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O N T A R I O Nov/Dec 2016 | Vol. 31 | No. 10-11

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Chef Filippo Saporito from La Leggenda Dei Frati in Florence, Italy (centre) plates food alongside students from Centennial College during Centitalia, the first public event held in the school’s new culinary centre.

Centennial College debuts new hospitality digs has a long history of hospitality. Some of these programs were here in 1966 when the college SCARBOROUGH, Ont. — While its students started,” said Joe Baker, dean of Hospitality, are well into their first semester at Centennial Tourism and Culinary Arts. “We’ve been growCollege’s new Culinary Arts Centre, the school ing ever since then. This was just the next evoluis beginning to introduce the public to its state- tion.” With more than 353,000 square feet of floor of-the-art hospitality facility. Planning for the $90-million facility began area, the culinary centre is the largest construcabout three years ago. Following two years of tion project completed by the college. The Local, the 90-seat restaurant and café, construction, the building opened its doors in as well as the 20,000-square-foot event centre September and includes a 742-bed residence, APPROVAL REQUIRED The enclosed proof is sent for your approval. will not proceed with the job until the proof is returned. serve as handsandWefour in-school hotel rooms classrooms, labs, offices, a restaurant, café and DO NOT GIVE VERBAL INSTRUCTIONS. CHECK CAREFULLY! learning centres allow students to learn conference centre. Beyond this point we cannot accept on responsibility for any errors. Alterationsthat (other than typographical errors) will be charged extra. Mark proof “OK” or “OK with corrections” as the case may be, signing your name so we may knowtheir that the proof reachedby the proper authority. the public. trade serving “It feels like natural growth. Centennial By Bill Tremblay

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“They’re all designed as experiential learning operations for the students,” Baker said. “The idea is to give them hands-on experience in the industry before they leave the college.” Before opening the experiential centres, students would learn their trade in a traditional classroom, located in a former hotel near the Scarborough school. “It was much more theoretical before,” Baker said. “We had a much smaller-scale space. It wasn’t as live and open to the public as it is now.”

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Teachers’ Pension Plan acquires Constellation Brands Canada Chef David Copperthwaite

Buffalo-born Anchor Bar opens in Etobicoke By Bill Tremblay ETOBICOKE, Ont. – The Buffalo, N.Y., bar credited with inventing the city’s namesake wing now has an outpost in Toronto. Anchor Bar recently opened near Dixon and Martin Grove roads in Etobicoke, the third Canadian store. The first Canadian Anchor Bar opened in Hamilton in 2013, followed by a Burlington location in late 2015. Chef David Copperthwaite began acquiring the rights to bring Anchor Bar to Canada after visiting Buffalo several times with his daughter’s rep hockey team. “The parking lot was full of Ontario licence plates all the time,” he said. “People are happy now they don’t have to drive all the way to Buffalo.” Anchor Bar began its rise to fame late one evening in 1964, when Dominic Bellisimo arrived at his parents’ establishment with several hungry friends. In a pinch, his mother Teressa deep fried some chicken wings and flavoured them with a homemade sauce. Her gamble created a menu staple throughout North America, the proclamation of July 29 as Chicken Wing Day in Buffalo as well as a James Beard Award for creating an American classic.

“Chicken Wings used to be garbage. They would put them in soup. Basically, the butcher gave them to you,” Copperthwaite said. “It’s amazing how it has evolved.” Acquiring the rights to open Anchor Bar in Canada took more than two years. For the wings, Copperthwaite must import the sauce and blue cheese dressing from Buffalo. His wings are never frozen and are sourced from a farm in Quebec. “Between the three stores in Canada, we’re selling 1,800 pounds per day. They’re having a hard time keeping up,” he said. Anchor Bar’s Canadian locations also serve sandwiches, pizza, salad and several “Anchor Bar classics” like fish and chips or spaghetti and meatballs. Copperthwaite said he has Canadianized the menu by changing some ingredients and adding new options. “We tend to eat fresher, and we have healthier options,” he said. “Canadians are well-educated in food quality, and we don’t mind paying extra for quality.” For the wings, Copperthwaite was allowed to add dry rubs. As well, to the bewilderment of his American counterparts, he created a maple honey garlic sauce to appeal to Canadian tastes. Although skeptical at first, Copperthwaite’s cre-

ation has caught the attention of head office. “They’re asking me to bottle it. I think we’re going to have a Canadian bottle they will take to the states,” he said. For the decor, Copperthwaite personally designed all of his restaurants, which draw inspiration from the original location. In all three Canadian locations, which seat about 250 to 300 guests, Copperthwaite played off the original red seating and nostalgic items, such as license plates and celebrity photos. “You can’t beat the Buffalo store. It’s the same product here, but it’s a bit of a museum down there,” he said. “You have 70 years of stuff on the walls in Buffalo, this is more of a Canadianized version.” In the United States, Anchor Bar has opened six locations, with 15 more in the works from Florida to California. In Canada, Copperthwaite plans to continue to grow the brand, eventually moving out of province and towards a franchise model. “Right now I’ve been doing corporate stores. I’d rather have quality versus quantity and I may just keep doing that for another three or four stores,” he said. “It’s important we set our seed properly before expanding too much.”

TORONTO — Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan (Ontario Teachers’) announced on Oct. 17 the acquisition of Constellation Brands Canada, the Canadian operation of Constellation Brands, for approximately $1.03 billion. The transaction is expected to close before the end of 2017. “Constellation Brands Canada is an ideal addition to our consumer portfolio,” said Jane Rowe, senior vice-president, private capital. “The company is already the undisputed market leader in the Canadian wine industry and has excellent potential for continued growth and value creation.” Constellation Brands Canada is headquartered in Mississauga, Ont., and operates three commercial wineries, five estate wineries, and 163 Wine Rack stores throughout Ontario. Its portfolio of domestic and international wines includes Inniskillin, Jackson-Triggs, Kim Crawford, Robert Mondavi, Ruffino, Sawmill Creek and Wallaroo Trail. “Our Canadian management team is excited about working with Ontario Teachers’ to take our business vision to the next level,” said Constellation president and CEO Jay Wright. “Their financial commitment and considerable expertise in helping their portfolio companies achieve meaningful strategic market advantages set the stage for an exciting partnership.”

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Your kitchen could help improve mental health

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n any given year, one in five Canadians experiences a mental health or addiction problem. Given the number of youth — who are more likely than any other age group to experience these issues, according to the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health — working in foodservice and hospitality, it might be more than one in five in our industry. Couple this with long hours, often conflicting with the schedules of friends and family — those who make up an individual’s support system — and it’s a recipe for self-medicating. A trio of Edmonton chefs are hoping to break the stigma surrounding anxiety, depression and substance abuse in the hospitality industry. Chefs Dan Letourneau (Ocean Odyssey), Stuart Whyte (Original Redhead Condiments) and Cory Rakowski (Edmonton Food Council) recently founded Food for Thoughts. In addition to fostering open communication regarding mental health, Food for Thoughts aims to develop and fund an in-

dustry-specific group counselling program with the assistance of organizations such as the Canadian Mental Health Association and Lifeline Canada. Rakowski said the current state of the foodservice industry as well as the founders’ personal experiences — having lost friends to suicide and overdose — inspired the initiative. An inaugural event brought Edmonton chefs together in November at Whyte Avenue bar, where the discussion focused on mental health struggles. Rakowski said the idea was that attendees would leave with “a willingness to start the conversation in their own circles, whether by reaching out to peers, friends and family, or by seeking assistance themselves.” Mental illness is not uncommon nor is it shameful, but it’s too often kept secret, ignored or brushed off as something that will go away on its own. If someone were suffering from a physical illness it would be acceptable — perhaps even expected — to let people know when it is affecting quality of life. If we don’t start treating mental illness as what it is, an illness as opposed to a weakness,

the stigma will linger. Mental health doesn’t simply mean avoiding illness; it also refers to our overall mental well-being, which is affected by numerous factors including the stress caused by balancing work and life. Owners, operators and managers have a responsibility to ensure what they expect from employees doesn’t put that balance in jeopardy. Food for Thoughts is planning monthlong events in Edmonton and Calgary to take place next spring. Participating restaurants will design a dish inspired by health and wellbeing, with a portion of the sale of each dish being donated to counselling programs. Long term, Rakowski said the idea is to bring Food for Thoughts across the country. “We are looking to start chapters in every city, and would welcome interested parties to reach out on this,” said Rakowski, who can be reached at foodforthoughtsyeg@gmail.com.

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part of everything We Care does, just letting someone else run the show and I get to come out and be the beneficiary.” In his new role, Collins plans to strengthen the connection between Friends of We Care and Easter Seals. “With my lengthy experience with Friends of We Care it will be a great opportunity for the board of Easter Seals Ontario and all of their supporters to understand the impact of what Friends of We Care does and strengthen the relationships between both sides,” he said. “The ultimate goal is to send even more kids to camp.” Following the announcement, Collins received numerous congratulatory communications from colleagues. “This foodservice and hospitality industry that we all work in and around, they’re unbelievable people,” he said. “Their generosity from a financial

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Kevin Collins departs Friends of We Care

s Kevin Collins departs Friends of We Care to lead Easter Seals Ontario, the longtime executive director is fulfilling a goal he has had since he was a boy. “It’s been a lifelong dream for me since I was 12 years old, when I was the Easter Seals/Timmy’s Ambassador,” Collins said in an interview following the announcement he would be taking on the role of president and chief executive officer early next year. Collins spent more than 17 years at Friends of We Care, a foodservice and hospitality organization that raises funds for Easter Seals Canada. Friends of We Care board chair Jim Greenway said Collins’ legacy includes raising millions of dollars to benefit children with disabilities, establishing a national presence for the organization and raising its profile within the industry. “Throughout his tenure, Kevin has touched and improved the lives of many. His caring spirit, ability to interact with everyone and genuine desire to be good at his role has benefited us all,” Greenway said in a statement. As a boy, Collins spent eight summers attending Easter Seals’ barrier-free camps. While representing the charity as an ambassador, the seed was planted; he wanted to be part of the organization in the future. “Working with Friends of We Care over almost the last 18 years, that was a huge part of almost coming full circle for me, but this brings it full circle now,” Collins said. “The best part about it is I’m not going away — I’m still going to be very much a

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standpoint to volunteer, to just supporting the cause, is unbelievable. To be able to sit back and look at how far the organization has come with growth and the amount of money that has been generated to help support so many kids, not only here in Ontario, but across Canada, it’s an unbelievable experience and something that I will cherish for the rest of my life.” At Easter Seals, Collins will have the opportunity to work more closely with children and their families. “This organization, for the past almost 18 years, we’ve raised over $20.5 million for the kids and now I get to actually be part of how it’s being spent and how the kids are benefiting directly. It’s a new learning curve for me, but it’s an exciting curve,” he said. “That’s basically where I started, getting that chance to go to summer camp for eight years. I want to make sure many other kids get that same opportunity.” Collins started in the industry in hotel management and worked for Easter Seals Ontario as manager of corporate and special events before joining Friends of We Care as executive director. “I’ve been very fortunate to be able to do something I’m very, very passionate about and to have people believe in what I do,” he said. Collins said he is driven by the desire to give others the same opportunity he was given. “Having the disability and being able to show people that given the opportunity, it’s amazing what anybody can accomplish, that’s my ultimate goal and dream,” he said.

MICKEY CHEREVATY Consultant, Moyer Diebel Limited JACK BATTERSBY President, Summit Food Service Distributors Inc. PAUL LECLERC Partner, Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. JORGE SOARES Director Food and Beverage Operations, Woodbine Entertainment Group ADAM COLQUHOUN President, Oyster Boy JOHN CRAWFORD Director of Sales-Canada, Lamb Weston TINA CHIU Chief Operating Officer, Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation MARTIN KOUPRIE Chef/Owner, Pangaea Restaurant JOEL SISSON Founder and President of Crush Strategy Inc. CHRIS JEENS Partner, W. D. Colledge Co. Ltd. Joe Baker Dean, School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts, Centennial College Graham Hayes Directory of Culinary/Corporate Chef, McCormack Bourrie Sales & Marketing & French’s Food Company Canada Jody Palubiski CEO, The Charcoal Group

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The many links of chef Guy Rawlings’ supply chain TORONTO — Chef Guy Rawlings is taking an unorthodox approach to sourcing ingredients for Montgomery’s, his first solo restaurant venture. To highlight wild and cultivated ingredients found in Ontario, the 50-seat Queen Street West restaurant is serving a “minimalist” menu created via foraging, uncommon protein sources and frequent visits to the province’s farms. “We consistently have some foragers coming by the restaurant and we like to go to farms as much as possible,” Rawlings said, who opened the restaurant with his wife Kim Montgomery. “I do a little bit of foraging myself.” Deirdre Fraser-Gudrunas of Vibrant Matter in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont., is one of the foragers supplying Montgomery’s. “Every time she shows up we have to have some restraint. Everything is fantastic and we want to buy it all,” said Rawlings, noting a recent score of marigold buds purchased from the business. “We’ve salted those to create something like a caper we’ll use down the road.” For ingredients that can’t be foraged, Rawlings heads to Amish farms in the Kawartha Region. “It’s a great community to work with. They

have such a history and depth in farming,” he said. In the coming months, Rawlings will also add his family’s dairy cow to the menu, likely as sausages. Dubbed “Snackies” by his daughter, the cow was purchased to produce raw milk for the family. However, the Rawlings recently found out the cow must be put down, so they decided to have the animal ethically processed. “It’s not something typically done and it’s not something you see a lot of here. In other countries, they eat older dairy cows,” Rawlings said. The cow’s meat will be dry-aged for at least 30 days before it appears on the menu. “The whole thing will be interesting and new. I’m excited to see what it translates into,” Rawlings said. “It could be a disaster, but you never find something special if you don’t find a couple of disasters along the way.” Rawlings is also investigating how he might be able to incorporate the products of urban gardens on the menu. “It’s something we want to explore, the idea of supporting a closer food system,” he said.

However, he noted an urban grower is likely unable to produce the volume required by a restaurant. “It’s difficult for them to produce those core vegetables. It would be hard to have an urban potato farmer,” Rawlings said. “It would be more specialized ingredients, things with high flavour where you don’t need a large quantity.” The ingredients sourced by the restaurant translate into what Rawlings calls Canadian cuisine. “I have an idea of what food in Newfoundland is like or northern Quebec, but in Ontario it doesn’t have a definition,” Rawlings said. “It’s not something we’re trying to define, but we’re trying to use the ingredients around us.” Montgomery’s menu will change as the ingredients available through their supply chain come and go. “The menu just evolves as the seasons do. As soon as the first frost hits, you’ll see a drastic change. When you get to the winter, there’s less evolution,” Rawlings said. In preparation for winter, Montgomery’s is drying, freezing and fermenting ingredients acquired during warmer months.

“We’re trying really hard to save interesting things,” he said. To prepare for opening his own restaurant, Rawlings spent the last four years working in front of house positions, including operations manager at Bar Raval and Bar Isabel. “To be back in the kitchen again, and being inspired by the ingredients, is the nicest thing,” he said. At Montgomery’s, the back of house is set up at the front of the restaurant, allowing foot traffic on Queen Street to see the kitchen. “The kitchen has a lot of energy, so it’s a shame to hide it in the back,” Rawlings said. “We can look out on the street and see life happening. We’re not just stuck in a box in the back without windows.” Rawlings also takes a different approach to table service. Guests pour their own wine, and staff avoid interrupting table conversation. “You go to a restaurant and they’re almost bugging you too much. I want an environment where I can enjoy the company of the person I’m with,” Rawlings said. “It’s not a lack of service by any means. We’re there and attentive to do all the necessary things, but otherwise we don’t want to interrupt.”

is the address where The Toronto Star originated as well as Muirhead’s Cafeteria. “We also have pictures and things on the walls that pay homage to that history,” Kozman said. The second Canadian Potbelly will open at 180 Bloor St. West in late January. A third store is planned for Yonge and Sheppard, scheduled to open in the spring.

“We’re still looking for other sites. Our goal is to try and roll out 15 to 20 shops in the next five years,” Kozman said. Eventually, Kozman would like to see Potbelly set up shop outside of the Greater Toronto Area. “Right now we’re focused on urban locations in Toronto,” he said. “We are a lunch brand, so we want to be in places with a lunch rush.”

