students grapple with current global issues in science and build a strong foundation in life, physical and environmental sciences. Students will deepen their conceptual understandings and become proficient in not only laboratory skills, but also peer collaboration, technology, critical non-fiction reading and writing, and applied math and design skills.

Integrated Science 2 One year; One credit; Grade 10 Prerequisite: Integrated Science 1 Homework: Average Integrated Science 2 is a continuation of Integrated Science 1, designed to prepare students to either enter the IB program or continue their science studies. Students continue their study of four compelling real-world contexts that drive hands-on laboratory experiences spanning: Environmental Dynamics, Genetic Unity and Diversity, Food, Nutrition & Fitness, and The Quest for Energy. Within these contexts, students grapple with current global issues in science and enrich their understanding of life, physical and environmental sciences. Students will deepen their conceptual understandings and become proficient in not only laboratory skills, but also peer collaboration, technology, critical non-fiction reading and writing, and applied math and design skills.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Homework: Average This is the first year of a two-year course. Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) is an complex interdisciplinary course, requiring a diverse set of skills from its students. It is firmly grounded in both a scientific exploration of environmental systems in their structure and function and in the exploration of cultural, economic, ethical, political, and social interactions of societies with the environment. As a result of studying this course, students will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world. The interdisciplinary nature of the course requires a broad skill set. The students’ learning experiences include diverse activities such as presentations, lab work, the use of modeling, simulations, investigations and participation in philosophical discussion. The Internal Assessment is an important aspect of the course and enables the students to plan an ecological investigation or research document on a topic of their choice. A required field trip to Tioman Island is an integral aspect of the course for students to gain valuable field work. The course requires a systems approach to environmental understanding and problem-solving, and promotes holistic thinking about environmental issues. It is recognized that to understand the environmental issues of the 21st century and suggest suitable management solutions, both the human and environmental aspects must be understood. Students should be encouraged to develop solutions from a personal to a community and to a global scale.

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IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ES&S) SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Homework: Average This is the second year of a two-year course. Students develop further the relationship between environmental systems and human impact of societies on these systems. The topics studied include: biodiversity, conservation, soil systems, agriculture, atmospheric systems, pollution, climate change and energy and population dynamics. The impact of government, non-government and intergovernmental organisations will be studied. Students will use a wide variety of references including academic papers, magazine articles and current affairs in the news; both political and ecological. The key assessments are the completion of the Internal Assessment and final IB two paper exam.

IB Biology SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with a laboratory-based curriculum. This course includes the study of molecular biology, cell theory, cell structure, metabolism and ecology. The purpose of this course is to develop a firm conceptual foundation in biology while laying important groundwork and developing skills needed for students intending to move on to IB Biology SL2. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. Success in the course requires a conceptual understanding and an ability to apply that understanding in new and relatively unfamiliar contexts. Also, it will involve a significant amount of independent study in addition to classroom activities. This course does not prepare students to move into IB Biology HL1 or IB Biology HL2.

IB Biology SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Biology SL1 or IB Biology HL1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with an extensive laboratory-based curriculum. This course is designed to allow students who have completed a year of IB Biology to finish the IB Standard Level Biology syllabus requirements. Topics of study include human physiology, genetics, evolution and biodiversity. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB. Success in the course requires a conceptual understanding and an ability to apply that understanding in new and relatively unfamiliar contexts. Also, it will involve a significant amount of independent study in addition to classroom activities.

IB Biology HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher. Integrated Math 2 with a B or better. Homework: Heavy This is a college/university preparatory course with an extensive laboratory-based curriculum. The course includes the study of molecular biology, cell theory, cell structure and metabolism, plant biology and ecology. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. This course is both rigorous and quantitative, laying important groundwork and developing skills needed for students intending to move on to IB Biology SL2 or IB Biology HL2.

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IB Biology HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better) of IB Biology HL1 Homework: Heavy  This course is designed to be equivalent to a laboratory-based general biology course usually taken during the first year of university study. This course follows the IB Higher Level Biology syllabus and includes the study of human and animal physiology, evolution, and genetics. One additional topic is selected for further study. The laboratory portion of the course is very intensive and the writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course, which accounts for a significant portion of the overall course grade. Success in the course requires a conceptual understanding and an ability to apply that understanding in new and relatively unfamiliar contexts. Also, it will involve a significant amount of independent study in addition to classroom activities. An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB. Students are required to attend one additional lesson every 8-day cycle, during their prep period. If a student wishes to sit for the AP Biology exam, additional outside preparation with a tutor is recommended.

IB Chemistry SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with a laboratory-based curriculum. Physical and chemical phenomena are investigated through a study of the composition of matter and its reactions. The main topics covered include atomic structure, bonding, periodicity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, kinetics and equilibrium. Concepts are learned and reinforced through a variety of classroom activities, including experimentation. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. The purpose is to develop a firm foundation in chemistry while laying important groundwork needed for students intending to move on to IB Chemistry SL2. This course does not prepare students to move into IB Chemistry HL1 or IB Chemistry HL2.

IB Chemistry SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Chemistry SL1 or IB Chemistry HL1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with a laboratory-based curriculum. This course is designed to allow students who have completed a year of Chemistry to finish the IB Standard Level Chemistry syllabus requirements. It reviews and reinforces all of the topics in IB Chemistry SL1 and includes the topics of oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, and basic organic chemistry. One additional topic is selected for further study. Concepts are learned and reinforced through a variety of classroom activities, including experimentation. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course and accounts for a significant portion of the overall course grade. An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB.

IB Chemistry HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher. Integrated Math 2 with a B or better. Homework: Heavy This is a college/university preparatory course with an extensive laboratory-based curriculum. This course includes an in-depth study of physical and chemical phenomena.

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Main topics covered include atomic structure, bonding, periodicity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and kinetics. Concepts are learned and reinforced through a variety of classroom activities, including qualitative and rigorous quantitative experiments. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. The course is both rigorous and quantitative, laying important groundwork and developing skills needed for students intending to move on to IB Chemistry SL2 or IB Chemistry HL2.

IB Chemistry HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better) of IB Chemistry HL1. Homework: Heavy This course is designed to be equivalent to a laboratory-based general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of university study. The course reviews and extends all of the topics in IB Chemistry HL1 and includes the topics of acid and base chemistry, oxidation-reduction and organic chemistry. One additional topic is selected for further study. Concepts are learned and reinforced through a variety of classroom activities, including qualitative and rigorous quantitative experiments. The laboratory portion of the course is very intensive and the writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course, which accounts for a significant portion of the overall course grade. Success in the course requires a conceptual understanding and an ability to apply mathematical solutions. Also, it will involve a significant amount of independent study in addition to classroom activities. ​An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB. ​Students are required to attend one additional lesson every 8-day cycle, during their prep period. If a student wishes to take the AP Chemistry exam, additional outside preparation with a tutor is recommended.

IB Physics SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Math 1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with a laboratory-based curriculum. The course includes the study of kinematics, dynamics, thermal, energy of waves, optics, sound, nuclear physics and electrostatics. While a conceptual approach is employed, mathematics (algebra/ trigonometry) and graphing will be used to the appropriate levels. A wide variety of topics will be taught in depth and others at a foundation level. The purpose is to develop a firm conceptual foundation in physics while laying important groundwork needed for students intending to move on to IB Physics SL2. This course does not prepare students to move into IB Physics HL1 or IB Physics HL2.

IB Physics SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Physics SL1 or IB Physics HL1 Homework: Average This is a college/university preparatory course with a laboratory-based curriculum. This course is designed to allow students who have completed a year of Physics to finish the IB Standard Level Physics syllabus requirements. Topics include electrostatics, magnetism, DC circuits, energy production, and one additional optional topic for further study. Students will learn to apply fundamental laws of physics in new and relatively unfamiliar contexts through a program, which includes researched student-designed labs, application and problem solving. The writing of formal laboratory reports is an important part of the course. An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB.

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IB Physics HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher. Int. Math 2 with a B or better. Homework: Heavy This is a college/university preparatory course with an extensive laboratory-based curriculum. It covers the major topics of physics including measurement, kinematics, dynamics, heat, circular motion, waves, sound, light, nuclear physics and energy, power and climate change. While a non-calculus approach is employed, the course is both rigorous and quantitative, laying important groundwork and developing skills needed for students intending to move on to IB Physics SL2 or IB Physics HL2.

IB Physics HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Physics HL1 and Integrated Math 3 with a B or better Homework: Heavy This laboratory-based course is designed to be equivalent to a general Algebra and Trigonometry-based Physics course at the university level. This course continues to build on work completed in IB Physics HL1. Topics such as gravitation and orbital motion, electrostatics, electromagnetism, DC circuits, quantum mechanics, particle physics and wave optics will be covered, including one additional topic, as students complete the IB Higher Level Physics Syllabus. Students will learn to apply fundamental laws of physics in new and relatively unfamiliar contexts through a program which includes researched student-designed labs, application and problem solving at an advanced level. An internal assessment of laboratory work will be prepared for external moderation by the IB. Students are required to attend one additional scheduled lesson every eight-day cycle, during their prep period. If a student wishes to take an AP Physics exam, additional outside preparation with a tutor is recommended.

