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O N T A R I O June 2016 | Vol. 31 | No. 5

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Building Basil Box Southeast Asian countries two years ago. There the couple spent time farming and immersed themselves in the bustling street marTORONTO — Peter Chiu learned about cre- kets. “We enjoyed that experience and wanted ating great guest experiences from his father, a to bring that feeling back to North America,” he successful Ontario restaurateur, but the young said, noting particular attention was paid to the entrepreneur is intent on blazing his own trail element of freshness they witnessed as vendors shopped daily for ingredients. with the development of Basil Box. “Sour, sweet, salty, all those flavours comChiu worked in foodservice and studied hospitality at Ryerson University before open- bined, was really something unique to us and ing the fast casual concept, which draws influ- we wanted to bring that aspect over here,” he APPROVAL REQUIRED added ence from Vietnam and Thailand. “We believe the enclosed proof is sent for your approval. We will not proceed with the job until the proof is returned. Chiu’s focus on quality food and service, that the North American palate was looking for INSTRUCTIONS. DO NOT GIVE VERBAL CHECKis CAREFULLY! Beyond this point we cannot accept responsibility for any errors. alterations (other than typographicalsaid errors) will be charged extra. Mark proof “OK” or “OK with corrections” aslead the case may done quickly. Staff guests through the prosomething more foreign and exotic,” Chiu. be, signing your name so we may know that the proof reached the proper authority. He and his wife Sherry travelled to the cess asking questions to help determine their By Kristen Smith, Managing Editor

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preferences. In May, the record number of guests served between noon and 1 p.m. stood at 179. The entirely gluten-free menu allows diners to choose a base: spring mix, short grain brown rice, long grain jasmine rice or chilled rice noodles. From there, guests can choose two vegetables and a protein, which include lemongrass chicken, five spice steak, chili lime shrimp and coconut curry tofu. Dishes are topped with one of five sauces, each with different levels of spiciness, and garnishes, which include fresh herbs, pickled vegetables and Sriracha-spiced pumpkin seeds. Continued on page 13

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MEXICAN FULLY

In MeMOrIaM

Gerald (Gerry) Warne passed away on May 1, 2016, in his 83rd year. A well-respected entrepreneur in Kingston, Ont., Warne joined Aunt Lucy’s restaurant in 1960, taking the helm nine years later from founder Ray Agnold, who opened the restaurant in 1947 with Lucy Harper as head cook and baker. Warne sold the restaurant in 2002 to long-time friend Bob Clark and his wife Myrna, who have since passed away, Bob in February and Myrna in 2013. The established restaurant closed its doors on May 9. Survived by his wife Wendy (Vaxvick), children Allison Warne and Matthew Vaxvick, Warne was predeceased by two sons Douglas (1995) and Geoffrey (2001).

Richard (Dick) Hunter passed away on May 18, 2016. The Toronto native attended Lawrence Park Collegiate and the University of Western Ontario and graduated with his HBA (Ivey Business School) in 1954. After graduation, he went to work for Imperial Oil. He spent many years in marketing which included memorable advantages of travel and business development. Throughout the rest of his career, food was a part of his business success, and Hunter eventually became the chief executive officer of Scott’s Hospitality/Scott’s Food Services. Even upon retirement in the early 1990’s, Hunter led many foodservice boards including Afton Group and University of Guelph Hospitality Foundation. Hunter married Eve (Graham) in 1959 and the couple had two daughters, Kate and Lisa. He will be missed by them and his grandchildren, Ryan, Keegan, Emma, James and Evan.

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Second helping of Ola Cocina OTTAWA — Ion Aimers discovered Donna Chevrier’s Ola Cocina shortly after the Ottawa chef opened the small Mexican restaurant in the Vanier neighbourhood in late 2013. “I just started telling everybody I knew about it because I thought it was the best food I had eaten in a long time,” said Aimers, founder The Works Gourmet Burger Bistro, which he sold in 2010 to Oakville-based Fresh Brands. Aimers now co-owns a handful of restaurants throughout Canada’s capital under The Shallowbrook Group. His partners are “full-ofzest, entrepreneurial people,” who like Aimers, “are also passionate about food.” The second Ola Cocina, which opened in late May at 1079 Wellington St. West (formerly a ZaZaZa pizzeria), is the sixth restaurant under Aimers’ purview. He also co-owns a butcher shop. “Donna [Chevrier] is a perfectionist and when she latched onto Mexican food, she did so with a vengeance from a traditional standpoint, but also from an innovative standpoint,” Aimers said. On one of his frequent trips for lunch or a snack, Aimers found himself sitting beside the wife of Mexico’s ambassador to Canada. He took the opportunity to ask what she though of Ola Cocina’s fare. “She looked at me and said, ‘This is the best Mexican food we’ve had since we left home.’ That really said it all,” Aimers recalled. “It ce-

mented my feeling at that point that I should talk to Donna about a potential expansion.” When Chevrier opened the 24-seat Barrett Street eatery in December of 2013, she had never stepped foot in Mexico. She had been involved in restaurant opening in the past, but Ola Cocina was her own concept. It was born of Chevrier’s imagination and her hard work. She did renovations herself and built all the tables (she built some for the new location as well). She did all the prep and the cooking. “That’s what it takes to own a restaurant these days … it is literally a lifestyle and not a career and I’m a true believer that the owner has to be in the restaurant,” said Chevrier. The new location seats 55 guests and has a similar decor and the same menu. “Our best step forward is probably our tacos; I have 16 different kinds,” Chevrier said. The menu covers traditional dishes and taco fillings, but also includes specialty tacos (corn tortillas are hand-crafted) using flavours Chevrier is personally found of, such as tandoori, Rueben and duck confit. “Maybe that’s wrong, but it’s my past,” she said. Ola Cocina and Chevrier have been getting quite a bit of attention this year. “Who’d have thought ... 33 years later to become an overnight success,” she laughed. “It’s very rewarding to get to this point finally.”

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MTY to double its units with acquisition of Kahala Brands MONTREAL — In a move that will double MTY Food Group’s units, the Montreal-based company has signed an agreement to acquire the shares of Kahala Brands in a deal estimated at $300 million (US). The acquisition, announced on May 25, is the largest in MTY’s history, following the purchase of Extreme Brandz in 2013. Board chair and MTY chief executive officer Stanley Ma called it “one of the most important days” in the company’s history. “MTY had been searching for the right foundation for its U.S. expansion for the last three years, and it has finally found the perfect match. The combination of the two companies’ portfolios and expertise will produce tremendous opportunities in Canada, in the United States and worldwide,” Ma said in a press release.

The Serruya family purchased a majority interest in Kahala in August 2013 and the remaining stake in early 2014. Kahala chairman and chief executive officer Michael Serruya said he feels this merger is in the best interests of shareholders, franchisees and employees. “My brothers and I have known Stanley Ma for many years. He is an extremely competent, and professional CEO, who successfully leads an outstanding company,” Serruya said. Kahala currently franchises and operates about 2,800 stores under 18 brands in 25 countries and generates annual system sales of more than $950 million. In Canada, Kahala’s brands include Cold Stone Creamery, Pinkberry and Taco Time. MTY already held Canadian franchising rights

for Taco Time. The combined entity will have a portfolio of approximately 5,500 stores under 57 brands. Kahala’s head office is located is Scottsdale, Ariz. Following the transaction, MTY’s United States head office will move into Kahala’s current offices. During the 12 months following the acquisition, the combined entity is expected to generate over $90 million in EBITDA, $250 million in revenues and $2 billion in system sales. “Combining the best of both companies and the knowledge and weight of each company in their respective markets is expected to yield significant acceleration in the growth of the combined business in North America and worldwide,” said Ma.

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June 2016 | 3


O N T A R I O

EDITORIAL

From foodservice to food rescue Every year, the food and beverage industry donates time and resources to support Second Harvest during Toronto Taste, held on June 12. The event has raised more than $11 million since 1991, when a group of six influential chefs came together for the first of what would become a model for modern food festival and fundraising events. It was held at the CN Tower back then and has grown steadily over the years. “This all started with them — it was the chefs’ idea,” said Second Harvest director of programs and partnerships Lori Nikkel. The food rescue charity was born 31 years ago with two women, Ina Andre and Joan Clayton, who saw people going hungry while food was going to waste. “It started literally with putting food from six restaurants into their hatchbacks and bringing it to six agencies,” said Nikkel. With a focus on nutrient-dense perishable food — dairy, protein and produce

— Second Harvest delivers food to about 220 social service agencies in the Greater Toronto Area. Toronto Taste, which is working with about 60 chefs and 30 beverage purveyors this year, accounts for 20 per cent of Second Harvest fundraising. The food rescue organization started with restaurants and is now mainly working with larger quantities from distributors, retail and farmers. According to Nikkel, restaurants are still involved, but Second Harvest connects foodservice operators with agencies for smaller amounts of food. Ontario’s Donation of Food Act — and Nikkel said there is similar legislation across Canada — protects the donor from liability. “No one is liable for food that is donated in good faith,” said Nikkel. While the organization has grown — it has nine refrigerated trucks and Nikkel estimated that Second Harvest will rescue 9.5 million pounds of food this year — the success of the program still relies on chefs and the foodservice community. Second Harvest has prevented more

than 100 million pounds of food from going to waste, a potentially growing problem. According to the Cut Waste, Grow Profit 2014 Report, Canadians waste $31 billion of food every year (up from $27 billion in 2010). Restaurants and hotels are responsible for nine per cent of that number. While operators are making strides in efforts to reduce organic waste, food waste is perhaps an inevitable part of the industry and maybe not the worst thing in the world as long as it doesn’t end up in landfills. Through good faith donations, operators have an opportunity to rescue food from becoming waste, since food that nourishes our community’s food insecure population — one in eight Canadian families struggle to put food on the table — isn’t wasted at all. “What I know for sure is there is way more food, way more, and there are way more hungry people,” Nikkel said.