Potbelly Sandwiches opens first Canadian location TORONTO — Potbelly Sandwiches has opened its first of three planned Canadian locations. In October, the fast casual sandwich shop opened at 83 Yonge St. in Toronto. “There’s no mystery as to why we wanted to bring it up here,” said David Kozman, founder of Halsted Hospitality, which has the exclusive franchise rights to Potbelly in Ontario. “We just thought it was a good idea, and something that Toronto really needed.” Potbelly originated as an antique store in Chicago in 1977. Peter Hastings, the store’s founder, decided to sell sandwiches alongside antiques, which included potbelly stoves. “As it turns out, they became quite popular, and they started getting lineups for the sandwiches,” Kozman said. The store eventually evolved into a sandwich shop with the antiques serving as the decor. After 20 years in business, Hastings sold the store to Bryant Keil, who began franchising the business. Today, there are more than 400 Potbelly locations in the United States, 12 in the Middle

East and one store in London, England. Kozman discovered the restaurant chain a decade ago as a student in Chicago. “It was one of those places we liked going to as customers,” he said. “This was before the explosion of fast casual. I remember thinking at that time, coming from Toronto, I hadn’t seen anything like it before.” The Potbelly menu features six signature sandwiches, including its flagship sub A Wreck (salami, roast beef, turkey, ham and Swiss cheese), as well as five sandwiches under its favourites category. Salads, soups and cookies complete the menu. “We try to stay true to (the original) menu,” Kozman said. “It’s proven itself to be something people respond to.” All Potbelly restaurants are equipped with a potbelly stove and the restaurants feature live music during lunch on occasion. “We try to have an acoustic guitarist during lunch, whenever we can manage that,” Kozman said. “It adds to the environment.” Each location also pays tribute to its neighbourhood. The 83 Yonge St. store, for example,

November/ December 2016 | 7


Canada

Pacini eyes hotel partnerships for growth By Don Douloff MONTREAL — Pacini Canada Inc. is eyeing new-builds and conversions in Canadian hotels for growth of its casual Italian restaurant concept. In the next two to three years, the company is targeting 15 to 20 locations, part of a larger plan to reach 200 restaurants within a decade, according to Lafleche Francoeur, vice-president of business development. There are currently 30 Pacini restaurants, 28 in Quebec and the balance in Alberta. So far, there are four hotel locations: in the Acclaim Hotel, near Calgary airport; Hotel Universel, in Alma, Que.; the Moose Hotel & Suites, in Banff, Alta., opened in July; and Auberge Gouverneur Shawinigan, in Shawinigan, Que., opened in spring. A site is under construction in Hotel Le Navigateur, in Rimouski, Que., and is expected to open in December. A deal has been signed for a freestanding Pacini to open in front of the Courtyard Toronto/Mississauga West property slated to open in 2017. The restaurant is expected to begin construction by the end of this year, targeting an opening by March, said Francoeur. The first hotel location opened in the Acclaim property in 2011 as a test of the Pacini concept outside Quebec. That site “has done very well,” he said. Al-

though Francoeur will consider freestanding, non-hotel restaurants, “90 per cent of franchising requests are coming from hotels.” Going forward, all provinces will be considered for hotel locations, but Alberta and Ontario will be the focus, he said. Since the brand is established in Alberta, it’s a natural fit for growth, he added, and Atlantic Canada represents a “natural evolution” for Pacini. “We’re in negotiation with 25 to 30 hotels in every region.” Larger cities are preferred.

Event center

In Quebec, Pacini will consider smaller markets, and indeed, being situated inside hotels enables Pacini to locate in less populated areas, since hotel guests provide a built-in customer base. Restaurants also draw from locals, said Francoeur. New-builds and conversions will be considered equally. Hotel sites require at least 4,500 square feet. Ground-floor locations offering good external exposure and a separate entrance are required.

Mid-scale to higher-end hotels will be considered. For freestanding, non-hotel sites, Pacini prefers markets with a minimum population of 30,000 people within a short radius. “The requirement in terms of population is half of that when we are within or close to a hotel.” Those sites need 6,000-plus square feet in power centres and strip-mall end caps. Up front, hotels pay $1.5 million, which covers the franchise fee and construction costs. Once the restaurant opens, hotels pay a royalty of 4 per cent of gross sales, and an additional 4 per cent of gross sales that is pooled in a national marketing fund. Restaurants serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with weekend brunch. Menus are themed casual Italian — pastas, pizzas, appetizers and main courses — and offer an all-youcan-eat bar where guests grill bread slices and top them with spreads and jams. Gluten-free options are available, as are allergen-free dishes made and sealed offsite by a third party. Locations feature a dining room, lounge and a market area, dubbed a ‘piazza,’ selling Italian oils, pasta sauces, dry pastas, chocolates, etc. In addition, Pacini provides all onsite event catering for its host hotels. Catering menus are adapted locally.

The Local

New centre offers new enrolment opportunities Continued from cover The hospitality centre’s labs and classrooms are also equipped with numerous audiovisual components to assist with learning. For example, when an instructor is demonstrating a technique, cameras stream an overhead view of the lesson to screens at each student workstation. “We wanted to make sure the spaces themselves were also designed with lots of digital capability,” Baker said. “If we’re preparing people to work in the modern food and hospitality industry, we have to ensure they’re well prepared and well versed in digital media.” In November, Centennial held its first public event. CENTITALIA,

8 Restaurant News

a partnership with Toronto’s Italian Chamber of Commerce, brought four chefs from Italy to prepare a fivenight dinner series alongside students. On the final night of the event, Dahyun Choi, a third year culinary management student, worked in the kitchen with chef Filippo Saporito, whose restaurant La Leggenda Dei Frati in Florence recently received a Michelin star. “Their cooking method, their plating and their attitude in the kitchen is amazing. They’re really friendly, but strict when they’re working with the food,” Choi said. “It’s really a rare experience to be with a Michelin star chef.” The fine dining experience de-

livered by the Italian chefs is just one aspect of the culinary program. The café teaches students the quickservice format, while the restaurant also serves a market-style lunch and weekend brunch. “We’re trying to give them exposure to all different aspects of the restaurant industry and lots of different styles,” Baker said. Each menu, designed by the school’s executive chef and culinary team, aims to highlight the diversity found in Scarborough’s population. “With the name, The Local, we wanted to make sure we did something that represents the community,” Baker said. “The food is very internationally inspired. It represents the

The new hospitality campus diversity of Scarborough with lots of different flavour profiles, and we source ingredients from Ontario.” The centre currently has about 1,000 students enrolled in hospitality programs. The new building will allow the college to grow its hospitality

cohort by 100 per cent. “We are growing to meet the demands of the Canadian hospitality and tourism industry,” Baker said. “We’re growing so we can prepare enough skilled workers to support this huge industry in Canada.”


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Ontario

French expats bring bistro to West Toronto By Bill Tremblay TORONTO — Pascal Vernhes and chef JeanRegis Raynaud both immigrated to Canada with only a suitcase and culinary aspirations. “I didn’t know anybody here, not a single person,” Vernhes said, who arrived in Toronto about 15 years ago. With extensive background working front of house at restaurants in Europe, Vernhes started working in Canada as a waiter. He worked his way up to a general manager position before opening Midi Bistro in downtown Toronto, which he sold in 2011. Despite three diplomas in French cuisine, a certificate in gastronomic excellence and experience in several fine-dining restaurants in Europe, Raynaud entered the Canadian workforce about five years ago flipping burgers, eventually landing the position of executive chef at Le Paradis. “You arrive with the mentality of an immigrant. You just want to make it,” Raynaud said. “It was frustrating, but it was good too, you learn. When you arrive to Canada everything starts at zero.” After meeting through mutual friends in

Toronto, Vernhes and Raynaud partnered to open Le Baratin, a 30-seat French bistro at 1600 Dundas St. West. “We’re on the same page. Sometimes people have different concepts or different tastes,” Vernhes said. “We worked in the same type of establishments, we know discipline. We’ve been trained the same way, even though there is 20 years difference between us.” Their approach is to provide French cuisine in a traditional bistro setting, which includes an affordable price. “I live in the neighbourhood, that’s why I decided to open here. It’s convenient, but there is also a need,” Vernhes said. “What I found missing here is bistros, something affordable, simple and authentic.” Le Baratin’s Brockton Village neighbourhood also lacks significant foot traffic. “We are not Queen Street, we are not Yonge Street and there’s no subway,” Vernhes said. To attract local clientele, Le Baratin opens at 8 a.m. as a café and offers a lunch menu averaging about $12 per person, and a dinner menu with entrees priced below $25 as well as a threecourse fixed price menu for $20.

Pascal Vernhes and Jean-Regis Raynaud. To keep ingredient costs low, Le Baratin is using economical proteins, elevated by traditional French methods of cooking. Their stock, for example, requires up to 72 hours of reduction before it is served. “We can’t serve Kobe beef or prime rib; we use flank steak. Flank is not the most expensive, but to make it great, we have the stock,” Vernhes said. For Raynaud, Le Baratin is his first venture as a restaurant owner.

“It is a really good feeling. It is a lot of work to go into business, but definitely no regrets,” he said. He added owning a restaurant in Canada’s largest city requires matching his culinary skills with marketing, and learning to plate his dishes so they are social media friendly. “You have to play the game, but you don’t want to compromise the quality,” said Raynaud. “Here you can be a good chef, but it doesn’t mean you’ll do well. It’s really competitive.”

Tortoise group picks up speed BURLINGTON, Ont. — Since Clark Lishman took on the role of chief operating officer, he has been building the team at Tortoise Restaurant Group. “It’s a time of positive changes and excitement,” said Somer Mullins, the new director of marketing. In addition to Mullins, there are district managers, Dale Vanderzwaag and Rob Dero, and a new director of training, Elizabeth Smith. To assist director of food and beverage, chef Anthony Leech, Tortoise Group also hired executive chefs Michael Vogt and Ruben Rapetti. President James Lishman founded the family-run business in 1992 with the opening of the first Turtle Jack’s Muskoka Grill in Brampton, Ont. Currently, there are 17 locations in Ontario and two Fraticelli’s Italian Grill restaurants, one in Burlington and another in Richmond Hill, Ont. The restaurant group also opened a new fast casual concept, Coop Wicked Chicken and is developing a smaller version of its Italian brand, Frat’s. His son, Clark Lishman moved from his role in marketing to COO in September 2015.

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“I’m a blue-collar guy; I came through marketing in college and I worked my way through every position in the restaurant — that’s how I know what we do,” said Lishman, who is also the executive chef overseeing the brands. “I’m not some number-savvy, MBA graduate operating officer. I surround myself with people who are way smarter than I am, ask them for their advice and then we roll forward with it.” While excited about the passion at Tortoise Restaurant Group, Lishman says the young operations team is bound to stumble. “I also think, we’re a smaller ship, we need to be able to move way faster than our big counterparts,” he said. There are three new Turtle Jack’s locations on the books in Grimsby, Ont., Erin Mills Town Centre in Mississauga and near Pearson International Airport on Dixon Road. Turtle Jack’s locations are getting a refreshed look and plans include adding cottage-style shareable menu items. It also recently introduced chicken raised without antibiotics and has plans to futher enhance the food program. Traditionally a suburban brand, Lishman

said the restaurant group is looking at locations in downtown Toronto as well as in smaller Ontario communities. The footprint of the two Fraticelli’s locations is between 7,000 and 8,000 square feet. While more locations of this size are unlikely and dependent on prime real estate, there is a smaller version in the works called Frat’s slated to open on King William Street in Hamilton in the New Year. This location is 1,500 square feet with 35 seats, but Lishman envisions other Frat’s units to be between 2,000 and 3,000 square feet in size. “We’ll be the Napoletana pizza joint of the suburbs,” he said. The first Coop location opened in July at 272-274 King St. West, Hamilton. The second is slated to open at 370 Brant St. in Burlington in January. With the tagline, “tasty as cluck,” the cheeky brand focuses on poultry with seared, pulled or fried chicken sandwiches, deep-fried deviled eggs, chicken salads, fried chicken, chicken and waffles and tacos. A late-night window offers pick-up after midnight on weekends. “This [Coop] has been living in my head a long time,” said Lishman.

Rather than franchising, Lishman plans to open corporate locations with an end goal of moving towards operating partnerships. “[Then] we both have skin in the game. If the store’s not making money, I’m losing and you’re losing, we’ve got to do something to fix this,” he explained. “With the franchise model, liability is off us in a sense, because it’s on them. There is a little bit of a flip there that I would like to get done for our team.” Lishman hopes to see these partnerships go to current management staff. “A lot of the people who work in our restaurants right now never could afford a Turtle Jack’s or think of getting into something that big,” he said. With a smaller investment, matched by head office, staff could secure financing and open a Coop or Frat’s, but first Lishman intends to prove the viability of the concepts. “We’re keeping it all corporate from the beginning because I want to under-promise and over-deliver — that’s the new mantra at Tortoise Restaurant Group,” he said.


Ontario

Orangeville Catering company opens its doors to highlight local flavours ORANGEVILLE — Rural Roots Catering is inviting diners into its kitchen to showcase ingredients grown in the surrounding area. The Orangeville, Ont., company has transformed a portion of its commercial kitchen into The Mezzanine Restaurant, an 18-seat communal dining room that will serve set tasting menus about one night a week. “There’s a high ceiling, so above the office there’s a mezzanine that overlooks the entire kitchen,” said Adam Ryan, the company’s chef. “Until now it’s just been used for private tastings for wedding clients.” With seating above the kitchen, The Mezzanine’s guests get a front row view of their meal being prepared. “I feel there’s not really anything like it around,” Ryan said. “It’s introducing the area to the idea of a tasting menu. There are places that have done it, but this is going to be exclusively one menu.” Each menu will feature seasonal items produced in the Dufferin County and Caledon areas surrounding Orangeville. The first menu, a 10-course meal served Nov. 5, was created using ingredients from Mulberry Moon Organics and Mount Wolfe Forest Farm, both located in Caledon. “There’s a lot of people working to promote local farms and producers in Dufferin County, and I feel we need to start doing more to put these actions in play,” Ryan said. Opening one day a week within the existing business is an ideal method to share regional flavours. “It’s much more intimate and we don’t necessarily have to pay for the overhead for a 60-seat restaurant and make sure we’re full six days a week to make ends meet,” Ryan said. “We have the resources here already, and there’s a business model set up to do catering, bring in revenue and make sure the bills are paid.” The Mezzanine will offer various price points for their tasting menus to attract a broad demographic. The first dinner cost $84 per person. “For people looking to spend a night out and have some luxury ingredients, we’ll have high-end dinners,” Ryan said. “For people looking to go out and spend $30 on a

three-course dinner, there will be that opportunity as well.” Each dinner is sold as a ticketed event, with the changing tasting menus promoted via social media. “You can go to the theatre, you can go to a movie or you can go to dinner,” Ryan said. “This is an opportunity for people to spend a night out having a food experience rather than a movie or musical experience.”

Restaurants for Change raises more than $250,000 TORONTO — On Oct. 19, 68 restaurants in 16 Canadian cities came together to raise money for Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) through the third annual Restaurants for Change. The event raised more than $250,000 in its third year, exceeding the goal set by organizers. Through CFCC, funds raised through the event will support programs that bring people in low-income communities together to grow, cook, share and advocate for healthy food for all. “This year’s participating chefs and restaurants are part of an amazing community who care about where food comes from and also about who has access to it,” said Nick Saul, president and CEO of Community Food Centres Canada. “We’re very thankful for their support, and excited to engage more Canadians from coast to coast in the movement towards a healthy and fair food system.”

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Use tech to better your business By Bill Tremblay

A

s new technologies are introduced to the public at an ever-increasing rate, restaurants aren’t left out of the fold. Tech developers, many of which are Canadian-based, are digitizing tasks for management as well as front and back of house. Everything from a restaurant’s marketing to staff training to evaluating strategies is now in the palm of an operator’s hand.

Make Wi-Fi work for you For restaurants that provide their guests with free Wi-Fi, Turnstyle allows the establishment to use the connection as a marketing catalyst. When a customer connects to the restaurant’s Internet, Turnstyle offers a customizable login page that collects the user’s email address as well as additional information. “Rather than paying for your Wi-Fi expense every month, it can actually be an investment and an asset that will increase loyalty and generate revenue,” said Bennett Fitzgibbon, Turnstyle’s marketing director. The Toronto-based program allows a restaurateur to customize the login page to their accessible Wi-Fi signal by adding up to three featured images to promote specials or upcoming events. Through the login page, the operator is also able to ask customers for their email address, or request they like, follow or check into their business on social media. “We can’t force them to like or check into the venue, but we can encourage them,” Fitzgibbon said. “We make it very simple for them to make one click and boost the social presence of [the restaurant’s] brand.”

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By collecting email accounts, operators are able to create marketing campaigns to encourage repeat business. “Millennials are very willing to give up an email address — which everyone craves these days — in exchange for access,” Fitzgibbon said. Turnstyle’s email capability goes beyond a blanket blast of information, as operators are able to tailor their content based on customers’ actions. “Rather than simply doing email blasts, we can use their mobile device as a beacon to trigger messages,” Fitzgibbon said. “It gives the ability to send more contextual and relevant messages based on demographics.” For example, the operator could set up a campaign to thank or welcome a customer when they return to the business by using their mobile device ID as it tries to connect to Wi-Fi. At Subway, one of Turnstyle’s largest customers, the email campaign is used to email a coupon to customers who haven’t returned to a restaurant in the chain in more than 30 days. “The redemption rate is at 12 per cent, compared to the traditional two or three per cent rate,” Fitzgibbon said. When a customer uses Facebook or Twitter to sign into the Wi-Fi service, Turnstyle is able to pull demographic information like age and gender. “The most valuable thing for our customers is being able to build their database of every single person who has connected to their Wi-Fi,” Fitzgibbon said. As well, Turnstyle records every device ID that is Wi-Fi enabled, even if they do not attempt to access the Internet. “Any device that is Wi-Fi enabled is constantly trying to find an access point to connect to,”


COMING TO CANADA

DipJar: An answer to a cashless economy The New York City-based Dipjar has identified Canada as its second target market, after providing more than 1,000 of the devices to cafés and quick service restaurants throughout the United States. Dipjar (dipjar.com) is a cash register-adjacent unit that allows customers to dip their credit or debit card into the device to provide staff with a tip. Dipjar chief executive officer Ryder Kessler came up with the idea after he noticed a busy café was generating less tips for its baristas, as less customers were carrying hard currency. “He had the idea to solve the problem that there are many people in the workforce in the service-based industry that rely on tips heavily to get by, but not a lot of people carry cash and coin any more,” said Dipjar director of marketing Ray Lin. “It really did start with thinking about how to evolve the tip jar.”