Environmental Science One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 11-12; Semester 1 only Prerequisite: Two years of High School science Homework: Average Environmental science is the study of the interaction of the living and nonliving components of the environment with special emphasis on the impact of humans on these components. This course examines the interrelationships of scientific fields such as Biology, Geology, Hydrology, Climatology, Meteorology, Oceanography, and Soil Science. By understanding how these sciences interact, students will examine how life on Earth is sustained, what leads to environmental problems, human responsibilities concerning the environment, and how environmental issues can be solved.

Marine and Terrestrial Ecology of Malaysia One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 11-12; Semester 2 only Prerequisite: Two years of High School science. Preference will be given to students who have completed the Environmental Science course. Homework: Average Marine and Terrestrial Ecology of Malaysia is the scientific study of the distribution and abundance of living organisms in marine and terrestrial environments in Malaysia. It includes the study of interactions among organisms and between organisms and their environment. Because of its focus on the higher levels of the organization of life on earth and on the interrelations between organisms and their environment, ecology draws heavily on many other branches of science. Lab activities, field studies, as well as both individual and group projects will be employed to present and reinforce concepts.

Human Anatomy & Physiology One semester; 0.5 Credit; Grade 11-12; Semester 1 only 46


Prerequisite: Two years of High School science Homework: Average This is a semester long introductory course that provides students an opportunity to explore the intricate and sophisticated relationship between structure and function in the human body. The course will cover the basic structure and function of the organ systems including skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and nervous systems.

Sports Science One semester; 0.5 Credit; Grade 11-12; Semester 2 only Prerequisite: Two years of High School science. Preference will be given to students who have completed Human Anatomy & Physiology Homework: Average This is a hands-on course that allows students to analyze the function of the human body with relationship to sport and exercise. The course focuses on the study of human movement and the effects of physical activity on health and fitness. In addition, it considers the factors that influence an individual’s performance in sport. Topics will include anatomy and physiology of exercise, components of fitness and training, exercise nutrition, sport injuries, biomechanics, and various trends and myths in the world of exercise performance.

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World Languages Overview

Notes: The World Languages Department recommends that students’ future interests will be best served by following the sequence outlined above; five years preparation or its equivalent for the IB language B SL and HL in Spanish and French (excluding the Chinese program). Students will normally sit for the SL Language B exam after five years of study. However, if a full IB Diploma student enters into the sequence at a point that will inhibit him/her from reaching the Standard Level B exam in his/her senior year (i.e. a Grade 9 student in Level 1), ISKL will work with that student to personalize a sequence that will enable him/her to sit the exam. Typically, this personalized sequence will require individual, outside of school work to bridge the skill and knowledge gaps to ensure the student’s opportunity for success in his/her course sequence.

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Requirement for Malaysian Students to Study Bahasa Malaysia: Malaysian citizens are required by the Ministry of Education to study Bahasa Malaysia (BM) to ​acquire proficiency in the language. At ISKL, students can demonstrate that they have acquired proficiency by passing the recognized external examination IGCSE Malay offered in May, which can be written at the end of any grade year based on the student placement test.

Options for Malaysian students to complete the BM requirement: *Middle School students who pass the IGCSE at the end of grade 8, forgo the steps below. All Malaysian students entering high school take a placement test and the appropriate BM level will be determined by this test. 1. Students may take BM as their World Language requirement. 2. Students may take BM in addition to another World Language (students who choose this option will not have a prep period). This is an option for students who would like to study another language for graduation requirement or for those who wish to prepare for future IB studies in that language. 3. Students may take BM in their timetable in grade 9 and grade 10 in place of one semester of Art and one semester of PE (this situation allows a prep period in their schedule). ISKL will waive ONLY one semester of Art and one semester of PE. Therefore, students would be required to make up the additional Art or PE/Health credit in Grade 11 or 12.

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4. Students may take BM external to ISKL (tutor, external course, another school, etc.) and bear the associated costs. Students’ parents must complete an online Google Form following the course registration period. The form includes the study plan, duration of study and intended date of completion of the IGCSE (based on the placement test).

World Language Courses IB Language ab initio SL1 ​(Bahasa Malaysia/French/Spanish/Chinese)

One year; One credit; Grade 10-11 Prerequisite: None (Teacher permission if below Grade 11) Homework: Heavy This is the first year of a two-year language course for IB students who have no previous academic experience in the chosen language. The program is more intensive than the regular Levels 1 and 2 and covers more material in two years than the normal course sequence. Students will be exposed to the target language and will produce different writing formats such as e-mails, formal and informal letters, journal entries, etc. Ab initio students may be in regular language classes but can expect a heavier schedule of homework assignments and specialized requirements tailored to IB expectations. All work will be graded according to IB rubrics, with which students will become familiar during the course.

IB Language ab initio SL2 ​(Bahasa Malaysia/French/Spanish/Chinese) One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB ab initio SL1 (Teacher permission if below Grade 12) Homework: Heavy This is the second year of the two-year language course for IB students who have no previous academic experience in the chosen language. The program builds on the first-year course. Students will continue to master the target language and will produce different writing formats such as e-mails, formal and informal letters, journal entries, etc. All work will be graded according to IB rubrics. The second year is strongly guided by IB deadlines, the IB-themed oral, as well as portfolios. For those wishing to sit the IB exams, they will do so at the end of the academic year in May.

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Bahasa Malaysia 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average This is a first-year language course, with emphasis on oral and aural skills. The student will develop oral fluency by improving pronunciation and intonation. Emphasis on reading and writing will increase knowledge and understanding of vocabulary and complex grammatical structures. The student will use locally available materials such as magazines, brochures and internet resources. Cultural studies are included. Students will also explore the values, beliefs and norms of the Malaysian society.

Bahasa Malaysia 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Bahasa Malaysia 1 and/or knowledge of BM Homework: Average This is a continuation of the first-year language course, with continued emphasis on oral and aural skills. The student will develop oral fluency by improving pronunciation and intonation. Continued emphasis on reading and writing will increase knowledge and understanding of vocabulary and complex grammatical structures. The student will use locally available materials such as magazines, brochures and internet resources. Further cultural studies are also included. Students will also explore the values, beliefs and norms of the Malaysian society.

Bahasa Malaysia 3 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Bahasa Malaysia 2 or equivalent Homework: Average The Bahasa Malaysia 3 course prepares Malaysians for the IGCSE external exam. This course emphasizes accuracy in self-expression and comprehension in speaking and writing through reinforcement, enrichment and refinement of vocabulary and grammar. The student will interpret, translate and analyze a variety of authentic materials to produce written documents. The study of culture within the Malaysian context will enhance the student’s understanding and appreciation of the values, norms and beliefs of the multi-ethnic Malaysian society. This course will benefit those preparing for IB Malay B SL1.

IB Malay B SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: Bahasa Malaysia 3 or equivalent Homework: Average-Heavy This course is for non-native Malay speakers and the first year in the tri-semester IB Standard Level sequence. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study the core thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all completed in the target language. Students should be prepared to write, read and speak solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to the IB assessment criteria. Students will sit the exam in November after their third semester of IB Malay B SL2.

IB Malay B SL2 One Semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Malay B SL 1 Homework: Heavy

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This course is the final semester in the three-semester IB Standard Level sequence. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language acquisition and analysis, reading and writing. They will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. Students should be prepared to attempt a substantial amount of writing, reading and speaking in the target language in preparation for the IB SL examinations in November. All work will be graded according to the IB SL assessment criteria.

French/Spanish 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average This course emphasizes the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At level 1, students use simple words, expressions, and structures to communicate in common, everyday situations. They will be able to formulate basic sentences using proper vocabulary and grammatical structures. By the end of level 1, students will be able to function well in present, near past and near future tenses, and demonstrate knowledge about some of the cultural, social, and geographical features of the countries under consideration.

French/Spanish 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: French/Spanish 1 Homework: Average At level 2, students will work in class to improve pronunciation and intonation. Students will work with authentic texts to increase vocabulary and to develop reading comprehension and writing skills. Students will also be able to better develop their speaking and writing skills. Upon completion of level 2, students will be able to speak and write about their lives in present, past, recent past, future, near future, imperfect tenses. Students will learn the cultural and linguistic pitfalls of direct translations. Students will read independently and react in various contexts to selections at their levels. A larger realm of the culture is covered at this level.

French/Spanish 3 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: French/Spanish 2 Homework: Average-Heavy This course is designed to facilitate the acquisition of advanced vocabulary and complex grammatical structures. At this level, students will enhance their writing and speaking skills. They will continue to develop an appreciation of the language and its culture. Upon completion of this level, students will be able to function independently in the target language. As this is a pre-IB course, students can expect to become familiar with IB expectations, rubrics and assessments.