TORONTO — In celebration of Local Food Week, Ontario’s Minister of Agriculture, Food and Affairs, Jeff Leal unveiled the new 2016 Local Food Report at Hawthorne’s Food & Drink in Toronto. “Ontario is an agri-food powerhouse and Local Food Week gives us an opportunity to celebrate the impressive and diverse variety of locally grown, harvested and produced food available within our own province,” Leal said. According to the report, Ontario’s agrifood sector has added $1.3 billion in GDP and created 34,000 jobs in the past two years. As well, 65 per cent of food grown in Ontario is purchased by food processors and stays within the province, while 80 per cent of shoppers in the province are likely to purchase fresh, local produce.

Chasing sustainability TORONTO — Chase Hospitality Group is strengthening its commitment to sustainability with a new company-wide initiative. The Toronto-based restaurant group announced all of their restaurants will be offering menus with 25 per cent plant-based dishes. The restaurant group includes The Chase, The Chase Fish & Oyster, Colette Grand Café, Kasa Moto and Little Fin. The menu change aims to elevate the guest experience while improving the lives of farmers and minimizing Chase’s impact on oceans and the broader ecosystem. “We are very fortunate to serve hundreds of diners every day and believe that we can make a positive impact on our en-

4 | Ontario Restaurant News

vironment by increasing our plant-based menu options,” said Steven Salm, president of Chase Hospitality Group. “It’s our duty as restaurateurs to acknowledge the impacts that agriculture and food production have on our environment.”

Distribution deal for Sazerac MONTREAL — The Sazerac Company and Charton-Hobbs Inc. have entered into a new long-term national distribution agreement for the Sazerac brand portfolio in Canada, effective June 1. Previously, Charton-Hobbs represented the Sazerac portfolio in western Canada and some of its brands in eastern Canada. The Sazerac portfolio offers a full palette of well-known spirits including Fireball, Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Blanton’s Single Barrel Bourbon, Southern Comfort, Dr. McGillicuddy’s, DeKuyper, Red Tassel Vodka and Silk Tassel Canadian Whisky. “We are delighted that our two familyowned companies share in common long histories, many core values, and aligned strategic vision for the future of Sazerac brands in Canada,” said Guy May, global sales director of Sazerac Company.

CAFP names Food Executive of the Year at national conference KANANASKIS, Alta. — The Canadian Association of Foodservice Professionals (CAFP) named Jim Kostuch its 2016 Food Executive of the Year at its annual national convention held in May in Kananaskis, Alta. The award, presented at the branch

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level and nationally, recognizes CAFP members with outstanding ability and contribution to the foodservice and hospitality industry, as well as for service in CAFP and community involvement. Kostuch, a member of the Toronto branch, has been in the foodservice industry for 32 years. In 1989 he joined the family business, Kostuch Media Limited, and began working with Foodservice and Hospitality Magazine and Hotelier Magazine. Kostuch joined TrainCan Inc. in 2002, and began expanding and developing the company’s food safety training business across Canada. He volunteers as a member of Friends of We Care and has been on the board for six years since 1989. Within CAFP’s Toronto branch of CAFP, Kostuch has been a SMAC (Senior Management Advisory Council) member since 2006.

100th location for Papa John’s LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Papa John’s has announced the opening of its 100th location in Canada. Mark Murphy, who opened the first Papa John’s in Canada about 16 years ago, is the franchisee opening the 100th restaurant, which is located in Alberta. “This is a major milestone for Papa John’s to achieve and I am pleased to have been a part of the development of the brand in Canada,” said Murphy. Papa John’s plans future expansion in order to take a larger slice of Canada’s $2.9 billion pizza market.

MICKEY CHEREVATY Consultant, Moyer Diebel Limited JACK BATTERSBY President, Summit Food Service Distributors Inc. PAUL LECLERC Partner, Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. JORGE SOARES Director Food and Beverage Operations, Woodbine Entertainment Group ADAM COLQUHOUN President, Oyster Boy JOHN CRAWFORD Director of Sales-Canada, Lamb Weston TINA CHIU Chief Operating Officer, Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation MARTIN KOUPRIE Chef/Owner, Pangaea Restaurant JOEL SISSON Founder and President of Crush Strategy Inc. CHRIS JEENS Partner, W. D. Colledge Co. Ltd. JOE BAKER Dean, School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts, Centennial College GRAHAM HAYES Directory of Culinary/Corporate Chef, McCormack Bourrie Sales & Marketing & French’s Food Company Canada JODY PALUBISKI CEO, The Charcoal Group

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Simcoe Chef Ryan Rivard is opening Lago to complement Port Dover’s growing arts and culture scene By Kristen Smith PORT DOVER, Ont. — When Ryan Rivard was preparing to open Lago in Port Dover, Ont., the accomplished chef took it upon himself to take lessons in making pasta and cheese. “In any good Italian restaurant, you’re making your own pasta,” Rivard said. “My next step in renewing my passion and energy for Italian food was to learn how to make cheese.” While Rivard doesn’t yet consider himself to have earned the title of cheesemaker, he can prepare mozzarella, burrata and ricotta. Every week Lago receives 60 litres of Jersey cow milk from nearby Little Brown Cow Dairy. Lago is the second restaurant for Rivard and his wife Jennifer von Schleinitz, who opened The Combine about three years ago in a renovated house in Simcoe, Ont., Rivard’s hometown. Slated to open by the end of June, Lago (meaning “lake” in Italian) will seat 40 guests at the corner of Market and Main streets. “There is a vibrant arts and culture scene in Port Dover that is spilling outwards within Norfolk Country” Rivard said. In addition to homemade pasta and cheese, Lago is making limoncello and will serve pastry chef Robynne Hubert’s gelato. “What we’re trying to do is along the same lines as what we do at The Combine; if we can make something, we will and that means time, energy, know-how and the desire to learn and push ourselves,” said Rivard. A selection of menu items includes carbonara pizza; butternut squash ravioli with a grainy house mustard and thyme cream,

fresh ricotta and fried sage; and Lake Erie pickerel with tomato caper pan jus, preserved lemon, niçoise olive and fennel risotto. “We have an open kitchen — we’re big fans of that — we know that people love watching the action,” Rivard said. The couple gutted the space, formerly home to another restaurant, to make way for a nautical-inspired décor, drawing influence from the beach and Italy. Under the direction of von Schleinitz, larger windows were created to allow more light into the 1,000-square-foot space, the original hardwood was recovered from under layers of flooring and whitewashed shiplap walls were installed. “We’re trying be simple inside and really airy and bright,” she said. Antique mirrors add dimension and interest to the space, pull-

ing passersby in and reflecting the park across the street. “Every time I’m in that space I feel like I’m still outside because we’re bringing in the reflection of the trees and the sky,” said von Schleinitz Outside, a blue and white beach towel motif draws attention to a new takeout window, which was created when they removed a safety deposit box, a remnant from when the building served as a bank. While von Schleinitz and Rivard turn their attention to the new venue, Hubert and sous chef-turned-head chef Marcus Myerscough will be helming The Combine kitchen. Looking to the future, Rivard and von Schleinitz hope to open other establishments under the umbrella of Magnolia Hospitality Company.

Adamson’s Barbecue has a different take on ‘location is everything’ TORONTO — Sometimes, a location with foot traffic isn’t ideal for a restaurant. In late April, Adamson Barbecue opened in an industrial area of Leaside in Toronto. “We’re in the middle of nowhere,” said Adam Skelly, who owns the barbecue joint with his girlfriend Alison Hunt. While more populous areas of Toronto would place Adamson Barbecue in sight of potential clients, the restaurant’s 6,000-pound wood smoker — capable of cooking 1,300 pounds of meat — isn’t exactly neighbourhood friendly. “Within a two-block radius on Queen West, you have thousands of homes. Some of those people are going to be vegans or old-timers that don’t want to smell barbecue,” Skelly said. “We’re in a great location. We don’t have anybody to piss off.” The restaurant, located in the former home of a welding shop, also has 3,000 square feet of space, 200 amps of power and an adjacent alley to park a 26-foot food truck and 22-foot smoker rig. “I wouldn’t be able to put any of my smokers in a restaurant on Queen West, not one of them. Here I have four,” Skelly said. Despite a lack of natural foot traffic, Adamson Barbecue is thriving. On some days, customers line up for more than an hour to quench their barbecue craving at the 65-seat restaurant.

6 | Ontario Restaurant News

“We’re open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., or when we sell out. We rarely make it until 2 p.m.,” Skelly said. Adamson serves Texas-style barbecue, a beef-centric smoking method. “It’s unique in that it is cooked using just wood, no gas or electricity or wood pellets,” Skelly said. “It’s seasoned very simply. Salt and pepper make up most of the spices people cook with.” Unlike other types of barbecue, adding sauce to Texas-style smoked meat is carnivorous heresy.

“We say putting barbecue sauce all over our brisket is like putting ketchup on a rib eye,” Skelly said. Although removing sauce from the cooking process is more difficult, Skelly said the method is reserved for both purists and perfectionists. “We don’t just turn on a switch on an electric smoker. I have a guy here just stoking a fire. It’s an around the clock job at this place,” he said. “I think it’s the best, there’s something about cooking and managing a wood fire that feels natural and primal.” Hunt and Skelly began selling barbecue in

2013 through their food truck and by catering weddings and special events. “When we felt confident enough in our product, we opened our retail spot,” Skelly said. The restaurant opens only for lunch Monday to Friday, to accommodate their busy catering business. The menu consists of ribs, brisket, pulled pork, turkey breast and sausage as well as potato salad, coleslaw and beans as sides. “Catering on weekends is much more lucrative than opening up for a day in a restaurant,” Skelly said. He added hiring staff to run the restaurant in his absence is not an option. “It’s going to impact the quality. Those guys aren’t going to care about making each piece of meat that goes onto someone’s tray perfectly cooked,” he said. “I’ve got to be around.” Skelly and Hunt tackled renovating the majority of the former welding shop, with the exception of ventilation and the heating and cooling system. “We did everything here we’re capable of doing, all electrical, plumbing, the kitchen and framing of the walls,” Skelly said. The DIY approach to building the restaurant was motivated by cost, Skelly explained. “It’s a low budget, self-funded thing,” he said. “We didn’t take out any loans, we own the whole thing and we don’t have any investments.”