Fitzgibbon said. “We can use that information to estimate the number of visitors in the venue, and we can pull other metrics as to whether we are detecting those visitors for the first time, or if we have seen them previously.”

Constructive criticism About two years ago, Rob Edell had a horrible restaurant experience. “I almost wrote my first Yelp review, but realized I didn’t want to bash this small business publicly,” Edell said. “It was a light bulb moment for me.” Edell realized while public review platforms are plentiful, there was a lack of digital tools to provide private feedback to operators. He decided to create Servy, a New York Citybased restaurant app similar to secret shoppers. “We essentially created a crowdsource solution to ensure operators get feedback and, more importantly, ensure staff are maintaining certain standards,” Edell said. Servy recruits foodies to review any aspect of a partner restaurant, based on questions posed by the operator. “They can ask any question. Is the server recommending coffee or dessert at the end of the meal? Are you begin greeted within a minute of entering the restaurant?” Edell said. “The restaurant can assess any aspect of their operation from food to service to atmosphere.” Servy’s reviewers, who are compensated for their time, are able to select from a list of restaurants requesting evaluations provided by the app. After the meal, they take a photo of their check to verify they ate at the establishment. Their evaluation is sent to the restaurant via email and stored in a cloud-based dashboard. While they review the restaurant, they also pay for their meal. “One of the cool things we do is actually drive traffic to our partner restaurants. They’re spending money at those restaurants,’ Edell said. He added the reviewers are usually experienced diners. “Anyone interested in such a concept is probably already a self-qualified foodie,” Edell said. “And the more you do this, the more you start to think of these different components of the experience.”

Rewards for training Spiffy is a Toronto-based mobile app for training restaurant employees. The app delivers short, digestible bursts of video-based training to an employee’s smartphone, followed by a quick quiz to ensure the information was absorbed. Successfully completing the training is matched with a reward for their time and attention. “It’s always micro-learning style, which is short bursts of information,” said Spiffy cofounder Chris Snoyer. “Research shows millennials best absorb and retain information when its delivered in short bursts of video-based content.” For training, restaurant management is able to log in to the Spiffy system, build a quiz, upload their video content and then send the test to a specific set of employees. “Staff no longer have to be in the restaurant to receive training,” Snoyer said. “You can have them do the short bursts at home and still pay them for their time.” Spiffy also allows alcohol brands to upload content to the training app. At The Keg, Corby Spirits and Collective Arts Brewing are using the app to train bartenders and servers about their products. Spiffy then charges the alcohol brands based on completion of the training provided. “Collective Arts wants to train servers on their product. The more they know, the more they sell,” Snoyer said. “Collective Arts will then pay them a few bucks to learn about their product.”

A sommelier at every table A new software application is allowing sommeliers to digitally accompany their front of house staff to each table they serve. The Vancouver-based Quini data company launched QUINI SOMM, a cloud-based software system that aims to improve wine sales, streamline and standardize testing and enhance customer engagement. Roger Noujeim, Quini chief executive officer, said the software enables staff to recommend the right wine to customers. “Everybody wants to sell more wine,” Noujeim said. “Unless the servers have the credibility and confidence to come up to the table and

The device works on a cellular network, and the restaurant operator predetermines the set tip amount. “We find having a set amount is better at encouraging people to give,” Lin said. “When it’s in cafés and QSR settings it’s usually at a dollar or two.” Cafés using Dipjar have reported boosting their employees’ wages by 50 cents to $1 per hour. Dipjar is also being used by non-profit organizations to solicit donations. “There is a lot of generosity to be captured for charitable causes as well,” Lin said. While the company plans to enter the Canadian market, a timeline for its introduction is not yet set.

upsell rather than take orders, the vicious cycle continues.” QUINI SOMM includes a virtual trainer that walks staff through tasting wines available at their restaurant. As staff taste the product, the app records notes on eye, nose, mouth finish and opinion. The server’s notes are then stored in the mobile application. “We made sure the tool takes that information along with the servers on their own cell phones or restaurant tablets,” Noujeim said. “The opportunity to deliver better service, more precise recommendations and to assist the restaurant in saving time is critical.” As well, the app includes tasting notes from the restaurant’s sommelier and other staff members. The sommelier’s notes, as well as suggested pairings, are ranked first within the app. “When I am a server talking to a customer today, I can go from saying the typical things like, ‘This one is my favourite,’ to actually talking about what the sommelier thinks about the wine and what food it is recommended with,” Noujeim said. “We are empowering the sommelier with tools that never existed before, to ensure their sales and service have state of the art technology.” Alongside the ability to create wine lists recommended for various occasions, integrated analytics allow restaurant management to access their staff ’s tasting data. “This way I’m archiving at all times the tasting and ranking of the wine by staff and sommelier,” Noujeim said. “I’m able to track and have infor-

mation about the team, the tasting and the wine at any point in time.” The SOMM app uses the database of the company’s original QUINI, a wine tasting and rating app that published reviews of thousands of varieties of wine. Customers are also able to see reviews and browse wines via the public-facing portion of the app. Reviews may also be integrated into a restaurant’s website. “This takes care of the millennial’s need to check out what their peers think,” Noujeim said. “They want transparency.”

Find out more:

getturnstyle.com servyapp.com withspiffy.com quiniwine.com

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Ontario

STK opens in Canada By Kristen Smith TORONTO — The One Group CEO Jonathan Segal has had his eyes on Toronto for about five years. “It took a long time to get there. Now we’re there and we’re very happy with the space, the location and the way it turned out,” said Segal, noting Canada would have been STK’s first international location if all had gone according to the original plan. When considering where to open the first Canadian outpost of STK, Segal and his team identified three potential areas in Toronto: Yorkville, the downtown core and King West. They decided on a second-floor, 9,000-square-foot space with a large street-level entrance at 153 Yorkville Ave. The One Group created the steakhouse brand a decade ago in New York City’s Meatpacking District. Now there are about a dozen locations in five countries. By the end of the second quarter

of 2017, Segal said there should be 22 STK venues, including the STK Rooftop concept. “STK was really a reinvention of the American steakhouse,” Segal said. “When we looked at the steakhouse business, we realized it was about 80 to 85 per cent men.” Most steakhouses looked the same, had similar menus and offered large portions, he said. “We really wanted to see if we could change the paradigm,” Segal said. “If we could make a steakhouse as much about social dining as an Italian or French bistro or a pub.” The restaurants feature lively bars, a live DJ and a colour palette of cream, black and purple. The menu offers a variety of portion sizes as well as twists on traditional steakhouse items, such as crab salad instead of the crab cakes. “There are a lot of salads, a lot of great lighter dishes. All the steaks

Photo Credit: STK / Ryan Forbes. come in small, medium or large, or extra large for sharing,” Segal said. More than half of the Toronto menu consists of STK staples, while chef Tommy McHugh creates 35 per cent of the dishes, which include a tater tot short rib poutine, local heirloom salad, chopped vegetable salad, grilled Spanish octopus, Mediterranean sea bass and lobster thermador. Some of the signature dishes have been modified to include local ingredients, such as Canadian cheddar for the “lil brg” and mac and cheese. “We’re going through the process of sourcing as many of our products as we can locally. We immediately go

in there and start in business, then we go out and learn who the best people to deal with are so we can bring their stuff in and try,” Segal said. But the beef will be USDA Prime, as it is all STK locations. Segal faced the dilemma of domestic or imported beef when they opened in the United Kingdom. “At first I said I was going to go British beef, but at the very last minute, I stayed true to what we do,” he said. “I will always attempt to buy locally and support local industry, but it [U.S. beef] is part of what we do, not an insult to Canadian beef.

“Canadian beef is equally as good as American beef.” Segal said he knows local beef is important to Canada, which is why the Toronto restaurant will likely introduce guest cuts from Canadian producers, as it did at STK London. Segal said The One Group is interested in opening a second Canadian location in Vancouver and is looking for appropriate real estate. “The first STK was in New York, the second was in Los Angeles” he said. “We went literally across the country. We’ll probably do the same thing here [in Canada].”

Brampton begins building its own culinary tourism strategy BRAMPTON, Ont. — Brampton is looking to its restaurateurs to help boost tourism. The city’s economic development office is working with the Culinary Tourism Alliance to determine how the municipality may use its 800 restaurants to attract tourists. “We saw what we have: a tremendous amount of fantastic restaurants. We saw the quality we have already,” said Sharon Wilcox, the city’s tourism manager. “We need to know how we can capitalize on that.” In late September, 60 stakeholders from the city’s culinary tourism sector gathered for a forum on food tourism. Various members of the city’s foodservice sector attended from restaurants to festival organizers to manufacturers. “We had a tremendous cross section. It was the first opportunity we had to engage the businesses in the culinary side of things,” Wilcox said. “We had a lot of discussion about what Brampton has, what our assets

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are already, what our focus should be and the gaps and challenges in the city.” From the meeting, the municipality plans to form an advisory board that will work with the Culinary Tourism Alliance to create a foodcentric tourism plan. The first step, however, is to define Brampton’s taste of place. Wilcox ex-

plained the city is home to regionally specific varieties of cuisine. “We have a lot of small independent restaurants that offer specific cuisine,” she said. “It’s not just Indian cuisine, it’s a certain part of the country. It’s a total variety across the board and very area specific.” While the tourism initiative will

aim to capitalize on its existing assets, it will also look at the notion of creating new festivals or events to promote the city’s culinary experiences. With its current tourism market comprised of visiting family and friends, the initiative will investigate which events Bramptonians would like to see in their city. “You want to get the message out

to the residents first,” Wilcox said. “That market is influential and has spending money coming in to have economic impact in Brampton.” “One of the challenges Brampton faces is its rapid rate of growth. As one of Canada’s fastest growing cities, marketing culinary experiences is difficult. “We’re growing by a small town every year, it’s difficult to get the message out to everybody,” Wilcox said. To assist restaurants, the initiative will help restaurants ready themselves for marketing. “Maybe it’s as simple as their website needs updating, but they’ll have everything,” she said. The Culinary Tourism Alliance is expected to complete its recommendations and strategy for the city by April of 2017. “They’re going to analyze our strengths, opportunities and our threats,” Wilcox said. “They’ll be looking at everything in a fair amount of detail.”


Canada

FMI adds Panera to its portfolio, plans to grow brand in Canada TORONTO — Franchise Management Incorporated (FMI), a Woodstock, N.B-based franchise operator, has taken over ownership and management of 12 Panera Bread bakery-cafes in Ontario. The purchase includes locations in Don Mills, Richmond Hill, Markham, Mississauga (Square One), Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax and Aurora in the Greater Toronto Area as well as the bakery-cafes in Barrie, Ottawa, Belleville and Kingston. Under the leadership of founding partner Dwight Fraser and operating partner Greg Walton, FMI Group operates more than 225 restaurants in Canada and the United States under the Yum! Brands banner, as a franchisee of Pizza Hut, KFC and Taco Bell. “We’ve been in growth mode for the better part of 10 years,” said FMI director of marketing Matthew Leech. He said FMI’s owners had been following the Panera Bread brand, which opened its first Canadian location in 2008. Based in St. Louis, the fast casual chain focuses on fresh-baked bread, soups, salads and sandwiches. There are currently 19 units in Ontario. Six of them are run by United States-based Covelli Enterprises, which operates more than 250 Panera locations in five states. “In Canada, it is a brand that is still relatively new and has tremendous potential for growth,” Leech said.

The company’s immediate focus will be on operations at the 12 stores and ensuring a smooth transition. “We want to grow those stores, there is great opportunity in the Ontario markets where Panera already exists to build awareness,” he said. “Once we have really established these stores, we think there is tremendous potential to grow across the country, in urban markets in almost every province.” Although Leech isn’t able to put a number on FMI’s growth plans for Panera, he said the brand “makes great sense for Canadians.” FMI also plans to continue adding Yum! Brands locations to its portfolio, which consists primarily of Pizza Hut units and is

rounded out with more than 80 KFC eateries, several of which are co-branded with Taco Bell. Recently, the company acquired seven KFC units in Canada and 18 in the United States, at about the same time as the Panera Bread purchase. “In five weeks, we had three acquisitions. It always happens at the same time,” Leech said. FMI also recently opened several new Pizza Hut stores in Ontario. “We still believe very much in those brands; we know those brands very well and are committed to continue growing those brands,” he said.

Host 2017 MILAN — In October, HostMilano will bring attendees and exhibitors from around the world to Milan for the 40th edition of the equipment, coffee and food exhibition. The event, which runs Oct. 20 to Oct. 24 of next year, had already confirmed 1,300 companies from 47 countries as of November. Among the 10 countries most represented at the show, there’s Germany with 80 companies, followed by Spain, France, the United States and a selection of other countries, including the United Kingdom, Greece, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Austria, Sweden and Turkey. Moving forward, show organizers are filling remaining exhibition space while putting a focus on target areas — Canada, the United States and the Middle East. Restaurants Canada has partnered with HostMilano to showcase Canada’s foodservice industry internationally and open the door to increased trade and innovation for Canadian companies. The exchange agreement will promote Canadian and global innovation at Restaurants Canada’s annual event, the RC Show, Feb. 26 – 28, 2017 in Toronto, and open new opportunities for Canadian companies to participate in HostMilano, Oct. 20 – 24, 2017 in Milan, Italy. HostMilano will be part of a new RC Show feature recognizing the latest innovations in design and technology, and will offer special incentives for Restaurants Canada members and exhibitors to participate in HostMilano. Exhibition areas include: foodservice equipment; bread, pizza and pasta; gelato and pastry; coffee and tea; bars, coffee machines and vending; and furniture and tableware. Professional visitors — in 2015, there were 150,968 from 172 countries — won’t just find business opportunities at the show. There will also be many training sessions and high-profile events.

November/ December 2016 | 1 5


2017

Ontario Buyers’ Directory

Research by: Peter Elliott Beverages Alcohol - Beer 5 Paddles Brewing Company All or Nothing Brewhouse Amsterdam Brewing Co. Barley Days Brewery Barnstormer Brewing Company Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. Bellwoods Brewery Big Rig Brewery Big Rock Brewery Ltd. Black Oak Brewing Company Block Three Brewing Company Bobcaygeon Brewing Company Boshkung Brewing Co Brimstone Brewing Company Brick Brewing Co. Ltd. Cameron’s Brewing Co. Cassel Brewery Clocktower Brewpubs Collective Arts Brewing Collingwood Brewery Cool Beer Brewing Co. County Durham Brewing Co. Creemore Springs, division of Molson Diageo Canada Inc. Flying Monkeys Craft Brewery Gananoque Brewing Company Ltd. Grand River Brewing Granite Brewery Great Lakes Brewery Highlander Brew Company Intra Vino Kichesippi Beer Kilannan Brewing Company Kirkwood Diamond Group Kolonaki Group Labatt Breweries Lacey’s International Lake of Bays Brewing Lake of the Woods Brewing

Lakes of Muskoka Cottage Brewery Left Field Brewery Macleans Ales Magnotta Brewery Manantler Craft Brewing Company Mark Anthony Group Mill Street Brewery, division of Labatt Molson Coors Brewing Company Muskoka Brewery Neustadt Springs Brewery New Ontario Brewing Co. Niagara Brewing Company Niagara Oast House Brewers Nickel Brook Brewery Northwinds Brewery Ltd. Oland Brewery, division of Labatt Old Credit Brewing Co. Old Flame Brewing Company Old Tomorrow Perth Brewery PMA Canada Ltd. Premier Brands Premium Beer Co. Publican House Brewery Railway City Brewing Ramblin’ Road Brewery Farm Sawdust City Brewing Side Launch Brewing Silversmith Brewing Sleeman Brewery & Malting Co. Sleeping Giant Brewing Co. Smithavens Brewing Company Steam Whistle Brewing Stratford Brewing Company Thornbury Village Craft Brewery Trafalgar Ales & Meads Walkerville Brewery Wellington County Brewery Alcohol - Cider 26 Acre Craft Cider Co. Applewood Cider Ardiel Cider House

