Page 1

i s h c o m p u b l i c at i o n s s i n c e 19 8 6

O

N

T

A

R

I

O

estaurant News R June 2014 Vol. 29 No. 5

N A T I O N A L

Mother’s is back

Mother’s co-owners Geeve Sandhu and Brian Alger.

Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40010152

By Jonathan Zettel, assistant editor

The kitchen’s only freezer is a small chest freezer for ice cream. KITCHENER, ON—Nostalgia was Sandhu said he and Alger located on the menu as the second Mother’s an original franchise owner who Pizza Parlour and Spaghetti House showed them the original sauce recfranchise opened in Kitchener on ipe and how the dough was prepared, May 5. which requires double proofing and Co-owners Brian Alger and Geeve 24 hours to make. The menu also Sandhu began revitalizing the brand includes spaghetti, panzarottis and in 2013 with the opening of a loca- salads. The brand—known for its 1920’s tion in Hamilton, ON, and plan to continue expansion by at least one ambiance including gingham tablestore per year. cloths, parlour-style pizza served on “We’re going to offer terrific value, a pedestal and Tiffany lamps—had great service and, above all, incredible more than 120 locations across Canfood quality,” Sandhu told ORN. ada, the U.S. and Britain. In the midAPPROVAL REQUIRED ‘80s, the franchise went public and in According toapproval. Sandhu, Mother’s the enclosed proof is sent for your We will not proceed with the job until the proof is returned. DO NOT GIVE VERBAL INSTRUCTIONS. CHECK CAREFULLY! 1989, Little Caesar’s bought the commakes as wemuch asresponsibility possible in-house Beyond this point cannot accept for any errors. alterations (other than typographical errors) will be charged extra. Mark proof “OK” or “OK with corrections” as the case may from itsnameoriginal recipe dough pany. Locations began closing in early be, signing your so we may know that the proof reached the properand authority. sauces, to granola and Italian sausage. in the ‘90s. Signature Of apprOval

C O V E R A G E

Alger said he grew up with Mother’s pizza as staple of his childhood and bought the rights to the brand the early 2000s. He and Sandhu—who owns three pubs and was previously a regional director for Jack Astor’s— joined forces in 2011. While the duo admitted nostalgia for the brand will bring many people into the restaurant, it will be important to provide an enjoyable experience to keep customer’s coming back. “Our service, our execution, and affordability—all of those things— must be real core principals for us to really excel,” Alger said. Michael Richardson of the Toronto-based design firm Jackknife designed the newest 150-seat restaurant. A glass case holds old, original memorabilia and photos. Other throwback shots of the brand, including a Polaroid of Alger’s 11th birthday at Mother’s, line the walls. “There’re just iconic elements that Mother’s shared, and anything we can do to bring that back in, I’m all for it,” Alger said, adding the restaurant would continue the tradition of giving a free dessert and taking Polaroids for birthdays and will also sponsor local sports teams. “One of the things that really made Mother’s was the way they were able to ingrain themselves in the community. We have old photos of kids whose T-ball team was sponsored by Mother’s or their hockey team,” he said. To open the Kitchener location, the city’s mayor Carl Zehr choose toppings for the “K-dub-ilicious” pizza from which $2 of each sale will go to children’s programs at the Kitchener public library. 4391 King St. East, Kitchener, ON. (519) 219-4999, www.mothersrestaurants.com.

R E G I O N A L

GROWING NEW IDEAS AT TERROIR CONFERENCE

CONTRACT BREWERS RULING SKIRTED

F O C U S

$ 5 . 9 5

6

INDUSTRY FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT AT CRIS

8

9

OFF TO THE DRAKE HOTEL FOR FESWICK

22

16 2014

Top 50 Chains Report

date

sherkston shores, ontarIo

JoIn the

converteD May 2014

wInnInG teaM Call Us now. NAME:

restaurantnews_ad_MaY2014-Bp

SizE:

10" × 2.875"

DATE:

MaY - 2014

Job No:

14-313

iNK:

CYAN

MAGENTA

YELLoW

bLACK

Felix DeCata Jennifer Murphy

905.361.3608 905.361.4836

DeCataF@BostonPizza.com MurphyJ@BostonPizza.com

convert your restaurant

to a Boston PIzza Just lIke sherkston shores, ontarIo DID. It’s worth a call. It’s easIer than you thInk.


Profit from our expertise You may know us as the people behind the IÖGO brand. But the truth is, Ultima Foods has been making and selling yogurt for over 40 years in Canada. Maybe that’s why our food service team has a pretty good insight into your needs. It’s also why we never stop listening. If there’s any way we can help you improve your bottom line, we’re all ears.

1-800-363-9496 food.service@ultimayog.ca or visit us at iogo.ca

Maryse Leboeuf Mark Delany


J U N E 2 014

Icarus takes flight

Zack Agathos.

LONDON, ON—Zack Agathos is embracing the family trade with the opening of Icarus Resto Bar in downtown London, ON. The 27-year-old grew up in his grandfather’s restaurant Huron House, also operating The Dancing Greek Taverna within its 10,000 square feet. Huron House closed its doors earlier this year after more than 50 years. “I gained a lot of experience and knowledge from being in that restaurant 24/7,” Agathos told ORN. “I just love food more than anything.” The 75-seat restaurant is slated to open June 24 at 519 Richmond St. The name refers to a Greek myth, in which

Icarus and his father Daedalus were imprisoned in a labyrinth. With wings crafted of wax, string and feathers, Icarus didn’t heed his father’s warning and flew too close to the sun melting the wax and causing him to plummet into what was named the Icarian Sea. Agathos said the idea of failure is crucial to success. The moral he takes from the story is to strive for your goals, but take the necessary advice to get there safely. “There are points in time when I feel I could have done it all myself and then I take a step back … I have a great team of advisors who have really invested in me,” he said. A social person, Agathos said he is passion-

ate about the business and enjoys hosting. Feeling it is important to connect with customers, he keeps track of the names and life events of regulars. “There are lots of opportunities for sevendays-a-week lunch crowds and dinner crowds,” said Agathos, who has arranged for live music and a whiskey and bourbon bar at the back of the 2,000-square-foot restaurant. About 15 people can sit in front of the open kitchen, encouraging an interactive and lively atmosphere. With the help of Maren Turgeon Designs, Agathos aimed for the restaurant to mix a Mediterranean feel with modern décor. The eatery features brick walls, rust-coloured paint at the entrance and bamboo lines the ceiling in the front area. “I wanted that Mediterranean ambiance as soon as you walk in,” said Agathos. Sourcing local produce from the market and meat from Townsend Butchers in Simcoe, ON, Agathos designed a menu highlighting authentic Greek food such as moussaka, spanakopita, sagnaki and pan fried and grilled calamari. Other dishes such as sandwiches, a lamb burger, pasta and steak round out the offerings. “I wanted to bring a piece of Greece to Canada while still highlighting Greek food and Canadian food,” he said. With the mindset of making sure everyone’s needs are met, Agathos also ensured that some menu items are suitable for gluten-free and vegan diners. Heading up the kitchen is executive chef Thomas Waite, who will be putting out seasonally inspired specials. The bar list will feature some Greek wines, liquors and beer. Prices range between $7 and $10 for appetizers, $9 and $14 for a sandwich or burger and from $11 for an entrée. 519 Richmond St., London, Icarusrestobar.com, @icarusrestobar.

Ontario restaurant tests no tipping waters By Jonathan Zettel NORTH YORK, ON—A restaurant in North York opened in February under the business model of including both taxes and tips in the menu prices as a way to make paying more convenient for guests. Oxygen Restaurant & Lounge, located at 35 Sheppard Ave. E., quickly changed its initial pricing after customers complained they wanted tax separate from the price. “We tried to make things very simple and easy for everyone,” Oxygen management said in an email. Servers were initially paid between $12 and $14, which according to Oxygen was to the servers’ benefit because business was slow when the restaurant first opened. Staff eventually had a meeting and agreed to revert to server’s minimum wage and begin collecting tips. While Oxygen’s pricing policy was set up to convenience customers, David Jones, owner of Smoke ‘N Water on Vancouver Island said his restaurant—which opened on June 2—eliminated tipping in order to help bridge the apparent wage disparity between front of house and back of house staff. “We’re drawing a line in the sand and saying ‘it stops right here’,” Jones told ORN. “No longer will a woman working in the back of the house … for thirty years be a single mother with an 11-year-old son and be paid $11.50 with no medical or dental. That’s not OK.” Smoke ‘N Water staff will be paid “a living wage” and labour, budgeted at 30 per cent, is included in the menu prices.

| 3

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

“We want to be innovative, we want to create a transformational shift on the business model of how restaurants are run,” said Jones. Although a handful of restaurants across the U.S. have no tipping policies, Jones said, no Canadian restaurants prohibit the customary practice. He calls his business model one of profit sharing. Two per cent of gross sales will go to provide dental and medical care to all employees and one per cent of sales will go into a social fund, the use of which will be determined by staff on a monthly basis. According to Jones, the practice of tipping makes for difficult management situations, citing incidences when servers provide excellent service yet receive a poor tip. “How does that make you feel as a human being?” Jones said. “How do I, as an owner, tell my server to shake it off?”

Reconsidering tipping models Jones said he got the idea of banning tips in his restaurant after listening to University of Guelph professor of hospitality and tourism management Bruce McAdams on CBC Radio. McAdams—who has more than 25 years experience in restaurant industry—has researched the effects of tipping and has been a proponent of rethinking tipping as a business model. “The biggest thing is probably the inequity of wages it causes between the front and back,” McAdams told ORN, noting servers can make up to $30 per hour while cooks and dishwash-

ers make between $10 and $14 per hour. This inequity, McAdams argues, causes real financial consequences for operators because the industry has a high employee turnover. Culinary students coming into the industry leave after a couple years because they are living paycheque to paycheque and some servers come into restaurants to make as much money as possible then leave. McAdams estimates it can cost up to $1,500 to train a new employee. McAdams said over the past 15 years, operators have tried to balance the wage disparity by having servers tip-out to the house. Unfortunately, he said, this practice causes trust and transparency issues and puts restaurants in a high-risk situation with the Canadian Revenue Agency because tips collected from servers are “controlled tips” and must be taxed. The practice of tipping also makes it difficult for restaurants to hire mangers, McAdams said, because managers often make less, have more responsibility and work longer hours than servers. McAdams said tipping has the ability to influence quality of service, but not as much as one might think, because many customers will tip regardless of the quality of service. Some restaurateurs may try a no-tipping policy, boost prices and not pass along the revenue to staff: “You have to try and have faith in the marketplace and you hope that people will move to places where they are treated properly,” he said. According to McAdams, Canadians tip $6 billion annually.

Ground Beef Pizza Crumble topping

Perfect portion sizing on pizzas

Famous Pepperoni, Salami, Donair and Gyros products.

TTS Sales 905-677-2900 www.chrisbrothers.ca FEDERALLY INSPECTED

Food Innovation & Research Studio

Restaurateurs and Food Entrepreneurs ask FIRSt about...