CCFCC converges in Windsor WINDSOR, Ont. — The Windsor, Ont., riverfront was a sea of chef whites as the 53rd annual Canadian Culinary Federation (CCFCC) National Convention descended on St. Clair College Centre for the Arts in mid-May. The five-day event, themed Leading the Way, was filled with seminars, meetings and competitions. Ontario chef and conference chair Ryan Marquis was named Chef of the Year. Marquis, whose day job is corporate chef and ingredient sales for C.W. Shasky & Associates, is a dedicated member of the CCFCC. He is the former central region vice-president and was instrumental in establishing the CCFCC Oakville, Ont., branch. Regional nominees included Mark Davie, Victoria branch president and University Club of Victoria executive chef, and Jennifer Bryant, product developer and food stylist at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen at the Culinary Institute of Canada in Charlottetown. Association business announced at the annual convention included a partnership with Friends of We Care. David Franklin, corporate chef for Sysco Southwestern Ontario, replaced Marquis as central region vice-president. Sean Beckingham, owner of Toronto-based Branding and Buzzing, gave chefs a primer on social media marketing within the restaurant space focusing on “The Big Three” platforms: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. He walked delegates through the progression of Facebook, which evolved from a space for making connections, then let brands in on

the action. Recently, Facebook “shut the door,” on the engagement to which companies had grown accustomed. Only 10 per cent of people who like a page see its posts and the most engaged users see posts more often. “Facebook had an answer: advertising,” said Beckingham. The more people engage with your posts, the more people Facebook will show them to, said Beckingham, noting the platform should be used for “hero moment opportunities,” such as sharing a news story or blog post. Beckingham compared Twitter to microblogging and encouraged restaurateurs to make connections and interact with followers. “It’s almost like a text message to your fans and influencers,” he explained. To keep up with the ever-changing platforms, Beckingham encouraged people to try Twitter Polls and Periscope, noting moving images always perform better than still ones. “When Facebook puts out something new, try it out, because Facebook will typically reward you,” he added. Beckingham said it is more important to have quality photos than many photos, particularly on photo-based Instagram. “If you can’t do it yourself, hire someone to take your photos,” he said, noting there might already be capable photographers and marketers within a restaurant’s employee pool. “Find these people, empower them.” During the final sessions on May 19, the Saskatchewan Canola Development Commission (SaskCanola) presented its documentary Licensed

Ryan Marquis was named Chef of the Year.

to Farm.“What we wanted to achieve from this is conversation,” said executive director Janice Tranberg. SaskCanola partnered with Joe Schwarcz, director of McGill University’s Office for Science and Society, for the presentation, which aimed to debunk common food myths. Schwarcz took to task the Food Babe blogger and “one of your own,” Jamie Oliver. He said they are guilty of making a fundamental error: that something that is used in one way cannot be used in another. For example, shellac is also a food ingredient. “Chemicals. These are not dirty nasty things, they are the building blocks of life,” Schwarcz said. He added many food myths also confuse correlation with causation. “What all of this commotion has done, is confuse people,” said Schwarcz. “It’s no surprise that people are confused — they don’t know who to listen to.” It’s the job of scientist to separate the sense from the nonsense. “The presence of a chemical does not equate to the presence of risk,” said Schwarcz. He illustrated this by listing the naturally occurring chemical makeup of an apple, which includes acetone and formaldehyde. Keynote speaker Ned Bell rallied the troops to join the Chefs for Oceans cause, which already has about 660 partners. The executive chef at Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver’s YEW seafood + bar feeds almost half a million guests every year.

“I feel that I have a responsibility to know where that food is coming from,” he said. “Seafood is the last wild protein that we get to still eat.” He encouraged delegates to try species further down the food chain and added that well managed fishery operations also include aquaculture. The convention concluded with the President’s Gala, where dinner was prepared by Culinary Team Canada, both the juniors and seniors, as well as Bocuse d’Or Canadian representatives James Olberg (2017) and Trevor Ritchie (2019). Claudio Ferrer, the continental director representing the Americas from WACS, lauded the participation of the junior chefs throughout the convention. Ferrer told the chefs to share their knowledge with future industry leaders. “There are no secrets anymore,” Perrotte said. The winners of the chef competitions, which ran throughout the convention, were announced during the gala. The Saputo National Junior Culinary Challenge winner was Benjamin Hodder, who recently graduated from Nova Scotia Community College (Kingstec Campus). Vancouver chef Sandy Chen, of Torafuku restaurant, took the title in The Sysco Great Canadian Cook-Off, despite losing points for time. “The flavour in her dish just blew everybody away,” said judge and CCFCC board chair Jud Simpson. Next year, the national convention will be held in Calgary in late May.

Junior Culinary Team Canada prepare appetizers at the President’s Gala.

June 2016 | 7


to Pair f0r a full house

The right combination of beer and food is increasingly becoming a safe bet to boost sales and impress customers By Bill Tremblay

B

eau’s All Natural Brewing Company doesn’t have an in-house restaurant at its brewery in Vankleek Hill, Ont. However, the company does employ an inhouse chef. The brewery hired chef Bruce Wood in 2014 to work closely with brewmaster Matthew O’Hara to assist in developing connections between beer and food. “Now when they’re developing recipes he’ll actually consult with them to make sure we’re getting the right flavours in there,” explained Steve Beauchesne, co-founder of Beau’s All Natural Brewing Company. “For every beer we put out, we’ll do a series of critical tastings to determine exactly what food matches best with that beer.” Outside of the brewery, Wood helps restaurants develop beer pairings as well as plan beer dinners. The idea of professionally pairing beer with food is helping to bring the beverage into a new light. “Beer is still the drink of everyday people, but everyone is coming to realize that quality over quantity is a better way to go. It’s being appreciated as opposed to guzzled,” said Beauchesne, who is also the vice-chair of Ontario Craft Brewers. “It has definitely moved up in people’s esteem as being a drink that’s got a lot of complexity to it.”

8 | Ontario Restaurant News

Menu pairings with beer is a growing trend, with dinner. Now more and more people are capable of benefitting both restaurants and ordering beer with dinner,” said Crystal Luxmore, a certified cicerone, Prud’homme beer breweries, Beauchesne explained. “Craft beer as a whole, as a movement, has sommelier and operator of craftbeertastings. really been trying to change what people think com, a business that delivers staff training as of when they think of beer. There’s so much well as beer dinners. “These breweries are serving more varietvariety and so many dimensions of flavour that ies than we’ve ever seen exist with craft beer,” he before in Canada, even said. before Prohibition.” “There’s no better There’s no better Big Rock Brewing way to show off the verway to show off and Oliver & Bonacini satility and completely recently partnered to credifferent flavours availthe versatility ate a modern-day brewable to beer than through and completely pub, where beer pairings pairing with food.” different flavours will dominate the menu. For restaurants, a Liberty Commons will beer dinner may help fill available to beer open at the brewery in seats on nights when custhan through Toronto’s Liberty Village tomers are less likely to this fall. dine out. pairing with food. “The goal is to cre“A beer dinner goes over really well. People Steve Beauchesne, ate a truly unique dining remember where they co-founder of Beau’s All experience for guests — went for that amazNatural Brewing Company whereby certain dishes and brews will be created ing beer dinner,” intentionally to be paired Beauchesne said. The idea of pairing beer with food has with one another,” said chef Anthony Walsh. “We’ll be creating a total flavour experiexploded in the last five years, particularly as more and more communities are home to their ence where food and drink work to augment one another; working hand in hand as brewer own craft brewery. “Five years ago, people were ordering beer and chef is paramount.” Oliver & Bonacini decided to partner with at the beginning of the meal, and then wine

a single brewery to ensure close involvement with the brewing process. “Having a professional brewer onsite working with our chefs allows us to offer a wider range of custom brews that play into our menus, seasons and guest preferences,” Walsh said. “Craft beer is best when it’s served fresh. You can’t get much fresher than brewing inhouse with a craft brewery that has 30 years of experience under its belt.” Liberty Commons will serve beer exclusive to the restaurant. Big Rock will use a five-barrel, three-vessel, copper-plated brew kit to create up to 3,000 hectolitres a year for Liberty Commons. Walsh will also be able to provide input into the flavour of the in-house beers. “As a chef, it’s exciting to be part of the brewing process. However, the big benefits are shared,” Walsh said. “Chefs look at and treat ingredients in a very different manner than brewers, from ingredient combinations to technical aspects.”

The right combination Canada’s beer landscape is quickly changing, according to Mirella Amato, a master cicerone and author of the book Beerology: Everything You Need to Know to Enjoy Beer … Even More. “Summer weather used to point to pilsners, hefeweizens and pale ales,” Amato said. This summer, however, the Berliner Weiss


is gaining popularity. Berliner Weiss is a lowalcohol, tart-style beer brewed with wheat. The beer is refreshing with notes of lemon and green apple. “Napoleon’s troops were said to refer to this style as ‘the champagne of the north.’ It pairs well with fresh fruit or fruit salads, fried seafood or french fries and rich, light-flavoured cheeses,” Amato said. Faced with changing trends in beer varieties, Amato’s book offers a quick, two-step technique to ensure the brew matches a meal. First, make sure the strength of the beer and the food’s flavour intensity are closely aligned. “This makes sense, when you think about it. If you pair a light salad with a 12 per cent (abv) rich and roasty imperial stout, the subtle flavours in your salad will be lost,” Amato said. Mirella’s Rule of Thumb is the second step, which is the method of matching the colour of the beer with the colour of the food. Amato suggests matching golden beers with white fish and chicken, amber beers with pork and lentils or brown beers with steak and mushrooms. “This is just something I noticed I was doing and, for some reason, it works,” Amato said. “If you line up the hues, keeping in mind the intensity — because there are a large number of beer styles available in any given colour range — you’ll have a pairing that works.”