1 6 | Ontario Restaurant News

Archibalds Orchards & Estate Winery Bains Road Cider Company Beaver Valley Cidery Boreal Winery Brickworks Ciderhouse, a division of Mill Street Coffin Ridge Cider County Cider Co. Duxbury Cider Co. Empire Cider Co. Ernest Cider Co. Flying Canoe Hard Cider Heritage Estate Winery & Cidery Hoity Toity Cellars Ironwood Cider Kawartha Country Wines KW Craft Cider Pommies Cider Co. Puddicombe Cider Revel Cider Shiny Apple Cider Spirit Tree Cider Sunnybrook Farm Winery Tawse Winery Thornbury Village Cidery Twin Pines Cider West Avenue Cider Alcohol - Pre-mixed Bacardi Canada Canada Dry Mott’s Inc. Constellation Brands Diageo Canada Inc. Georgian Bay Spirit Co. Kirkwood Diamond Group Mark Anthony Group Alcohol - Spirits Authentic Wine & Spirits Merchants Bacardi Canada Beam Canada Inc Canadian Iceberg Vodka Corp Canadian Mist Distillers Charton-Hobbs Inc. Churchill Cellars Ltd. Corby Spirit and Wine Diageo Canada Inc. Dillon’s Small Batch Distillers Dixon’s Distilled Spirits Eurovintage Interna-

tional. Inc. Georgian Bay Spirit Co. Intra Vino Forty Creek Distillery J. Cipelli Wines & Spirits Junction 56 Distillery King’s Lock Craft Distillery Kirkwood Diamond Group Lacey’s International Last Straw Distillery Lifford Wine & Spirits Murphy’s Law Distillery North of 7 Distillery Polonée Distillery Ozawa Canada Inc. PMA Canada Ltd. Rheault Distillery Seventh Concession Distillers Signature Wines & Spirits Still Waters Distillery Sixty-Six Gilead Distillery Top Shelf Distillers Toronto Distillery Co. Wolfhead Distillery Woodman Wines & Spirits Yongehurst Distillery Alcohol - Wines 30.50 Imports 13th Street Winery Authentic Wine & Spirits Merchants Andrew Peller Limited Angels Gate Winery Ltd. B & W Wines Calona Wines Cave Spring Cellars Ltd. Charles Baker Chateau des Charmes Wines Ltd. Churchill Cellars Ltd. Coffin Ridge Colaneri Estate Winery Colio Estate Wines Inc. Connoisseur Wines & Spirits Constellation Brands Creekside Estate Winery D’Angelo Estate Winery DiProfio Wines Diamond Estates Ernest & Julio Gallo Winery Canada Ltd. Eurovintage Interna-

tional. Inc. Fielding Estate Winery Flat Rock Cellars Foreign Affairs Winery Foster’s Wine Estates Canada Gehringer Brothers Estate Winery Georgian Hills Vineyard HHD Imports Inc. Henry of Pelham Family Estate Winery Hernder Estates Winery Hobb & Co. Inniskillin Wines Jackson-Triggs John Hanna & Sons Kirkwood Diamond Group Kittling Ridge, division of Magnotta Winery Konzelmann Winery & Vineyards Le Caviste Wine Importers Le Clos Jordanne Lifford Wine Agency Magnotta Winery Estates Ltd. Malivoire Wine Company Mark Anthony Group Mike Weir Wine Mission Hill Winery Norman Hardie Winery Pelee Island Winery Peller Estates Wines Perugini Fine Wines Philippe Dandurand Wines Ltd. Pillitteri Estates Winery PMA Canada Ltd. Profile Wine Group Ravine Vineyard Estate Winery Redstone Winery Reif Estate Winery Inc. Rogers & Company Select Wines Southbrook Vineyards St. Hubertus Estate Winery Stonechurch Vineyards Stratus Vineyards Strewn Estate Winery Tawse Winery Thomas Bachelder Wines Trius Winery Two Sisters Vineyards

Vineland Estates Wines Woodman Wines & Spirits Ziraldo Estate Wine Coffee & Tea Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. Ara Arruzzo Co. BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Beaver Rock Roastery Brazilian Canadian Coffee Canterbury Coffee Colonial Coffee Co Elco Fine Foods Inc. Espresso Avenue Espresso Canada Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. Illy Espresso Canada Ltd. Island Originals Java Works Coffee Inc. McCullagh Coffee & Juiceables Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd., The Mother Parker’s Tea & Coffee Inc. Nespresso Coffee Nestle Professional Nestle Professional Beverages / Vitality Food service Canada Ltd. Pilot Coffee Roasters Reunion Island Coffee Limited Specialty Beverage Solutions Starbucks Coffee Canada Station Cold Brew SupraMatic Inc. Tetley Canada Trudeau Corporation Van Houtte Inc. Hot & Cold A. Lassonde Inc. BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Berthelet Food Products Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Cafe Essentials Canada Dry Mott’s Inc. Coca-Cola Beverages Ltd.

Damon Industries Dr. Smoothie Brands E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods Earth’s Own Food Company Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. Island Originals McCullagh Coffee & Juiceables Nestle Professional Beverages Ocean Spray International Inc. Parmalat Canada Pepsi Beverages Canada PreGel CANADA Premium Near Beer Q Water Saeco, division of Philips Canada Sun-Rype Products Ltd. The Kraft Heinz Company Torani Italian Syrups Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company W.T. Lynch Foods Limited

Decor Chairs Contract Supply Corp. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. GAR Chairs Grosfillex Holsag Canada Jamco Chairs Jetco Mfg. Ltd. JSP Industries Inc. Keca International Inc. Noram Interiors Senior Custom Upholstering & Furniture Ltd. The Table and Chair Co. UniChairs Inc. Furniture, Furnishings: Interior Bum Contract Furniture Contract Supply Corp.


Davidson Furniture Specialties Ltd. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. GAR Chairs Holsag Canada Jamco Chairs JSP Industries Inc. Keca International Inc. Maywood Furniture Corp. Noram Interiors Senior Custom Upholstering & Furniture Ltd. Southern Aluminum The Table and Chair Co. Furniture, Furnishings: Exterior

Contract Supply Corp. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. GAR Chairs Grosfillex J. B. Lynn & Associates Ltd. LCE Interiors Noram Interiors Palette Furniture Southern Aluminum The Table and Chair Co. Linen: Tablecloths, Napkins, Table Skirting Alsco Canada - Ontario Americo Inc. Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Cintas - The Uniform People Eden Textile George Courey Inc. Globe Hotelware Agency Inc. Table Top Resources Tiimports Ltd. Tricific Enterprises Inc. Menus, Menu Covers Art Printing Company Creative Impressions Divine Menu Covers Ltd. Kronos Menu Covers Menu & Plus Inc. Menu By Design Menu Tools Inc. Mor’s Menu Cover Mfg. Music & Sound Systems PC Music SIRIUS XM Radio SOCAN Sound Products Limited Signs - Custom, Neon Abracadabra Signs Ketchum Manufacturing Inc. Mainstreet Menu Systems, a Howard Company Brand

Table Tops & Bases Bum Contract Furniture Contract Supply Corp. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. GAR Chairs Jamco Chairs Jetco Mfg. Ltd. Steady Eddie Table Stabilizers The Table and Chair Co. Uniforms Alsco Canada - Ontario Ansell Canada Inc. Blackwood Career Apparel & Essentials Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Chef Uniforms - Classic Chef Chef Works Canada Inc Chef’s Hat Inc. Cintas - The Uniform People Forma Uniforms Hospitality Uniforms and Supplies Canada Mark’s Commercial No Limits Design Ronco Protective Products Shoes for Crews, LLC Showa-Best Glove Sika Footwear, division of Greenhouse Style Skechers

Town & Country Uniforms

557 Dixon Rd. Unit 122 Etobicoke, ON M9W 6K1 Tel: 1-877-571-8286 Fax: 416-243-8323 tcuniforms.com store@tcuniforms.com Tricific Enterprises Inc. Unisync Group Work Authority

Equipment Bakery Equipment, Supplies Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co. Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Canada Chicago Metallic Bakeware Canada Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Distex M & M Inc. Doyon Equipment Inc., A Middleby Company Earthstone Wood/Gas Fire Ovens Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Flour Confections

Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc Harvest Corporation Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. McCall’s Bakers Warehouse Mfg Tray Co. Moretti Ovens Canada MVP Group NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby Company Rational Canada Inc. Ravensbergen Bakery Supplies Ltd. Silesia Velox Grill Machines Ltd. Stephan Machinery (Canada) Ltd. The Middleby Corporation Unifiller Systems Inc. Univex Corporation Barbecue Equipment, Smokers Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Cookshack Inc. Crown Verity Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment M.K.E. Industries NU-VU Food Service Systems, A Middleby Company Pitco Frialator Inc. Smokaroma, Inc. Southern Pride Distributing LLC TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Bar Equipment American Metalcraft Inc. Azbar Inc. Bar Maid Electric Glass Washers Beer Gas Systems Berg Liquor Controls Blendtec Bum Contract Furniture Carlisle Foodservice Products Draught Services Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Freepour Controls Inc. Hamilton Beach Brands Harco Enterprises Ltd. ISI Cream Whipper / Jascor Housewares Inc. Magnuson Industries, Inc. Nor-Lake Inc., a division of Standex Perlick Corporation POS Canada Sculpture Hospitality Sure Shot Precision Pours Zuccarini Importing Co. Buffet, Banquet and Cafeteria Cafeteria,Banquet Bauscher Hepp Inc.

Browne + Co. Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Bum Contract Furniture Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Canada Cutlery Inc. Celco Inc. Front of the House G.E.T. Enterprises Inc. Hatch Industries Ltd. Kason Industries Lockwood Manufacturing Company PanSaver Ovenable Pan Liners Prince Castle Inc. Randell, a Unified Brands subsidiary Rational Canada Inc. Silesia Velox Grill Machines Ltd. Southern Aluminum Specialty Beverage Solutions Sterno Products Syracuse China Company Tableware Solutions Ltd. Tomlinson Industries Tork Hygiene Products, a division of SCA Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. China, Dinnerware, Flatware, Glassware Bauscher Hepp Inc. Browne + Co. Dudson (North America) European Hotel & Restaurant Imports Ltd. Fortessa of Canada Front of the House Globe Hotelware Agency Inc. Homer Laughlin China Co. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Johnson-Rose Inc. Megcour Foodservice Inc. Oneida Canada Ltd. Steelite International Canada Ltd. Syracuse China Company Table Top Resources Tableware Solutions Ltd. The Hall China Co. Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Trudeau Corporation Villeroy & Boch Table ware / Sirius Tabletop Corp. World Tableware, a division of Libbey Food service WWRD Canada Inc. (Wedgewood, Waterford, Royal Doulton) Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Cleaning 3M Canada Company, Clorox Professional Products Company Colgate-Palmolive Canada Inc.

Ecolab

Sundance Pressure Cleaning Coffee Equipment Alfa Cappuccino Imports BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Canterbury Coffee Espresso Avenue Espresso Canada Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Hamilton Beach Brands McCullagh Coffee & Juiceables Mother Parker’s Tea & Coffee Inc. Nespresso Coffee Nestle Professional Beverages / Vitality Food service Canada Ltd. Newtech Beverage Systems Ltd. Reunion Island Coffee Limited Saeco, division of Philips Canada SupraMatic Inc. Tomlinson Industries Van Houtte Inc. Zuccarini Importing Co. Ltd. Concession Equipment, Supplies A.J. Antunes & Co. APW Wyott, a Standex Company BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Cooper-Atkins Corporation Great Western Products Hatco Corporation Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Megcour Foodservice Inc. Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Server Products Silesia Velox Grill Machines Ltd. Specialty Beverage Solutions Star Manufacturing International Inc. TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Tomlinson Industries Tork Hygiene Products, a division of SCA Dealer - Equipment Advantage Restaurant Supply Niagara Falls Arctic Refrigeration and Equipment Barrie Equipment Sales Inc. (RED) Brokerhouse Distributors Inc. Butcher and Restaurant Equipment Campione Restaurant

Supply Inc. Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Celco Inc. Chefs Paradise / C.A. Paradis Inc. Chris’s Store Fixtures Cook’s Mate Restaurant Equipment Supply Inc., The (RED) Custom Stainless Works Inc. David Food Processing Equipment Del-Bac Sales Ltd. (ESI) Demenz Restaurant and Hotel Supplies Ltd.(ESI) Dinetz Restaurant Equipment Ltd. Entegra Procurement Services Eurodib H & K Canada Hamilton Store Fixtures Ltd - HSF Hanway Restaurant Equipment

Hendrix Restaurant equipment & Supplies

3011 HWY 29, Brockville, ON K6V 5V2 Tel: 844-656-0303 Email: Customerservice@ hendrixequip.com www.hendrixequip.com

Hendrix Restaurant Equipment & Supplies Kingston & Ottawa Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada I Food Equipment Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. J.F.S. Restaurant Equipment Ltd. (RED) Jarden Consumer Solutions Jordash Co. Ltd. Kitchenaid Canada, a Whirlpool division La Compagnie Empire Crockery Level it Inc. LG Electronics Canada Maxum The Commercial Kitchen Depot MCL Hospitality Ltd. Nella Cucina Nella Cutlery & Food Equipment Inc. Niagara Restaurant Supply Ltd. Nikolaou Restaurant Equipment Ltd. PVA Enterprises / Reliable Food Service Equipment Roma Caribbean Hotel & Restaurant Supply Ltd. Russell Food Equipment S.T.O.P. Restaurant Supply Ltd. Silver Star Metal Fabricating Inc. Specialty Beverage Solutions

Spring Air Systems Sunshine Bar & Restaurant Supply Tiba Restaurant Equipment Service Trans Canada Store & Restaurant Supplies Ltd. (RED) Trimen Food Service Equipment Inc. W.H. Puddifoot Ltd Williams Food Equipment Co. Ltd. Dish Washing Equipment, Supplies Avmor Ltd. / Kleen Canada Blakeslee Foodservice Equipment Burlodge Canada Ltd.

Cooper-Atkins Corporation

ECOLAB

5105 Tomken Rd. Mississauga, ON L4W 2X5 Tel: 1-800-352-5326 Fax: 1-800-665-5256 www.whycleanmatters.com marketing@ecolab.ca Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada Insinger Machine Co. Jet Tech Systems / MVP Group Magic White Inc. Meiko USA, Inc. Miele Limited MVP Group Power Soak, a Unified Brands company Procter & Gamble Professional San Jamar Foodservice Solutions JYJ Swissh Commercial Equipment Inc. Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Union Gas Whirlpool Canada Dispensers (Non-Beverage) Chef Specialties Dante Group International Ecolab Kruger Products San Jamar Foodservice Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Server Products Tork Hygiene Products, a division of SCA Dispensing Equipment (Beverage) BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Berg Liquor Controls Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Chef Specialties Draught Services

December 2016 | 1 7


Hoshizaki America Inc. IMI Cornelius Inc. Magnuson Industries, Inc. Megcour Foodservice Inc. Pepsi Beverages Canada Regal Ware Inc. Saeco, division of Philips Canada Salton/Jascor Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Server Products Specialty Beverage Solutions Toronto Hospitality UBC Group Western Refrigeration & Beverage Equipment Display Cases: Refrigerated & Non-Refrigerated A.J. Antunes & Co. Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Cool King Refrigeration Ltd. Coolmate Rentals Decastris Refrigeration Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada General Refrigeration HABCO Henny Penny Corporation Hoshizaki America Inc. Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Lockwood Manufacturing Company QBD Modular Systems Silver King True Food Service Equipment Western Refrigeration & Beverage Equipment Ltd. . Distributor: Equipment Arctic Refrigeration and Equipment Flanagan Foodservice Hamilton Agencies Hamilton Store Fixtures Ltd. - HSF LRS Paging Canada Magnuson Industries, Inc. MVR Cash and Carry PVA Enterprises / Reliable Food Service Equipment Rabco Food Service Limited Food Processing Equipment & Blenders Berkel Company, a division of ITW Food Equipment Bettcher Industries Inc. Duke Manufacturing Co. Dynamic International Electro Freeze Globe Food Equipment Co. Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Orient Depot Tarrison Products Ltd. Univex Corporation Varimixer c/o Garland

Canada Vita-Mix Waring Commercial Fryers American Range APW Wyott, a Standex company Autofry Distex M & M Inc. Filtercorp Frymaster Corp. c/o Garland Commercial Ranges Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment General Filtration Henny Penny Corporation Keating of Chicago Inc. Kendale Products Ltd. M.K.E. Industries Perfect Fry Company Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc. TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Griddles & Grills Accutemp Products Inc. APW Wyott, a Standex Company Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co. Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment M.K.E. Industries MVP Group, formerly Canadist International Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc. Quest Metal Works Ltd., division of Russell Food Equipment Ltd. Star Manufacturing International Inc. The Middleby Corporation Wood Stone Corporation Ice Machines, Cubers, Ice Storage Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Hoshizaki America Inc. Ice-O-Matic/Mile High Equipment Co. Ltd. IMI Cornelius Inc. Kold-Draft Magic White Inc. Manitowoc Ice Inc. Permul Limited Ravensbergen Bakery Supplies Ltd. Scotsman Ice Systems TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Induction Cooking CookTek Globe Hotelware Agency Inc. Heartland Food Products