IB French B SL1 / IB Spanish B SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-11 Prerequisite: French/Spanish 3 Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Standard Level sequence. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all done in the target language. Students should be prepared to write, read, listen and speak solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to IB SL assessment criteria.

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IB French B HL1 / IB Spanish B HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: French/Spanish 3 Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence. Students will develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic options in which they will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. At Higher Level, student will study two literary works, thus all students should possess a sound knowledge of the basic and complex structures and vocabulary of the language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

IB French B SL2 / IB Spanish B SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB French/Spanish B SL1 Homework: Heavy This course is the final year in the two-year IB Standard Level sequence. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic options in which they will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language in preparation for the IB SL examinations in May. All work will be graded according to the IB SL assessment criteria.

IB French B HL2 / IB Spanish B HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB French/Spanish B HL1 Homework: Heavy This course is the final year in the two-year IB Higher Level sequence. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic options in which they will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. At Higher Level, two or more literary works are studied, thus all students should possess a sound knowledge of the basic and complex structures and vocabulary of the language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language in preparation for the IB HL examinations in May. All work will be graded according to the IB HL assessment criteria.

Chinese 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 (Beginner) Prerequisite: None Homework: Average-Heavy This is the beginner class for highly motivated students Grade 9-12 with no previous academic experience in the chosen language. This is also the first year of the two-year IB ab initio SL language course for Grade 11. For those Grade 9 highly motivated beginners who plan to take IB Chinese B SL, this is also the first year of the four-year accelerated track. The program is more intensive than the regular levels and covers more materials. Students will begin mastery of the Chinese Hanyu Pinyin system, radical, stroke order, basic grammar, use of keyboard and dictionary and foundation of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Chinese etc. Students will also learn to speak in the target language and will produce different writing formats such as short notes, diary entries, emails, letters etc. Students can expect a heavier schedule of homework assignments and specialized requirements tailored to IB expectations or preparation.

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Chinese 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 1 or Placement Test Homework: Average At level 2, students will continue to reinforce elements of the foundation of the language such as the Hanyu pinyin system, radical and stroke order etc. They will also gradually develop in the four skills areas with an emphasis on communication and interpersonal skills. Recognizing and writing Chinese characters are reinforced, as it is essential. They will learn simple and moderate complex expressions and grammar structures in the context of dialogues, conversations and short reading selections on everyday social situations. This course will continue to expose the students to the cultural awareness of the Chinese-speaking world.

Chinese 3 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 2 or Placement Test Homework: Average-Heavy At level 3, students will continue to refine their basic language skills and continue to develop in the four skill areas with an emphasis on communication and interpersonal skills. Recognizing and writing Chinese characters are reinforced. They will learn increasingly complex expressions and grammar structures in the context of dialogues, conversations and short reading selections on everyday social situations. This course will continue to expose the students to the cultural awareness of the Chinese-speaking world.

Chinese 4 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 3 or Placement Test Homework: Average-Heavy This course is designed to facilitate students for the acquisition of advanced vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures. At this level, students will continue to improve their writing, speaking as well as listening and reading skills. They will continue to develop an appreciation of the language and its culture. Upon completion of this level, students will be able to function more independently in the target language and be more ready for the IB SL/HL courses.

IB Chinese B SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 4 or Placement Test. Students who took IB Chinese ab initio SL2 in 10th grade may take this class with teacher permission. Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Chinese B Standard Level program. Students are expected to further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all done in the target language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to the IB assessment criteria.

IB Chinese B SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Chinese B SL1 or placement testing Homework: Heavy

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Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic areas, through which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all in the target language. Students should be prepared to write, read, listen and speak solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to the IB assessment criteria. For those wishing to sit the IB exams, they will do so at the end of the academic year in May.

IB Chinese B HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 4 or Placement Test Homework: Average-Heavy This course is the first year in the two-year IB Chinese B Higher Level program. Students are expected to further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all done in the target language. Students will be exploring literature texts in addition to the thematic units. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language. All work will be graded according to the IB assessment criteria.

IB Chinese B HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Chinese B HL1 Homework: Heavy The HL class will include more depth and breadth of the IB syllabus coverage, the assessment details, the assessment criteria, and literature coverage. Students will further develop their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize and synthesize information in the target language. At this level, literary pieces are studied, thus all students should possess a sound knowledge of the basic and more complex structures and vocabulary of the language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading, listening and speaking solely in the target language in preparation for the IB examinations. All work will be graded according to the IB assessment criteria. For those wishing to sit the IB exams, they will do so at the end of the academic year in May.

Chinese Language Arts 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Placement Test Homework: Average This class is for highly competent Chinese speakers. Students will deepen their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study certain thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all done in the target language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading and speaking solely in the target language. Students will be exploring two works of literature in addition to the thematic units. This class is preparing students for IB Chinese A Language and Literature program by studying Chinese literature works (from different eras, genres, regions in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, etc.) and working on literary analysis.

Chinese Language Arts 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Chinese Language Arts 1 or Placement Test Homework: Average

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Students will deepen their language proficiency through aural/oral work, language analysis, reading and writing. They will study certain thematic areas in which they will explore, hypothesize, and synthesize information, all done in the target language. Students should be prepared to do a considerable amount of writing, reading and speaking solely in the target language. Students will be exploring two works of literature in addition to the thematic units. This class prepares students for IB Chinese A Language and Literature program by studying Chinese literary works (from different eras, genres, regions in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, etc.) and working on literary analysis.

Korean Language Arts 1 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: Native or near-native level of Korean fluency Homework: Moderate This course is designed to develop readers, writers, listeners, and presenters of a variety of genres who are able to use Korean for learning, creative self-expression, social interaction, reflection, and the beginnings of critical analysis. Students will explore and begin to analyze aspects of culture through literary and non-literary works in order to develop a lifelong interest in reading. Students will use technology as they apply Language A skills in a variety of real-life contexts. The course content ​includes a continuation of the writing process, the research process, and blogging. Students study vocabulary-learning and reading strategies as they make connections, distinguish literary terms in texts, and analyze character and plot. In addition, students study writing structures and techniques for reflective writing, poetic writing, research writing, and creative writing. Assessments ​in this course include essay writing, oral presentation, written responses, reading and media journals and quizzes. This course will benefit Gr.9 students who are preparing for the IB Korean A Language and Literature courses for Grades 11 and 12.

Korean Language Arts 2 One year; One credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: Native or near-native level of Korean fluency Homework: Moderate In this course, students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and presentational skills in Korean. The course will help students gain proficiency in the writing process by studying writing structures and techniques for analytical writing and persuasive writing including skills in literary analysis and critical responses. Students will use reading strategies as they make connections, compare and contrast works, and distinguish literary terms in fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction. Assessments in this course include short and extended written pieces, creative writing, and oral presentations. This course will benefit Gr. 10 students who are preparing for the IB Korean A Language and Literature courses for Grades 11 and 12.

IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish/Japanese A: Language and Literature SL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-11 Prerequisite: Highly competent Chinese, Korean, Spanish or Japanese speakers Homework: Average The main focus of this course is the study of language and literature in four parts: Part 1 Language in cultural context; Part 2 Language and mass communication; Part 3 Literature - texts and contexts; and Part 4 Literature - critical study. Language A: Language and Literature is designed to have students understand how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts and asks them to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. During the year, students study two or three literary texts depending on the level, in addition to a variety of non-literary texts and text types. Students will also undertake individual and interactive oral activities (Further Oral Activities) and complete the first two written tasks.

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IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish/Japanese A: Language and Literature HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: Highly competent Chinese, Korean, Spanish or Japanese speakers Homework: Heavy The main focus of this course is the study of language and literature in four parts: Part 1 Language in cultural context; Part 2 Language and mass communication; Part 3 Literature - texts and contexts; and Part 4 Literature - critical study. Language A: Language and Literature is designed to have students understand how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts and asks them to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. During the year, students study two or three literary texts depending on the level, in addition to a variety of non-literary texts and text types. Students will also undertake individual and interactive oral activities (Further Oral Activities) and complete the first two written tasks.

IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish A: Language and Literature SL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: IB Chinese / Korean / Spanish A Language and Literature SL1 Homework: Heavy The main focus of this course is the study of language and literature in four parts: Part 1 Language in cultural context; Part 2 Language and mass communication; Part 3 Literature - texts and contexts; and Part 4 Literature - critical study. Language A: Language and Literature is designed to have students understand how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts and asks them to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. SL students study a total of four literary texts in addition to a variety of non-literary texts and text types. Students will also undertake individual oral commentaries and interactive oral activities (Further Oral Activities) and complete the written tasks. For those wishing to sit the IB exams, they will do so at the end of the academic year in May.