What’s on tap? When it comes to varieties, Amato explained there are three types of beer a restaurant should have on tap. The first is a pilsner or other golden effervescent, lower alcohol by volume (abv) beer. “That’s a given,” Amato said. Restaurateurs should also ensure they have an IPA on tap to appeal to beer enthusiasts. “When I think of our beer landscape just 10 years ago, it’s amazing to me how quickly American-style IPAs have blown up,” Amato said. “Beer drinkers are fascinated by the rich fruity or pine flavour and invigorating bitter finish of these beers.” Tapping a keg of pilsner and an IPA will satisfy the needs of the majority of beer drinkers. To cover all bases, Amato suggests including a Bavarian or Belgian wheat beer. “Both these styles have delicate fruit flavours and a bitterness that is almost undetectable,” she said. “This beer accommodates those who enjoy flavourful beer but aren’t keen on IPAs, as well as those who like to vary what they’re drinking over the course of the evening.” A brown ale or porter may also be an ideal third option, depending on an establishment’s menu. “These ales are dark and they present rich bread crust, toffee, coffee and dark chocolate notes,” Amato explained. “They are great with meat, so a burger joint, for example, should definitely serve a brown ale, whereas an establishment that specializes in seafood and lighter fare should bring in a wheat beer as their third.”

Pre-pair Customers that seek out a proper beer pairing are looking for sound advice from front-ofhouse staff, according to Luxmore. “If the servers know the beer well, and if you have someone that knows the dishes well, they can have a meaningful discussion about what flavours you will find in the beer, and what flavours you will find in the dish,” Luxmore said.

Beau’s Lugtread Lagered Ale pairs well with wild salmon.

Beer and ribs are still a delicious couple. Instead of training staff to narrate a set list of pairings, Luxmore recommends a team approach to matching beer and food. “It’s great if restaurant managers or owners take the staff through tastings, with two or three beers. I think the best way to pair something is to taste it yourself,” Luxmore said. “I think you can learn a lot that way rather than trying to recite what someone has told you.” Amato added a beer list should be revisited about four times per year. “The beer industry and, consequently, consumer palates and appreciation for beer flavours are both in rapid evolution,” she said. “It’s important to take a step back, see how things are selling, make sure the beers still complement the menu, and make adjustments

Master cicerone Mirella Amato where necessary.” A bar or restaurant with a static menu should be more consistent with its beer offering. “Establishments with a more adventurous crowd may benefit from a more frequent rotation,” she said.

More than just craft While the idea of a focused beer pairing is gaining popularity, mixing a macrobrew with food is an uncategorized tradition. “Big breweries have matched beer with food for a long time. Sometimes it’s not that sophisticated,” Luxmore said. Beer is traditionally consumed alongside chicken wings, pizza or barbecue. However, big name brands are now looking to get in on the more organized beer and food partnerships.

“The bigger breweries want in. Now more and more I see bigger breweries matching them with salad or Thai spring rolls or various types of cheese,” Luxmore said, adding beverage corporations are launching craft-like brands. The brands of beer carried should reflect the clientele of a business, Amato explained. She added a restaurateur should ensure their beer list is as carefully planned as their food menu. “Too often, I’m confronted with uninspired beer lists. This is especially disappointing in establishments that have clearly taken great care to curate other aspects of the menu,” Amato said. “Thankfully, more and more establishments are discovering the added dimension — and sales — that a mindfully assembled beer list can bring.”

June 2016 | 9


Smashburger, Smoke’s Burritorie and Shanghai 360 head to YYZ By Colleen Isherwood, Senior Editor TORONTO — HMSHost will open three new restaurants at Toronto Pearson International Airport in Terminal 3’s revamped domestic/ international departures area early this summer, including Smashburger, Smoke’s Burritorie and Shanghai 360. Amy Dunne, HMSHost vice-president of business development, told ORN the restaurants were chosen because they offer the best-in-category options available to consumers today. “They represent a great mix of local, national, regional and international brands that will appeal to the passengers of the airport’s new Terminal 3 area. Shanghai 360 has a great local presence and recognizability in Toronto,” said Dunn. “Smashburger is an international brand that the majority of travellers will recognize, and the hamburger is an increasingly popular meal in places all over the world. And of course, Smoke’s Burritorie is an undeniably popular brand in the region that will give travellers an authentic experience.” Michael Ross, director of commercial development for Greater Toronto Airports Authority, echoes the emphasis on the Toronto food scene. “At Toronto Pearson, we seek out opportunities to give passengers a range of choices and access to some of the great food coming out of the local food scene,” he said in a release. “The new Terminal 3 restaurants give trav-

ellers through our airport the variety they want and a great taste of our city and the world.” The Pearson location marks Smashburger’s Ontario debut, its first Canadian location outside of Alberta. The fast casual burger restaurant’s signature item is a Black Angus beef patty which is smashed on the grill and seared to seal in the juices. The sandwiches are topped with fresh ingredients and healthy salads are available. Smashfries, seasoned with garlic, rosemary and olive oil, are another signature item. Smashburger has also added a touch of lo-

cal with the Toronto Smashburger and Toronto Smashchicken. Both are topped with seasoned, grilled onions, pepper jack cheese, Applewood smoked bacon, lettuce, tomato and Dijon mustard on a kaiser roll. Shanghai 360, created by Innovated Restaurant Group, now has 12 locations across Ontario and more than 170 across the United States and Canada. Inspired by Shanghai Tang, a Chinese luxury fashion brand, it has a bold, sleek and sophisticated design. The food is Chinese with a quick service format, featuring open wok stations and dishes stir-fried to order. The restaurant also boasts

custom-designed steam tables and a noodle bar, serving traditional noodle soups. Smoke’s Burritorie, part of the Smoke’s family of restaurants, was founded by Ryan Smolkin, whose restaurant empire began in Toronto with Smoke’s Poutinerie and has grown to include more than 100 Smoke’s in Canada and the United States. The concept’s marketing is anchored by the legend of Smoke, a man who lives in a Lego cabin out in the woods, and has a passion for Cabbage Patch Kids, poutine and the culture of the 1980s. Smoke’s burritos are stuffed with pork, carne asada chorizo, conchinita chicken plus rice, beans, sour cream, cheese and other fresh ingredients. Toppings include salsas, jalapenos and gluten free is also an option. “Every successful dining program in an airport offers a variety of food types to appeal to the many palettes and appetites of passengers,” said Dunne. “By bringing these brands together, travellers will have a wide variety of dining options, from Asian, to traditional American and Mexican. “By taking this approach to offering restaurant options, we’re able appeal to a broad base of tastes and supply an experience that diners from all over will be able to enjoy.” HMSHost currently operates 28 locations in Toronto Pearson International Airport, including Twist by Roger Mooking, The Hearth by Lynn Crawford, Caplansky’s Delicatessen, LEE Kitchen, Paramount Fine Foods and Starbucks.

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1 0 | Ontario Restaurant News


The Hearn control room.

Luminato offers new flavour for the Hearn Generating Station By Bill Tremblay TORONTO — The creative power of two notable restaurateurs will transform the control room of the Hearn Generating Station into a classic French restaurant. Frédéric Morin, from Joe Beef in Montreal, and John Bil, from Honest Weight in Toronto, have partnered to tackle the task of creating the restaurant in the abandoned power plant for this year’s Luminato Festival. “I’m the seafood guy and Fred’s the Joe Beef guy. At the same time we feel like we have more to offer than what people know us as,” Bil said. “We really wanted this to happen for our own sense of adventure and fun. We don’t want this to be a serious thing.” Dubbed La Pavillion, the restaurant will open for the duration of the art festival from June 10 to 26. A film shoot occupied the Hearn until mid-May, leaving little time to renovate the dilapidated control room, previously equipped with rusted equipment, peeling paint and concrete floors. “That space itself is so eerie, it’s really trapped in time. It just looks like it is right out of a science fiction movie,” Bil said. “The idea, for me, is to keep as much of that creepiness as possible while still making it comfortable.” The idea for the collaboration was created one evening over a few post-dinner drinks, while Bil and Morin watched The French Connection. They agreed they should one day open a French restaurant similar to The Copain, featured in the film. “It kind of rolled around in our heads for years, we want to have this very old-school French restaurant,” Bil said. “It didn’t seem like it was ever going to happen, then this space and opportunity happened.” La Pavillion pays tribute to the 1939 Yew York World’s Fair, where France created Pavillion as a way to highlight its country’s cuisine. When the fair concluded, chefs Henri Soulé and Jacques Pepin sought post-war asylum in The United States and opened the restaurant Le Pavillion. “It just seemed appropriate that we set up this restaurant in an exhibition,” Bil said. Creating a kitchen in the Hearn will be a difficult task for Morin and Bil, as all of the required equipment must be installed temporarily. “Because of the nature of the space, we don’t have proper ventilation, for example, and stuff like that,” Bil said.

John Bil Exactly what will be served on Bil’s and Morin’s 10- to 12-item tasting menu will remain a secret until La Pavillion’s guests arrive. “It’s going to be a lot of French classics. It will skew a little more to colder items,” Bil said. “We had envisioned a little more of an elaborate menu at the beginning, but we’ve stripped it down a little bit.” La Pavillion will seat 30 people at communal tables in the 1,300-square-foot restaurant. While tickets for the $100 tasting menu sold out quickly, the bar will also seat about 14 people for à la carte dining. “We don’t want it to be too much of a foodie event and too conceptual,” Bil said. “We want it to be fun and convivial. When you have the mix of the people having the tasting menu and the people at the bar, it will really give it a good vibe.” For more information on La Pavillion, visit: luminatofestival.com/2016-Program/Events/Le-Pavillon.