NutRItIoNal labellINg

PRoduct & RecIPe develoPmeNt

aPPlIed ReSeaRch FIRSt’s integrated team of culinary and food science experts provides solutions to the challenges of Ontario’s food industry. Contact first@georgebrown.ca 416-415-5000 ext. 6400 www.georgebrown.ca/first

SUBSCRIBE TO ONTARIO RESTAURANT NEWS AT

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com/sub


4 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

RestaurantNews

Com m e n t

Food or fad?

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com Editorial Director Leslie Wu ext. 227 lwu@canadianrestaurantnews.com Senior Contributing Editor Colleen Isherwood ext. 231 cisherwood@canadianrestaurantnews.com Assistant Editor Jonathan Zettel ext. 226 jzettel@canadianrestaurantnews.com Assistant Editor, Digital Content Kristen Smith ext. 238 ksmith@canadianrestaurantnews.com Senior Account Manager Debbie McGilvray ext. 233 dmcgilvray@canadianrestaurantnews.com Account Manager Kim Kerr ext. 229 kkerr@canadianrestaurantnews.com Production Stephanie Giammarco ext. 0 sgiammarco@canadianrestaurantnews.com Circulation Manager Don Trimm ext. 228 dtrimm@canadianrestaurantnews.com Controller Tammy Turgeon ext. 237 tammy@canadianrestaurantnews.com How to reach us: Tel (905) 206-0150

S

imilar to the fickle world of fashion— where trends paradoxically follow twenty year cycles, but also flow from a celebrity’s arm to the back of a suburban minivan at an ever increasing speed—food trends are careening from small independents to chains, from high end to low brow, from one culture to another and then back again. “We are living in a gold rush of food trends, mined with ladles and saucepans instead of pickaxes and dynamite,” writes David Sax in his new book The Tastemakers: Why we’re crazy for cupcakes but fed up with fondue. As operators try to make their cronut or pork bun spell commercial success, our industry spends millions of dollars a year monetizing, distilling and converting trends. What may be lost in the roar is the idea that trends are not only arbiters of taste, but may also distract us from how food actually tastes. When it comes to trends, why do we tend

Mickey Cherevaty Consultant, Moyer Diebel Limited Marvin Greenberg Consultant Jack Battersby President, Summit Food Service Distributors Inc. Barney Strassburger Jr. President, TwinCorp Paul LeClerc Partner, Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Michael Stephens Director of Retail, Inventory and Wholesale, LCBO Ralph Claussen Director Food and Beverage Operations Woodbine Entertainment Group Adam Colquhoun President, Oyster Boy John Crawford Director of Sales-Canada, Lamb Weston Tina Chiu Chief Operating Officer, Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation Matt Johnston Vice-president, Marketing, Moosehead Breweries Martin Kouprie Chef/Owner, Pangaea Restaurant Joel Sisson Founder and president of Crush Strategy Inc. Leslie Wilson Vice-president of Business Excellence Compass Group Canada Chris Jeens Partner W. D. Colledge Co. Ltd. Volume 29 No. 5 Ontario Restaurant News is published 12 times a year by Ishcom Publications Ltd., which also publishes: Pacific/Prairie Restaurant News, Atlantic Restaurant News, Canadian Lodging News, Ontario Chains and the ORN Buyers’ Directory. 2065 Dundas Street East, Suite 201 Mississauga, Ontario L4X 2W1 Tel: (905) 206-0150 Fax: (905) 206-9972 In Canada 1 800 201-8596 Subscriptions: Canada: $52.33/year or $78.57/2 years, $102.67/ 3 years; U.S.A.: $58.85/year or $84.85/2 years, $108.70/ 3 years. Single copy: $5.95 (Plus taxes where applicable) Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to circulation department, 2065 Dundas Street East, Suite 201, Mississauga, Ontario L4X 2W1 Publication Mail Agreement No. 40010152 ISSN 0834-0404 GST number R102533890

toward categorical breakdowns rather than taste, touch or any of the senses? We are inundated by trend summaries, detailing everything from leafy greens to ancient grains, from types of cuisines to cooking methods, but rarely do we see a list broken down into what the customer experiences first and foremost: taste. Through a concept such as comfort food, the diner experiences fatty richness and salt, soothing textures and homey warmth that all fuel a sense of nostalgia. What, then, makes this trendworthy over other similar items? “Why does food have to be trendy? Why can’t it just taste good on its own merits?” asks Sax. “I often find myself just wanting to be given a grilled cheese and then left alone. Not artisanal aged cheese, mind you, or ancient grain bread. Just cheese. And bread.” Are trends the drivers of our tastebuds, manufactured by tastemakers across the globe as Sax envisions,

Bi t s

Publisher Steven Isherwood ext. 236 sisherwood@canadianrestaurantnews.com

Editorial advisory CounCil

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Menchie’s hits 400 stores KITSILANO, BC—Frozen yogurt franchise Menchie’s opened its 400th location in late April in Kitsilano, BC. According to a release, the California-based company, which operates in 14 countries, plans continued growth with 500 units in the development pipeline. By the end of 2014, 120 additional locations are slated to open in addition to the 30 units which have already opened this year.

OTPP invests in restaurants SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan (OTPP) invested $300 million into the Flynn Restaurant Group L.P., operator of Applebee’s and Taco Bell brands in late May. With the investment, the OTPP holds more than 50 per cent stake in the franchise operator. “We are pleased to welcome the Ontario Teachers’ as an investor,” Greg Flynn, chairman and chief executive officer of the Flynn Restaurant Group, said in a release. “We now have enhanced resources to continue to grow through a variety of initiatives, including existing restaurant revitalizations, new restaurant development and potential new acquisitions.” According to Flynn Restaurant Group, its management team also participated in the investment and has “significantly increased its direct ownership position in the company as a result of the transaction.” The investment by the OTPP values FRG at more than $1 billion.

Domino’s Pizza opens 11,000th store in Brantford, ON ANN ARBOR, MI—After 54 years in operation, Domino’s Pizza opened its 11,000th store in Brantford, ON. In honour of the milestone, the company will donate $11,000 to the Rotary Club of Brantford. “I am proud of the many people who worked hard to reach this international milestone for Domino’s Pizza,” Patrick Doyle, Domino’s president and chief executive officer, said

or are they markers of existing ideas bubbling in our collective consciousness? Trends can make us better, more informed eaters by widening our comfort zone, but they can also send us galloping down the same taste trails in a mass herd, destined to repeat the same cycle year after year until its planned obsolescence drives a newer model forward: “Cauliflower is the new kale! Artisanal toast is the new bruschetta!” Whether you ignore them or follow them, trends are important signposts of not only how we eat, but how we think about what we eat. The irony is that although trends speak to and promote certain commonalities of mindset, operators often find success through their individuality: creating food they do well and forging their own directions. Perhaps the true value of trends lies in separating that personal sense of taste from a crowd of popular opinion.

a nd

in a release. “We’re thrilled we have the opportunity to celebrate our 11,000th store in Canada, where we began expanding to international markets more than 30 years ago.” Domino’s opened its first location outside the U.S. in Winnipeg in 1983. Accoding to the company, annual global retail sales were more than $8 billion in 2013. “We are going to continue looking for more opportunities to share Domino’s with people across the world,” Doyle said.

Changes in the kitchen at MTCC TORONTO—There’s a new head of the kitchen at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. Taking over the 14,000-square-foot kitchen space from former executive chef Angelo Fernandes, the 49-person kitchen staff will now be led by chef Duff Lampard. A former chef de partie at Alberta’s Chateau Lake Louise and Jasper Park Lodge, Lampard has also been executive chef of Toronto’s Westin Harbour Castle and a professor of the Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism at George Brown College. The kitchen staff changes follow a $6 million renovation of the MTCC’s kitchen in 2013.

Canada picked for McDonald’s sustainable beef pilot CALGARY—Canadian beef will be frontand-centre for a pilot project launched by McDonald’s designed to supply the restaurant with sustainable beef. According to Alberta Farmer, the exact terms of the pilot have yet to be finalized and there has yet to be a definition of “sustainable beef.” “It is still in the preliminary stages, so there are a lot of details to be worked out, but everyone is on the same page,” Greg Bowie, chair of Alberta Beef Producers told Alberta Farmer. “They’re working with industry to come up with something that is sustainable long term, for the entire industry.” Bowie said McDonald’s is the largest buyer of Canadian beef and has pledged it will not

Leslie Wu Editorial director

Bit e s impose rules on how to raise cattle. Instead, the restaurant will collaborate with producers, feeders and packers to create practical guidelines. “A lot of these things are going to be things that producers are doing anyhow,” Bowie said. “They’re just going to come up with a means of proving that the producer is doing it.” McDonald’s announced in January it would begin sourcing what it calls verifiable sustainable beef by 2016. According to the company, McDonald’s Canada sources all of its beef from Canadian suppliers.

Raymonds voted best in Canada TORONTO—Raymonds in St. John’s Newfoundland has been ranked the best restaurant in Canada by the some of the nation’s leading chefs. “I can’t believe it,” Jeremy Bonia, Raymonds co-owner and sommelier said in a statement. “It’s exciting and humbling, especially when you know who voted for it.” More than 50 chefs from across the country including Vikram Vij and Connie Desousa were given 100 points to allocate between 5 to 10 restaurants the chef had visited within the last two years. Chefs were not allowed to vote for their own restaurants. The top 50 restaurants were published at Vacay.ca. This was the travel site’s third annual vote. Bar Isabel in Toronto, Maison Publique in Montreal, Farmer’s Apprentice in Vancouver and Vij’s in Vancouver rounded out the top five.

Arby’s named most craveable restaurant in Canada ATLANTA—Arby’s Restaurant Group Inc. received the 2014 Canadian Restaurant Consumers’ Choice Award, an award presented by Technomic. The quick service sandwich chain won in the category of craveability. “We’re thrilled to receive this recognition from Technomic,” Rob Lynch, brand president and chief managing officer, said in a release. Technomic asked consumers to rate leading Canadian restaurant chains on more than 60 different attributes.


When your hot water stops flowing, so can your revenue. Protect your bottom line with the Reliance Commercial Solutions™ water heater rental program today. Lots of things can go wrong in the food services and hospitality business, but few can compare to a water heater breakdown, and having to close your doors to customers. That’s where Reliance™ comes in. A leading provider of worry-free water heating solutions for over 30 years, we’re proud to guarantee outstanding service: • Four-hour service response guarantee, 24/7/365

• No upfront equipment replacement costs*

• No repair bills*

• One predictable monthly payment

• Customized solutions

Plus, if you own a water heater that’s less than 6 years old, or a boiler that’s less than 8 years old, you can benefit from our exclusive Buy-Back Program and earn $3,000 to $9,000 to invest in your business.

To find out if you qualify for our Buy-Back Program and learn more about our customized water heating solutions, call 1-866-326-9392 today.

™ “Reliance”, “Reliance Commercial Solutions”, and the Reliance Commercial Solutions logo are trademarks of Reliance Comfort Limited Partnership. * Subject to standard rental program terms and conditions. Some additional charges relating to installation (e.g. code required venting) may be applicable. Call for details.