1 8 | Ontario Restaurant News

KBC Specialty Products Inc. Regal Ware Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. Kettles Accutemp Products Inc. JustSteph Sales Inc. Merco Products, division of Manitowoc The Middleby Corporation Tomlinson Industries Knives Bettcher Industries Inc. Canada Cutlery Inc. Chef Works Canada Inc. Dexter-Russell, Inc. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Knifewear Victorinox Switzerland Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Laundry Equipment, Supplies Coinamatic Commercial Laundry Inc Ecolab Magic White Inc. Miele Limited Milnor Laundry Systems Union Gas Whirlpool Canada Manufacturers Agents Arnott Distributors Inc. Bum Contract Furniture Chesher Equipment Ltd. Collis Group Dayco Distributing Ltd. Fort Marketing Ltd. - West KGB Marketing Inc. Maximum Food Sales & Marketing Inc. Nunes Culinary Source Permul Limited S.P. Sales Canada Inc. Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Unisync Group W.D. Colledge Co. Ltd. Microwave Ovens Amana Commercial Products, a division of Whirlpool MVP Group, formerly Canadist International Panasonic Canada Inc. Permul Limited Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Sharp Electronics of Canada Ovens: Bakery & Combination Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond GroupCanada Food Equipment Ltd. Doyon Equipment Inc., A Middleby Company Earthstone Wood/Gas Fire Ovens Eurodib Henny Penny Corporation

Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby Company Sipromac / Picard Ovens Rational Canada Inc. Pasta Making Equipment, Products Bluebird Mfg Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Espresso Avenue Faema Canada Stephan Machinery (Canada) Ltd. Pizza Equipment, Products Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. American Metalcraft Inc. APW Wyott, a Standex Company Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co. Bluebird Mfg. Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Chicago Metallic Bakeware Canada Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. CTX, A Middleby Company Distex M & M Inc. Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Garland Canada, a Division of Manitowoc Hatco Corporation Lockwood Manufacturing Company Merco Products, division of Manitowoc Moretti Ovens Canada PanSaver Ovenable Pan Liners Robot Coupe Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. The Middleby Corporation Thunderbird Food Machinery Inc. Tomlinson Industries What A Pizza Wood Stone Corporation POS Systems AM/PM Service Ltd. Armagh Cash Register Ltd. Casio Canada Ltd. Caterease Software/Horizon Business Services Chase Paymentech Canada CLS Info Givex HDX Solutions / Posera InnSource Solutions Inc. Justin eTraining Key POS Maitre’ D by Posera

Matrix Integrated Solutions Menu Tools Inc. Micros Systems Inc., an Oracle Company NCR Radiant Systems Panasonic Canada Inc. PixelPoint POS Canada POS Systems Ltd. Profitek P.O.S. Solutions Radeon Advanced POS Solutions Sharp Electronics of Canada Silverware POS Inc. Squirrel Systems Sweda Canada Inc. Technic POS Teletec Systems Inc. Toshiba TEC Canada Inc. Touch Bistro Trim - P.O.S. Software Visual Information Products Vivonet Inc. Volante Systems Pots, Pans Bluebird Mfg. Browne + Co. Chicago Metallic Bakeware Canada Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Padinox Inc. Regal Ware Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Racks & Storage Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., Diamond Group Cres Cor Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc.

Julien Commercial Kitchen Solutions - QC Market Forge Industries Inc. Megcour Foodservice Inc. Metropolitan Wire (Canada) Ltd. Ranges, Broilers & Rotisseries American Range Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co Blodgett Oven Company Cleveland Range c/o Garland Commercial Ranges Distex M & M Inc. Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment Hardt Equipment Manufacturing Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Kendale Products Ltd. M.K.E. Industries

NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby company Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc. Quest Metal Works Ltd., div. of Russell Food Equipment Ltd. Rational Canada Inc. Southern Pride Distributing LLC TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. The Middleby Corporation The Montague Company Toastmaster, a Middleby company Vollrath Company L.L.C. Wood Stone Corporation Refrigeration Equipment, Service Action Restaurant Equipment Services Ltd. APW Wyott, a Standex Company Arctic Air Beverage-Air Built Rite Solutions Canadian Curtis Refrigeration Inc. Carlisle Foodservice Products Cooper-Atkins Corporation Distex M & M Inc. HABCO Hoshizaki America Inc. IFI Refrigeration Kason Industries M.K.E. Industries Master-Bilt, a Standex International Company Norbec Systems Inc. Nor-Lake Inc., a division of Standex Silver King Tarrison Products Ltd. True Food Service Equipment Western Refrigeration & Beverage Equipment Ltd. Restroom Equipment, Supplies Alpine Specialty Chemicals Ltd Avmor Ltd. / Kleen Canada Bay West Paper Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Cannon Services Carlisle Foodservice Products Cascades Tissue Group Cintas - The Uniform People Deb Canada Diversey Care, a division of Sealed Air Ecolab Georgia Pacific Canada Consumer Products KBC Specialty Products Inc.

Kruger Products Procter & Gamble Professional Rubbermaid Canada Commercial Products San Jamar Foodservice Tork Hygiene Products, a division of SCA Scales Browne + Co. Ecolab Gemsys Money Handling Systems Globe Food Equipment Co. JustSteph Sales Inc. Kilotech POS Canada Toshiba TEC Canada Inc. Total Tobletop Plus Slicers Berkel Company, a division of ITW Food Equipment Bizerba Canada Inc. Canada Cutlery Inc. Edlund Company Globe Food Equipment Co. Robot Coupe Univex Corporation Vollrath Company L.L.C. Toasters Belleco, Inc. Hamilton Beach Brands Inc. Hatco Corporation JustSteph Sales Inc. Megcour Foodservice Inc. Merco Products, division of Manitowoc Prince Castle Inc. Star Manufacturing International Inc. The Middleby Corporation Trays Cambro Manufacturing Company Carlisle Foodservice Products Cima-Pak Corp. G.E.T. Enterprises Inc. Johnson-Rose Inc. Mfg Tray Co. Orbis Corporation, formerly Norseman Plastics Pactiv Canada Inc. Polar Pak Rubbermaid Canada Commercial Products Utensils: Kitchen & Cooling Bios Professional / Thermor Ltd. Bluebird Mfg. Brama Inc. (RED) Canada Cutlery Inc. Chef Specialties G.E.T. Enterprises Inc. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Johnson-Rose Inc. Thunder Group Inc.


Trudeau Corporation Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Warming & Holding Equipment Alto-Shaam Canada Inc. Carter-Hoffmann CookTek Equipex Ltd. FWE - Food Warming Equipment Co. Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment Kendale Products Ltd. Metropolitan Wire (Canada) Ltd.

Food Appetizers, Hors d’Oeuvres Bonte Foods Limited Clearwater Seafoods Limited Partnership Expresco Foods Grand River Foods High Liner Foods Inc. IFC Seafood Janes Family Foods Ltd. King and Prince Seafood Kontos Foods Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. McCain Foods Canada Olymel/Galco Reuven International Willowfield Enterprises Ltd. Bakery Products ACE Bakery Ardent Mills Backerhaus Veit Ltd. BakeMark Ingredients Canada Ltd. (AFD)

Canada Bread Company, division of Grupo Bimbo Carole’s Cheesecake Company Ltd. Chudleigh’s Coveted Cakes Dealers Ingredients Inc. Dufflet Pastries, division of Best Baking Inc. English Bay Batter Inc. Fiera Foods Company Flour Confections General Mills Canada Corporation Give and Go Prepared Foods Handi Foods Ltd. / Mediterranean Bakery Ireks North America Kirkwood Kitchens, a division of Dewnorth Kontos Foods L & M Bakers Supply Co. La Danoiserie

La Rocca Creative Cakes McCall’s Bakers Warehouse McCormick Canada Oakrun Farm Bakery Ltd. Otis Spunkmeyer Canada Ltd, division of Aryzta P & H Milling Group Pfalzgraf Patisserie PreGel CANADA Puratos Canada Inc. Qzina Specialty Foods, a division of Chefs Warehouse Ravensbergen Bakery Supplies Ltd. Rich’s Products of Canada Saputo Foods Solis Mexican Foods Inc. The Original Cakerie Ltd. Tradition Fine Foods Ltd. Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Tyson Foodservice Weston Foods Wow! Factor Desserts Cheese, Cheese Products Agropur, Cheese and Ingredients division

Chicago 58 Food Products Limited Dealers Ingredients Inc. Finica Food Specialties Flanagan Foodservice Ivanhoe Cheese, division of Gay Lea Jan K. Overweel Ltd. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Neilson Dairy, a Saputo Company Parmalat Canada Salerno Dairy Products, a division of Gay Lea Saputo Foods Skotidakis Farm Solis Mexican Foods Inc. Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Condiments (General) Derlea Brand Foods E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods JFC International (Canada) Inc. Kikkoman Sales USA, Inc. McCormick Canada McIlhenny Company Olive-it Canada Reckitt Benckiser Canada Inc. Select Food Products Ltd. Smucker Foods of Canada The Kraft Heinz Company Unico Inc. Unilever Foodsolutions

Whytes Dairy Products Dealers Ingredients Inc. Elco Fine Foods Inc. Gay Lea Foodservice Kozy Shack Enterprises Natrel, a division of Agropur Neilson Dairy, a Saputo Company Parmalat Canada Saputo Foods SunOpta Inc. Deli Meats Brandt Meat Packers Ltd. Expresco Foods Heidelberg Foods Ltd. Olymel/Galco Sofina Foods Springer’s Meats Inc. Tyson Foods, Inc. Vienna Meats Desserts & Dessert Products Berthelet Food Products Carole’s Cheesecake Company Ltd. Chudleigh’s Coveted Cakes Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Flour Confections Gumpert’s La Rocca Creative Cakes Martin Desserts McCain Foods Canada McCall’s Bakers Warehouse Pfalzgraf Patisserie PreGel CANADA Qzina Specialty Foods, a division of Chefs Warehouse Shalit Fine Foods The Eli’s Cheesecake Company Tyson Foodservice W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Wow! Factor Desserts Distributors: Food Better Food Concepts Costco Wholesale Canada Ltd. Coveted Cakes Empire Foods Ltd. (ITWAL) Findlay Foods Ltd. Kingston

Gordon Food Service Giraffe Food & Beverage Greenhouse Central IFC Seafood Kariba Foods Ltd. Kehan Food Imports Inc. Kronos Foods Ltd. Mercury Wholesale Foods Morton Wholesale Ltd. North Ontario Food Sales Olympic Wholesale Co. Ricco Food Distributor Sheridan Specialties Skor Wholesale Market-

place, division of Colabor Stewart Foodservice Inc. Summit Food Service Distributors Inc. Sysco Tannis Food Distributors Trent Valley Distributors Willowfield Enterprises Ltd. Wow! Factor Desserts Eggs, Egg Products Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Cargill Kitchen Solutions Egg Farmers of Ontario

EggSolutions 283 Horner Ave. Etobicoke, ON M8Z 4Y4 Tel: 1-866-Eggs-4-You Email: info@eggsolutions.com www.eggsolutions.com MFI Food Canada, a Michael Food subsidiary Entrees Carmen Creek Gourmet Bison Clearwater Seafoods Expresco Foods Heritage Frozen Foods KeyBrand Foods Inc. Kirkwood Kitchens, a division of Dewnorth Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Les Plats du Chef (Thyme & Truffles) Marsan Foods Ltd. Nestle Professional Peter the Chef Fine Foods Ltd. Pintys Delicious Foods TMF - The Meat Factory Ethnic Foods / Kosher Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Bonte Foods Limited Burke Corporation ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. Elco Fine Foods Inc. Finica Food Specialties, a Gellert Global Co Grecian Delight Heritage Frozen Foods Ltd. Italpasta Ltd. Jan K. Overweel Ltd. JFC International (Canada) Inc. Kontos Foods Kronos Foods Ltd. McCormick Canada Meaty Meats Inc. Mina, by Maple Leaf Mission Foods Mr. Donair, a division of Tony’s Meats Naleway Foods Ltd. Ozawa Canada Inc. Patak’s Foods Limited Patty King International

Pintys Delicious Foods Queens Pasta Rosina Food Products Shalit Fine Foods Solis Mexican Foods Inc. Sonora Foods Tatangelo’s Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables The Butcher Shoppe Unico Inc. Weston Foods Wing’s Foods Products Wong Wing Foods, division of McCain Foods

Rosemount Sales & Marketing T. McConnell Sales & Marketing Ltd. Total Focus Foodservice Sales & Marketing Inc. Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Trimark Sales & Marketing TTS Marketing Uniidirect Sales & Marketing Upper Canada Food Group Ltd.

Fish, Seafood & Shellfish Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Allseas Fisheries Inc. Aqua Star Canada Inc. Atlantic Aqua Farms Inc. Azuma Foods (Canada) Co. Ltd. Clearwater Seafoods Limited Partnership Clover Leaf Seafoods Inc. Confederation Cove Mussel Co. Export Packers Company Limited Flanagan Foodservice Grand River Foods

French Fries Cavendish Farms Lamb Weston Canada, a division of ConAgra McCain Foods Canada Simplot Foods

IFC Seafood Janes Family Foods Ltd. King and Prince Seafood MacGregor’s Meat & Seafood Ltd. Ocean Brands Oceanfood Sales Ltd. Oyster Boy Prince Edward Aqua Farms Royal Star Foods Sea Watch International Shafer Haggart Ltd. Sysco Fine Meats Toppits Foods Ltd. Trident Seafoods Corp. True North Salmon Co. Willowfield Enterprises Ltd. Food Brokers Aliments AGG Foods C. B. Powell Corporation C.W. Shasky & Associates Ltd. Concord National Inc. Ontario Freeman Signature Inform Brokerage International Pacific Sales Ltd. J.L. International Magnum Food Brokers Inc. McCormack Bourrie Sales & Marketing PJB - Primeline - Ontario Provision Sales & Marketing Inc.

Fruits, General A. Lassonde Inc. A.J. Lanzarotta Wholesale Alasko IPS Frozen Foods Inc. Dole Packaged Foods Flanagan Foodservice Inc. Norpac Food Sales Ontario Food Terminal Board Prodex Shafer Haggart Ltd. Sun Rich Fresh Foods Inc. Sunkist Growers Tatangelo’s Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables The California Cling Peach Board Healthcare Foods / Gluten Free Allergy Aliments ED Foods Inc. EggSolutions Inc. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Marsan Foods Ltd. Meaty Meats Inc. MFI Food Canada, a Michael Food subsidiary Nestle Professional Parmalat Canada Piller’s Fine Foods Pintys Delicious Foods Reuven International Shafer Haggart Ltd. Summer Fresh Salads W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Meats AdvancePierre Foods Belmont Meat Products Ltd.

BontÉ Foods Limited

615 Champlain St. Dieppe, NB E1A 7Z7 Tel: 506-857-0025 1-888-859-7222 Fax: 506-859-6905 www.bonte.ca moncton@bonte.ca

Brandt Meat Packers Ltd.

Burke Corporation Cardinal Meat Special ists Ltd. Cargill Kitchen Solutions Chicago 58 Food Products Limited Delft Blue/Proveal Elite Meat Company, The European Quality Meats and Sausages Export Packers Company Limited Expresco Foods Finica Food Specialties, a Gellert Global Co. Flanagan Foodservice Grand River Foods Hills Foods Ltd. Hormel Foods International Corporation Intercity Packers Ltd. Jadee Meat Products Leavoy Rowe Beef Co. Lesters Foods Limited MacGregor’s Meat & Seafood Ltd. Maple Leaf Foodservice Meat & Livestock Australia Meaty Meats Inc. Montpak International Olymel/Galco Ontario Pork Original Philadelphia Cheesesteak Co. Piller’s Fine Foods Pure Food Meat Solutions Rose Packing Company Sofina Foods Sysco Fine Meats The Bruss Company, a Tyson Foods division The Butcher Shoppe The Lamb Company TMF - The Meat Factory Tony’s Meats Tyson Foods, Inc. Tyson Foodservice VIAU Foods Inc. Oils, Fats, Shortenings ACH Food Companies Bunge (Canada) C.P. Vegetable Oil Inc. CanolaInfo ConAgra Foods Canada Dealers Ingredients Inc. Hubberts Industries Richardson Oilseed Limited Smucker Foods of Canada Stratas Foods Vito Oil Filter Pasta, Noodles Italpasta Ltd. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Nestle Professional Olivieri Foods Pasquale Bros. Downtown Ltd. Peter the Chef Fine Foods Ltd. Queens Pasta Unico Inc. Continued on Page 22

December 2016 | 1 9


Foodservice Marketing Resources to promote Ontario turkey on your menu Smoked Turkey Club

H ot T urkey

Knife & Fork Sandwich

Turkey Black Bean Salad

Jerk Turkey

Mango Wraps

Best Ever

T urkey Chili

The Today's Special Recipe Booklet Folders & Recipes

Operator Handbook


Continued from page 19 Pizza, Pizza Products Ardent Mills Aurora Importing and Distributing Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Bonte Foods Limited Burke Corporation Chase Global Foods Ltd. ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. Earthstone Wood/Gas Fire Ovens Hormel Foods International Corporation Jadee Meat Products Kontos Foods Kraft Heinz Company McCain Foods Canada McCormick Canada Musco Family Olive Co. Nestle Professional Olive-it Canada Olymel/Galco P & H Milling Group Parmalat Canada Queens Pasta Rich’s Products of Canada Saputo Foods Springer’s Meats Inc. Tyson Foods, Inc. Unico Inc. VIAU Foods Inc. Portion Packs Kraft Heinz Company McIlhenny Company Smucker Foods of Canada Sun Rich Fresh Foods Inc. W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Potatoes, Potato Products Bamford Produce Co. Ltd. Basic American Foods Cavendish Farms Heritage Frozen Foods Ltd. Lamb Weston Canada, a division of ConAgra McCain Foods Canada Potatoes New Brunswick Reser’s Fine Foods Tatangelo’s Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables Poultry AdvancePierre Foods Brandt Meat Packers Ltd. Burke Corporation Canards du lac Brome Ltd. Chicken Farmers of Ontario D&D Poultry Elite Meat Company, The Exceldor Foods, aka Butterball Canada Exceldor Poultry Export Packers Company Limited Expresco Foods Grand River Foods Intercity Packers Ltd. Janes Family Foods Ltd.