June 2016 | 1 1


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MISSISSAUGA, Ont. — As Coffee Culture celebrates 10 years, the Ontario-based brand is getting a refreshed look. There are 52 Canadian locations — four in Manitoba and the rest in Coffee Culture’s home province. Including a couple units in the United States, there are 70 locations either open or in development across North America. Founded by Mississauga, Ont.-based Obsidian Group chief operating officer Gus Karamountzos, the familyowned company opened the first location in Woodstock, Ont. in July of 2006. Business there is thriving, according to Coffee Culture vice-president of operations Perry Ouzounis, as are other locations in smaller markets. “When Gus launched the concept, his vision was to create this community café … bring that European feel and ambiance to smaller communities,” Ouzounis said. “And we’ve done extremely well in these small communities and as we’ve done well, we’ve looked at urban centres.” Future plans include opening locations in north Toronto, Barrie, Mississauga, Oakville and Burlington. “I think we have a great opportunity to expand our visibility in the GTA,” Ouzounis said. Given the brand’s success in Manitoba, he also sees opportunity in Saskatchewan. “We’d love be at 125 stores in the next five years — we talk about 10 to 15 stores per year, there’s no reason we can’t do that,” he said. The average footprint for a Coffee Culture unit ranges between 1,850 and 2,500 square feet with seats for 40 to 80 guests. Under the refreshed look, Coffee Culture marketing manager Azim Akhtar explained the ambiance will remain the same: dim lighting, soft seating, fireplaces and exposed

brick. The brand’s new interior will see the use of lighter tones and wood floors, a cooler colour palette and modern light fixtures. “We’re still sticking with our traditional roots, but really just elevating our game,” said Akhtar. A number of physical changes have been made to the menu board, but Obsidian Group culinary development manager Kurt Hein has also been working to create the chain’s Power-Up line, which started with a smoothie, then added a breakfast bagel and finally a quinoa salad. Hein said it is important to offer go-to favourites, such as Coffee Culture’s asiago breakfast bagel and a variety of made-to-order sandwiches, but it is also vital to include more creative options. “We’ve done some co-branding in the past with Nutella, currently we’re working with Hershey’s and Reese,” he said. The cafes also stock cakes from the Cheesecake Factory. Pastries are made in-store, and Hein puts a lot of thought into sourcing from bagels made by hand in New York to a Toronto company who makes small batches of Coffee Culture’s sauces. The fast casual brand focuses on full service options and efficient speed of service. “Although we can make your food really fast and give you coffee really fast, we’d like you to take a second and enjoy it,” Akhtar said. Other brands under the Obsidian Group umbrella include: Crabby Joe’s, Union Burger, as well as two newer concepts, Chuck’s Roadhouse Bar and Grill and The Open Kitchen. Among Obsidian’s brands there are about 115 open and another 15 in development.

Third Basil Box location slated to open this fall Continued from cover “We wanted to stand out in the market and offer a really good gluten free menu,” Chiu said, adding it was important for Basil Box to be environmentally friendly wherever possible. For example, the food containers are compostable, made from sugarcane fibre. On the beverage side of the menu, Basil Box doesn’t offer big brand soft drinks. Instead, there are handcrafted options: Thai iced tea, mango ginger ale, passionfruit lychee soda and pineapple rose soda. A partnership with Markham, Ont.-based Hatch allows Basil Box to have a custom cold brew using organic coffee beans from Southeast Asia. With an average check of about $12, Basil Box is dealing with higher food costs by buying what is in season and by managing labour costs. “We believe in building a brand, we have a passion for this brand,” said Chiu, adding he thinks Basil Box’s pur-

chase power will benefit from future economies of scale. After opening the first location in Square One Shopping Centre’s revamped Food Central in 2015, Chiu and his team created a store in the Ryerson Student Learning Centre, north of Yonge and Dundas streets earlier this year. The flagship seats about 80 and occupies 2,700 square feet, but Chiu estimates future sites will range from 1,700 to 2,500 square feet and seat between 25 and 40 guests. Basil Box’s future food court footprint is in the area of 500 square feet. A third location is slated to open in Toronto at Queen and Spadina this fall. Chiu said he plans to have five or six outposts in operation before franchising. “We have some leases signed for other areas in the Toronto area,” said Chiu. “There was some interest from developers out on the West Coast, but we want to make sure our growth in Toronto is solid enough before expanding too fast.”

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A decade of Coffee Culture

June 2016 | 1 3


Top

75 Chains Report R E S E A R C H BY P E T E R E L L I OT T

RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY

Please send changes to pelliot t@canadianres taurantnews.com

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

1

1

Tim Hortons (Restaurant Brands International)

3,340.4

3,163.4

1,813

1,804

2

2

McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd.

1,336.3

1336.3

453

453

3

3

Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd.

479.0

549.1

1,296

1,237

4

4

Swiss Chalet (Cara)

410.0

411.4

164

162

5

6

Pizza Pizza Limited

395.2

363.2

552

549

6

5

Starbucks Canada

389.0

389.0

389

389

7

8

Boston Pizza International Inc.

327.7

317.1

115

115

8

7

Wendy's Restaurants of Canada Inc.

321.0

321.0

193

193

9

9

A&W Food Services of Canada Inc.

259.1

223.7

225

219

10

10

KFC Canada (Yum! Brands)

220.7

217.2

281

272

11

11

Keg Restaurants Ltd.

205.0

200.0

42

42

12

12

Country Style (MTY Food Group)

191.0

191.0

382

382

13

13

Harvey's (Cara)

185.0

183.1

185

179

14

15

Jack Astor's Bar and Grill (SIR Corp)

140.0

133.7

32

29

15

14

Kelsey's (Cara)

148.5

150.5

68

69

16

16

Montana's (Cara)

131.0

131.0

51

51

17

17

East Side Mario's (Cara)

124.0

123.9

58

59

18

21

Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation

120.0

115.0

26

23

19

18

Pizza Hut Canada (Yum! Brands)

118.2

120.0

160

161

20

19

Burger King Restaurants of Canada Inc.

118.0

118.0

121

118

21

20

Mr. Sub (MTY Food Group)

117.5

117.5

235

235

22

22

Pizza Nova

112.0

112.0

142

142

23

23

Dairy Queen Canada

111.0

109.0

222

218

24

24

Milestones (Cara)

95.0

95.7

30

30

25

25

Second Cup Ltd.

91.6

89.7

164

178

26

26

Domino's Pizza

86.0

86.0

172

172

27

27

Moxie's Restaurants L.P. (NOR)

77.0

78.0

25

26

28

28

Oliver & Bonacini Restaurants

67.0

65.0

12

11

29

29

St. Louis Franchise Limited

66.5

61.6

50

44

30

30

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brands)

59.0

59.0

118

118

31

35

Taco Bell Canada (Yum! Brands)

55.3

49.3

108

108

32

32

Little Caesars of Canada Inc.

53.5

53.5

107

107

33

34

Pita Pit

53.0

50.9

136

126

34

39

Sunset Grill Restaurants Ltd.

52.0

48.0

52

48

35

41

Turtle Jack's (Tortoise Group)

51.0

48.0

17

16

36

37

Prime Pubs (Cara)

50.0

48.3

26

23

37

38

Shoeless Joe's Sports Grill

49.5

48.0

34

33

38

31

Crabby Joe's Tap & Grill (Obsidian Group)

49.0

58.0

32

37

39

48

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen

46.5

40.0

100

80

1 4 | Ontario Restaurant News

* In some cases sales and unit numbers have been estimated.


RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

40

42

Booster Juice

46.5

46.5

112

112

41

43

Lone Star Restaurants

46.0

45.0

21

21

42

33

Menchie's Frozen Yogurt

45.0

53.0

45

53

43

46

Firkin Group of Pubs

45.0

44.0

27

26

44

43

Cora Franchise Group Inc.

42.0

46.0

42

43

45

55

Freshii

42.0

30.0

42

30

46

47

Gino's Pizza Inc.

41.0

43.0

82

86

47

40

Timothy's World Coffee (Threecaf Brands Canada)

39.0

48.0

39

48

48

51

Baton Rouge (Imvescor)

37.0

36.1

12

11

49

49

Wild Wing Restaurants

36.5

38.5

73

77

50

52

Pizzaville Inc.

35.5

33.0

71

66

51

36

Quiznos Canada Restaurant Corp

35.0

49.0

70

98

52

60

The WORKS Gourmet Burger Bistro

35.0

30.0

26

20

53

63

Panzerotto Pizza

33.0

29.0

33

29

54

88

Topper's Pizza

32.2

28.5

37

37

55

54

Mucho Burrito (MTY Food Group)

31.0

30.4

38

38

56

58

Thai Express (MTY Group)

30.0

30.0

60

60

57

N/A

FAB Restaurant Concepts

30.0

42.0

10

14

58

56

Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment

30.0

30.0

5

5

59

N/A

Ottawa Venues

30.0

N/A

15

N/A

60

44

Casey's Grill & Bar (Cara)

30.0

45.0

13

19

61

61

Baskin-Robbins Canada (Dunkin' Brands)

29.1

29.1

97

97

62

64

Mary Brown's Inc.

29.0

28.5

37

38

63

53

Teriyaki Experience (Innovative Food Brands)

29.0

32.4

76

81

64

69

Gabriel Pizza

29.0

26.0

31

27

65

65

Symposium Cafe Inc.

28.0

28.0

19

19

66

67

Canyon Creek (SIR Corp)

27.1

27.3

8

8

67

57

Mr. Greek Restaurants Inc.

27.0

30.0

18

20

68

66

Yogen Fruz Canada Inc. (MTY Food Group)

26.4

27.6

88

92

69

62

Hero Certified Burgers

26.0

29.0

52

58

70

59

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc. (DRUXY'S Inc.)

26.0

30.0

26

30

71

71

Wimpy's Diner Restaurant

26.0

26.0

47

47

72

81

Jimmy The Greek

25.8

21.6

43

36

73

87

Papa John's

25.0

19.0

25

19

74

74

New York Fries (Cara)

25.0

24.8

61

62

75

50

241 Pizza (Chairman's Brands)

25.0

38.0

50

76

Top

10 Breakfast Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

1

1

Sunset Grill Restaurants Ltd.

52.0

48.0

52

48

2

2

Cora Franchise Group Inc.

42.0

46.0

42

43

3

3

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc. (DRUXY'S Inc.)

26.0

30.0

26

30

4

4

Wimpy's Diner Restaurant

26.0

26.0

47

47

5

5

Eggsmart Corp. (Chairman Brands)

17.0

14.0

34

28

6

6

Denny's of Canada Inc. (Dencan) (NOR)

14.0

13.0

12

10

7

9

Sunnyside Grill

7.0

6.0

7

6

8

7

Smitty's Canada Ltd.

6.5

6.5

4

4

9

8

International House of Pancakes

6.0

6.0

6

6

10

10

Michel's Bakery Cafe (Threecaf Brands)

3.0

4.5

6

9

* In some cases sales and unit numbers have been estimated.