Receive up to $9,000 through our exclusive Buy-Back Program.


6 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

Terroir: Growing new ideas By Kristen Smith TORONTO—At one time, a chef ’s recipes were closely guarded secrets, but a new generation of Canadian chefs and foodservice professionals are sharing knowledge and working together to bolster the craft and a spirit of collaboration pervades the culinary community. Chefs, food writers, suppliers and wine experts gathered at Arcadian Court in Toronto on May 12 for the Terroir Symposium, which brought together 89 speakers. The eighth annual edition of the hospitality industry event focused on the theme “Growing Ideas: Community building and creative collaboration in the world of food.” Chair Arlene Stein said she was proud of the sense of community that has been established over the years at the event, which has grown to more than 500 attendees this year. In opening remarks, Peter Oliver, of Oliver and Bonacini Restaurants, called Terroir the foodservice industry’s most important event. He noted that the average customer has shifted from one demanding consistency to one expecting change. “If you don’t change, you’ll go out of business,” he said, advocating for increased entrepreneurship and innovation. Oliver encouraged attendees to make Toronto a food destination. Momofuku Restaurant Group founder and chef David Chang noted that Toronto has the resources—population, diversity and infrastructure—to be a great culinary city. “On paper, Toronto should have one of the best food scenes in the world,” Chang told ORN. “It’s good, it’s growing, there’s a movement of youth, but I think that there seems to not be a real unifying goal.” Chang noted that his intention isn’t to up-

set anyone—he wants Toronto to thrive and a forum like Terroir is a good place to get the discussion rolling. “I think part of that discussion is hearing things you don’t necessarily want to hear. Medicine doesn’t always taste good and I’m not the doctor, I’m just a person that’s a fan of Toronto,” said Chang. “I’m invested in Toronto—we’ve had our ups and downs as a restaurant. It’s been really hard and we’re still around,” said Chang. “Restaurants are still closing at an alarming rate and I don’t think enough attention is being put on why these restaurants close.” He thinks one chef coming from Toronto and “crushing it” could change the game like René Redzepi did with Noma in Copenhagen. “There is great product here, there is amazing talent here,” said Chang. “We should become our harshest critics.” Albert Adrià, chef of Tickets and 41o, shared some of his creations with attendees. He called using a fork and knife “boring” and recommended removing any elements from the environment that could detract from a dish. He said it is important to hear and smell while eating—either the experience is emotional or it’s not. Kevin Patricio, chef and restaurateur of La Madame and founder of Basqueland Brewing Projects, shared the story of creating a food community in San Sebastian, Spain. “We don’t set out to challenge the status quo—we don’t set out to build community,” said Patricio, calling these results a byproduct of the journey to accomplish a goal. Patricio identified there was a lacking vegetable culture in the Basque community and a missing connection between chefs and farmers. Along with misinformation, he said, this

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Daniel Boulud.

David Chang.

resulted in a lack of demand from customers and a lack of biodiversity, with farmers growing only five types of vegetables. Patricio arranged for farmers to come from nearby France once a month for a market on private property of the beach expanding the varieties of vegetables available to the community and its chefs. From there, the food culture began expanding on the street food side of the business and then Patricio delved into education on hops. Now, there is a street food festival and a beer festival, where competitors gather together on the beach. Chef Daniel Boulud encouraged collaboration between peers, staff, media, customers and suppliers. “The suppliers are our lifeboat—good cooking wouldn’t exist without them,” he noted. Boulud added that he is looking forward to seeing what the new generation of chefs will continue to build. Toronto’s Group of Seven Chefs spoke of the importance working together. “It’s so nice to be in a kitchen with different chefs,” said Bertrand Alépée, The Tempered Chef. Chris Brown, Citizen Catering, said the group has accomplished a lot since 2010. Brown said they might start incorporating an educational element into The Group of Seven Chefs’ repertoire and “show future chefs and future cooks the power of collaboration.”

Albert Adrià.

He said it’s through this vehicle that chefs can build the industry and create better food. “Our goal is to unite the world,” he added.

Awards of excellence The third annual GE Monogram Terroir Awards of Excellence in Hospitality Awards were chosen by industry peers and awarded during the symposium. Calgary’s River Café picked up two awards with proprietor Sal Howell and chef Andrew Winfield (pictured above) named Best Restaurateur in Canada and Outstanding Chef, respectively. Kristin and Dan Donovan, of Hooked in Toronto, received the inaugural OceanWise Award for Advocacy in Sustainable Seafood. Outstanding Service Professional went to Guy Rawlings of Bar Isabel in Toronto. Jonathan Forbes of Toronto-based Forbes Wild Foods was named Outstanding Supplier.

From left: Ryan Donovan and Carl Heinrich.

Exploring the terroir in Niagara The following day, the camaraderie continued with chefs and speakers heading out to Ontario’s Niagara Peninsula. First stop was at 18-month-old Dillon’s Distillers in Beamsville, ON, where founder Geoff Dillon explained the process of distilling its single batch vodka, whiskey and gins, which recently brought home two gold and a silver medal from the 2014 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The group was joined by Charles Baker, Charles Baker Riesling winemaker, and Tom Pennachetti, vice-president of marketing and sales and managing partner at Cave Spring Cellars, at Ball’s Falls Conservation Area to demonstrate the unique topography and geology of the area and its connection to the area’s strength in producing rieslings. The day wrapped up at Ravine Vineyard Estate Winery featuring dishes by Ryerson Eats; Visit Sweden, including chef Daniel Berlin; and Feast ON, including Carl Heinrich and Ryan Donovan, Richmond Station, Toronto.


Our Passion. Your Guests. Coffee

Tea

Iced

Espresso

Our cof fee experience is about quality and personalization for ever y person we ser ve, so naturally we’re passionate about delivering our branded solutions the same way. We love adapting our brands, produc ts and plat forms to your business.

F I N D O U T M O R E B Y C A L L I N G U S AT

1- 844 -221-2232 Š 2014 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.

Foodservice


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

8 |

Industry snapshot at restaurant summit TORONTO—The Canadian Restaurant Investment Summit (CRIS) brought together some of the restaurant industry’s top executives to network and discuss opportunities for growth on May 7 at the Eaton Chelsea in Toronto.

State of the industry •

The NPD Group’s executive director Robert Carter outlined the key facts and figures when it comes to Canadian restaurant use. According to Carter, Canadian restaurants saw 6.6 billion visits in 2013, which is down by one per cent (72 million visits). Despite the decline in visits, total foodservice dollars rose by two per cent to $53 billion and overall, Canadians are eating more meals. During the past 10 years, traffic growth has risen by two percent while new unit growth is up by 12 per cent. According to Carter, the decline in visits shows an increased battle for profit share among restaurants. Millennials, Carter said, are the number one source of traffic growth, adding up to 28 per cent of annual visits.

restaurants must have a signature ingredient or product differentiating it from competitors. Provide a journey. Incorporating the story of where your products come from into the design of the space can provide customers with a sense of being taken on a voyage. Know the millennials. According to Kowalski, this demographic can be elusive to understand, but is important to the overall health of the business. He said millennials want to hear a story for each product. Seamless technology. Kowalski said mobility is the key technology driver. Optimizing scale. Kowalski said restaurants should not overextend themselves and be mindful of their footprint.

Cara and Fairfax Amanda Lang moderated two discussions: Bill Gregson, president and chief executive officer of Cara and Paul Rivett, president of Fairfax, spoke about turning the Cara brand around following Fairfax’s purchase of the company; and Peter Senst, president of Canadian capital markets at CBRE, Blake Hutcheson, president and chief executive officer of Oxford Properties and Craig Wright, chief economist at RBC capital markets spoke about

Opportunities for growth Tom Kowalski of Interbrand Design Forum identified five key growth opportunities for restaurants. • Avoid sameness. Kowalski said

Canada’s economic outlook and the real estate market. Rivett spoke about opportunities for turnaround within Cara and Prime brands. He said it’s important for the brands to steal share. “All nine brands have some very distinct aspects to them,” said Rivett, noting the brand teams for each have been left intact. He said Fairfax and Cara believe in all nine brands, noting that some are more robust than others, with Swiss Chalet as its biggest. Gregson spoke of the recent brand renovation at The Queensway and Islington Avenue location—it created a “wow” factor, but cost $1.5 million do so. “The challenge is creating that ‘wow’ at a price the franchisee can afford. For us, that’s about $300,000,” said Gregson. Rivett said Fairfax’s plan is to go with an IPO. “I think we’ll like to see ourselves as a Fairfax restaurant company,” he said. “We’d love to do additional investments.”

Real estate People are putting too much of an emphasis on increasing interest rates, said Hutcheson during the second panel. “It’s going to be measured, incremental bumps,” he said. Senst said the Canadian real estate landscape should be fairly positive.

THEY CAN FORGIVE

AN OVERCOOKED STEAK,

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

From left: Fairfax president Paul Rivett, Cara CEO and president Bill Gregson and moderator Amanda Lang.

With urban and suburban markets seeing gains, Senst said the market is going to see landlords trying “pull great concepts in as amenities.” Senst suggested restaurateurs start thinking about space in 20 to 30-yearold buildings as good real estate locations because people are going to be vying for the commercial openings in new condo developments. “The old building will be crying out for restaurants,” he said.

Fast casual With a seven per cent revenue increase and traffic up nine per cent, GE Capital Canada chief operating officer Peter Ringler noted that fast casual appears to be the hot sector. “Fast casual seems to be much further along in the [U.S.],” said Warren Solochek, NPD Group vice-president. He made a note to operators: if the segment follows the path in Canada

that it did in the U.S., “don’t take your eye off it.” He describes fast casual as having an average ticket of between $2 and $2.50 higher than QSR and, while the traditional quick service focuses on speed of service, that falls to number three on the priority list of a fast casual concept behind food quality and freshness and guest experience. Alex Rechichi, Crave It Restaurant Group CEO, said the fast casual segment is beginning to break out into two tiers: those focused on customization and those that feature a chefdriven menu. Over the past eight years, 17,000 fast casual units opened in the U.S. Five Star North America COO Darven Erickson said there will be more concepts entering the segment as popularity grows. “We welcome the competition but there will be a shakedown,” said Erickson.

Would your kitchen pass the Clean test? Train your kitchen staff on: Preventing Sanitation and Food Safety risks Maintaining a pest-free kitchen environment Being ready for your next kitchen inspection

Order your CleanSAFE Program today!

BUT NEVER A DIRTY PLATE.

A $50 value FREE when you call 888-210-7050 or email cleansafe@abellgroup.com

Research shows that consumers will forgive bad food faster than dirty dishes. That won’t be an issue if you have a Champion in your dishroom. Our exclusive dual rinse technology provides double the sanitation and offers a quieter, cooler dishroom through insulated, hinged doors. This keeps the heat where you want it and offers easier access to the clean you need. Regardless of the size of your operation, problems in the dishroom, or the number of covers per day...

We can take that off your plate.