IB Chinese/Korean/Spanish A: Language and Literature HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: IB Honors Chinese / Korean / Spanish A Language and Literature HL1 Homework: Heavy The HL class will include a great deal of depth and breadth of the IB syllabus coverage, the assessment details, the assessment criteria, and literature coverage. The main focus of this course is the study of language and literature in four parts: Part 1 Language in cultural context; Part 2 Language and mass communication; Part 3 Literature - texts and contexts; and Part 4 Literature - critical study. Language A: Language and Literature is designed to have students understand how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts and asks them to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. HL students study a total of six literary texts in addition to a variety of non-literary texts and text types. Students will also undertake individual oral commentaries and interactive oral activities (Further Oral Activities) and complete the written tasks.

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Physical Education / Health Overview Physical Education and Health are integral components of the educational program at ISKL. Within the ISKL community we seek to develop and promote greater understanding of the benefits of physical activity wellness and their relationship to a healthy and productive lifestyle. The Physical Education and Health programs at ISKL provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to a variety of activities/sports through which they have a chance to develop better fitness, physical skills and cognitive abilities. Strong emphasis is also placed on the further development of students’ social skills, values, leadership and self-esteem. (Grade 9 students are required to take Grade 9 PE.)

PE/Health Courses Grade 9 Physical Education One year; One credit; Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light In PE 9, students develop knowledge and skill in a wide range of activities that foster a healthy lifestyle and lifelong physical activity. The course is designed in modular blocks that give students a wide range of experiences including some choice over the sports/disciplines that they pursue. Activities offered will include traditional team sports such as football and basketball as well as individual activities like badminton and rock climbing. Required units will include swimming, track and field, a fitness-based unit, a creative movement unit and a health unit focusing on wellness. Through all of these activities, students will develop understanding of principles of the sport or discipline, as well as capacities in leadership and teamwork.

Elective Physical Education One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light By clumping “like” sports together the physical education department aims to develop a greater understanding of the strategies and concepts involved in those sports and how better to transfer them from one game to another. The course builds on what the students will have done in middle school and grade 9. This course is great for those who enjoy team sports and working hard.

Lifeguard Training One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10*-12 Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years of age by the end of the course. Students must demonstrate competent swimming skills in order to be eligible and must complete a pre-course swim assessment on the first day of class before they can be officially enrolled. Students need not be of a competitive swimmer level but must be able to swim continuously with good form for 10 minutes by the end of the course. Homework: Average The purpose of this American Red Cross Lifeguard Training course is to teach lifeguard candidates the skills and knowledge needed to prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. The course content and activities prepare candidates to recognize and respond quickly and effectively to emergencies and prevent drowning and injuries. Upon successful completion of the course, participants may receive the American Red Cross

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Lifeguard Certificate (valid for two years) depending on an external assessment standard.

Creative Movement One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light This course is a student-centered course where different aspects of movement are explored through research. We will introduce basic forms of movement as a means of creative expression and physical activity. Students will explore a range of movement styles, including some, but not exclusive to traditional dance forms, gymnastics and martial arts. This course will continue to emphasize the acceptance of other cultures through an appreciation of movement unique to many countries. The course provides a complete fitness program and promotes participation that builds health and wellness including cardiovascular fitness, rhythm, balance, flexibility, body composition, muscular strength and endurance. The course will examine how cooperation and collaboration are important, how cooperation and collaboration in organised movement activities impact the final outcome and the role that different movement forms affect societies and cultures.

Personal Fitness One semester; 0.5 credit (May be repeated for credit, but priority enrollment is given to students who have not previously taken this course); Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average The purpose of this course is to motivate students to achieve lifetime personal fitness (Fit for Life) with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the cornerstone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives: students designing their own personal fitness program as a way to develop the skills necessary to improve one's fitness. Students will learn basic relevant anatomy, physiology, and fitness theory, as well as fitness testing, test result evaluation, and correct exercise techniques (Note: This course requires physical exertion equal to that of the regular physical education class. Students enrolled in the course must be prepared to exercise vigorously and work to improve their own personal fitness. Students who have any doubt as to their physical condition should consult a physician before attempting this course.)

Health One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10-12 (Graduation requirement of all students and recommended in Grade 10.) Prerequisite: None Homework: Average The goal of this course is to develop the required knowledge, skills and attitudes so that students may develop and maintain lifelong health and wellness. Wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the cornerstone of this course. It is the state of physical, mental and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease. The course topics are based around empowering students to make informed decisions. Topics include wellness, substance abuse, nutrition, CPR and first aid, and stress management. Students who pass the necessary tests are certified by the American Red Cross in First Aid and CPR. The Health curriculum is designed to prepare our students with the necessary decision-making skills for the future beyond ISKL.

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Technology Overview

Technology Courses Publications: Magazine One Semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for additional credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: EAL students must have a WIDA score of 5.6 or higher. Participants must demonstrate grade-level proficiency with writing in English. Homework: Regular Students will gain experience with non-fiction writing for specific purposes, including the writing of news, features, photo captions, editorials, and reviews. Articles will be published online on OurTAKE and printed once a semester in TAKE magazine. Students will experience the different needs of online publishing and print. TAKE magazine, will help students demonstrate knowledge by designing layouts and submitting ready-for-print writing. OurTAKE, the online Magazine, will focus on different forms of magazine writing skills and will work to tighter deadlines. Students are encouraged to take this course for the entire year. The course may be taken for as many as 8 semesters. *Students may take this course for English core elective credit.

Interactive Multimedia One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Good comfort level with basic computing skills. Homework: Light

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Computers are making it possible to easily link together a wide variety of media to promote meaningful access to inform or entertain audiences. In this course, students will work with computer graphics, images, stage, props and audio to develop multimedia presentations, while utilizing principles of multimedia creation like audience awareness, storyboarding, researching and elements of design to guide creation. Students are exposed to devices to capture original images and sound as well as software used for creating and manipulating drawings, photos, sound and animation. The course is project-oriented, and a large part of student evaluation is based on lab exercises that will be designed to meet the individual interests of students in authentic ways and shown to live audiences. *Students may take this course for art credit.

Video Production One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for additional credits); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Good comfort level with basic computing skills. Homework: Average (Heavy around deadlines) Video creation is becoming the tool most used in informing or entertaining audiences. This course will look at this ever-growing industry with hands-on application. In this course students will work with computer graphics, images, audio and video clips to develop relevant video for broadcasting. They will gain an understanding of video concepts like audience awareness, storyboarding, researching and editing principles. Students are exposed to devices to capture original sound and video as well as software used for creating and manipulating audio visual effects and video editing. The course is project-oriented with broadcasting via weekly bulletins and live streaming, and will involve times out of class to capture events. A large part of student evaluation is based on real life projects which will be designed to meet the individual interests of students in authentic ways and shown to live audiences. *Students may take this course for art credit. The course may be taken for as many as 8 semesters.

Publication Design Yearbook One year; One credit (may be repeated for credit), Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. All participants must demonstrate grade-level proficiency with writing and have an interest in design. Homework: Average (Heavy around deadlines) *Some Saturday work sessions. Students will experience all aspects of production of the High School Yearbook. They will decide upon a theme, create layouts with emphasis on the elements and principles of design, and submit edited copy for the publication. They will become proficient with Adobe InDesign and Photoshop and will submit final layouts on CD. They will gain experience with cutting edge (Macintosh) computers, as this is the design industry standard. Their product will be the Harimau. They will also submit copy and design for a variety of other publications. Students may take this course for art credit, provided they first take Art I - Visual Art Foundations. An ability to adhere to deadlines and a high level of motivation is also necessary. The course may be taken for as many as six semesters.

Film Making One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for additional credits); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Video Production Homework: Average (Could be heavy around deadlines) Students taking this course will develop a greater understanding of filmmaking as a craft and industrial process. This course is a practical study of the creative and technical aspects of film production. Students will make short films in small groups, to develop their skills in scripting, videography, mise en scène, performance, editing and sound recording. The course will also examine how narrative films are conceived and crafted by developing an understanding of the underlying principles of filmmaking. *Students may take this course for art credit. The course may be taken for as many as 7

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semesters.

Web Page Design One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Good comfort level with basic computing skills. Homework: Light In Web Page Design students will learn the fundamentals of the Internet, the World Wide Web, and of creating a website utilizing a range of web page creation, graphic design, and coding software, including HTML, and CSS. Initially, students will learn HTML coding and styling. Then students will focus on the construction of web sites linking multiple pages and images. Students will examine and evaluate existing websites to develop both functional and aesthetic design criteria and then focus on web page planning, creation and management using current software. The course is project-oriented, and a large part of student evaluation is based on practical assignments. Skills acquired within the Interactive Multimedia course could be used to enhance the products within this class. * Students may take this course for art credit.