June 2016 | 1 5


Top

10 Chicken Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY 1

1

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

Swiss Chalet (Cara)

410.0

411.4

164

162

2

2

KFC Canada (Yum! Brands)

220.7

217.2

281

272

3

3

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen

46.5

40.0

93

80

4

4

Wild Wing Restaurants

36.5

38.5

73

77

5

5

Mary Brown's Inc.

29.0

28.5

37

38

6

6

Buffalo Wild Wings

20.0

20.0

10

10

7

7

Double Double Pizza and Chicken

16.5

16.5

33

33

8

8

Wacky Wings

16.0

16.0

7

7

9

9

Rotisseries St-Hubert Ltee

15.0

15.0

6

6

10

10

Nando's Flame Grilled Chicken

9.0

8.0

10

9

Top

10 Burger Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY 1

1

McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd.

2

2

Wendy's Restaurants of Canada Inc.

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015 1,336.3

1,336.3

453

453

321.0

321.0

193

193

3

3

A&W Food Services of Canada Inc.

259.1

223.7

225

219

4

4

Harvey's (Cara)

185.0

183.1

185

179

5

5

Burger King Restaurants of Canada Inc.

118.0

118.0

121

118

6

6

The WORKS Gourmet Burger Bistro

35.0

30.0

26

20

7

7

Hero Certified Burgers

26.0

29.0

52

58

8

8

South St. Burger Co.

21.0

17.0

27

24

9

9

Five Guys Burgers and Fries

14.5

14.5

29

29

10

10

The Burger Priest

11.0

7.0

11

7

Top

10 Pizza Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

1

1

Pizza Pizza Limited

395.2

363.2

552

549

2

2

Boston Pizza International Inc.

327.7

317.1

115

115

3

3

Pizza Hut Canada (Yum! Brands)

118.2

120.0

160

161

4

4

Pizza Nova

112.0

112.0

142

142

5

5

Domino's Pizza

86.0

86.0

172

172

6

6

Little Caesars of Canada Inc.

53.5

53.5

107

107

7

7

Gino's Pizza Inc.

41.0

43.0

82

86

8

9

Pizzaville Inc.

35.5

33.0

71

66

9

10

Panzerotto Pizza

33.0

29.0

33

29

10

11

Topper's Pizza

32.2

28.5

37

37

1 6 | Ontario Restaurant News

* In some cases sales and unit numbers have been estimated.


Top

10 Sandwich Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY 1

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

1

Subway Franchise Systems of Canada Ltd.

479.0

549.1

1,296

1,237

2

2

Country Style (MTY Food Group)

191.0

191.0

382

382

3

3

Mr. Sub (MTY Food Group)

117.5

117.5

235

235

4

4

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brands)

59.0

59.0

118

118

5

5

Pita Pit

53.0

50.9

136

126

6

6

Quiznos Canada Restaurant Corp

35.0

49.0

70

98

7

7

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc. (DRUXY'S Inc.)

26.0

30.0

26

30

8

10

Panera Bread

24.0

24.0

16

16

9

9

Coffee Culture Cafe & Eatery (Obsidian Group)

23.5

24.0

47

48

10

8

Arby's of Canada

23.0

24.8

29

31

Top

10 Coffee/Pastry Chains RANK 2016 RANK 2015 COMPANY

SALES 2016 ($MILLIONS) SALES 2015 ($MILLIONS) UNITS 2016 UNITS 2015

1

1

Tim Hortons (Restaurant Brands International)

3,340.4

3,163.4

1,813

1,804

2

2

McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd.

1,336.3

1,336.3

453

453

3

3

Starbucks Coffee Co.

389.0

389.0

389

389

4

4

Country Style (MTY Food Group)

191.0

191.0

382

382

5

5

Second Cup Ltd.

91.6

89.7

164

178

6

6

Coffee Time Donuts Inc. (Chairman's Brands)

59.0

59.0

118

118

7

7

Timothy's World Coffee (Threecaf Brands Canada)

39.0

48.0

39

48

8

8

Williams Fresh Cafe Inc. (DRUXY'S Inc.)

26.0

30.0

26

30

9

9

Coffee Culture Cafe & Eatery (Obsidian Group)

23.5

24.0

47

48

10

N/A

Aroma Espresso Bar Canada Inc.

18.5

13.5

37

27

Reach new customers with national and regional advertising options. Our sales team will work with you to develop a cost effective and competitive print and digital strategy to reach your target audience. Contact our sales team for our 2016 rates and editorial calendar. Debbie Mcgilvray | 905-206-0150 ext. 233 dmcgilvray@canadianrestaurantnews.com Kim Kerr | 905-206-0150 ext. 229 kkerr@canadianrestaurantnews.com * In some cases sales and unit numbers have been estimated.

June 2016 | 1 7


S U P P LY

For its 50th birthday, Belmont Meats got a new market NORTH YORK, Ont. — Belmont Meats celebrated its 50th anniversary by expanding its product line into the United States. This spring, the North York-based meat processor officially launched in the United States, offering both retail and foodservice products. “We’re celebrating our past, but also recognizing the future is very different,” said Paul Roach, president and chief executive officer of Belmont Meats. David Spragge, vice-president of sales and marketing for Belmont, said taking their product south demonstrates a Canadian producer is able to compete in the American market. “Our burgers can match up against any U.S. burger supplier in quality,” said Spragge. “We’re winning the taste test and we’re listening to the consumer.” The Walderman Family opened Belmont Meats in 1966. In its early years, the business primarily served as a foodservice provider. Summer Street Capital Partners purchased the company eight years ago. “Over the years, as the next generations came in, it became more of a burger manufacturer and steak portion processor,” Roach said. “That just evolved over time.” Today, Belmont Meats sells more than 40 million pounds of hamburgers to numerous chain restaurants, including Burger King, Dairy Queen and Hero Certified Burgers. Before heading into the United States market, Belmont studied emerging trends in the burger business. Spragge explained Americans are buying higher-end cuts of meat — such as prime rib, brisket and short rib — for their burgers. “The consumer seems to be willing to pay, on both the retail and foodservice side, a pre-

David Spragge and Paul Roach. mium for a better burger. They study the ingredient deck,” Spragge said. “We’re turning into a gourmet supplier of higher-end quality burgers, that’s what consumers are demanding.” He added trends in the United States, which also include beef that is grass-fed, organic, antibiotic-free and with no hormones added, are headed north. “People want better quality meat blocks. They want to know what meat is in the product,” he said. To stay on top of trends, Belmont hired Curtis Dool, a Red Seal-certified chef, to lead the

company’s test kitchen. “It’s where we get a lot of creativity and exchange of ideas of what’s happening in the market,” Roach said. “We invest heavily in our R&D facilities,” Spragge added. One of the company’s recent advancements is a home-style burger, a frozen patty that avoids the traditional hockey puck shape. “It makes it look like a homemade burger. It’s not like a formed round burger,” Spragge said. Now, the company is working towards creat-

ing a patty that requires less cooking time. “Foodservice is really about reducing the cooking time,” Roach said. “If we can get more air into the patty, so the heat gets to the burger quicker, you can reduce that cooking time.” Innovation in the burger business is a focus of Belmont’s strategy as they move forward. “We’re searching the world for the next new burger technology,” Spragge said. So what makes a great burger? “It’s a very personal answer,” Roach said. “We believe it’s the nature of the ingredients itself.”

Ontario Pork promises a better bacon By Bill Tremblay GUELPH, Ont. — Ontario Pork has released its first Social Responsibility Report, a first for livestock commodity groups in the province. The report outlines various commitments to setting standards for farm management, economic performance, environmental stewardship, animal care, food safety and workers’ well-being. “We thought this report would allow us to have a conversation and to be open and transparent with the public about our industry,” said Amy Cronin, chair of the organization. “Ontario Pork is always looking at the landscape and how we interact with our consumers.” The report was born from pork producers’ request to increase communication with consumers and the public. While the roadmap publicly outlines issues within the industry, Cronin explained the document is an opportunity to talk openly about the industry and where they plan to make improvements. “The public doesn’t expect anyone to be perfect, but I think they do expect

1 8 | Ontario Restaurant News

that we’re conscientious and that we’re always striving to be better at what we do,” Cronin said. “It’s not a defensive conversation. It’s understanding what’s important to them.” For example, Cronin explained the number of farms with an established occupational health and safety program is low. However, 98 per cent of Ontario’s pork farms are family owned. “For those that do have employees, we have to make sure we’re doing the best we can for a workers’ wellbeing,” Cronin said. She added efforts to increase environmental stewardship would not only help battle climate change, but also assist the farmer’s operation. Water usage, for instance, may not be monitored at all farms. “We do live within the Great Lakes and have a lot of fresh water, but as citizens of Ontario, it’s our responsibility to look at ways to improve that area as well,” Cronin said. Monitoring water usage could increase conservation as well as help determine the health of the animals. Re-

duced water consumption may be an indicator of illness in swine. “The benefits would be twofold,” Cronin said. The report also outlines the need to promote the responsible use of antibiotics, as well as track and monitor the drugs’ use. “I think that’s something important to the general public,” Cronin said. “Ideally, we would like to see the amount of antimicrobials going down. Our goal isn’t to be antimicrobial free. We want to make sure we’re doing what’s best for our animals.” Creating the report required 18 months of research. Ontario Pork is now working on an action plan to ensure it meets commitments outlined in the report within three years. “It’s not just putting out a report and saying, ‘here’s where we’re at’,” Cronin said. “We have to approach it as something that we will always be improving on. We can’t let ourselves be okay with where we are, in any dimension of our business.”


Forget Froyo, Freshii founder suggests TORONTO — In a bold open letter to “unprofitable” frozen yogurt shop and juice bar owners, Freshii Founder and CEO Matthew Corrin pitched the From Froyo to Freshii initiative. In the letter, Corrin offers to waive his company’s franchise fee for qualifying partners. Corrin said it is the first deal offered for a Freshii franchise since its creation in 2005. “I challenge you to make your restaurant relevant again. My offer is real, and it’s win-win. The time to act is now – before your froyo or juice business goes out of business,” Corrin said in the letter. Freshii once benefitted from the frozen yogurt craze, according to Corrin. He explained frozen yogurt once accounted for 30 per cent of sales and fresh pressed juice is popular in certain seasons.