JD Sweid, formerly Elmira Poultry Inc. King Cole Ducks Ltd. La Brochette Maple Leaf Foodservice Maple Lodge Farms Nikolaos Fine Foods Ltd. Olymel/Galco Piller’s Fine Foods Pintys Delicious Foods Reuven International Simplot Foods Sofina Foods SunOpta Inc. Sysco Fine Meats TNT Foods International Turkey Farmers of Ontario Tyson Foods, Inc. Rice Dainty, Les Aliments Dainty Foods MARS Canada Shafer Haggart Ltd. Salad Dressings Carole’s Cheesecake Company Ltd. Dr. Oetker Canada Ltd. E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., di vision of Treehouse Foods Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. McCullagh Coffee & Juiceables Select Food Products Ltd. Unilever Foodsolutions Sauces, Bases

Aliments ED FOODS

6200 Trans-Canada Pointe-Claire, QC H9R 1B9 Tel: 1-800-267-3333 Fax: 514-695-0281 www.ed.ca edinfo@ed.ca Berthelet Food Products Campbell’s Foodservice Catelli Foods Canada Corporation E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods Earth’s Own Food Com pany Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. Ivanhoe Cheese, division of Gaylea JC Creative Foods Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Neil Jones Food Company Nestle Professional Olivieri Foods, a division of Catelli Select Food Products Ltd. Solis Mexican Foods Inc.

2 2 | Ontario Restaurant News

Torani Italian Syrups Unilever Foodsolutions W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Wing’s Foods of Alberta Ltd. Seasonings, Spices, Herbs ACH Food Companies Inc. Aliments ED Foods Inc. Berthelet Food Products Bush Dreams Chef Paul Prudhommes’ Magic Seasoning Blends Chef Specialties Chester Fried Chicken Club House, a division of McCormick Canada Derlea Brand Foods Fresh Herbs by Daniel Fresherized Foods Ireks North America Toronto Kerry Ingredients & Flavours Malabar Super Spice

McIlhenny Company Snacks, Snack Foods Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Coveted Cakes Diamond Foods / California Walnuts J&J Snack Foods Corp. Johnvince Foods Distribution Kellogg Canada Inc. MARS Canada Pepsi Foods Canada Piller’s Fine Foods Solis Mexican Foods Inc. Trophy Foods Inc. Tyson Foodservice Soups Aliments ED Foods Inc. Berthelet Food Products Bonte Foods Limited Campbell’s Foodservice Clearwater Seafoods Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Marsan Foods Ltd. Neil Jones Food Company Nestle Professional Norpac Food Sales Sea Watch International Unilever Foodsolutions Tomatoes, Tomato Products Aurora Importing and Distributing California Tomato Growers ConAgra Foods Canada Inc.

E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods Greenhouse Central Italpasta Ltd. Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Neil Jones Food Company Prodex Stanislaus Food Products Tatangelo’s Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables Unico Inc. Vegetables A.J. Lanzarotta Wholesale Alasko IPS Frozen Foods Inc. Arctic Gardens, a Bonduelle Company Bamford Produce Bondi Produce Bonduelle Americas Canadian Produce Marketing Association Cavendish Farms Delmare Quality Foods Ltd. Flanagan Foodservice Inc. Fresh USA (CA & FL) Tomatoes Gielow Pickles Greenhouse Central I-D Foods Corporation Kraft Heinz Company Monaghan Mushrooms Norpac Food Sales Ontario Food Terminal Board Ponderosa Mushrooms Shafer Haggart Ltd. Summer Fresh Salads Tatangelo’s Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables Ubbelea Mushroom Farms Ltd. Yogurt Chapman’s Ice Cream Danone Inc. Dr. Smoothie Brands Gay Lea Foodservice Natrel, a division of Agropur Neilson Dairy, a Saputo Company Parmalat Canada PreGel CANADA Skotidakis Farm Ultima Foods Yogen Fruz Yoplait, division of General Mills

Services Associations Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Beef Information Centre Canadian Association of Foodservice Professionals

Canadian Beverage Association Canadian Culinary Federation (CCFCC) Canadian Hospitality Foundation Canadian Produce Marketing Association CanolaInfo Catfish Institute, The Chicken Farmers of Ontario Commercial Food Equipment Service Association Dairy Farmers of Canada Ottawa Dairy Farmers of Ontario Food and Consumer Products of Canada Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada Hotel Association of Canada National Sunflower Association of Canada Inc. Ontario Craft Brewers Ontario Greenhouse Vegetable Growers Ontario Hostelry Institute Ontario Pork Ontario Restaurant Hotel & Motel Association Ontario Tourism Education Corporation Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation (OTMPC) Potatoes New Brunswick Resorts of Ontario Restaurants Canada Tea Association of Canada Turkey Farmers of Ontario Wild Blueberry of North America Wine Council of Ontario Workplace Safety and Preventation Services

Marsh Canada Menu Tools Inc. MPP Marketing Group Inc. R.E.D. Canada Restaurant Equipment Distributors of Canada Limited Smart Serve Ontario Steritech Surety Food Safety Group Inc. The Fifteen Group TrainCan Inc. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Credit Cards American Express (Amex Canada) Diners Club Canada, division of BMO Direct Cash ATM Discover Card Global Payments Canada MasterCard Moneris Solutions POS Canada TD Visa VISA Canada Disposable & Paper Products Annemar Apparel, formerly Canawipe Distributors Ltd. Polar Pak Tork Hygiene Products, a division of SCA Entertainment Equipment, Services Action Bulk Vending Bell TV NTN Buzztime Panasonic Canada Inc. PC Music Sound Products Limited The Playdium Store, formerly Starburst Coin Machines Inc.

Buying Group AFD Marketing Group Alliance Purchasing Services Inc. Entegra Procurement Services ESI Groupex, a division of Restaurants Canada ITWAL Ltd. R.E.D. Canada Restaurant Equipment Distribu tors of Canada Limited R.I.B.A. Corporation

Equipment Parts, Services Bell Canada, Equipment division Draught Services

Consultants - Management, Marketing & Training adHOME Creative Allercom Allergy Consulting, Inc. Brick and Mobile CBRE Hotels dine.TO Hospitality Marketing Consultants Inc. Hospitality Solutions Ottawa Justin eTraining

Garbage Disposal Clean River, division of Midpoint International Inc. Emterra Group In-Sink-Erator (Emerson Electric) Organic Resource Management Inc. Pressure Kleen Services Co. Inc. Progressive Waste Solutions

JIKS Industrial Kitchen Services R.G. Henderson & Son Ltd.

Rothsay, a division of Darling Ingredients Sanimax Waste Management of Canada Corp. Linen Services Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Pest Control Abell Pest Control Inc. Cannon Services Ecolab HD Supply Facilities Maintenance Orkin Canada Inc Recycling, Compactors Canada Composting Inc. Emterra Group Progressive Waste Solutions Rothsay, a division of Darling Ingredients Utilities Bullfrog Power Inc. Enbridge Gas Distribution

Reliance Commercial Solutions

2 Lansing Square, 12th Floor Toronto, ON M2J 4P8 Tel: 1-866-RELIANCE (7354-2623) reliancecommercialsolutions.com nmartin@reliancecomfort.com Superior Propane Union Gas

Check out the complete Buyers’ Guide at: restaurant buyersguide. ca. Company listings can be added and revised online or emailed to Peter Elliott: pelliott@ canadian restaurantnews. com.


A T L A N T I C Vol. 18 | No. 4

Restaurants unite at Eliot & Vine By Bill Tremblay HALIFAX — Restaurateurs in West End Halifax are working together to establish their neighbourhood as a culinary destination. A few months after Johanna Eliot opened Eliot & Vine, at 2305 Clifton St., her chef left for another venture, taking staff members with him. Chef Ray Bear, who owns Studio East next door to Eliot & Vine, wanted to ensure his neighbour was successful, and offered to help fill the gap left in the kitchen. “When we needed somebody to step into our kitchen briefly, he did,” Eliot said. “He came in and cooked for a few nights, while we put ads out looking for kitchen staff.” Bear also helped Eliot review resumes submitted for the kitchen positions advertised. “A lot of people wouldn’t do that, but I think there’s lots of people that would,” Eliot said. “He’s just that kind of guy, like I’m that kind of gal. I would help him out if he needed it as well.” Eliot explained the location of their two restaurants, as well as several other foodservice establishments in the area, means restaurateurs have to work together to draw customers to the neighbourhood.

“We’re really trying to build a food community in this part of Halifax. We’re not right in the downtown core,” Eliot said. “It’s sort of building a neighbourhood centre for good food and wine.” For the chef position, Eliot recruited Lachlan Culjak, a Halifax native who has worked in numerous fine dining restaurants including: Nota Bene and the former Splendido in Toronto; Noma in Copenhagen, Denmark; Mayer’s Restaurant auf Schloss Prielau, a two-Michelin Star restaurant in Zell am See, Austria; and most recently he worked as development chef at Nur in Hong Kong, helping the restaurant earn its first Michelin star. Eliot & Vine serves modern European food in an upscale, but casual environment. “It’s a little bit about my tastes, I lived in Europe for many years,” Eliot said. “I love the style and the way people eat in Europe. It’s more slow and family oriented. I just love that vibe and all the flavours.” The 60-seat restaurant features a long bar, main dining room, chef ’s table and second dining area nicknamed The Frolic Room, a tribute to a Hollywood lounge with the same moniker. Dinner checks average about $50 per person. While the restaurant is Eliot’s first foodservice venture, her television production company

Eliot & Vine’s new chef, Lachlan Culjak. Ocean Entertainment has created more than 500 hours of Food Network television. “I’ve been around food and recipes a long time. I’ve worked with many chefs and I’m used to working with people who know how to cook,” Eliot said. Today, the restaurants in West End Halifax continue to assist each other in ensuring their

of dough, 30 lbs of celery, 15 lbs of red pepper and five gallons of mayonnaise.

The 2016 competitions included: The Oyster Grower of the Year competition allows professional Island growers to showcase their farm-raised oysters. 1st Place ($1,500)- Jason Simpson 2nd Place ($750) – Martin O’Brien 3rd Place ($500) – Wayne Wallace People’s Choice – Tommy Jo MacDonald Sr. P.E.I. Potato Chowder Championship 1st ($1,000) – Erin Henry, Piatto 2nd ($250) – Mitchell Jackson, Claddagh Oyster House 3rd ($100) – Mike Elyfson, ADL

P.E.I. Shellfish Festival CHARLOTTETOWN — Highlights from the 21st annual P.E.I. International Shellfish Festival included a slew of competitions and the creation of a record-breaking lobster roll.

It also saw an increase in attendance of 13.5 per cent over 2015. The creation of a 120-foot lobster roll included 120 pounds of P.E.I. lobster meat, 30 lbs

Garland Canada International Chef Challenge Andrew McLeod – Bolete, St. Catharines, Ont. (1st Place) – $10,000 Mark Andrews – Barlette Mitchell, London, England (2nd Place) – $2,500 Mott’s Clamato Best Caesar In Town 1st ($1,000) – Malary Schurman, The Merchantman Seafood & Oyster Bar 2nd – Matt Kelly, Olde Dublin Pub

businesses thrive, from sharing staff and ingredients to bouncing ideas of one another. “We shout out about one another through advertising and social media. We celebrate each others’ successes,” Eliot said. “It’s a great relationship and it’s great for the neighbourhood. The food only gets better with that kind of love and attention.”

3rd – Melissa Meyers, The Brickhouse Shiny Sea P.E.I. Oyster Shucking Championship 1st ($500) – Jeff Noye 2nd ($250) – Marc Dolan 3rd ($100) – Melissa Somers Cleanest Plate ($100) – Marc Dolan Tie One On Mussel Competition 1st ($1,500) – Neil Ellsworth 2nd ($750) – Lester Clow 3rd ($500) – Jeff Peterson Raspberry Point International Oyster Shucking Championship 1st ($2,000) – Eamon Clark 2nd ($500) – Jason Nagy 3rd ($100) – Ian Peck Canada’s Smartest Kitchen International Chowder Championship 1st ($2,000) – Devon Latte, Notkin’s Montreal, Que. 2nd ($500) – Chris Lawson, Olde Dublin Pub Charlottetown 3rd ($250) – Sarah Stewart, Juniper Vancouver Next year’s festival runs Sept. 14-17.

November/ December 2016 | 2 3


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Convention Centre foodservice team readies for guests By Kristen Smith HALIFAX — When the Halifax Convention Centre opens in 2017, the foodservice team could serve as many as 3,500 seated guests at full capacity. The fifth-floor ballroom can seat up to 2,000 guests for plated meals and the convention hall has capacity for 1,500 seated guests. An anchor tenant of the Nova Centre, the five-storey convention centre has dealt with a number of delays. Excavation of the site started in 2012 with the expectation it would be ready in January 2016. The completion date was extended to Sept. 30, then March 2017, but the opening has been delayed again. At press time, a new completion date hadn’t been confirmed and the centre was working to relocate events planned for April. When the new facility does open, the foodservice team will be ready. Director of food and beverage Greg Smith and executive chef Christophe Luzeux have worked together at the World Trade and Convention Centre for two decades. “Christophe and I have worked together for a long time. Between the two of us, we have more than 80 years of industry experience, so I hope that’s coming through when we’re doing

our planning,” said Smith, who has been in the food and hospitality business for about 40 years and at the trade centre since 1995. A France native, Luzeux joined the convention centre in 1989. Before coming to Halifax, he completed his culinary education and worked in his home country, including some Michelin-starred restaurants in Northern France. “I started travelling the world; I wanted to do the world tour, like most of the chefs like to do sometimes. My first stop was in Nova Scotia and I’ve been here for 25 years,” Luzeux said. He took a commis position at the convention centre and worked his way to executive chef, a position he has held since 1993. Smith said there is a diverse team in the kitchen, including executive sous chef Pierre Gaudet, who is from New Brunswick and brings an Acadian influence to the team, as well as cooks and chefs from places such as Sri Lanka and Korea. “We want to make sure that when people come to Halifax, they get that local experience as well,” Smith said. “That all factored into our new menu. It definitely has some Mediterranean and European influences, but it also has local fare — we even have donairs.”

PIZZA

To your menu

The food and beverage team researched convention centre trends and talked to meeting planners to ensure the new menu fit with their needs. “We wanted to make it as easy on the meeting planner as possible,” said Smith. They discovered a desire for grab-and-go options and market-style food stations. “They still exist, but the days of those formal sit-down dinners with everybody sitting with the same 10 people for three days are kind of gone,” said Smith. “They [delegates] want to network, they want to talk to each other, and so you’ll see more grab-and-go style.” In the kitchen, Luzeux and his team are focused on from-scratch cooking and sourcing what they can from local suppliers. “We just changed the breakfast sausages to a local supplier, because we find the flavour is much better. It was not a question of cost, it’s a question of flavours,” Luzeux said. “We want to make sure we provide our guests with the best quality of product we can get and really reflect what’s local and available.” With the volume expected at the new convention centre — as many as 3,500 at one time — Luzeux said they aren’t able to source everything locally, but perhaps they will be able to down the road.

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“As part of our strategy, we’re also engaging the local providers and seeing what they can provide. So we based the menu on what we knew we could get,” Smith added. This extends to the beverage list as well, which includes Propeller Brewery’s craft sodas, a selection of Nova Scotia wines and some local beer, which Smith said he is working to expand. With about 50 people on the food and beverage team, plans call for hiring more staff when operations move to the new Halifax Convention Centre. “When we get up and going at full production, we’re going to need that doubled — that’s our goal,” Smith said. At the trade centre, Luzeux and his kitchen brigade cook for groups as large as 2,500 guests. When they move into the new state-of-theart production kitchen, Luzeux has full confidence in his team’s ability to adjust to the extra capacity. “The crew we have in the kitchen, a lot of them have been with me from the beginning,” he said. “We have a lot of understanding of how things are going to flow and how many staff we need — it’s amazing to see how fast we can deliver a dinner at night with the crew we have.”