Introduction to Design Technology One semester; 0.5 credit: Grades 9-12 Homework: Light/Regular Prerequisites: None This is an introductory course in the subject of Design Technology. It is a popular and hands-on subject where students learn about product design by using a wide variety of practical technologies in the process of realizing their designed projects. It is a subject that involves both applied arts and applied science, combining artistic ability with technological know-how to create innovative products. Emphasis is on both the aesthetics and functionality of their final designs. Students are engaged in designing simple projects with a strong emphasis on skill development, thoughtful material selection and manufacturing techniques. They are introduced to the Design Cycle and the tools and equipment of a Product Design Studio. The Design Cycle is a problem-solving model used to help create and evaluate solutions to challenges. It begins with analyzing the design opportunity or problem involved, designing and drawing unique solutions, planning the construction, fabrication of the product, and then finally evaluating its success and potential marketability. * Students may take this course for art credit.

Design Technology 2 One year; 1.0 credit: Grades 10-12 Homework: Light/Regular Prerequisites: Intro to Design Technology This course is designed to build on the Introduction to Design Technology course and will allow students to refine and expand their skills both in design and fabrication. We will continue to work with the Design Cycle as a means of evaluation and adaptation of our work, bringing rough ideas through to final designs. Continued work with 3-D design software will allow students to hone their skills, making improved and more sophisticated renderings. Design Technology 2 will have more studio time for students to work independently on projects of their own design. Emphasis will continue to stress both the aesthetics and functionality of their final designs, while considering more carefully the appropriateness of material selection and fabrication method. Further work exploring materials and techniques will be in part guided by student interest and application to their particular projects. Students will be asked to submit two projects, one at the end of each semester that will serve as their semester exams. *Students may take this course for art credit.

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Computer Science in the Modern World One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light The goal of this course is to provide all students with an introduction to the principles of computer science and its place in the modern world. Students will develop an understanding of how computers and networks work, gain experience designing algorithms and programming solutions to a variety of computational problems, and develop insight about the impact of computer technology on individuals and modern society. Additional topics will be determined by student interest.

Introduction to Robotics One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light Students will be introduced to the subsystems of the VEX Robotic System (structure, motion, power, sensor, control, logic, and programming). They will gain a basic understanding of robotic construction, mechanical design, and sensor operation. Basic programming skills will be developed using the RobotC text-based programming language. Working individually and in collaborative design teams, students will develop an appreciation for the value of following the design cycle as they work through a blend of lab investigations and game challenges.

Robotics II One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Robotics Homework: Light Students will focus on using the design cycle to engineer robots and use advanced programming techniques to enable their robots to perform complex behaviors. The course will be organized using a project based format that encourages students to work collaboratively within design teams. Collaboration and creative solutions will be encouraged as students custom build components to meet project needs using a variety of building tools.

AP Computer Science A One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Advanced Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 or concurrently taking Integrated Math 3 Plus Homework: Heavy *Fulfills IB Computer Science Standard Level requirement, Year 1 This course is designed for students who wish to gain knowledge and understanding of logical problem solving using a computer. Students will be taught a stepwise development of algorithms using the JAVA programming language. Topics include program documentation, structured design, basic control structures, common programming idioms and modularization using Java methods, predefined data types, and object-oriented programming. The course will prepare students to take the AP Computer Science A exam. If there is sufficient demand, then students may prepare for the IB SL or HL Computer Science course and continue for a second year.

IB Computer Science HL 1 One year; One credit; Grade 11 Prerequisite: B or better in IM3 or C or better in IM3+ Homework: Moderate to Heavy This course is the first year of a 2 year IB Computer Science HL course. It requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. The course, underpinned

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by conceptual thinking, draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge and enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Students study software development, algorithmic thinking, pseudo code development and abstract data structures in data storage management. During the course, students will develop computational solutions using Java, which will include identifying an authentic problem, designing and testing a solution, and evaluating the success of the outcome. The course will lead students to take the IB Computer Science HL exam in the second year (IB2 HL).

IB Computer Science SL2 One year (second year of a 2-year course; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors Prerequisite: AP Computer Science A Homework: Moderate This course requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. The course, underpinned by conceptual thinking, draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge and enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Students study how computer science interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave, and the ethical issues involved. During the course students will develop computational solutions using Java, which will include identifying an authentic problem, designing and testing a solution, and evaluating the success of the outcome. The course will prepare students to take the IB Computer Science SL exam.

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The Arts Visual Arts - Overview

Visual Arts Courses ART I: These are entry-level visual arts courses at ISKL. Students may enroll in any Art I subject in a given year, but Visual Art Foundations must be one of them unless it has been taken in a prior year.

ART I: Visual Art Foundations One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average Required Equipment: Sketchbook This foundations course offers an exploration of the many fields in the visual arts. Studies reinforcing the art elements and principles of design will be demonstrated both in studio and journal exercises. Students will experience a variety of two and three-dimensional techniques and multiple mediums in the areas of: drawing, painting, 65


sculpture, ceramics, and printmaking. Each focus area will emphasize critiquing methods for formulating good composition and design that can span visual needs in the arts and other academic areas. Students will be introduced to various periods of art history, and culture, in studio and journal applications throughout the semester. This course, or its equivalent from a prior High School, is a prerequisite for most other Visual Arts courses at ISKL.

ART I: Photography One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None, but must be followed by or preceded by Art I Visual Art Foundations Homework: Average Recommended Equipment: 35mm manual camera This beginning course is designed to introduce students to the 35mm camera - what it is, what it is not and how to use it. Students work to begin “seeing� through the lens studying composition and design - and to produce their own high quality photographs. The course includes an introduction to the black and white darkroom (developing black and white film, making contact sheets and enlarging from negatives). Readings and historical research, classroom discussions and various photo shoot assignments are an integral part of the course.

ART I: Ceramics One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Regular Prerequisite: None, but must be followed by or preceded by Art I Visual Art Foundations Homework: Average Recommended Equipment: Sketchbook and clay tools This class introduces basic skills in ceramics and sculpture combined in a semester course. A variety of mediums such as paper, clay, and plaster are explored while focusing on art elements and design principles that relate to ceramics and sculpture. Students are introduced to ceramics/sculpture throughout art history and learn to recognize important features from certain art periods and artists.

ART II: These courses are each a full semester with students choosing areas of focus. Students are encouraged to experience as many disciplines in the Visual Arts as possible, but are advised to choose their greatest interest area in preparation for further course work at a more advanced level. Art history, culture, and critiquing methods using the art elements and principles of design will be included in all disciplines. At least one Art II class is required for entry into IB Visual Arts HL1.

ART II: Visual Arts One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Art I Visual Art Foundations Homework: Average Required Equipment: Sketchbook This course will build on skills gained in Art I Visual Art Foundations and students will be encouraged to be more independent in both choice and content of their work. Students will develop their life drawing and painting skills in various media and will learn how to mix and manipulate forms from different media to create original outcomes. While developing and documenting the process of their research and ideas in the form of an art workbook, students will be exposed to art history critique and the study of techniques from a variety of artists.

ART II: Graphic Design One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Art I Visual Art Foundations 66


Homework: Average Recommended Equipment: Laptop able to run Photoshop and InDesign, Sketchbook, 2B, 2H and HB pencils, and eraser. Students plan visual presentations for such things as CD jackets, advertisements, brochures, package designs, magazine covers and posters. Students research a problem, work out sketches called “roughs” and then prepare detailed designs.drawings, which include lettering, sketches of all artwork, and any combination of the above.

ART II: Photography One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 Photography Homework: Average Recommended Equipment: 35mm manual camera This intermediate course is designed to help students continue skill development with the 35mm camera - what it is, what it is not and how to use it. Students work to continue “seeing” through the lens - studying composition and design - and to produce their own high quality photographs. The course includes an introduction to the black and white darkroom (developing black and white film, making contact sheets and enlarging from negatives.) Readings & historical research, classroom discussions and various photo shoot assignments are an integral part of the course.

ART II: Ceramics One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 Ceramics Homework: Average Required Equipment: Sketchbook and clay tools This class continues basic skills in ceramics and sculpture combined in a semester course. A variety of media such as paper, clay, and plaster are explored while focusing on art elements and design principles that relate to ceramics and sculpture. Students continue to explore ceramics/sculpture throughout art history and learn to recognize important features from certain art periods and artists.

ART III: These courses are each a full semester and focus on the visual art discipline of choice. Further studies in art history, culture, critiquing methods using the art elements and principles of design will be re-emphasized in all coursework.

ART III: Visual Arts One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art II Homework: Average/Heavy (Additional studio time required) Required Equipment: A Hardback Sketchbook This course is for students who have taken Visual Art II. It will allow them to further develop the skills and techniques they have gained. They will explore a variety of media, focused on drawing, painting and printmaking. Students will explore more open-ended projects, giving them the ability to work more independently and explore their own interests. They will research and document the development and thought process in their workbooks as they study art styles throughout history, making connections to both historical and modern artists with their ideas. Independent thinking and problem solving skills will be emphasised.