“We appreciate the seasonal surges of these on-trend menu categories. But there’s risk in selling just one product line,” he said. However, Corrin compared froyo and juice bars to the faded fad of cupcake-centric businesses. “Cupcakes are dead. Froyo is finished. Juice is next,” Corrin writes. The offer also includes a free consultation with the company’s franchise attorney to determine the best way to convert to the Freshii brand. The deal ends on July 4. “I hate seeing passionate, hardworking entrepreneurs fail,” Corrin said. “Before it’s too late, before your bank account goes to zero, I urge you to embrace the same strategy that has already rescued many troubled owners in the frozen yogurt and juice bar categories.”

Adrien Blair

Just Eat offers a look into local markets TORONTO — Just Eat is now offering its roster of restaurants a glimpse into what its customers are craving. The web-based delivery company is working to expand its service to include an analytical approach to online ordering. “The great thing we’re starting to do for our restaurant partners is to give them more insight into what their customers are ordering off their menus,” Adrien Blair, Just Eat’s chief operating officer, said during a recent trip to Toronto. Through the ordering platform, restaurateurs will be able to gauge which menu items are profitable and popular and which items are not. “We can go to a restaurant owner and say, for example, ‘out of the 100 dishes you have, these five are not selling at all and these five are your most popular’,” Blair said. “We’re starting to offer that kind of value-added advice.” As well, the company is able to offer insight into what consumers are ordering elsewhere and price comparisons for similar restaurants. “One of the nice things about being the market leader is we have so much data and insight,” Blair said. Currently, the information is provided by Just Eat’s territory managers, rather than accessed directly thought the company’s platform. “It’s not something we’ve productized yet. It’s not completely self-serve at this point,” Blair said. Offering its data isn’t Just Eat’s attempt at menu consulting, Blair explained. Sharing information boosts sales, which in turn boosts commission collected by Just Eat. “We only make money when the restaurants are making money. We’re trying to understand what we can do to make our restaurant partners more successful,” Blair said. “If it helps them to grow and be successful that will help our business as well.” Just Eat’s data has also revealed a customer who orders online is likely to spend more than those who place an order via telephone. Blair said many restaurants now try to move customers that would typically order over the phone to the Just Eat platform. “The check increase outweighs the commission we charge on the order,” Blair said. Just Eat was founded in 2001 in London, England. The company operates in 15 countries and launched its online food ordering and delivery service in Canada in 2009. “Canada is one of the key markets for us,” Blair said. “We have a coast-to-coast presence, we’re the only truly nationwide player in our industry in Canada.” This year, the company expects to generate $358 million GBP, which includes revenue growth of 57 per cent year-over-year. “For a company of our size, we’re growing incredibly fast,” Blair said.

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June 2016 | 1 9


BEVERAGE NEWS

Tom Paterson

The Destructor

Junction brewery finds new home in The Destructor TORONTO — Junction Craft Brewing will help turn a page in its namesake neighbourhood’s history book. The craft brewery has signed a deal to move into “The Destructor” a heritage building at 150 Symes Rd. in The Junction about 1 kilometre from the brewery’s current location. The Art Deco building was constructed in the early 1930s, and is considered a rare survivor of west Toronto’s industrial history. The building served as an incinerator and eventually a transfer station. “It fits with our whole historical part of the company,” said Tom Paterson, president of the brewery. “It’s pretty fitting on its own, besides just the actual physical nature of the building.”

The brewery plans to open its doors to its new location in early 2017, following renovations of the building. Junction will use about two thirds of the 16,000-square-foot building, situated on a 5.5-acre property. “There are a couple other areas designated as event spaces,” Paterson said. “We’re kind of the only real business in the building. We’re the anchor tenant I guess.” To complement its planned brewery tours, Paterson explained numerous dining options are in the works. One area of the brewery will have a regular menu, while a designated space for food trucks will allow for a rotating operators. As well, Junction plans to partner with Toronto chefs for an

alternating menu and several catering companies for special events. “We know quite a few chefs in the city and restaurants in the city that have helped us get to where we are,” Paterson said. “This way the food is always changing. Every time you come, like our beer, there’s going to be something new on tap and something new to try.” The move will significantly increase the brewery’s floor space, which currently sits at 2,000 square feet. The expansion allows Junction to upgrade its equipment, improve quality control and establish a lab. As well, more floor space will allow for all production to take place in house with the installation of a 25-hectolitre brewing system, a 22 hectolitre increase. Cur-

rently, Junction brews a portion of its beer at the Wellington Brewery in Guelph, Ont. “We don’t have any vision of becoming a massive beer company. We still want to stay small,” Paterson said. “It’s just making sure what we do just gets that much better.” Junction will maintain its current location to avoid a disruption in supply. Once they move into their new home, Paterson said the brewery might operate out of both locations. “It’s still a bit up in the air. … We might just keep it and change the dynamic of it,” Paterson said, noting they might entertain offers from other craft breweries. “We’re still considering options.”

Collingwood’s Side Launch named Brewery of the Year VANCOUVER — Collingwood, Ont-based Side Launch Brewing Company earned the title of Brewery of the Year at the 2016 Canadian Brewing Awards. Nectarous Dry-hopped Sour Ale by Four Winds Brewing Co. in Delta, B.C., was named Beer of the Year. A panel of 40 judges determined the beer and cider winners, based on aroma, appearance, flavour, mouth-feel, and overall impression. The winning beverages were announced in Vancouver in late May. The winners are: Pilsner, Flying Monkeys Craft Brewery, Mythology Canadian Pilsner; European Style Amber to Dark Lager, Gladstone Brewing Co., Gladstone Czech Dark Lager; Traditional German Style, Side Launch Brewing Company, Side Launch

2 0 | Ontario Restaurant News

Germanic Bock; Kellerbier/Zwickelbier, Brassneck Brewery, No Brainer; German Style Kölsch, Half Pints Brewing Co., St. James Pale Ale; Wheat Beer – Belgian Style, Belgh Brasse, Mons Witte D’Abbaye; Wheat Beer – German Style, Side Launch Brewing Company, Side Launch Wheat; Baltic Porter, StoneHammer Brewing, Continuity Baltic Porter; Belgian-Style Dubbel, Frampton Brasse, Nuit d’Automne; Belgian-Style Tripel, Side Launch Brewing Company, Huronic Tripel; Belgian Style Abbey Ale, Dageraad Brewing, Burnabarian; Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale, Block Three Brewing Co., Danger Zone Farmhouse Imperial IPA; French and Belgian Style Saison, Tooth and Nail Brewing Company, Valor; Belgian-Style Brett

Beer, Four Winds Brewing Company, Operis Brett Saison; German-Style Sour Ale, Nickel Brook Brewing Co., Raspberry Uber BelgianStyle Sour Ale; Porter, Clifford Brewing Co., Clifford Porter; Brown Ale, Shuswap Lake Brewing, Bushwacker Brown Ale; Scotch Ale, MacLeans Ales Inc., Armchair; English Style Pale Ale, Off The Rail Brewing Co., Classic Pale Ale; English Bitters, Howe Sound Brewing, Baldwin & Cooper Best Bitter; Sweet Stout or Cream Stout; Railway City Brewing Co., Black Coal Stout; Oatmeal Stout, Townsite Brewing, Perfect Storm; Dry Stout, Postmark Brewing, Postmark Stout; Imperial Stout, Tatamagouche Brewing Company, Russian Imperial Stout; English Style India Pale Ale, PEI Brewing Company, Rogues Roost IPA; North American Style Lager, Moosehead Breweries Limited, Alpine Lager; North American Style Premium Lager, Parallel 49 Brewing Co., Craft Lager; North American Style Amber Lager, Mill Street Brewery, 100th Meridian; North American Style Dark Lager, Rickard’s Red Session Lager; Light Lager, Bud Light; Cream Ale, Boshkung Brewing Co., 35 & 118 Cream Ale; North American Style Amber Ale, Black Oak Brewing, Love Fuzz; North American Style Blonde or Golden Ale, The Grizzly Paw Brewing Company, Powder Hound Blonde Ale; American-Style Black Ale, Stack Brewing, Black Rock; North American Style Pale Ale, Left Field Brewery, Wrigley; Wheat Beer – North American Style, PEI Brewing Company, Gahan Sir John A. Honey Wheat Ale; American Style India Pale Ale, Rainhard Brewing Co., Lazy Bones; Session

India Pale Ale, PEI Brewing Company, Gahan Vic Park APA; American Style Imperial India Pale Ale, Innocente Brewing Company, Two Night Stand; American Belgo-Style Ale, Cameron’s Brewing Company, Cameron’s DryHopped Tripel; American-style Brett Beer, Burdock, Brett Lime; American-style Sour Ale, Four Winds Brewing Company, Nectarous Dry-Hopped Sour; Special Honey/Maple Lager or Ale, Corsaire Microbrasserie, Oreille de Crisse; Fruit or Field Beer, Old Abbey Ales, Sour Raspberry; Gluten Free, Brasseurs Sans Gluten, Glutenberg India Pale Ale; Session Ale, PEI Brewing Company, Setting Day Saison; Experimental, Brasseurs Sans Gluten, Glutenberg Lapsang d’Automne; Herb and Spice, Off The Rail Brewing Co., Raj Mahal India Ale; Smoked, Coal Harbour Brewing Co., Smoke & Mirrors Imperial Smoked Ale; Barley Wine-Style Ale – English-Style; Tatamagouche Brewing Company, Giantess Barley Wine; Wood and Barrel-Aged Dark, Clifford Brewing Co., Barrel Aged Clifford Porter; Wood and Barrel-Aged Strong, Covered Bridge Brewing, TWO; Wood and BarrelAged Sour; Broadway Microbrasserie, Saison Chardonnay; Flavoured Stout/Porter, Flying Monkeys Craft Brewery, The Chocolate Manifesto Triple Chocolate Milk Stout.

Cider New World Cider, Twin Pines Orchards & Cider House, Hammer Bent Red; Cider with Other Fruit, Brickworks Ciderhouse, Stadium Island Peach; Cider with Herbs/Spices, West Avenue Cider, The Catalyst; Specialty Cider, The BX Press Cidery, The Dufferin.