AN @championind

facebook.com/championind.warewashing

800.263.5798 championindustries.com/canada

NIV

ER S A

RY

Visit CleanSafeKitchen.ca or call 888-210-7050


J U N E 2 014

| 9

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O

N

T

A

R

I

O

BeverageNews Contract brewers ruling skirted Left Field Brewery owners Mandie and Mark Murphy.

TORONTO—Contract brewers will be allowed to sell at festivals after at least one brewery was told in early May by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) it would be against the rules. Despite selling beer to more than 60 bars and restaurants across the GTA, Left Field Brewery was told by the AGCO they would not be allowed to sell beer to holders of special occasion permits (SOP). “It’s a longstanding requirement under the Liquor Licence Act

that holders of SOP must purchase liquor for their SOP event from the LCBO, the Beer Store or from a manufacturer’s retail store,” AGCO spokesperson Jeff Keay said in an email. “As contract brewers are ineligible for manufacturer retail stores, their only avenues for providing beer to SOP holders are the Beer Store and the LCBO.” The rule was skirted after the Beer Store arranged a temporary solution with the AGCO, offering to purchase beer from contract brewers and sell it to SOP holders for the nominal administration fee of $20. “The temporary fix does not require that our beers be formally listed with the Beer Store, a previous hurdle for us as a tiny brewery that

is unable to bear the extremely high cost of listing a variety of our beers in the Beer Store’s system,” Left Field Brewery owners, husband and wife team Mark and Mandie Murphy, said in a statement. “It also gives regulators time to develop a more permanent and long-term solution following the election this June.” As the Beer Store brokers the deal, breweries will still be responsible for delivery, collecting payment and returns. “We are huge supporters of all Ontario-based brewers, including those in the rapidly growing craft beer business,” Ted Moroz, president of the Beer Store, said in a release. “Crafts who produce their products under contract are the start-ups, like Left Field Brewery, who need our support the most.” In February, Left Field announced it would be moving into a facility at 36 Wagstaff Dr., Toronto, which will eventually house a full brewery. Currently the company brews at Grand River Brewing in Cambridge, ON, and Barley Days Brewery in Picton, ON.

New Zealand wine showcase

Top left: Sahara MacDonald and Brody Slacer, Alcon International Wine Merchants. Bottom left: The Village Press olive oil company. Right: Chris Alton, Craggy Rock.

TORONTO—Vineyards from across New Zealand gathered in Toronto as part of a national tour showcasing the country’s wine on May 8. Twenty-four wineries from across New Zealand set up booths in the St. James Cathedral centre in Toronto to share samples of the country’s booming $1.2 billion wine export industry. According to Statistics New Zealand, wine export sales are up nine per cent from last year. Chris Alton, American business

manager for Craggy Range, said the event provided an opportunity to introduce wine to potential customers. Alton said he was looking to sell strictly on consignment basis. Similar events—dubbed New Zealand in a Glass—were held in Vancouver, Calgary and Ottawa. Proceeds for the Toronto event went to Ashley’s Angels, a SickKids hospital charity raising money and awareness for organ and tissue transplants.


10 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

hen it comes to trends, it’s easy for the operator to succumb to information overload. Although some themes such as local eating, consumer awareness of ingredients and sustainability are starting to emerge year after year, trends often move quickly in today’s market, driven by factors such as increasingly engaged customers and social media. “The restaurant industry is the research and development sector for trends,” says Garth Whyte, president and chief operating officer of Restaurants Canada. “We’re the ones that drive excitement to the consumer. But it’s not just a push, but also a pull: trends reflect consumer demand as well.” Staying on top of trends can be a balancing act for the operator: ensuring new customers are attracted by an up-to-date menu, while staying true to the restaurant’s identity and existing clientele. “You have to move from your strengths and know your customers,” warns Whyte. “Trying to do everything is no longer what people want. You don’t have to throw out the whole menu.” Whether you’re ready to take the plunge into the trend pool, or just want to test the waters, ORN takes a look at how operators are finding success with four of this year’s top trends.

W

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

By Ontario Restaurant News staff

THINKING LOCALLY Making connections with local producers starts with getting out in the community. John-David Jacobsen, executive chef at the Kitchener, ON, Borealis Grille & Bar, visits farmers’ markets, farms, local abattoirs and butchers. During the winter, The Neighbourhood Group, which also operates a Guelph location and The Woolwich Arrow, uses the Ontario greenhouse program. Jacobsen says the pictures of producers that hang in the bar help share the story about where the food comes from. Borealis Grille & Bar group leader Court Desautels says there are a number of reasons to support local food, including its positive impact on the local economy. The restaurant has participated in studies with local post-secondary institutions over the past five years, and while cost is still the driver behind buying decisions, people are starting to place more emphasis on local food. “At the three restaurants, we

serve about 7,000 people a week; that’s a lot of food,” says Desautels. As the restaurant group grew, it maintained its local mandate by adjusting the menu so there wasn’t too much of one ingredient, being less specific about the types of vegetables, and allowing for more chef’s features and market soups and salads. Andrew Aitken is the chef at Wild Caraway Restaurant & Cafe, a 45-seat restaurant in Advocate Habour, NS, on the Bay of Fundy. “We have a mandate to use as much local produce as we can,” says Aitken, who with partner Sarah Griebel, forages and grows herbs and vegetables on the property. “Obviously, we can’t grow everything we use. You would need a full farm to support a restaurant of our size,” he says, adding they keep the radius for sourcing as tight as possible, but local food has to meet a certain quality standard as well. They grow a wide variety of herb and focus on specialty vegetables that aren’t easy to find in the area,

such as different types of radishes, heritage carrots and various beets. “We need to change the menu every two weeks, so we try to grow enough of one thing so it’s a highlight on the menu for two weeks,” Aitken says. Aitken says it’s important to the customers and the people in the fishing village community that they serve local food. Desautels suggests a restaurateur who wants to start implementing local food on the menu should start by going to a farmers’ market. “Ask questions, that’s a big one, because it’s amazing how many fronts there are,” he says. Aitken also warns of farmers’ markets being fraught with people bringing in items from elsewhere, but notes it’s easy to tell when someone has a passion for the product. “Then find out what their supply is like,” says Desautels. He suggests starting with locally sourced feature items, such as one appetizer, main and dessert, to learn about the process of sourcing locally.

John-David Jacobsen, executive chef at the Kitchener, ON, Borealis Grille & Bar.


| 11

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

J U N E 2 014

GREENER RESTAURANTS If a restaurant is going to be sustainable in its food sourcing, it’s counterproductive for this not to extend to internal operations, says Paul McGreevy, corporate chef for CRAFT Beer Market, which has had two of its three locations certified by Leaders in Environmentally Accountable Foodservice (LEAF). The Edmonton location is undergoing its audit process. McGreevy says sustainable operations are a part of the company’s philosophy. “It shows that you’re not just open for business, but you care about the community you’re in,” he says. LEAF certification requires an onsite environmental audit by a local consultant, which includes inspection of the lighting and water fixtures, equipment, food and supplies: “absolutely everything that

goes on within the functioning of the restaurant,” says LEAF president Janine Windsor, adding the certification requires the restaurant to prohibit the use of Styrofoam. Since the organization launched in 2009, about 50 restaurants have achieved the designation. This year, 11 restaurants were certified by June. “Each year, we’re getting more and more interest, and it’s modest, yet steady growth that we’re pleased with,” said Windsor. “I think there used to be this conception that it always costs money to do anything that is green or environmentally friendly and it’s actually not true. Whenever you’re doing things to reduce your energy, reduce your water, reduce your food waste, that’s actually putting money in your pocket,” Windsor says.

GLUTEN FREEDOM Olymel corporate chef Marc Laroche says restaurants are realizing they ought to be ready for requests for glutenfree menu items. According to Laroche, it is bit of a challenge for some restaurants—not due to a lack of available gluten-free products—but because logistically it can be difficult to make separate prep and cooking areas to avoid cross-contamination. “But they understand that Olymel corporate chef Marc Laroche. they have to go that way belaunched as a showcase of glutencause, even if it’s one per cent of the population that is gluten-free, free meals in the city. The event saw 20 restaurants it affects the whole family around across the city offer a three-course those people,” Laroche says. Laroche says gluten is very vola- gluten-free meal at a set price, modtile and even small particles can be elled after Summerlicious and Winleft inside deep fryers which results terlicious. “I wanted to create an event that in some restaurants looking for gluten-free products that can be baked I could attend and that others in my situation could also enjoy, where instead. At Olymel, Laroche says the you could dine out and enjoy a company has more than 130 glu- three-course meal from a variety of ten-free items and has produced a cuisines,” co-ordinator and founder brochure outlining how operators Rachael Hunt says. Hunt says she should handle gluten-free products. developed a gluten allergy two years “It’s all about training your ago and decided to seek out glutenstaff,” Laroche says. Managers, free options in the city. She says restaurants have been servers and kitchen staff must be aware of how easily gluten can be very receptive and recognize there is a gluten-free trend. transmitted, he says. “There are a ton of books out Olymel produces its gluten-free items first thing in the morning to now, and a ton of health specialists avoid cross contamination with talking about how gluten can negatively effect your health and not just other products, Laroche says. While people who suffer from linked to digestive issues but neuroceliac disease must remove gluten logical issues and dermatology isfrom their diets, Laroche says some sues,” Hunt says. Hunt is currently working to people are avoiding gluten as a way organize another Toronto event in to lose weight. In Toronto, the inaugural Glu- November and expand the project ten Freedom Week in Toronto was to other Canadian cities.

“Checking for leaks is a simple thing that you can do to make sure that you’re not wasting water,” she advises. Other low cost starting points are adding low flow faucet aerators, setting up a lighting policy and determining a start up and shut down schedule for equipment. McGreevy says waste management at the three locations is different depending on municipal services. In Calgary, a third-party waste management company picks up waste items that are sorted by staff. “Whereas, in Edmonton, [the city] sorts it for you,” he says. McGreevy says waste reduction is becoming prevalent in the industry and in restaurant practices—CRAFT gets its deliveries in reusable containers and uses energy efficient equipment. “The choices are becoming more and more abundant,” says McGreevy.

CRAFT Beer Market, Vancouver.

LEARNING TO SHARE Four years ago, Michelle LeBlanc, chef and co-owner of Chinched in St. John’s, started serving charcuterie. At the time, she says, there weren’t many serving it in St. John’s, so they approached it in a very mild way. “Our charcuterie board certainly has evolved tremendously since we first opened,” LeBlanc says. Chinched started with terrines and chicken liver and country pâtés to introduce the different food items and provide exposure to charcuterie in general. As staff and customers got more comfortable, she says, the charcuterie boards became much more adventurous. LeBlanc says the kitchen spent a lot of time researching traditional methods and different curing techniques and began producing dry-cured items such as prosciutto.