ART III: Photography One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Art II Photography with B- or higher Homework: Average/Heavy (Additional studio time required) Recommended Equipment: 35mm manual camera 67


This course is designed for students who have taken Art II - photography, have confidence in their darkroom, camera and research skills and are committed to serious study and some individual, independent work. The course encourages students to continue to develop skills in the darkroom and with black and white photographic techniques. Students will also be exposed to collage, mixed media and printmaking. Through a combination of structured study (assigned photo shoots, research, class discussions, mixed and multi-media work) and individual themes and interests, the students will produce a quality workbook, a portfolio and an exhibit of their work.

ART III: Ceramics One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Art II Ceramics Homework: Average/Heavy (Additional studio time required) Recommended Equipment: Sketchbook, 2B pencils, eraser and set of clay tools. Ceramics media and techniques are explored further as they relate to the art elements and principles of design. The emphasis will be on developing techniques and competence both in hand building and wheel throwing. Design problem solving using three dimensional approaches is stressed. The study of art styles throughout history, as they relate to both traditional and modern sculpture and ceramics, is emphasized for personal development.

Additional Arts Courses: Publication Design Yearbook One year; One credit (may be repeated for credit), Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. All participants must demonstrate grade-level proficiency with writing and have an interest in design. Homework: Average (Heavy around deadlines) *Some Saturday work sessions. Students will experience all aspects of production of the High School Yearbook. They will decide upon a theme, create layouts with emphasis on the elements and principles of design, and submit edited copy for the publication. They will become proficient with Adobe InDesign and Photoshop and will submit final layouts on CD. They will gain experience with cutting edge (Macintosh) computers, as this is the design industry standard. Their product will be the Harimau. They will also submit copy and design for a variety of other publications. Students may take this course for art credit, provided they first take Art I - Visual Art Foundations. An ability to adhere to deadlines and a high level of motivation is also necessary. The course may be taken for as many as six semesters.

Introduction to Design Technology One semester; 0.5 credit: Grades 9-12 Homework: Light/Regular Prerequisites: None This is an introductory course in the subject of Design Technology. It is a popular and hands-on subject where students learn about product design by using a wide variety of practical technologies in the process of realizing their designed projects. It is a subject that involves both applied arts and applied science, combining artistic ability with technological know-how to create innovative products. Emphasis is on both the aesthetics and functionality of their final designs. Students are engaged in designing simple projects with a strong emphasis on skill development, thoughtful material selection and manufacturing techniques. They are introduced to the Design Cycle and the tools and equipment of a Product Design Studio. The Design Cycle is a problem-solving model used to help create and evaluate solutions to challenges. It begins with analyzing the design opportunity or problem involved, designing and drawing unique solutions, planning the construction, fabrication of the product, and then finally evaluating its success and potential marketability.

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Design Technology 2 One year; 1.0 credit: Grades 10-12 Homework: Light/Regular Prerequisites: Intro to Design Technology This course is designed to build on the Introduction to Design Technology course and will allow students to refine and expand their skills both in design and fabrication. We will continue to work with the Design Cycle as a means of evaluation and adaptation of our work, bringing rough ideas through to final designs. Continued work with 3-D design software will allow students to hone their skills, making improved and more sophisticated renderings. Design Technology 2 will have more studio time for students to work independently on projects of their own design. Emphasis will continue to stress both the aesthetics and functionality of their final designs, while considering more carefully the appropriateness of material selection and fabrication method. Further work exploring materials and techniques will be in part guided by student interest and application to their particular projects. Students will be asked to submit two projects, one at the end of each semester that will serve as their semester exams.

IB VISUAL ARTS: These courses are designed for highly motivated students who are committed to a serious study of art. They will offer students the opportunity to prepare a portfolio for university entrance and the IB Diploma. Students will build and develop their technical abilities to create resolved artworks. During the process, they will provide evidence of understanding a variety of materials and media with direction and critiques. They will investigate a range of art history to compare and make connections with their own work, emphasising critical analysis. The courses conclude with a collection of investigation studies and finished artwork in a final exhibition. *Note for IB Diploma or Course Candidates in Higher Level: This is a highly demanding course of study. Art students will be expected to provide a portfolio of 8-11 finished studio work which is worth 40%. ​The documenting parts will include 13-25 pages for a Process Portfolio which is worth 40% and a Comparative Study on artists of the student’s choice. This will be a digital document that will analyse and compare artists on 13-20 screens worth 20%. *Note for IB Diploma Standard Level candidates: This is a less demanding course of study under the IB Art syllabus. Art students will be expected to provide a portfolio of 4-7 finished studio work which is worth 40%. ​The documenting parts will include 9-18 pages for a process portfolio which is worth 40% and a Comparative Study on artists of the student’s choice. This will be a digital document that will analyse and compare artists on 10-15 screens worth 20%.

IB Visual Arts SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Homework: Heavy (Additional studio time required.) Prerequisite: Art II with B- or higher The is the first year of IB Visual Art and it is designed to be more teacher-led, concentrating on the development of technical abilities and critiquing skills. Students will be exposed to a variety of media and they will explore different approaches to the visual arts, broadening their horizons and understandings. There is an emphasis on the development process, researching art history and making connections. Students will learn how to critique at a more complex level. They will be encouraged to take risks and be independent thinkers.

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IB Visual Arts SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors (SL2)/Advanced (HL2) Prerequisite: IB Visual Arts B- or higher Homework: Very Heavy (Additional studio time required) This is a continuation of the IB Visual Arts HL1 course. Students will already be able to work independently and this year, the focus will be on the refinement and resolution of materials appropriate to visual communication. Students will build on their independent ideas to coincide with their investigative research. An additional focus will be on cultural context and exploring work from other artists to form connections with their own work. They will learn how to critique and conduct in-depth analysis and therefore demonstrate a strong understanding and knowledge of art.

Performance Arts / Theater Courses ISKL Players One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for additional credits); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light + Performance Requirements ISKL Players is a hands-on course in which students work together as an ensemble to develop and tell a story. As an ensemble, students build an understanding of the role that theatre-makers play and transform their inspirations and ideas into performances that will engage and inspire audiences. Actors, directors, costume designers, set-designers, and light and sound technicians each have a unique role in contributing to the artistic process and vision for a performance. Students will practically explore how an artistic ensemble works together to create a theatrical performance. In addition to building a comprehensive understanding of theatre-making, students will practice acting and directing skills, physical and vocal techniques, stage-blocking, explore characterization, and gain a deeper understanding of dramatic structure. Students will be evaluated on their preparations for performance, contributions to the ensemble and documentation of the artistic process. Each semester will culminate with a showcase performance where students will be able to share their theatre-making process and product with an audience. As a member of the ‘ISKL Players’ ensemble, students will have the unique opportunity to work with impassioned peers to demonstrate their learning through theatre-making and performance.

Theatre Tech Team One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for additional credits); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light and Tech Hours* Theatre Tech Team is a hands-on course in which students build an understanding of the role that theatre-makers play in developing technical and artistic concepts that engage and inspire audiences. Costume designers, set-designers, stage managers, light/sound/av designers each have a unique role in contributing to the artistic process and vision for a performance. Students will practically explore how an artistic ensemble works together to create a theatrical concept and artistic vision. This hands-on course revolves around exposing ​Theatre Tech Team members to the many technical and design components of producing theater, dance & music programs. Areas of exploration include: light/sound/av technologies, production/stage management, stagecraft & scenic design. Theatre Tech Team members can choose an area(s) of focus which best matches their interests. Over the course of the semester, students will complete a series of projects to demonstrate their acquisition of skills and understanding of their chosen focus.

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*Students will be expected to put their technical theatre skills into action, serving on a running crew of at least one ISKL event/production per semester.

IB Theatre Arts SL1/HL1 One year; One credit; Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average + Performance Requirements *While the IB Theatre course is a two-year program, this course is open to non-IB diploma candidates -- students that would like to complete the course, and students interested in taking IB Theatre as a one-year elective. IB Theatre is a multi-faceted course that encourages discovery through experimentation and developing the skills necessary to effectively communicate an “idea” through performance. With the framework of “Theatre in Context, Theatre Processes and Presenting Theatre”, students analyze, research, and create theatre as designers, directors and performers. With this range of artistic perspectives, students understand the complex and interconnected nature of the artistic process. Students develop an understanding of the role that theatre-makers (actors, directors, costume designers, set-designers, and light and sound technicians) play in bringing an artistic vision to fruition. Student portfolios showcase the artistic journey of each student. Performance/production skills are developed through exercises in class, rehearsals, workshops and performances. World theatrical styles and performance theories are explored both theoretically and practically. IB Theatre learners develop the confidence, creativity and critical ability to present a message to any audience. IB Theatre SL/HL exam components are identical in content. IB Theatre SL/HL students work over the course of the two year program to complete: The Collaborative Project, The Director’s Notebook and The Research Presentation. IB Theatre HL students are responsible for the completion of one additional assessment, The Solo Theatre Piece.