Niagara College to launch distilling program NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE, Ont. — Niagara College hopes to lead the charge in distilling education on Canadian soil with the creation of a year-long graduate certificate program and teaching distillery. Already home to a teaching winery and brewery at the college’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute, the distilling program is slated to accept its first 20 students in the fall of 2017. Plans call for ground to be broken on the 2,000-square-foot teaching distillery this summer. It will become part of the existing Wine Visitor + Education Centre at the Niagara-onthe-Lake Campus. Dean of the College’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute Craig Youdale called this the next step in the

college’s fermentation education programs. While is seems logical, Youdale noted it wasn’t easy — the program and teaching distillery has been in discussions for about four years, shortly after the teaching brewery opened in 2010. “One of the greatest challenges of craft distilling has been the lack of educational resources for the modern distiller. This emerging industry has been desperately searching for somewhere to turn and I believe the new program from Niagara College will quickly become that place,” said Geoff Dillon, founder of Beamsvillebased Dillon’s Small Batch Distillery. “We are at the beginning of a great growth period in craft distilling that doesn’t show any signs of slowing.

The industry needs direction, and after seeing what the Niagara College team has accomplished with their wine and beer programs, I am confident the distilling program will be one that will make the distilling world proud.” Charles Benoit, president of the 15-member Ontario Craft Distillers Association, called the program “tremendous news” for the budding industry. “With few peers anywhere, I expect the school will contribute mightily to making Ontario a global leader in distilling excellence, as well as a foundation for our local community to collaborate and grow,” Benoit said. The program is designed for students who have already completed

an Ontario diploma or degree, particularly those with a background in sciences, as well as culinary, business, food innovation, wine and beer. Youdale noted distilling is a scientific process, but the program will also address the business side. “Certainly the old adage is: it’s one thing to make good product, but you also need to know how to sell it,” he said. Drawing on internal resources as well as experts in the field — including Dillon and Inge Russell, who sits on the board of Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh, Youdale called building the program “a bit of a jigsaw puzzle.” There will be two full-time instructions to lead the production and

academic portions of the program. “We will probably use, at least initially, a lot industry people to teach certain aspects,” Youdale added. Prior to the opening of the teaching distillery, the craft was either selftaught or learned overseas. Youdale said he feels the program will provide the industry with the support it needs to grow, adding this is also dependent on the legislation in each province. “We feel, like any time education gets involved, our job is to support the industry and allow it to grow faster. But we will also listen to industry and we will develop and grow according to what they need,” Youdale said. Niagara College is also planning to add cider-making classes for shortterm training.

Beau’s announces intent to sell … to staff Beau’s CEO Steve Beauchesne. Photo by Brendan Coutts. VANKLEEK HILL, Ont. — Beau’s All Natural Brewing Company’s 150 staff members were quiet as they waited to hear who the new owners of the craft beer company would be. They had gathered at Ottawa’s ByTowne Cinema the morning of May 16. One by one, the familiar faces of fellow employees appeared on the screen behind chief executive officer Steve Beauchesne as he shouted out the names of the craft beer company’s staff. As of July 1, the company’s 10th anniversary, Beau’s will begin the

process of selling the company under an Employee Share Ownership Plan (ESOP). Since its inception in 2006, Beau’s has experienced growth at a compounded rate of 45 per cent yearover-year, according to a news release. “My Dad and I started Beau’s 10 years ago with the promise of making excellent, flavourful beer, and using our brewery as a force for good,” Beauchesne said. “We look forward to our expansion and success across Canada, with the help of our new company stewards,” he added.

June 2016 | 2 1


PEOPLE Centennial adds to leadership team

Dorothy Vo (left) and Alison Iannarelli.

TORONTO — Centennial College’s School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts has added two new members to its leadership team. Executive chef Alison Iannarelli and general manager Dorothy Vo will head operations at the new restaurant and event centre opening this fall as part of the school’s $85 million expansion. Iannarelli was most recently executive chef at the Summit Golf and Country Club in Richmond Hill, Ont. She has held senior culinary positions at the Toronto Island Yacht Club, SIR Corp’s Canyon Creek and the York Downs Golf and Coun-

try Club. She is a graduate of George Brown College’s culinary management program and Humber College’s food and beverage management program. Vo comes to Centennial from Compass Group Canada where she was the assistant general manager of food and beverage operations at the Parkside Student Residence in Toronto. She previously worked for Compass Group in Calgary. Vo is a graduate of George Brown College’s culinary management nutrition program and has a bachelor of arts in food nutrition and economic from Brescia University College.

Ontario Restaurant, Hotel and Motel Association members awarded Members of the Ontario Restaurant, Hotel and Motel Association’s London, Ont., and Simcoe Country branches were recognized at regional events this spring. London hospitality awards were presented at the London Convention Centre on May 9. Winners included: Best Server: Cindy-Lou Dale, Kelsey’s London; Best Bartender: Mike Robertson, Robinson Hall/Thorny Devil; Favourite Bar: Molly Bloom’s Irish Pub; Favourite Restaurant: Olde London Fish and Chips; Favourite Hotel: Hampton Inn by Hilton London; Favourite Hotel Representative: Kathleen Harper, Delta London Armouries Hotel; Supplier of the Year: Sysco Southwestern Ontario; Favourite Event: SunFest London Victoria Park; Ho-

tel of the Year: DoubleTree by Hilton London; Restaurant of the Year: Tony’s Famous Italian Restaurants; Chef of the Year: Mike Pitre from Four Points by Sheraton London; Facility of the Year: Western Fair District; Heart of House: Ramona Lee, Hotel Metro. The Simcoe Country took place at Cranberry Village’s The Bear Estate on April 27 in Collingwood, Ont. Hospitality award winners included: Favourite Server: Rob McGibbon, Kenzington Burger Bar, Barrie; Favourite Bartender: Sarah Williams, Queens Nightclub, Barrie; Favourite Restaurant: Big Chris BBQ Smokehouse, Barrie; Favourite Accommodations Facility: Casino Rama Resort; Favourite Hospitality & Tourism Ambassador: Lori

Hough, Cranberry Village: Cranberry Golf Resort & Living Water Resort & Residences; Favourite Recreational/Tourism Facility: Casino Rama; Hospitality Manager of the Year: Melanie Montroy, Casino Rama Resort; Local Chef of the Year: John Cordeaux, Casino Rama; Industry Recognition Award: Larry Law, Cranberry Village; Foodservice and Hospitality Supplier of the Year: Ryan Traversy, Peller Estates Winery; Heart of the House- Legacy Award: Ken Chynoweth, Casino Rama; Nancy Monk, Nottawasaga Inn Resort; and Debbie Pevrill, Cranberry Golf Resort. Lastly, the 2016 Silver Plate Award winner was chef Marc Bery of Lakeside Seafood and Grill at Living Water Resort & Residences.

John Cordeaux, Casino Rama.

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EarthTronics introduces high lumen, high efficiency LEDs. Available in 36-, 54- and 120-watt sizes providing 4500, 6400 and 14,200 lumens, respectively. All feature full radial illumination to simulate the HID lamps they are replacing and to fully utilize existing fixture optics. These lamps easily replace 100 watt to greater than 400 watt HID lamps.

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earthtronics.com

The Party Trailer is ready to roll MISSISSAUGA — The Party Trailer, a new venture launching this month in the GTA, is ready to fill a wet bar void in the region. Michael Valencic, who operates Toronto Hospitality and installs alcohol-monitoring equipment, said he has been toying with the idea of the mobile bar for several years, before deciding to build the trailer. Valencic said the trailer is ideal for outdoor festivals as well as corporate or charitable or sporting events. “It’s for anybody, anywhere that wants a drink, and doesn’t want to deal with setting up everything,” he said. The trailer is equipped with four beer taps,

2 2 | Ontario Restaurant News

which are chilled by a flash cooler that instantaneously cools draft beer to 33 F. “It cools the line, not the keg. This isn’t a walk in fridge,” Valencic said. The trailer also has four taps for spirits, and is capable of pouring perfect one-ounce shots each time. By partnering with a catering company, Valencic said the party trailer arrives with a liquor license. As well, the trailer is fully stocked with soda, juice, a serving table, ticket table, cash drawer, beer cups and liquor cups. For more information, visit thepartytrailer. ca.


New Billy Collection! DENIM BIB APRON · STRIPED BIB APRON AND RAW CANVAS BIB APRON

black with white stripes

dark denim

natural

billy collection

billy collection

billy collection

DENIM BIB APRON

STRIPED BIB APRON

RAW CANVAS BIB APRON

Adjustable neck, waist ties, large divided pocket with a space for pens, small breast pocket. 100% cotton, washable. dark denim/light denim waist ties.

Adjustable neck, waist ties, kangaroo and pen pocket, towel loop. 65% polyester, 35% cotton, washable. black with white stripes/solid black ties & pen pocket.

One size (14811) $24.75 ea.

One size (14814) $24.50 ea.

Set of two adjustable and interchangeable snap button straps, large divided pocket with a space for pens, towel loop. 100% cotton, washable. natural and copper straps included.

TORONTO 557 Dixon Road, Unit 122 Etobicoke (Ontario) M9W 6K1

OTTAWA 1750 Montreal Road Ottawa (Ontario) K1J 6N3

Phone: 416-241-8286 Toll Free: 1-877-571-8286 store@tcuniforms.com

Phone: 613-742-8286 Toll Free: 1-855-442-8286 ottawastore@tcuniforms.com

monday to friday 9 am to 5 pm

monday to friday 9 am to 5 pm

One size (14807) $29.75 ea.

NEW! SHOP ONLINE AT WWW.TCUNIFORMS.COM OR VISIT OUR STORES

NO MINIMUM ORDER REQUIRED · LARGE IN-STOCK INVENTORY ONLY $7.50 FLAT RATE FREIGHT CHARGE TO ANYWHERE IN CANADA

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2016-04-11 14:21


Need a 100% Genuine OEM foodservice kitchen replacement part? Let us handle it. Our dedicated parts specialists and same-day shipping make it easy for you to get the part you need, when and where you need it.

800.268.6316 Š2016 TM/MC Heritage Foodservice Group Canada

Ontario Restaurant News - June 2016  
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