“Now people know us for doing charcuterie and having a variety of fresh items,” LeBlanc says. Moose, beef and seal along with many pork items are often available. LeBlanc says it is important to her to use local meat and use the entire animal—from nose to tail—“to treat it with the respect it deserves.” While charcuterie is popular with customers, she says convincing them to try sharing platters is a bit more of a challenge. “It’s hard to convince people to eat like that,” LeBlanc says, indicating people are familiar with the popular appetizer, entrée and dessert progression of a meal. This past winter, Chinched introduced a seasonal dinner for two designed for a couple to share and restructured the menu to be

Charcuterie board. Photo by Tim Corbett.

appetizer-heavy so there are several items ideal for sharing. “It is certainly catching on and people are more receptive to it,” LeBlanc says. “It’s more of a connection to the food.” According to LeBlanc, sharing smaller portions is perfect for tourists visiting St. John’s. “We have lots of people who are here only for a day or two and they want to try several things on the menu and it gives a better overview of our food style,” she says. LeBlanc says she looks forward to a time when the entire menu is made up of one-sized plates, perfect for sharing as a multi-course meal, but notes the price must match the portion. The goal, says LeBlanc, is for people to enjoy and feel full, and ensure that guests are “not feeling ripped off.”


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

12 |

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Browns Socialhouse heads into ON OAKVILLE, ON—Browns Socialhouse is setting up shop in Ontario with plans to develop more than 100 locations within the next five years. The west-coast premium casual restaurant currently has 30 locations in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan and will open at least another 10 this year in the western provinces. The flagship Ontario location is currently being built in Oakville, ON, and will open this fall acting as a launching pad for the franchise. “In the long run, we’ll be in all sorts of communities all over the whole province,” Bruce Fox, chief operating officer and vice-president of development, told ORN.

Browns Socialhouse location in Red Deer, Alberta.

Fox said the nine-year-old company has been franchising for the last five years and is currently on a mission to find qualified franchisees. Locations, Fox said, will ideally fall between 3,500 and 4,000 square feet and cost between $600 and $800 per square foot in development. “We’re not interested in bigger because bigger compromises the experience that we deliver and the experience that we deliver is very intimate,” he said. “What we create inside the four walls is a social experience, we want people to come in and socialize,” said Fox, adding the company holds the trademark on the term socialhouse. The small footprint, he said, will encourage customers to interact. Some locations will be built from the ground up, while others will be retrofits. Fox said each location will have a unique design resulting in a $35,000 design fee for franchisees. There is also an initial $50,000 franchise fee and a continuous six per cent royalty fee. Promotional elements such as websites, social media and gift cards are included in the royalty fees. According to Fox, there is no advertising fee because the company has opted for a word-of-mouth strategy. “We think the awesome guest experience that you leave with is going to bring you back and other people back with you,” Fox said, adding the company encourages owners to invest the money they would have spent on advertising on training, recruiting and employee compensation. Average check is about $30 and the menu consists of pizza, burgers, tacos and ribs. According to Fox, Browns will serve local craft beer and prepare as much food as possible in-house. In April, Browns Socialhouse received a gold medal for new and emerging franchises from the Canadian Franchise Association.

Foodservice for new outlet mall Canadian Brie or Camember t

Your guests are looking for new and interesting burger toppings.

Natural Aged 2 yr Old Canadian Chedda r Cheese

Offer your gourmet burger aficionados

adian d Can Smoke arella or Mozz heese lone C Provo

a real great taste experience. By offering a variety of LOCAL Specialty Cheeses made from 100% Canadian Milk, as a topping. Adding Canadian Specialty Cheese is cost effective way to create a gourmet cheeseburger that delivers a real great taste experience. Specialty cheeses create a higher perceived cheeseburger

Hot Chilli Pepper Canadian Jack Cheese

Smoked Canadian Cheddar Cheese

Canadian Blue Cheese

value that you can charge a premium price for. Add Canadian specialty cheese and watch them come back for more!

Just Add Locally Produced Canadian Specialty Cheese MADE FROM 100% CANADIAN MILK.

NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE, ON—The Outlet Collection opened its doors along with a separate food building in mid-May. Located on 63 acres of land just off the Queen Elizabeth Way in Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON, the open-air outlet mall will house eight buildings including The Eatery. The 7,000-square-foot foodservice building will house 11 full-time tenants and two seasonal kiosks. “The food pavilion does offer those food brands that you recognize and trust nationally,” Bri-Ann Stuart, general manager of the Outlet Collection told ORN. “But then, also that regional flavour as well.” Among the tenants are S’barro, Aroma Espresso Bar, Subway, Big Smoke, Wine Country Vintners, OLiV Tasting Room and a Gateway Express. A cupcake company and a florist will be the first occupants of the two seasonal kiosks. A standalone McDonald’s restaurant is also on the site and a Tim Hortons location can be found inside the guest services building. According to Stuart, the outlet mall will also host Food Truck Fridays throughout the summer with food trucks setting up in the parking lot. “We’re always looking for something completely different from what we are currently offering [in The Eatery]” Stuart said. The Eatery will have 254 seats and family and nursing rooms. Stuart said customers also have the option of sitting outside in a pavilion with tables, chairs and a fireplace. Stuart points out the region sees 10 million tourists a year, so the venue has been made as family friendly as possible. “We are trying to offer an experience. That’s our main motivator,” she said. The mall—operated by Ivanhoé Cambridge—includes more than 100 shops including Brooks Brothers Factory Store, Coach, Michael Kors, Michaels and Mountain Warehouse.


J U N E 2 014

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

A new direction for Nando’s Canada

Nando’s Bay Street location.

MISSISSAUGA, ON—South African chicken restaurant Nando’s Canada is taking on the fast casual market with a rebranded look that reflects the chain’s intentions across Canada. Two locations piloting the look include a revamped Toronto location on Bay Street and a site in Calgary on 32 Ave NE, both of which were unveiled this year. The company also recently moved its headquarters from Richmond, BC, to a new site opening in Mississauga in July to signal its focus on central Canada. “It was a strategic decision to concentrate growth in Alberta and Ontario,” said Ron Cecillon, president and chief executive officer of Nando’s Flame Grilled Chicken Canada, to ORN. “Our concentration had been on the West Coast and we thought Ontario is such a great growth vehicle for us.” Part of the rebranding reflects the decision three years ago to change Nando’s in Canada from a master franchise agreement and allow founders and shareholders to buy back the rights, Cecillon said. Although the brand has been in Canada for almost two decades, the changes are targeting a different demographic and business model. “For the first 18 to 20 years in Canada, Nando’s was playing in an expensive fast food market,” said Cecillon, a former vice-president of operations with Swiss Chalet and Harvey’s. “With the traditional South African model of very high-end takeaway and low guest engagement, because we were selling chicken, pricing wasn’t congruent with our competitors.” This disconnect led to a global decision to migrate the majority of Nando’s units to the full fast casual model. “We were cheap and cheerful, and wanted to get into market with the least investment, which at the time, was right for the brand as it was 100 per cent franchised,” said Cecillon. The chain will use a blended model moving forward, with the next four or five sites being company owned. Nando’s current plans involve moving from a footprint of 1,500 to 1,900 square feet to 2,800 to 3,500 square feet, creating more of a dining experience than takeout. “Ideally, people dining at a QSR would trade up, and people dining mid level would feel comfortable rounding down,” he said. Working with local artists in Africa for fabrics and paintings, and farmers in Mozambique and Malawi, base and table sauces, as well as the art on the walls, will reflect the brand’s South African heritage. The flagship Bay Street Toronto location, at 4,600 square feet and 160 seats, reflects the direction of the design for all existing Nando’s restaurants in Canada in the next three years, said Cecillon. With open kitchens, wood and leather furniture, all touchpoints will be reimagined for the larger footprints, said Cecillon. “We’re a chain that doesn’t want to look like a chain,” he said. “When you visit the new Nando’s, you don’t expect the type of fixtures that you see when you’re paying a $14 average check.” Every restaurant will be designed differently moving forward, with artwork unique to each location. An Etobicoke, ON, location will be opened by early fall, with a second one to follow in Toronto later this year, said Cecillon. Another three units will open in the province and one in southeast Calgary in 2015. “What we’d like to do in the next five years is double our locations to get us to 60 locations across Canada,” said Cecillon, who indicated that Nando’s is “definitely looking at future development” in Atlantic Canada.

| 13

Darden sells off Red Lobster ORLANDO, FL—Darden Restaurants, Inc. is selling off its Red Lobster business and related assets to San Francisco-based private equity investment firm Golden Gate Capital for $2.1 billion in cash. The sale, announced on May 16, is expected to close in the first fiscal quarter of 2015. The move comes as part of a change in Darden’s strategic direction and is intended to help “regain momentum at Olive Garden,” as well as reduce the company’s existing debt, Clarence Otis, Darden chairman and chief executive officer, said in a release. The news comes six months after a mid-

December 2013 announcement by Darden that it would spin off Red Lobster into a separate company within the year. “As a stand-alone company, we will be free to focus in a more single-minded manner on the many current and prospective guests who find what Red Lobster brings to the marketplace highly relevant,” Kim Lopdrup, Darden’s president of specialty restaurant group and new business, said in a release at the time. According to Darden, the 705 Red Lobster restaurants across Canada and the U.S. saw annual sales of approximately $2.6 billion in the 2013 fiscal year.

C o . s e l t i b Effective. o M

Elevate your customer experience by supplying your associates mobile tools to help make all guest interactions and transactions extraordinary. Designed for retail and hospitality operators, a collaboration by names you trust brings you a new MICROS experience with service options at a price point never before available.

www.microscanada.ca/mtab 877-456-2777


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

14 |

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Restaurants Canada calls for lift of TFWP ban

Restaurants Canada held a press conference in Charlottetown.

CHARLOTTETOWN—Restaurants Canada’s board of directors is calling for an emergency meeting with Prime Minister Stephen Harper to address what they are calling a labour crisis in some regions of the country. In April, employment minister Jason Kenney placed a moratorium on the Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) for the foodservice industry after complaints of the program being misused. “There couldn’t be a worse time for this ban,” Garth Whyte, president and chief executive officer of Restaurants Canada, told ORN in late May. “We strongly agree with penalties for people abusing the system, but it’s hurt some

members that are in dire need right now.” Restaurants Canada held a press conference on May 27 in Charlottetown where the 30-person board of directors gathered for its annual spring meeting. The group called on the federal government to end the moratorium on the TFWP, strengthen rules of the program to ensure it is not abused and allow operators to hire foreign workers for positions at all skill levels after exhausting all other options to hire Canadian workers. The group also launched a petition that has gathered more than 2,700 signatures. “This is about protecting Canadian jobs,” Brenda O’Reilly, owner of Yellow Belly Brewery

and Public House in St. John’s said in a statement. “I employ 120 people, including five foreign workers, I’d have to cut back on hours, putting Newfoundlanders out of work. I’ve also turned down an opportunity to open a new restaurant, because I know I won’t be able to staff it.” The moratorium put a stop to any new or pending labour market opinion (LMO) applications related to the foodservice sector. However, president and chief executive officer of Alberta Hotel and Lodging Association Dave Kaiser told ORN Service Canada has clarified hotels operating their own foodservice do not fall under the moratorium.

Quesada, Mississauga location.