IB Theatre Arts SL2/HL2 One year; One credit; Grade 11-12 Credit/Degree of Difficulty: Honors (SL2)/Advanced (HL2) Prerequisite: IB Honors Theatre Arts Homework: Average + Performance Requirements Fulfills the IB Theatre Arts Standard Level or Higher Level requirement Year 2 IB Theatre Arts SL2/HL2 is the second year of the IB Theatre program. This course encourages students to experience theatre-making through the framework of “Theatre in Context, Theatre Processes and Presenting Theatre”. IB Theatre learners create, present, and critically reflect on theatre as participants and audience members, as well as gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community and the world. The second year of the IB Theatre program focuses on the preparation for and completion of the core exam components of the program: The Director’s Notebook, Research Presentation, Collaborative Theatre Project, and Solo Theatre Piece (HL only). In the second year of the course, students become more fully aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives, developing an appreciation of the diversity of theatre practices, their processes and their modes of presentation. Ultimately, IB Theatre enables students to discover and engage with different forms of theatre across time, place and culture and promotes international-mindedness. IB Theatre SL/HL exam components are identical in content. IB Theatre SL/HL students work over the course of the two year program to complete: The Collaborative Project, The Director’s Notebook and The Research Presentation. IB Theatre HL students are responsible for the completion of one additional assessment, The Solo Theatre Piece.

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Music Courses Music Technology One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Average with scheduled recording projects Music Technology is a hands-on project-based course for students who want to learn basic fundamentals of audio recording, digital music production, and live sound design. As a music course, students will be required to learn the basic music elements like rhythm and pitch. It is a project-based course that requires students to manage their time well to complete required assignments. Assignments may include original compositions using pre-recorded audio loops, a karaoke background track that choir students will sing on, a podcast on a topic of interest, as well as how to use plugins to change and operate music in a new way. This course does not require any musical training, but it will be helpful. Students are not required to have a Mac computer but it will be helpful as the course will be taught with GarageBand and/or Logic Pro X. Students who do not have a Mac will have access to a computer in the technology lab at school.

The Sound Project One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light The Sound Project is for students who are interested in knowing how the world works through music. This exploratory course involves students in the ways musicians and thinkers create musical instruments. Students will be able to break things, take things apart, and learn through activity and trial and error. Ultimately, students will create performances using the instruments they build. We will form groups and work to write songs together. Student interest will focus and drive the music-making and composition/songwriting. Prior musical training is not necessary for this course, but it can be helpful. The Sound Project is for students who are working on mixing their skills in new and fun ways.

Songwriting One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Passion for music and a desire to write their own Homework: Light and cabaret performances Songwriting is a hands-on music elective course for those students who wish to begin and then develop their songwriting skills. Students will learn the basics of how to compose a song for the desired ensemble they have. Students must be creative and have a passion for creating their own music. The course will focus on composing melodies, writing song lyrics, and writing music for your desired ensemble. Students will learn the basics of music theory like chords, chord progressions, drum beats, and bass lines so they understand the songs they hear for inspiration and then the songs they compose for this class and beyond. The course will utilize the elements of music: Pitch, Rhythm, Form, Timbre, Texture, and Expressive Techniques as a means to create meaningful melodies. There will be scheduled masterclasses throughout the semester for the students to showcase the songs they have written. Students do not need to know how to play an instrument or read music notation, but they must be willing to learn as this music course has a performance aspect.

Rock Band One semester; 0.5 credit (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Basic playing ability on guitar, bass, piano, drums, or voice. Wind and strings players should speak with the teacher. Homework: Light and Performances

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Rock Band is an ensemble class for students who have a basic knowledge of how to play at least one of the following instruments: bass, guitar, piano, drums, or voice. Wind and String instruments are welcome to join, but must have consent of the teacher. Students will be expected to perform on their “primary” instrument as well as on a “secondary” instrument. The ideal student for this course will want to go beyond playing in their basement and has a desire to polish music for a professional standard. Throughout the semester the band will learn music mostly suggested by band members; these will all be covers. We may also work on original compositions from the ISKL community. There will be regularly scheduled masterclasses throughout the semester; these may occur during class or at lunch, as well as an evening cabaret performance. Students are expected to be full participants in the ensemble by suggesting music, practicing at home, and attending all performances.

Concert Band One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Previous experience on instrument is preferred but not required. Admission granted at discretion of ensemble director. Homework: Average (rehearsals 3:00pm-4:00pm on Tuesdays as needed) plus concerts Concert Band is available to students who wish to perform in a beginning instrumental ensemble and/or choose to learn a band instrument (flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba and percussion). This is also a good class for a student to learn a secondary instrument. Class instruction is given to the teaching of note-reading and music fundamentals and to providing experience in a performing ensemble. In-class lessons provide individual attention to improve the student’s playing skills on a particular instrument. Students are asked to prepare playing assignments during practice time outside of class to be submitted as homework. There are a limited number of school-owned instruments available for rental; thus each student is encouraged to provide his/her own instrument. This is a preparatory course for the Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble. Students are expected to purchase the required uniform for concerts. Upon completion of Concert Band in one school year, or achieving appropriate skill level, students may audition for Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble.

Symphonic Band One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Required; Discretion of ensemble director. Homework: Average (rehearsals 3:00pm-4:00pm on Tuesdays as needed) as well as concerts This course is open to all students with previous playing experience who wish to perform in an intermediate to advanced instrumental ensemble. Symphonic Band selections will explore a variety of styles from classical, jazz and pop. Sectional rehearsals are provided to improve individual playing skills. Students are expected to prepare lessons and band parts outside of class. Playing assessments as well as written reflections will be an integral component of assessment in this course. While most members provide their own instruments, some school-owned instruments are available. Co-curricular performances throughout the year (may include a band exchange) are an integral part of the band program. Band members are also eligible to audition for cultural convention with other IASAS schools. School eligibility requirements apply to travel.

Wind Ensemble One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Required Homework: Heavy (rehearsals 3:00 pm-4:00 pm on Tuesdays as needed) This course is for those students who wish to perform with an advanced level wind band ensemble. Students audition and are selected for this group by the director. Membership is limited to one or two students on each instrumental part. Instruction is provided for improving playing skills to an advanced level. Performance repertoire

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includes advanced-level band arrangements of various styles as well as recommended core literature for High School musicians. Students are expected to prepare lessons and band parts outside of class. Most members provide their own instruments. Some school-owned instruments are available for student use. Co-curricular performances throughout the year (may include a band exchange) are an integral part of the band program. Members will be required to purchase prescribed concert clothing and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances. Band members are also eligible to audition for cultural convention with other IASAS schools. School eligibility requirements apply to travel.

String Ensemble One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: 1 year of experience Homework: Regular/Heavy (rehearsals 3:00 pm-4:00 pm on Tuesdays as needed) String Ensemble is a class where students will continue to enrich and enhance their abilities on violin, viola, cello, and double bass. This course is designed for students with some orchestral string experience to continue performing, improving technically, and increasing their knowledge of music. Students will learn and prepare various styles of music literature and repertoire for their instrument and ensemble throughout the year. Co-curricular performances throughout the year (may include an exchange) are an integral part of the program. Members will be required to purchase an outfit and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances. Members are also eligible to audition for cultural convention with other IASAS schools. School eligibility requirements apply to travel.

Chamber Players One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition required Homework: Regular/Heavy (rehearsals 3:00 pm-4:00 pm on Tuesdays as needed) Chamber Players is a string ensemble class designed for students with a lot of orchestral string experience to continue performing, improving technically, and increasing their knowledge of music. Students will learn and prepare various styles of music literature and repertoire for their instrument and ensemble throughout the year. Co-curricular performances throughout the year (may include an exchange) are an integral part of the program. Members will be required to purchase an outfit and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances. Students need to have one or more years of experience to take this course. Members are also eligible to audition for cultural convention with other IASAS schools. School eligibility requirements apply to travel.

Concert Choir One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light Concert Choir is open to anyone who is interested in singing. No experience or audition is necessary. This class will teach you to how to sing in a variety of music styles, including pop, folk, classical, and multicultural music. This course will also focus on music theory and reading music. Members will be required to purchase prescribed concert clothing and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances.

Chamber Choir - Soprano/Alto One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit) Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Homework: Light Chamber Choir is an auditioned advanced treble (soprano and alto) ensemble where enthusiasm and commitment are necessary. This group will perform frequently

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throughout the year. The students will sing a wide variety of choral music, both accompanied and unaccompanied. Students will study vocal solo and ensemble techniques, music theory, musicianship, ear training, and performance practices. Enthusiasm and commitment are necessary. Members will be required to purchase prescribed concert clothing and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances in and out of school.