The Canteen gets new digs DARTMOUTH, N.S. — At the current location of The Canteen, above Two If By Sea Café, staff get creative to replicate common kitchen equipment often taken for granted, such as a gas stove. “I’ve got an amazing team and I know they’re all super-excited to get in there and meet a new challenge and be able to really cook in a kitchen, because right now we’re in a tiny space with induction burners,” said chef/owner Renée Lavallée. “I think we do really well with what we’ve got, but to get into an actual kitchen is going to be really amazing for us.” The new kitchen is admittedly still small, but will have a gas stove, flat top, grill, salamander and a walk-in fridge. In October, Lavallée announced the sandwich shop was moving from Ochterloney Street to 22 Portland St., into the former home of the Sun Sun Café. The Canteen is expanding in size from 25 to 55 seats in the 1,800-square-foot space as well as adding dinner and brunch to the menu. She envisions a neighbourhood establishment, not a special occasion restaurant.

“You’re going to feel like you’re in someone’s home,” Lavallée said. “I want it to be as seasonal and local as we can. Keep it so it’s simple enough for everyone … just some really solid comfort food, done really well.” Menu plans call for dishes such as seafood chowder, roasted heirloom carrot salad, fried chicken sandwich, steak frites, house-made sausage pappardelle and salted caramel tart. When Lavallée opened The Canteen in March 2014, she didn’t have plans for expansion. “It was never part of the bigger picture. My lease was coming up in the New Year, in 2017, and we realized we were getting busier and busier,” she said. Lavallée’s friend, Elliot MacNeil of Bruno Builders Inc., purchased the Portland Street property and is renovating the building for both retail and residential space. Local design firm By + Large Studios will be behind the new Canteen’s décor. A $30,000 crowdfunding campaign reached its target in four days. The stretch goal of $50,000 was surpassed by another $15,000, for

Local design firm By + Large Studios will be behind The Canteen’s new decor. a total of more than $65,000, with contributions coming from 484 backers in exchange for rewards ranging from T-shirts to private parties. “We set what we thought would be a reasonable goal over three weeks; we did not expect this at all,” said Lavallée. “The community support has been overwhelming; it’s been amazing.”

Construction is slated to begin in November and take six to eight weeks, with the move scheduled for January. “We’d love to seamlessly move everything over from our current location into the new location and not have to be closed for more than a day or two, or not close at all, if that could work,” Lavallée said.

November/ December 2016 | 2 5


2017

ATLANTIC Buyers’ Directory

Research by: Peter Elliott Beverages

Alcohol: Beer & Ciders Annapolis Cider Bad Apple Brewhouse Barnone Brewery & Hop Farm Big Spruce Brewing Bogtrotter Craft Brewery Bore City Brewing Boxing Rock Brewing Co. Breton Brewing Co. Bulwark Cider Celtic Knot Brewing Diageo Canada Inc. First City Brewery Garrison Brewing Company Granite Brewery Grimross Brewing Co. Hammond River Brewing Intra Vino Kirkwood Diamond Canada Labatt Breweries Lazy Bear Brewing Nine Locks Brewing Co. North Brewing Company Mainbrace International Limited Mark Anthony Wine & Spirits Maybee Brew Co. McClelland Premium Imports Molson Coors Canada Moosehead Brewery Oland Brewery Picaroons PMA Canada Ltd. Port Rexton Brewing Premier Brands Premium Beer Co. Prince Edward Island Brewing Co. Propeller Brewing Company Quidi Vidi Brewery Railcar Brewing Red Rover Brewing Co. Saltbox Brewing Schoolhouse Brewery Sea Level Brewing Company ShipBuilders Cider Sleeman Brewery & Malting Co. Spindrift Brewing Company Storm Brewing Tatamagouche Brewing Co.

Townhouse Brewing Company Uncle Leo’s Brewery Upstreet Craft Brewing York County Cider Alcohol: Wines Andrew Peller Limited Atlantic Spirits and Wines Avondale Sky Winery Benjamin Bridge Bishop’s Cellar Blomidon Estate Winery Charton Hobbs Chateau des Charmes Wines Ltd. Churchill Cellars Ltd. Constellation Brands Christopher Stewart Wine & Spirits Devonian Coast Wineries Domaine de Grand Pré Ernest & Julio Gallo Win ery Canada Ltd. Foster’s Wine Estates Canada Franklin Imports Gaspereau Vineyards Gehringer Brothers Estate Winery Kirkwood Diamond Canada L’Acadie Vineyards Mainbrace International Limited Mark Anthony Wine & Spirits Muwin Estate Wines Ltd Nova Scotia Spirit Co. Philippe Dandurand Wines Ltd. PMA Canada Ltd. Select Wines Alcohol: Spirits Atlantic Spirits and Wines Ltd. Authentic Seacoast Distillery Bacardi Canada Barrelling Tide Distillery Caldera Distilling Canadian Iceberg Vodka Corp. Charton Hobbs Churchill Cellars Ltd. Christopher Stewart Wine & Spirits Coldstream Clear Distillery Corby Spirit and Wine Diageo Canada Inc. Glenora Distillery Halifax Distilling Co.

News 2 6 | |Restaurant Atlantic Restaurant News

Intra Vino Ironworks Distillery Jost Vineyards Kirkwood Diamond Canada Mainbrace International Limited Mer et Soleil Ozawa Canada Inc. Prince Edward Distillery PMA Canada Ltd. Steinhart Distillery Coffee & Tea Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Canterbury Coffee Down East Coffee Elco Fine Foods Inc. Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada G.E. Barbour Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. Java Blend Coffee Roasters Jumping Bean Coffee Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op Laughing Whale Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd., The Mixology Canada Inc. Mother Parker’s Tea & Coffee Inc. Nespresso Coffee Nestle Professional Reunion Island Coffee Limited SupraMatic Espresso Machines Starbucks Coffee Canada Tetley Canada Van Houtte Inc. Hot & Cold A. Lassonde Inc. Cafe Essentials Canada Dry Mott’s Inc. Coca-Cola Beverages Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. Island Originals Nestle Professional Ocean Spray International Parmalat Canada Pepsi Beverages Canada Scotsburn Dairy Group, a Saputo Company Sunpac Foods Ltd. Sun-Rype Products Ltd. Tree of Life Canada, a

KeHe Company Q Water

Decor

Chairs Bum Contract Furniture Contract Supply Corp. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. Grosfillex Holsag Canada Jetco Mfg. Ltd. JSP Industries Inc. Keca International Inc. Shorewood Furniture Ltd. The Table and Chair Co. UniChairs Inc. Furniture, Furnishings Interior Bum Contract Furniture Contract Supply Corp. Davidson Furniture Spe cialties Ltd. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. Holsag Canada JSP Industries Inc. Keca International Inc. Schoolhouse Products Inc. Simmons Canada Inc. Southern Aluminum The Table and Chair Co. Furniture, Furnishings Exterior

Contract Supply Corp. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. Grosfillex LCE Interiors Palette Furniture Southern Aluminum The Table and Chair Co. Total Tabletop Plus Menus, Menu Covers Creative Impressions Inc. Divine Menu Covers Ltd. Kronos Menu Covers Menus-Plus Menu By Design Menu Tools Inc.

Menu Boards Best Menu Boards E Display Impulse Graphics & Display Solutions Netvisual Table Tops & Bases Bum Contract Furniture Contract Supply Corp. Decor-Resto Inc. Dor-Val Mfg. Ltd. Jetco Mfg. Ltd. Keca International Inc. Schoolhouse Products Inc. Southern Aluminum Steady Eddie Table Stabilizers The Table and Chair Co. Uniforms Ansell Canada Inc. Blackwood Career Ap parel & Essentials Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Chef Uniforms - Classic Chef Chef’s Hat Inc. Chef Works Canada Forma Uniforms Hospitality Uniforms and Supplies Canada Mark’s Commerical Murphy Gear No Limits Design Shoes for Crews, LLC Sika Footwear, division of Ecolab Skechers

Town & Country Uniforms

1975 Dagenais Blvd. West Laval, QC H7L 5V1 Tel: 450-622-5107 1-800-361-0388 Fax: 450-622-4632 tcuniforms.com webmaster@tcuniforms.com Unisync Group WearWell Garment Company Work Authority

Equipment Bakery Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co. Brute Kitchen Equipment, The Diamond Group Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Distex M & M Inc. Doyon Equipment Inc., A Middleby Company Earthstone Wood/Gas Fire Ovens Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Garland Canada, a Division of Manitowoc Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. MFG Tray Co. Moretti Ovens Canada MVP Group NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby Company Rational Canada Inc. Silesia Velox Grill Machines Ltd. The Middleby Corp. Unifiller Systems Inc. Barbecue & Smokers Cookshack Inc. Crown Verity Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment M.K.E. Industries NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby Company Pitco Frialator Inc. Smokaroma, Inc. Southern Pride Distributing LLC Bar Equipment American Metalcraft Bar Maid Electric Glass Washers Beer Gas Systems Berg Liquor Controls Blendtec Bum Contract Furniture Carlisle Foodservice Products Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Freepour Controls Inc. Hamilton Beach Brands Harco Enterprises Ltd. ISI Cream Whipper/Jas-

cor Housewares Inc. Magnuson Industries, Inc. Nor-Lake Inc., a Division of Standex Perlick Corporation Sculp ture Hospitality Buffet, Cafeteria & Banquet Bauscher Hepp Inc. Bethco Agencies Limited Browne + Co. Brute - The Diamond Group Bum Contract Furniture Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Canada Cutlery Inc. Celco Inc. Front of the House G.E.T. Enterprises Inc. Hatch Industries Ltd. Kason Industries Lockwood Manufacturing Company PanSaver Ovenable Pan Liners Randell, a Unified Brands Subsidiary Rational Canada Inc. Silesia Velox Grill Ma chines Ltd. Southern Aluminum Specialty Beverage Solutions Sterno Products Syracuse China Company Tableware Solutions Ltd. Tomlinson Industries Tork Hygiene Products, a Division of SCA Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. Dinnerware, Flatware, Glassware Bauscher Hepp Inc. Browne + Co. Dudson (North America) Fortessa of Canada Front of the House Globe Hotelware Agency Inc. Homer Laughlin China Co. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Johnson-Rose Inc. Jym Line Glassware Libbey Canada Inc. Noritake Canada Limited Oneida Canada Ltd. Pasabahce Professional Steelite International


Canada Ltd. Syracuse China Company Tableware Solutions Ltd. The Hall China Co. Total Tabletop Plus Trudeau Corporation Villeroy & Boch Tableware World Tableware, a division of Libbey Foodservice WWRD Canada Inc. (Wedgewood, Waterford, Royal Doulton) Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Cleaning 3M Canada Company Clorox Professional Products Company Colgate-Palmolive Canada Inc.

Procter & Gamble Professional Coffee Equipment Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. BBC Sales & Service Ltd. Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Canterbury Coffee Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Hamilton Beach Brands Mother Parker’s Tea & Coffee Inc. Nespresso Coffee Nestle Professional Beverages Reunion Island Coffee Limited Saeco, division of Philips Canada Supramatic Espresso Machines Tomlinson Industries Van Houtte Inc. Containers, Food Berry Plastics Cambro Manufacturing Company Front of the House Genpak Georgia Pacific Canada Consumer Products Hatco Corporation M & Q Plastics Inc Pactiv Canada Inc. Polar Pak Reynolds Food Packaging Canada Inc. Rubbermaid Canada Commercial Products Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Dealer: Equipment Arctic Refrigeration and Equipment B & B Sales Limited (RED) Big Erics Inc. Brokerhouse Distributors Bunzl Canada Ltd. (ESI) Cameron Restaurant Equipment Ltd. Celco Inc. Davidson Food Equipment & Supply Ltd.

Eurodib Ferguson Sales Inc. H & K Canada

Hendrix Restaurant equipment & Supplies

3011 HWY 29, Brockville, ON K6V 5V2 Tel: 844-656-0303 Email: Customerservice@ hendrixequip.com www.hendrixequip.com Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada I Food Equipment Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. J.R. Mahoney Limited Jarden Consumer Solutions La Compagnie Empire Crockery Level it Inc. LG Electronics Canada Maritimes Restaurant Equipment & Accessories Russell Food Equipment Ltd. Sodexo Ontrak Purchasing Services Specialty Beverage Solutions Summertime Restaurant Equipment Ltd. Dish Washing Equipment and Supplies Avmor Ltd./Kleen Canada Blakeslee Foodservice Equipment

Cooper-Atkins Corporation

ECOLAB

5105 Tomken Rd. Mississauga, ON L4W 2X5 Tel: 1-800-352-5326 Fax: 1-800-665-5256 www.whycleanmatters.com marketing@ecolab.ca Hobart Food Equipment Group Canada Insinger Machine Co. Jet Tech Systems / MVP Group Meiko USA, Inc. Miele Limited MVP Group Power Soak, a Unified Brands Company Procter & Gamble Professional San Jamar Foodservice Solutions JYJ Swissh Commercial Equipment Inc. Total Tabletop Plus Inc. Whirlpool Canada Display Cases: Refrigerated & Non-Refrigerated A.J. Antunes & Co. Bethco Agencies Limited Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc. Decastris Refrigeration Euro-Milan Distributing

Faema Canada General Refrigeration HABCO Henny Penny Corporation Hoshizaki America Inc. Igloo FooEquipment Ltd. Lockwood Manufacturing Company Silver King True Food Service Equipment Distributor: Equipment Arctic Refrigeration and Equipment Atlantic Systems Distribtion Inc. B & B Sales Limited Hamilton Agencies LRS Paging Canada Mack Restaurant Equipment & Supplies Magnuson Industries, Inc. Rabco Food Service Limited Summertime Restaurant Equipment Ltd. Food Processing & Blenders Berkel Company, a division of ITW Bettcher Industries Inc. Duke Manufacturing Co. Dynamic International Electro Freeze Globe Food Equipment Co. Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Orient Depot Tarrison Products Ltd. Varimixer c/o Garland Canada Vita-Mix Fryers American Range APW Wyott, a Standex Company Autofry Distex M & M Inc. Filtercorp Frymaster Corp. c/o Garland Commercial Ranges Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment Henny Penny Corporation Keating of Chicago Inc. Kendale Products Ltd. M.K.E. Industries Perfect Fry Company Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc. TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Griddles & Grills Accutemp Products Inc. APW Wyott, a Standex Company Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co. Bethco Agencies Limited Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment M.K.E. Industries MVP Group Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc.

Star Manufacturing International Inc. The Middleby Corporation Wood Stone Corporation Ice Machines, Cubers, Ice Storage Bunn-O-Matic Corporation of Canada Hoshizaki America Inc. Ice-O-Matic/Mile High Equipment Co. Ltd. IMI Cornelius Inc. Kold-Draft Manitowoc Ice Inc. Permul Limited Scotsman Ice Systems USA TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Induction Cooking CookTek Globe Hotelware Agency Inc. KBC Specialty Products Inc. Regal Ware Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. Knives & Sharpening Bettcher Industries Inc. Canada Cutlery Inc. Dexter-Russell, Inc. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Victorinox Switzerland Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Laundry Equipment, Supplies Chandler Sales, a JD Irving Company Coinamatic Commercial Laundry Inc. Ecolab Miele Limited Milnor Laundry Systems Whirlpool Canada Manufacturers Agents Arnott Distributors Inc. B & K Agency Bum Contract Furniture Chesher Equipment Ltd. Copperfield Agencies Ltd. Flanagan Agencies Fort Marketing Ltd. KGB Marketing Inc. Milneco Permul Limited Taylor Agencies Total Tabletop Plus Inc Unisync Group W.D. Colledge Co. Ltd.

Fire Ovens Eurodib Henny Penny Corporation Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Ice-O-Matic/Mile High Equipment Co. Ltd. IMI Cornelius Inc. Kold-Draft Manitowoc Ice Inc. Permul Limited Scotsman Ice Systems USA TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. Pasta Making Equipment, Products Bluebird Mfg. Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Faema Canada Pizza Equipment, Products Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. American Metalcraft Inc. APW Wyott, a Standex Company Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex Co Bluebird Mfg Brute Kitchen Equipment Inc., The Diamond Group Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. CTX, a Middleby Com pany Distex M & M Inc. Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc Hatco Corporation Lockwood Manufacturing Company Merco Products Moretti Ovens Canada PanSaver Ovenable Pan Liners

Robot Coupe Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. The Middleby Corporation Thunderbird Food Machinery Inc. Tomlinson Industries Wood Stone Corporation POS Systems AM/PM Service Ltd. Atlantic Hospitality and Technologies Ltd. Casio Canada Ltd. Caterease Software/Horizon Business Services CLS Info Compatible Computer Services Givex InnSource Solutions Inc. Justin eTraining

Maitre'D by Posera

2020 Robert-Bourrassa, Suite 1900 Montreal, QC H3A 2A5 Tel: 888-404-2662 Fax: 514-499-9951 www.maitredpos.com sales@posera.com Menu Tools Inc. Micros Systems Inc., an Oracle Company NCR Radiant Systems Panasonic Canada Inc. Pineapple Bytes PixelPoint POS Canada Profitek P.O.S. Solutions Sharp Electronics of Canada Squirrel Systems Sweda Canada Inc. Technic POS Toshiba TEC Canada Inc. Touch Bistro Visual Information Products Vivonet Inc.