Quesada plans to double up

For 75 years, many generations of dedicated employees and loyal customers have contributed to our success at Sanimax. On behalf of our family, thank you.

The Coutures

Used cooking oil collection·Organic food waste collection www.sanimax.com|1.800.361.4269|

TORONTO—Following the opening of two new franchises, Quesada announced plans to double growth within a year. The four-year-old company recently launched Ontario locations in Mississauga and Brockville with another 10 locations currently under construction nationally. By July, the burrito company will have 35 national locations and plans to continue doubling its franchise numbers annually. “The two big limitations are finding quality franchisees and finding quality real estate,” Quesada president Tom O’Neill told ORN. Currently, Quesada has eight area developers who are contracted to open 240 locations. O’Neill said within the year the company will have a developer for the Atlantic provinces which would position the company from coast to coast. The company is also looking for an area developer in Manitoba. Each location is roughly 1,200 square feet with 20 to 30 seats, however O’Neill points out the footprint is dependent on cost. “We don’t want our franchisee’s choking on rent,” he said. The franchise fee is $20,000 with a six per cent royalty fee and a three per cent advertising fee. While the company is not yet large enough to consider national advertising, O’Neill said Quesada has hired on Field Day Inc. as the company’s official advertising agency and will focus on regional marketing. According to O’Neill, Field Day Inc., produced a study on how consumers perceived the brand. “The perception of our brand is that it’s very affordable and that our product quality is very high,” O’Neill said, pointing to several products prepared in-house including the company’s salsa and seasoned meats. Quesada also has plans to move into the U.S. in 2015 and O’Neill said it will target locations along the East Coast through New Jersey and Pennsylvania.


J U N E 2 014

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

DEC ODI NG T hE D aTa

Breakfast buzz By James Fok, NPD Group The morning meal has provided restaurants in Canada with the most consistent growth over time, especially in Ontario. During the year ending in February 2014, nearly one third (29 per cent) of all foodservice visits in the Ontario market were for the morning meal compared to 24 per cent in the rest of Canada. This translates into tremendous volume with the majority of morning meals being served by quick service restaurants. Ontario consumers have a higher propensity to visit QSR’s for the morning meal than in other parts of the country, 84 per cent compared to 75 per cent. Although the Canadian restaurant industry has faced challenges over the last five years, morning meal visits have increased, accounting for nearly 90 per cent of all incremental traffic growth in the restaurant industry since 2009.

The economics of eating out Although softened by consumers pulling back on restaurant visits in the past year, morning meal occasions generally fare better than lunch and supper through economically stressful periods. Some of the dynamics providing support to restaurant morning meals are: • Restaurants satisfy the need for convenience: 66 per cent of morning meals are eaten offpremise. • More offerings are being made available— more QSR concepts are offering breakfast and there is tremendous new product opportunity to satisfy consumers’ continued interest in trying new menu items. • Lower price points make it easier to use restaurants for morning meals, compared to other meals, and it is easier to pay for that meal— while cash is still king, the use of debit cards is increasing.

Favourable outlook Demand for popular breakfast foods will undoubtedly continue to experience real growth moving forward. Visits at the morning meal on a compounded annual growth rate over the past five years has been up three per cent in Ontario (most developed market) and up four per cent for the rest of Canada. To put this into perspective, visits to restaurants for the balance of the industry (excluding breakfast) in Ontario during this same time frame have been flat and only up one per cent for the rest of Canada.

Growing opportunities Convenience supports much of the traffic volume for the morning meal and the key here is to keep it simple and convenient. Consumers are most inclined to use QSRs and off-premise, drive-thrus in particular, as this addresses the need for convenience among those who are strapped for time. Further opportunity exists for additional breakfast items beyond traditional hot coffee and breakfast sandwiches. Many consumers who take their meal off-premise are in a rush, so there is definitely demand for products that can be easily consumed in the car. However, there are many consumers in the Ontario market who are inclined to eat their morning meal at home or at work instead of in the car, taking more time to eat their breakfast foods and beverages. This trend provides an opportunity for new items, such as breakfast wraps and burritos that have been key growth drivers in the food and beverage morning meal market in the U.S. In the end, it is all about offering consumers convenient morning meal solutions that help them feel great about how they start their day. James Fok is a foodservice client development manager for NPD Group.

| 15

COMING EVENTS June 13–21: Ontario Craft Beer Week. Various locations. www.ocbweek.ca

July 19-20: Savour Straford Festival. Stratford, ON. www.savourstratford.com.

June 19-21: Toronto Wine and Spirit Festival. Sugar Beach, Toronto. www.wineandspiritfestival.ca.

July 24-27: Taste of Toronto. Fort York, Toronto. www.tasteoftoronto.com.

June 25–29: Canadian College and University Food Service Association National Conference, Niagara Falls, ON. www.ccufsa.on.ca.

Aug. 24: The 7th annual Savour Simcoe Event. Simcoe County Museum, Minesing, ON. www.simcoecountyfarmfresh.ca. September 18-21: P.E.I. International

Shellfish Festival, Charlottetown Festival Grounds, Charlottetown. peishellfish.com September 28-29: Canadian Coffee and Tea Show, The International Centre, Toronto. www.coffeeteashow.ca. Oct. 25: Canadian Hospitality Foundation Ball, Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto. www.thechf.ca.

Tonight, serve an evening they’ll remember forever... Tonight they are yours. To enchant. To delight. To wow. Only Mirabel offers the consistent and exacting quality shrimp you demand from sustainable sources worldwide. Bring them back with a meal they’ll remember. 1.800.387.7422 highlinerfoodservice.com


O

N

T

A

R

I

O

TOP 50 CHAINS

2014 Report

T

Top 10 Unit Increases nationally

he list, right, showing unit changes during the past year, tells an interesting story. Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd. and Tim Hortons led the pack. Their numbers are impressive but not surprising, since they are both huge in terms of national units. Subway grew by 140 stores in 2012, and then added 213 more this past year. Tim Hortons added 145 stores in 2012, and 142 last year. Number three on the list—Menchies Frozen Yogurt had just 19 units last year and has grown exponentially. At press time, the self-serve pay-by-weight frozen yogurt chain listed 84 Canadian locations on its website, with 20 more stores under development, mainly in Ontario and Western Canada. Number four, Starbucks, added 63 units since our last report, on top of the 41 added in 2012. Pizza chains are also expanding, with Pizza Pizza adding 24 new units in 2013 and Pizza Hut grew by 21. Ontario’s burger chain landscape is shifting, as A&W, The WORKS Gourmet Burger Bistro, Hero Certified Burger, Five Guys Burgers and Fries and South St. Burger Co. expanded, while Burger King and Licks closed stores. Burger King netted 13 fewer stores, down to 124 compared to 137 last year. Licks reported 12 stores this year, compared to 17 in 2013. Mid-sized chicken chains are on the rise in Ontario as well, with Wild Wing Corp., Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Mary Brown’s Inc. and Buffalo Wild Wings all reporting increases in both units and sales. Coffee Time Donuts listed only 118 units on their website, down from 176 last year. Please email any changes to data for our online listings or next year’s report to lwu@canadianrestaurantnews.com, subject line: Chains Report 2014 changes.

O

N

T

A

R

I

R e s e a r c h by P e t e r E l l i o t t

Units 2014

Units 2013

Change

Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd.

3063

2850

213

Tim Hortons (TDL Group)

3578

3436

142

Menchie's Frozen Yogurt

84

19

65

Starbucks Coffee Co.

940

877

63

Dairy Queen Canada

643

583

60

Booster Juice

308

261

47

A & W Food Services of Canada Inc.

802

773

29

Pita Pit

182

156

26

Pizza Pizza Limited

629

605

24

Pizza Hut Canada (Yum! Brands Inc.)**

345

324

21

O

TOP RESTAURANT CHAINS BY CATEGORY TOP 10 breakfast Chains, ontario sales 2014

sales 2013

($ millions)

($ millions)

Units 2014

Units 2013

Cora Franchise Group Inc.

47.00

41.67

43

42

2

Sunset Grill Restaurants Ltd.

45.00

38.00

45

38

3

3

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc.

33.00

36.20

35

39

4

4

Wimpy's Diner Restaurant

24.50

29.00

44

42

5

5

Eggsmart Corp. (Chairman Brands)

15.00

15.00

30

30

6

7

Denny's of Canada Inc. (Dencan)

13.00

13.50

10

12

7

6

Perkins' Restaurant & Bakery

12.00

13.23

6

6

8

8

Michel's Bakery Cafe (Threecaf Brands Canada Inc.)

5.50

7.00

11

14

9

N/A

Sunnyside Grill

5.00

5.00

5

5

10

10

International House of Pancakes

4.00

4.00

4

4

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

2

name

Photo by Ezran Kamal.

TOP 10 CHICKEN Chains, ontario sales 2014

sales 2013

($ millions)

($ millions)

Units 2014

Units 2013

Swiss Chalet (Cara)

402.00

402.00

168

163

2

KFC Canada (Yum! Brands Inc.)

226.00

293.30

295

288

3

3

Wild Wing Corp.

43.50

35.00

87

70

4

4

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen

33.00

29.35

66

50

5

6

Mary Brown's Inc.

25.26

20.50

34

33

6

7

Buffalo Wild Wings

20.00

15.00

10

6

7

12

Wacky Wings

16.00

12.00

7

5

8

5

Double Double Pizza and Chicken

15.50

18.00

31

37

9

11

Rotisseries St-Hubert Ltee

15.00

15.00

6

6

10

8

Dixie Lee Food Systems Ltd.

8.00

8.00

12

12

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

2

name

Photo by Roger Kirby.

* Numbers from previous year. Did not respond this year.

Note: Some sales figures are estimates.**


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

J U N E 2 014

| 17

TOP 10 burgers Chains, ontario SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd.*

1364.60

1364.60

453

453

2

Wendy's Restaurants of Canada Inc.*

321.00

320.68

193

193

3

3

A & W Food Services of Canada Inc.

191.80

178.00

202

187

4

4

Harvey's (Cara)

159.00

159.00

185

185

5

5

Burger King Restaurants of Canada Inc.**

122.00

146.62

122

137

6

7

WORKS Gourmet Burger Bistro, The

40.50

30.00

27

20

7

8

Hero Certified Burgers

29.00

21.00

58

42

8

6

Lick's Franchising Inc.

24.00

44.30

12

17

9

10

Five Guys Burgers and Fries

13.50

11.00

27

22

10

9

South St. Burger Co.

13.00

11.70

19

16

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

2

name

Photo by Caro Leite.

TOP 10 international Chains, ontario UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

107.00

22

22

45.00

42.30

21

19

Pita Pit

43.16

31.35

113

96

3

Teriyaki Experience

33.20

39.00

83

78

5

4

Thai Express (MTY Group)

30.00

30.00

60

60

6

N/A

MR. GREEK Restaurants Inc.