Chamber Choir - Tenor/Bass One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit) Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: None Homework: Light Chamber Choir is an ensemble for tenors and basses where enthusiasm and a positive attitude are necessary. Students will sing a variety of pop, multicultural, classical and jazz music. This group will perform frequently throughout the year at school assemblies and concerts. Students will study group singing techniques, music theory, microphone techniques, and staging. Members will be required to purchase prescribed concert clothing and are expected to participate in all concerts and performances in and out of school.

ISKL Singers One year; One credit (may be repeated yearly for credit); Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Audition Homework: Regular ISKL Singers is a small auditioned advanced vocal ensemble. The students will sing a wide variety pop, classical, and contemporary jazz music, both accompanied and unaccompanied. Students will study challenging literature, ensemble techniques, microphone techniques, staging, music theory, musicianship, and jazz harmony. Enthusiasm and commitment are necessary. This ensemble will perform for multiple functions, in and outside of school, in addition to regular music concerts and Jazz Nights.

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Learning Resource Learning Resource Courses LR Core Support One semester; 0.5 credits (may be repeated for credit); Grade 9 Prerequisites: None Homework: None The Learning Resource Center offers students who have learning differences assistance and guidance in content area courses. A variety of study strategies are introduced and practiced in order to foster independence in the content classes. A primary goal of the Learning Resource Center is to promote independence and responsibility to self-advocate, both in and out of the classroom, by using a collaborative model to establish goals and objectives. Placement in this class is based on previous school records of a learning difference, teacher, parent or student referral. The referral process involves collaboration between members of the Student Resource Team (SRT). Diagnostic tests may also be given and used as part of the criteria for placement in the LRC.

Effective Study Skills One semester; 0.5 credit; Grade 9-12 Prerequisites: None Homework: None Students are faced with demanding courses. Their full participation and commitment is expected. While the subject and teacher may intrigue young learners, many lack specific skills and/or strategies needed to be proactive, efficient and effective students. In short, they require direct instruction. Skills are initially taught in isolation. When mastered, skills are transferred and applied to content area classes. This class offers specific, direct instruction in the area of study skills and strategies. Time management, organization, note taking, mind mapping and test taking skills comprise the main components of this course. Time is also devoted to exploring individual learning styles and creating new study habits to fit the needs of the individual learner. Students are encouraged to utilize a portion of their preparation period to initiate homework, clarify class project objectives, and revise for quizzes/tests. This allows the instructor to observe student executive habits and assist individually.

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Course Registration & Scheduling Considerations Course Registration Registration for the following year’s classes takes place in March for current High School and Grade 8 students. Rising 9th, 10th and 11th grade students are required to complete a ​Four-Year Plan​ each year to assure an appropriate progression of classes. In general, course changes will be considered the exception rather than the rule. Therefore, please plan your courses carefully. Remember that your choices will impact the building of the master schedule and your initial choices may make changes impossible. *NOTE: Students (full IB or not) may choose up to 4 HL/AP courses in any given semester (students cannot select 5 or more HL/AP courses).

Student Schedules and Preparation Periods ISKL has an eight-block learning schedule. Blocks meet every other day, with only four blocks meeting on any given school day. Typically, students take seven courses each semester and have one Preparation Period. Preparation Periods are unstructured 80-minute blocks of time that students may use to do homework, prepare for tests or exams, meet with fellow students or teachers who share the same Prep Period, etc. Students in Grade 9 or Grade 10 may have no more than one Prep. Grade 11 and 12 students may have two Prep Periods if desired, and Grade 12 students who have three or more AP or IB HL2 courses may have up to three Preps. While we recommend that all students have a Prep Period, those that wish to petition to have no Preps should see their Counselor.

Academic Success Program The Academic Success Program is in place to provide students who are in need with supervision, time management assistance, and a quiet space to conduct their studies. Students who are not managing their Prep Periods well, as evidenced by lower grades, consistently late or missing assignments, etc., may be assigned to the Academic Success Program for a specified number of Prep Periods. The student’s progress will be evaluated at the end of the assigned number of sessions and it will be determined if additional time is needed, or if the student may return to having a Prep Period. While attendance is mandatory and “Academic Success” will appear on a student’s schedule, there will be no indication of this program on the student’s transcript.

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GPA and Honor Roll GRADE POINT AVERAGE--Gr. 12 students only 2018-19 What is a ​Grade Point Average (GPA)?

Many colleges and universities evaluate students’ high school academic performance using a score called the Cumulative ​Grade Point Average (GPA). I​n most cases, those institutions calculate GPA using their own formulae. GPA is used to determine qualification for Honor Roll, National Honor Society, and various other academic awards. While GPA is not used in the learning process, ISKL recognizes that it is of interest to students and parents as a record of past achievement and standing at each semester end. ISKL calculates and reports GPA as follows.

How are Grade Points assigned? A Grade Point (GP) is assigned to each letter grade a student earns for courses taken in the high school. The chart below shows the Grade Point values associated with each letter grade in the range of courses offered at ISKL. All AP and IB HL2 courses are Advanced level courses. All IB SL2 and IB HL1 courses are Honors level courses. All other courses are Regular level courses. Percentage Grade Point (GP) Awarded for Letter Grades Grade Range Regular Honors Advanced A+ 97 - 100 4.33 4.67 5.00 A 93 – 96 4.00 4.33 4.67 A90 - 92 3.67 4.00 4.33 B+ 87 – 89 3.33 3.67 4.00 B 83 – 86 3.00 3.33 3.67 B80 - 82 2.67 3.00 3.33 C+ 77 - 79 2.33 2.67 3.00 C 73 - 76 2.00 2.33 2.67 C70 - 72 1.67 2.00 2.33 D+ 67 - 69 1.33 1.67 2.00 D 63 - 66 1.00 1.33 1.67 D60 - 62 0.67 1.00 1.33 NC 59 or below 0.00 0.00 0.00

How is Grade Point Average (GPA) calculated? A Grade Point Average (GPA) can be calculated for any set of courses by dividing the sum of the values for the Grade Points earned for those courses by the number of courses. This could be for a semester, a year, or for what typically is done, the entire high school experience.

What is Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)? A ​cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the sum of the Grade Points (GP) for all courses by the total number of courses taken. The Cumulative GPA is for the student’s complete educational career and is calculated and updated at the end of each semester only.

How is ​Cumulative GPA​ communicated?

The official record of a student’s academic progress through high school is the transcript. Upon completion of each course at the end of each semester, the transcript reflects the letter grade earned in each course, as well as the ​Cumulative GPA ​for all courses attempted to date.

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ISKL HS - Four Year Plan for Grade 9 - 11 Students 2018/19 NAME:

DATE:

Subject / Credit Required English 4.0

Social Studies 3.0

Science 3.0

Mathematics 3.0

World Language 2.0 PE & Health 2.0

Fine/Applied Arts 2.0

Grade 9

Grade 10

English 9

English 10 or English 10 A

World History 1

World History 2 or AP World History or AP US History

Integrated Science 1

Integrated Science II or:

Math:

Math:

WL:

WL:

Grade 9 PE

Health & PE:

Arts:

Arts:

Grade 11

English Selection:

Grade 12

English Selection:

Electives 5.0 Total Credits (24 min.)

*Note: Shaded boxes do not need to be filled in. They may be used if space is needed. *Note: Students (full IB or not) may choose up to 4 HL/AP courses in any given semester (students cannot select 5 or more HL/AP courses). Instructions: Using your Course Guide, write in all the courses you have taken and intend to take during your 4 years of High School. When complete, please make a copy of the form for your future reference.

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ISKL HS - Four Year Plan for Grade 12 Students 2018/19 NAME:

DATE:

Subject / Credit Required English 4.0

Social Studies 2.5

Science 2.0

Mathematics 2.0

World Language 2.0 PE & Health 2.0

Fine/Applied Arts 2.0

Grade 9

Grade 10

English 9

English 10 or English 10 A

World History 1

World History 2 or AP World History or AP US History

Integrated Science 1

Integrated Science II or:

Math:

Math:

WL:

WL:

Grade 9 PE

Health & PE:

Arts:

Arts:

Grade 11

English Selection:

Grade 12

English Selection:

Electives - 5.5 3.5 Core* 2.0 General** Total Credits (22 min.)

*Core Electives: Any additional courses in English, Social Studies, Science, Math, World Language or Technology **General Electives: Any additional courses in any subject area. *Note: Shaded boxes do not need to be filled in. They may be used if space is needed. *Note: Students (full IB or not) may choose up to 4 HL/AP courses in any given semester (students cannot select 5 or more HL/AP courses). Instructions: Using your Course Guide, write in all the courses you have taken and intend to take during your 4 years of High School. When complete, please make a copy of the form for your future reference.

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High School International School of Kuala Lumpur No. 2, Lorong Kelab Polo Di Raja, 55000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. T : +603 4813 5003 | F : + 603 4813 5101 W : www.iskl.edu.my

High School Course Guide 2018-2019  

The International School of Kuala Lumpur High School Course Guide 2018-2019

High School Course Guide 2018-2019  

The International School of Kuala Lumpur High School Course Guide 2018-2019