30.00

30.00

20

20

7

2

Extreme Pita (MTY Group)

22.00

21.95

57

57

8

N/A

Manchu WOK

22.00

31.50

44

63

9

5

Jimmy the Greek

18.50

18.50

37

37

10

8

Vanelli's Restaurants Limited (MTY Group)

18.00

21.00

18

19

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

2

7

3

N/A

4

SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation

110.00

Lone Star Restaurants

name

Photo by Emiliano Spada.

TOP 15 pizza Chains, ontario UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

360.02

545

531

302.00

242.07

110

108

Pizza Hut (Yum! Brands Inc.)

123.50

128.44

146

137

4

Pizza Nova

96.00

90.00

131

131

5

5

Domino's Pizza

68.00

68.04

135

135

6

6

Little Caesar of Canada Inc.

45.50

45.50

91

91

7

9

Gino's Pizza Inc.**

45.00

42.50

90

83

8

7

241 Pizza (Chairman's Brand Corp)

38.00

42.00

76

84

9

8

Pizzaville Inc.

30.00

30.00

71

71

10

10

New Orleans Pizza (Chairman's Brand Corp)

23.50

25.00

56

62

11

14

Topper's Pizza Canada

18.00

17.50

36

35

12

13

Godfather's Pizza

16.00

18.00

32

37

13

12

Double Double Pizza and Chicken

15.50

18.00

31

37

14

15

Panzerotto Pizza Ltd.

13.50

14.00

29

29

15

N/A

Pizzaiolo

13.50

14.40

27

28

name

SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

Pizza Pizza Limited

353.86

2

2

Boston Pizza International Inc.

3

3

4


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

18 |

O

N

T

A

R

I

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

O

TOP RESTAURANT CHAINS BY CATEGORY continued TOP 15 Sub /sandwich Chains, ontario UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

618.67

1201

1102

213.00

213.00

427

427

MR. SUB (MTY Group)**

127.50

127.00

255

253

4

Quiznos Canada Restaurant Corp

64.00

84.75

128

171

5

3

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brand Corp)

59.00

88.00

118

176

6

6

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc.

33.00

36.20

35

39

7

8

Coffee Culture Cafe & Eatery (Obsidian Group)

24.50

30.05

49

44

8

7

Arby's of Canada

24.19

35.62

31

42

9

N/A

Panera Bread

18.00

13.50

12

9

10

10

Druxy's Inc.

15.00

14.80

37

37

11

12

Robin's (Chairman's Brand Corp)

14.00

14.50

28

29

12

N/A

Square Boy Pizza & Subs

11.00

11.50

22

23

13

14

Bagel Stop, The

10.00

10.57

20

20

14

16

Great Canadian Bagel, Ltd., The

8.50

8.78

17

19

15

13

Select Food Services Inc.

8.00

14.03

16

25

name

SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd.

627.36

2

2

Country Style Food Services Inc. (MTY Group)*

3

5

4

Photo by Daniel Duchon.

TOP 15 Coffee/pastrY Chains, ontario

Photo by Eziquel Boita.

UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

2998.00

1790

1692

1364.60

1364.60

453

453

Starbucks Coffee Co.

372.00

320.00

372

347

3

Country Style Food Services Inc. (MTY Group)*

213.00

213.00

427

427

5

5

Second Cup Ltd.

98.09

106.40

186

190

6

8

Timothy's World Coffee (Threecaf Brands Canada Inc.)

65.00

73.00

65

73

7

6

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brand Corp)

59.00

88.00

118

176

8

7

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc.

33.00

36.20

35

39

9

9

Coffee Culture Cafe & Eatery (Obsidian Group)

24.50

30.05

49

44

10

10

Druxy's Inc.

15.00

14.80

37

37

11

12

Robin's (Chairman's Brand Corp)

14.00

14.50

28

29

12

14

Bagel Stop, The

10.00

10.57

20

20

13

N/A

Great Canadian Bagel, Ltd., The

8.50

8.78

17

19

14

N/A

Lettieri Cafe

8.00

5.00

8

12

15

13

Select Food Services Inc.

8.00

14.03

16

25

name

SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

Tim Hortons (TDL Group)

3068.33

2

2

McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Ltd.*

3

4

4


O

n

t

a

r

i

O

TOP 50 RESTAURANT CHAINS SaleS 2014

SaleS 2013

($ millionS)

($ millionS)

UnitS 2014

UnitS 2013

Tim Hortons (TDL Group)

3068.33

2998.00

1790

1744

2

McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd.*

1364.60

1364.60

453

453

3

3

Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd.

627.36

618.67

1201

1102

4

4

Swiss Chalet (Cara)

402.00

402.00

168

163

5

7

Starbucks Coffee Co.

372.00

320.00

372

347

Starbucks opened 69 stores and closed three across Canada in 2013.

6

5

Pizza Pizza Limited

353.86

360.02

545

531

Opened 35 and closed six across Canada in 2013.

7

6

Wendy's Restaurants of Canada Inc.*

321.00

320.68

193

193

8

8

Boston Pizza International Inc.

302.00

242.07

110

108

9

9

KFC Canada (Yum! Bands Inc.)

226.00

293.30

295

288

10

10

Country Style Food Services Inc. (MTY Group)*

213.00

213.00

427

427

11

11

Keg Restaurants Ltd.

195.00

189.40

41

40

12

12

A & W Food Services of Canada Inc.

191.80

178.00

202

187

13

13

Harvey's (Cara)

159.00

159.00

185

185

14

14

Kelsey's Restaurants (Cara)

144.00

147.00

72

72

15

19

Jack Astor's Bar and Grill (Sir Corp)

139.52

118.55

30

29

16

18

MR. SUB (MTY Group)**

127.50

127.00

255

255

17

17

Pizza Hut Canada (Yum! Brands Inc.)**

123.50

128.44

146

137

18

15

Burger King Restaurants of Canada Inc.

122.00

146.62

122

137

19

16

East Side Mario's (Prime Restaurants)

114.00

138.76

57

64

20

21

Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation

110.00

107.00

22

22

21

23

Dairy Queen Canada

106.00

101.50

212

203

22

20

Montana's (Cara)

105.00

114.00

52

55

Three Ontario locations were closed in 2013. Ottawa, Sarnia and Windsor.

23

24

Milestones (Cara)

101.50

97.00

29

26

Three new stores opened in 2013 ( Ottawa, Sudbury and Richmond Hill). One store closed in BC (Burnaby).

24

22

Second Cup Ltd.

98.09

106.40

186

190

Opened 15 new cafes, closed 19 and renovated 22 in 2013. They opened a net of four in the first quarter of 2014.

25

25

Pizza Nova

96.00

90.00

131

131

Planning to open 10 additional units in Ontario.

26

29

Moxie's Restaurants L.P.* (NOR)

78.00

70.40

26

24

Opened Kitchener, downtown Toronto and Montreal in the last 12 months. Closed Nanaimo.

27

30

Domino's Pizza

68.00

68.04

135

135

28

31

Oliver & Bonacini Restaurants

65.00

65.00

11

12

29

50

Timothy's World Coffee (Threecaf Brands Canada Inc.)**

65.00

73.00

65

73

30

27

Quiznos Canada Restaurant Corp*

64.00

84.75

128

171

31

32

Casey's Grill & Bar (Prime Restaurants)

60.00

60.12

20

28

32

33

Crabby Joe's Tap & Grill (Obsidian Group)

60.00

60.00

38

39

33

26

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brand Corp)

59.00

88.00

118

176

34

45

St. Louis Franchise Limited

55.50

40.00

40

34

35

N/A

Taco Bell of Canada (Yum! Brands Inc.)

51.00

74.50

29

44

36

37

Firkin Group of Pubs, The

49.00

50.00

31

32

Expecting to expand sub-franchise systems in Ottawa, South Western Ontario, Western Canada and Newfoundland

37

N/A

Booster Juice

48.40

24.31

122

88

With ongoing development in Canada and Internationally the chain plans to open 34 new Canadian locations and five new international locations opening in 2014.

38

N/A

Shoeless Joe's Sports Grill

48.00

46.50

33

31

Plan to open new units within Ontario and license agreements throughout the rest of Canada.

39

39

Turtle Jack's (Tortoise Group)

48.00

45.00

16

15

40

44

Cora Franchise Group Inc.

47.00

41.67

43

42

41

N/A

Little Caesar of Canada Inc.

45.50

45.50

91

91

42

N/A

Gino's Pizza Inc.

45.00

42.50

90

83

43

41

Lone Star Restaurants

45.00

42.30

21

19

44

46

Sunset Grill Restaurants Ltd.

45.00

38.00

45

38

45

36

Yogen Fruz Canada Inc. (MTY Group)

45.00

50.50

90

101

46

35

Baton Rouge (Imvescor)

44.00

54.03

11

11

47

49

Wild Wing Corp.

43.50

35.00

87

70

48

N/A

Pita Pit

43.16

31.35

113

96

Opened 32 new locations across Canada in 2013. Planning on opening 40 new locations in 2014.

49

N/A

WORKS Gourmet Burger Bistro, The

40.50

30.00

27

20

Opened seven new stores in Ontario and one in St. John's in the last year.

50

42

241 Pizza (Chairman's Brand Corp)

38.00

42.00

76

84

Rank 2014

Rank 2013

1

1

2

name

* Numbers from previous year. Did not respond this year.

Note: Some sales figures are estimates.**

expanSion noteS

New Canadian units planned for 2014: 140 -160. 168 new Canadian stores in 2013. Another 16 were closed.

Twelve stores added in 2013: six in the West, four in Ontario and two in Quebec.

The Mandarin opened its 22nd store in north Brampton in 2013.

Six to eight units per year in Ontario. Looking for expansion to East and West Coasts.

Four units opened in the last 12 months (one in QC and three in Western Canada). Four have closed also (Brampton, Edmonton, Montreal, Sept Iles)

Gino's has closed eight and opened 15 stores in the last year.

Twenty-four new stores in development. 18 of these are scheduled to open in 2014.


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

20 |

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Products

2.

4.

6.

1. Campbell’s jambalaya and Korean beef soup. 2. Reusable sign kits from Imprint Plus. 3. Hopkins PEI potato peeler and chipper. 4. Jack’s edible spoons. 5. Seagram’s coolers. 6. Olymel’s gluten-free chicken pieces and turkey sausage patty. 1.

3.

5.

Soup’s on Campbell’s has launched two new soups: the Korean Style BBQ Beef contains beef simmered in an Asian broth with rice, shitake mushrooms, spinach, garlic and green onions; and the Jumpin’ Jambalaya, which contains chicken, sausage, ham, long-grain rice, onions and green peppers in a tomato-infused chicken stock. Both soups are marketed under the company’s Verve Soups line. For more information visit: www.campbellsfoodservice.ca.

Hanging signs Reusable signage kits from Imprint Plus allow users to create customized signs. The kit includes software to help create customized and personalized signs with dozens of design templates and several display options including freestanding tabletop, hanging and wall signs. The signs are available in rectangular and oval shapes in a variety of sizes and colours. For more information visit: www.imprintplus.com.

For the spuds The HC1 Potato Chipper and the HP25/26 Potato Peeler by Hopkins PEI boast cutting prep time and producing little waste. The chipper has a 12-kilogram hopper load and a 370-watt motor. The chip size can be adjusted by changing the blade and the overall machine is easy to clean. According to the company, the chipper can process 25 kilograms of potatoes in less than a minute. The peeler has a 25-kilogram capacity and can process 600 kilograms an hour. For more information visit: www.hopkinspei.com.

Kosher spoons Edibles by Jack has released a line of kosher, edible spoons. The kosher spoons come in chocolate, corn, poppy seed and sea salt flavours. The spoons can act as a plating method, which can also be eaten. Edibles by Jack also offers several gluten-free varieties and 15 standard flavours including gingerbread, cranberry, and wasabi sesame. The spoons can be shipped anywhere in Canada. For more information visit: www.ediblesbyjack.com.

Gluten-free breaded chicken After four to five minutes in the fryer Olymel’s new gluten-free breaded chicken are ready for service. The puffed-rice breaded chicken come in strips or pieces. Olymel has also introduced a turkey sausage patty for use in breakfast sandwiches. According to the company, the patty offers breakfast consumer’s convenience value, nutrition and variety. For more information: www. olymelsolutions.com.

Seagram coolers Brick Brewing Co. has launch several new coolers heading into the summer months. The Seagram 80 Mixed Berry is being toted by the company as having a third of the calories of leading coolers and is sweetened with stevia. The company also announced the release of Seagram Lemon Lime and Seagram Orange Mango, which will be distributed in a new 12-can mixer pack along with Seagram’s Iced Lemon Tea and Wildberry coolers. For more information visit: www.brickbeer.com.


| 21

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

J U N E 2 014

Dr. Oetker opens in London

Dr. August Oetker.

LONDON, ON—Dr. Oetker Canada, a maker of frozen pizza brands, dessert and dry baking products for retail and foodservice, officially opened the company’s new frozen pizza production facility in London, ON, in mid-May. The plant, which has been in operation since mid-March, will act as a production hub for the company’s North American pizza operations. “Canada is an excellent market for Dr. Oetker,” Christian von Twickel, executive vicepresident at Dr. Oetker Canada, said in a release. “We are confident in the local workforce, the Ontario agri-food sector and the North American market and we are honoured to be part of the London community.” The London facility houses production of the company’s pizza lines. Over time, the facility will produce up to 50 million frozen pizzas every year for both the Canadian and U.S. markets, and will source millions of pounds of raw ingredients from Ontario farmers and food processors. Dr. Oetker Canada has been in operation since 1960. Dr. Oetker’s Canadian operation produce more than 190 products and includes the new London, ON, location and facilities located in Mississauga, ON. According to the release, Dr. Oetker Canada has more than doubled in size over the last decade.

Leamington plant sold to Highbury LEAMINGTON, ON—Highbury Canco has purchased H. J. Heinz Co.’s Leamington plant, a move which will save 250 jobs. The plant will continue to produce Heinz products such as tomato juice, beans and canned pastas. In February, H.J. Heinz signed a letter of intent to sell the 105-year-old plant and hire Highbury Canco as a contact packer for the company. In late May, Highbury Canco announced it would hire back 250 of the plant’s 800 employees and cut wages by about 40 per cent. “It’s disappointing,” employee Todd Dunford told the CBC. “Heinz is the heart of the town, the entire town, for 105 years now. For it to be shut down is devastating for the community.” Dunford added, “for it to be reopened even in some capacity is a good thing for the community.”

The Marketplace I N V E S T M E N T O P P O RT U N I T I E S QUEEN WEST

BAR ON CHURCH

• Quick Service Concept • Profitable

• Established & Profitable • Great Venue

Price: $69,000

Price: $249,000

WING SPORTS PUB

SPORTS BAR

• Yonge & Eglinton / Good Lease • Great Location / Concept

• AAA Location • $ 1.2 Million in Sales

Price: $159,000

QUEEN WEST

• Casual Diner • Profitable / 50 Seats with Patio

Price: $175,000

Price: $295,000

NIGHT CLUB FOR LEASE

SED •• Licensed for 524 with Rooftop Patio Toronto / Turn Key LEA Price: $24 Net Sq Ft

ALL ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PROVIDED BY APPOINTMENT / PRINCIPALS ONLY

1-303-447-3334

DOES YOUR KITCHEN MAKE MONEY? OURS DOES... New High Volume location for FAST CASUAL restaurant franchise, contact CAROL KAHN at: ckahn@selectfoodservices.com or 416-709-1222

urbankitchen.com Min. cash required $200,000.00

Joseph Cunjak

Sales Rep

416-723-9770

Email: joecunjak@gmail.com Homelife Bayview Realty Inc. I.C.I. Division


P E OP L E

Alexandra Feswick.

Alexandra Feswick joined The Drake Hotel in March as the new chef de cuisine. Born and raised in Dundas, ON, Feswick received her culinary training at George Brown’s Chef School. She apprenticed under chef Jeff Crump in 2005 at Ancaster Mill, where she held the position of sous chef for five years. Feswick, who holds that good food should speak for itself and that culinary excellence comes from the heart, relocated to Toronto in 2010. Most recently, Feswick was the executive chef at The Great Hall/Samuel J. Moore and during her time at Brockton General was recognized by the Ontario Hostelry Institute on its 2011 Top 30 Under 30 list. “I would like to see the Drake take a more local, fresh, homemade approach. We are already doing this in many regards, however, I think we could do more,” said Feswick in a company blog post. “What’s better then an apple freshly picked from the tree you’re standing next to – or strawberries still warm from the plant? I would like to offer this type of experience to our customers on a more regular basis.”

Michael P. Clive.

Chef Michael P. Clive has been appointed grilling specialist at Weber-Stephen Products’ first Canadian office. The 2,400-square-foot Weber Canada Grill Academy is slated to open this fall. Cooking lessons, demonstrations and lectures will be available at the Canadian headquarters, located on Roybridge Gate in Vaughan, ON. As part of Weber’s expanded presence in Canada, Chef Clive will be responsible for internal and external training and education initiatives and will represent Weber as brand ambassador. Danny Smiles is representing Canada at the 2014 S. Pellegrino Cooking Cup held in Venice, Italy on June 13 and 14. The two-day event includes a signature dish competition with 10 chefs preparing dishes in the galley of a sailboat while crews race to make the best course times. This is the first time a Canadian has competed in the event in its 14year history. The chef de cuisine at Montreal’s Le Bremner called the event a unique

Danny Smiles.

cooking challenge. “Creating a winning dish in a sailboat galley while it’s racing around a course in the Venetian lagoon is hard to imagine. But I’m definitely up for it and honoured S. Pellegrino selected me to compete as its first Canadian competitor,” Smiles said in a release. Mirella Amato recently published Beerology, a book aimed at understanding the world of beer. The Toronto resident is a national level Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) judge and has sat on juries for the Canadian Brewing Awards, the Great American Beer Festival, the European Beer Star and the World Beer Cup. She also provides staff training and consulting to pubs, restaurants and breweries. Beerology covers tips for beer storage and cellaring and breaks down beer styles into four categories covering the history and origin of specific brews and brands that exemplify each type. It also includes beer cocktails and pairing brews with food. “There is a beer for every mood, food and occasion. And, with the growing number of beer festivals popping up worldwide, beer is final-

Mirella Amato.

ly getting the attention it deserves,” states a release. Since 2007, Amato has dedicated herself to promoting local beer and beer appreciation and was the first non-U.S. resident to earn the title master cicerone. Starbucks recently announced new leaders for two key positions. Starbucks Canada executive vicepresident and president Annie Young-Scrivner has been named executive vice-president and president, Teavana. Nine-year retail operations executive and employee resources senior vice-president Rossann Williams has been appointed senior vicepresident and president, Starbucks Canada. Teavana founder and chief executive officer Andy Mack, having helped with the integration of Teavana with Starbucks, has decided to retire from the company. Yum! Brands, Inc. announced in May that its chairman and chief executive officer David Novak will become the company’s executive chairman in January, at which time Greg Creed will take on the role of CEO and join the board of directors.

Annie Young-Scrivner.

Novak has served as CEO since 1999, building a global restaurant company with more than 40,000 restaurants in 125 countries. Once he becomes executive chairman, Novak will form the office of the chairman, which will be comprised of Novak, Creed and Sam Su, Yum Brands vice-chairman and chairman/ CEO of the YUM China Division. Until Jan. 1, Creed will continue to serve in his current role as CEO of Taco Bell and work with Novak to develop the company’s 2015 operating plan. The company named Brian Niccol, currently Taco Bell’s U.S. president, as the chain’s next CEO, filling the role that will be vacated by Creed. Jeff DeLapp is McCain Foods Limited’s North America president, effective June 2. DeLapp took over the role from Frank van Schaayk, who is retiring next October. DeLapp brings to McCain more than 25 years of leadership experience in the food industry, including former positions of president of Lamb Weston and president and chief operating officer at The Bruss Company.

TORONTO LOCATION OPENING SOON 77 Samor Rd. North York, ON M6A 1J2 With over 500 supplier partners from the most recognized names in the industry, Hendrix is sure to fulfill your foodservice needs. hendrixequip.com


Perfect Packaging options for your busy operation Yoplait Creamy Yogurt A creamy smooth texture without fruit pieces. Available in a variety of flavours, and 5 different package sizes, including a 2kg resealable pouch.

Yoplait Source Lighten your recipes! Fat free, no sugar added, no aspartame. Available in many flavours, and 6 different package sizes, including a 2kg resealable pouch.

Yoplait Source Greek The indulgence of Greek yogurt for only 50 calories! no sugar added, 2x protein, thick texture, stirred. Available in single serve portions, or tubs.

For a tasty parfait, try layering one of these great yogurts with some fruit and nature Valley Granola. it’s a crowd pleaser!

®

¤

TM

foodservice.canada@genmills.com lifemadedelicious.ca


SERVE UP

GREAT ENTERTAINMENT The right audio/visual experience is just good business

To keep your guests coming back, we’ll help you create that perfect vibe with the right HDTV, sound system, projector and digital menu boards – all from top brands like LG. We’ll leave the kitchen to you.

SPECIALIZED TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS TVs – Wall or ceiling mounting – Calibration

BEST BUY FOR BUSINESS OFFERS A BROAD RANGE OF TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS, INCLUDING • Digital menu boards • Background and zone audio systems • Indoor/outdoor audio/visual systems

• Complete customized audio/visual design layout • Professional installation

• Commercial grade systems

PROJECTORS – Mounting – Screen install (fixed/manual/motorized) AUDIO – Design and install of ceiling or wall speaker systems VIDEO DISTRIBUTION – Installation and programming of sources (cable boxes, blu-ray etc.) – Panel wiring across floors – Wire concealment VIDEO WALL – Design and install of multi-panels

WE’RE HERE TO HELP BY PHONE

BY EMAIL

ONLINE

Phone: 1.877.423.3429 Email: forbusiness@BestBuyCanada.ca Online: BestBuy.ca/BBFB

AT YOUR LOCATION

Ontario Restaurant News - June 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you