Pots, Pans Bethco Agencies Limited Bluebird Mfg Browne + Co. Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. Padinox Inc. Regal Ware Inc. Vollrath Company L.L.C. Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Ranges, Broilers & Rotisseries American Range Bakers Pride Oven Company, a Standex co. Blodgett Oven Company Cleveland Range c/o Garland Commercial Ranges Distex M & M Inc. Garland Canada, a division of Manitowoc GBS Foodservice Equipment Hardt Equipment Manufacturing Igloo Food Equipment Ltd. Kendale Products Ltd. M.K.E. Industries NU-VU Food Service Systems, a Middleby company Permul Limited Pitco Frialator Inc. Rational Canada Inc. Southern Pride Distributing LLC TFI Food Equipment Solutions Inc. The Middleby Corporation Toastmaster, A Middleby ompany Vollrath Company L.L.C. Wood Stone Corporation Refrigeration, Service & Hardware APW Wyott, a Standex Company

Microwave Ovens Amana Commercial Products. a division of Whirlpool MVP Group Panasonic Canada Inc. Permul Limited Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Sharp Electronics of Canada Ovens: Bakery & Combi Brute - The Diamond Group Doyon Equipment Inc., a Middleby Company Earthstone Wood/Gas

November 2016 | 2 7


Beverage-Air Built Rite Solutions Canadian Curtis Refrigeration Inc Carlisle Foodservice Products Cooper-Atkins Corporation Distex M & M Inc. HABCO Hoshizaki America Inc. IFI Refrigeration Kason Industries M.K.E. Industries Master-Bilt, a Standex International Company Norbec Systems Inc. Nor-Lake Inc., a division of Standex Silver King Tarrison Products Ltd. True Food Service Equipment Restroom Supplies Avmor Ltd./Kleen Canada Bay West Paper Canadian Linen and Uniform Service Capital Paper Products Carlisle Foodservice Products Cascades Tissue Group Chandler Sales, a JD Irving Company Deb Canada Diversey Care, a Division of Sealed Air Ecolab Georgia Pacific Canada Consumer Products KBC Specialty Products Kruger Products Procter & Gamble Professional Rubbermaid Canada Commercial Products San Jamar Foodservice Tork Hygiene Products, a Division of SCA Toasters Belleco, Inc. Hamilton Beach Brands Hatco Corporation JustSteph Sales Inc. Merco Products, division of Manitowoc Star Manufacturing International Inc. The Middleby Corporation Utensils - Kitchen & Cooling Bios Professional/Thermor Bluebird Mfg. Cameron Restaurant Equipment Ltd. Canada Cutlery Inc. Chef Specialties G.E.T. Enterprises Inc. IVO Cutlery Canada Ltd. Johnson-Rose Inc. Thunder Group Inc. Trudeau Corporation Zwilling J.A. Henckels Canada Ltd. Warming & Holding Equipment Alto-Shaam Canada Inc. Carter-Hoffmann CookTek FWE - Food Warming Equipment Co. Inc.

GBS Foodservice Equipment Kendale Products Ltd. Metropolitan Wire (Canada) Ltd.

Food

Appetizers, Hors d’Oeuvres

BontÉ Foods Limited

615 Champlain St. Dieppe, NB E1A 7Z7 Tel: 506-857-0025 1-888-859-7222 Fax: 506-859-6905 www.bonte.ca moncton@bonte.ca Expresco Foods Grand River Foods IFC Seafood Janes Family Foods Ltd. King and Prince Seafood Kontos Foods Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. McCain Foods Canada Olymel/Galco Reuven International Selkirk Foods Willowfield Enterprises Ltd. Bakery Products Ardent Mills Backerhaus Veit Ltd. BakeMark Ingredients Canada Ltd. (AFD)

Canada Bread Company, division of Grupo Bimbo Dealers Ingredients Inc. Dolphin/Village English Bay Batter Inc. Fancy Pokket Corp. General Mills Canada Corporation Kontos Foods La Danoiserie McCormick Canada Oakrun Farm Bakery Ltd. Otis Spunkmeyer Canada Ltd, division of Aryzta P & H Milling Group Pfalzgraf Patisserie PreGel CANADA Puratos Canada Inc. Rich’s Products of Canada Saputo Foods Ltd. (Dairy world Foods) Sara Lee Foodservice Ltd. Sarsfield Foods Limited, division of Westons The Original Cakerie Ltd. Tradition Fine Foods Ltd. Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Weston Foodservice Ltd. Cheese & Cheese Products Agropur Amalgamated Dairies Limited (ADL)

News 2 8 | |Restaurant Atlantic Restaurant News

Blancs d’Arcadie Blue Harbour Cheese Chicago 58 Food Products Limited Dealers Ingredients Inc. Finica Food Specialties, a Gellert Global Co. Fox Hill Cheese Glasgow Glen Farm Holmestead Cheese Sales Inc. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Parmalat Canada Ran-Cher Acres Salerno Dairy Products Limited Saputo Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Condiments Derlea Brand Foods E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods JFC International (Canada) Kikkoman Sales USA, Inc. Kraft Heinz Company McCormick Canada McIlhenny Company Olive-it Canada Reckitt Benckiser Canada inc. Select Food Products Ltd. Smucker Foods of Canada Strubs, division of Whyte’s Unilever Food Solutions Dairy Products Dairytown Products Ltd. Dealers Ingredients Inc. Elco Fine Foods Inc. Farmers Cooperative Dairy, a division of Agropur Gay Lea Foodservice Kozy Shack Enterprises Natrel, a division of Agropur Parmalat Canada Saputo Foods Ltd. (Dairy world Foods) Scotsburn Dairy Group, a Saputo Company Desserts & Dessert Products Berthelet Food Products Euro-Milan Distributing Faema Canada Gumpert’s Martin Desserts McCain Foods Canada Pfalzgraf Patisserie PreGel CANADA Sara Lee Foodservice Ltd. The Elia’s Cheesecake Company W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Distributors Food Amalgamated Dairies Limited (ADL) Atlantic Grocery Distributors, a GFS Company Better Food Concepts Capital Foodservice

Costco Wholesale Canada Ltd. (AFD) BakeMark Ingredients Canada Ltd. (AFD) Canada Bread Company, division of Grupo Bimbo Dealers Ingredients Inc. Dolphin/Village English Bay Batter Inc. Fancy Pokket Corp. General Mills Canada Corporation Kontos Foods La Danoiserie McCormick Canada Oakrun Farm Bakery Ltd. Otis Spunkmeyer Canada Ltd., division of Aryzta P & H Milling Group Pfalzgraf Patisserie PreGel CANADA Puratos Canada Inc. Rich’s Products of Canada Saputo Foods Ltd. (Dairy world Foods) Sara Lee Foodservice Ltd. Sarsfield Foods Limited, division of Westons The Original Cakerie Ltd. Tradition Fine Foods Ltd. Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Weston Foodservice Ltd.

Ozawa Canada Inc. Patak’s Foods Limited Pintys Delicious Foods Queens Pasta Sonora Foods Weston Foodservice Ltd. Wing’s Food Product Wong Wing Foods Fish, Seafood & Shellfish Acadian Sturgeon and Caviar A.C. Covert Distributors Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Alliance Seafood Aqua Star Canada Inc. Atlantic Aqua Farms Inc. Azuma Foods (Canada) Clearwater Seafoods Comeau Sea Foods Confederation Cove Mussel Co. Ltd. Cooke Aquaculture Export Packers Company Fisherman’s Market International Inc. Future Seafoods Goldwater Seafood Grand River Foods

Eggs, Egg Products Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Cargill Kitchen Solutions

EggSolutions 283 Horner Ave. Etobicoke, ON M8Z 4Y4 Tel: 1-866-Eggs-4-You Email: info@eggsolutions.com www.eggsolutions.com MFI Food Canada, a Michael Food subsidiary Nova Scotia Egg Producers Entrees Expresco Foods Heritage Frozen Foods Ltd. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Les Plats du Chef (Thyme & Truffles) Nestle Professional Pintys Delicious Foods TMF - The Meat Factory Ethnic Foods / Kosher Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Bonte Foods Limited Burke Corporation ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. Elco Fine Foods Inc. Finica Food Specialties, Grecian Delight Heritage Frozen Foods Ltd. Italpasta Ltd. JFC International (Canada) Kontos Foods McCormick Canada Meaty Meats Inc. Mission Foods Mr. Donair, a division of Tony’s Meats

IFC Seafood Janes Family Foods Ltd. King and Prince Seafood Ocean Brands Oceanfood Sales Ltd. P.E.I. Mussel King Inc. Prince Edward Aqua Farms Royal Star Foods Sea Watch International Shafer Haggart Ltd. Sustainable Blue Tangier Lobster Company Trident Seafoods Corp. True North Salmon Co. Willowfield Enterprises Food Broker Advantage Amca Sales & Marketing Aliments AGG Foods C.W. Shasky & Associates Concord National Inc. Focus Food Brokers Freeman Signature International Pacific Sales PJB - Primeline Ronahan Food Brokers Limited Rosemount Sales & Marketing Target Food Brokers Tree of Life Canada ULG, a KeHe Company Trimark Sales & Marketing TTS Marketing Uniidirect Sales & Marketing French Fries Cavendish Farms Lamb Weston Canada, a division of ConAgra McCain Foods Canada Simplot Foods

Meats AdvancePierre Foods Bonte Foods Limited Burke Corporation Cardinal Meat Specialists Ltd. Cargill Kitchen Solutions Chicago 58 Food Products Limited Export Packers Company Limited Expresco Foods Finica Food Specialties, a Gellert Global Co. Grand River Foods Hormel Foods International Corporation Jadee Meat Products Lesters Foods Limited Maple Leaf Foodservice Meaty Meats Inc. Montpak International New Zealand Lamb Co. Olymel/Galco Piller’s Fine Foods Sara Lee Foodservice Ltd. Sofina Foods The Bruss Company, a Tyson Foods Division The Lamb Company TMF - The Meat Factory Tony’s Meats Tyson Foods, Inc. VIAU Foods Inc. Oils, Fats, Shortenings ACH Food Companies Bunge (Canada) CanolaInfo ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. Dealers Ingredients Inc. Hubberts Industries Richardson Oilseed Limited Smucker Foods of Canada Pasta, Noodles Italpasta Ltd. Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Nestle Professional Olivieri Foods, a division of Catelli Queens Pasta Pizza, Pizza Products Ardent Mills Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Bonte Foods Limited Burke Corporation Chase Global Foods Ltd. ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. Earthstone Wood/Gas Fire Ovens Hormel Foods International Corporation Jadee Meat Products Kontos Foods Kraft Heinz Company McCain Foods Canada McCormick Canada Nestle Professional Olive-it Canada Olymel/Galco P & H Milling Group Parmalat Canada Queens Pasta Rich’s Products of Canada Salerno Dairy Products Limited

Saputo Foods Ltd. (Dairy world Foods) Springer’s Meats Inc. Tyson Foods, Inc. VIAU Foods Inc. Portion Packs McIlhenny Company Smucker Foods of Canada Sun Rich Fresh Foods Inc. The Kraft Heinz Company W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Wing’s Foods of Alberta Ltd. Potatoes, Potato Products Basic American Foods Cavendish Farms Heritage Frozen Foods Ltd. Lamb Weston Canada, a division of ConAgra McCain Foods Canada Potatoes New Brunswick Reser’s Fine Foods Poultry AdvancePierre Foods Burke Corporation Exceldor Foods, aka But terball Canada Export Packers Company Expresco Foods Grand River Foods Janes Family Foods Ltd. JD Sweid, formerly Elmira Poultry Inc. King Cole Ducks Ltd. La Brochette Maple Leaf Foodservice Maple Lodge Farms Nikolaos Fine Foods Ltd Olymel/Galco Piller’s Fine Foods Pintys Delicious Foods Reuven International Simplot Foods Sofina Foods Tyson Foods, Inc. Salad Dressings Dr. Oetker Canada Ltd. E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Select Food Products Ltd. Unilever Foodsolutions Sauces, Base

Aliments ED FOODS

6200 Trans-Canada Pointe-Claire, QC H9R 1B9 Tel: 1-800-267-3333 Fax: 514-695-0281 www.ed.ca edinfo@ed.ca Berthelet Food Products Campbell’s Foodservice Catelli Foods Canada Corporation E.D. Smith & Sons Ltd., division of Treehouse Foods


Earth’s Own Food Company Gerhards Importers Canada Ltd. JC Creative Foods Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Neil Jones Food Company Nestle Profesional Olivieri Foods Torani Italian Syrups Unilever Food solutions W.T. Lynch Foods Limited Wing’s Foods of Alberta Seasonings, Spices, Herbs ACH Food Companies Inc. Aliments ED Foods Inc. Berthelet Food Products Chef Specialties Club House, a division of McCormick Canada Derlea Brand Foods Kerry Ingredients & Flavours Malabar Super Spice

McIlhenny Company Snacks, Snack Foods

Backerhaus Veit Ltd. Diamond Foods / California Walnuts J&J Snack Foods Corp. Johnvince Foods Distribution Kellogg Canada Inc. MARS Canada Pepsi Foods Canada Piller’s Fine Foods Sara Lee Foodservice Ltd. Trophy Foods Inc. Soups Aliments ED Foods Inc. Berthelet Food Products Bonte Foods Limited Campbell’s Foodservice Kraft Heinz Company Les Aliments O’Sole Mio Inc. Neil Jones Food Company Nestle Professional Norpac Food Sales Unilever Foodsolutions Vegetables Alasko IPS Frozen Foods Inc. Arctic Gardens, a Bonduelle company Bonduelle Americas Canadian Produce Marketing Association Cavendish Farms Fresh USA (CA & FL) Tomatoes Hain Celestial Canada I-D Foods Corporation Kraft Heinz Company

Monaghan Mushrooms Norpac Food Sales Ponderosa Mushroom Shafer Haggart Ltd. Summer Fresh Salads Yogurt Danone Inc. Dr. Smoothie Brands Gay Lea Foodservice Natrel, a Division of Agropur Parmalat Canada PreGel CANADA Ultima Foods Yogen Fruz Yoplait, division of General Mills

Services Associations Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Baking Association of Canada Canadian Beef Canadian Association of Foodservice Professionals (CAFP) Canadian Beverage Association Canadian Culinary Federation (CCFCC) Canadian Health Food Association Canadian Hospitality Foundation Canadian Produce Marketing Association

CanolaInfo Coffee Association of Canada Dairy Farmers of Canada Food and Consumer Products of Canada Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador National Sunflower Association of Canada Potatoes New Brunswick Pulse Canada Restaurant Association of Nova Scotia Restaurant Association of Newfoundland and Labrador Restaurants Canada Taste of Nova Scotia Tea Association of Canada Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick Tourism Industry Association of Nova Scotia Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island Wild Blueberry Association of North America Buying Group AFD Marketing Group ESI ITWAL Ltd. Sodexo Ontrak Purchasing Services Unipco

Consultants: Management, Marketing, Training adHOME Creative Alain Bosse Consulting Allercom Allergy Consulting, Inc. Barmetrix Brick and Mobile Enbridge Gas New Brunswick Justin eTraining Marsh Canada Menu Tools Inc. The Fifteen Group TrainCan Inc. Credit Cards American Express Diners Club Canada, division of BMO Direct Cash ATM Discover Card Global Payments Canada GP MasterCard Moneris Solutions POS Canada TD Visa VISA Canada Disposable & Paper Products Annemar Apparel, for merly Canawipe Distributors Ltd. Polar Pak Tork Hygiene Products, a Division of SCA

Entertainment Equipment, Services Action Bulk Vending Bell TV NTN Buzztime Canada, Inc. Panasonic Canada Inc. PC Music Sound Products Limited The Playdium Store Equipment Parts, Service Bell Canada, Equipment Division

Garbage Disposal Clean River, division of Midpoint International Inc In-Sink-Erator (Emerson Electric) Rothsay, a Division of Darling Ingredients Waste Management of Canada Corp. Linen Services Canadian Linen and Uniform Service

Check out the complete Buyers’ Guide at: restaurant buyersguide. ca. Company listings can be added and revised online or emailed to Peter Elliott: pelliott@ canadian restaurantnews. com.

Pest Control Abell Pest Control Inc. Ecolab HD Supply Facilities Maintenance Orkin Canada Inc

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November 2016 | 2 9


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HER0039 Heritage_Canadian Restaurant News_10.12.16.indd 1

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beverage news

Cowbell begins construction of carbon neutral brewery BLYTH, Ont. — Cowbell Brewing wants to ensure its product isn’t paired with a detriment to the environment. In August, the company began construction on a new 26,000-square-foot facility in Blyth, Ont., that will brew carbon-neutral beer. With its brewery located on a former 111acre cattle farm (hence the name Cowbell), the move to a carbon neutral facility was inspired by the agricultural surroundings. “We believe farmers are the last true stewards of the land,” said Grant Sparling, vicepresident of the brewery. “Really that inspired us to do as much as we can to operate a sustainable business.” The new facility will include the brewery as well as a 100-seat restaurant and bar, retail store and event space.

“The vision has changed quite a bit over time. We initially began looking to start a small brewpub,” Sparling said. “Over time, we expanded our vision and decided to create a destination brewery.” The first step towards carbon neutrality is reviewing where the brewery is generating carbon dioxide and installing energy efficient systems where possible. “We’re building from the ground up, so we can implement a lot of sustainable technologies right into the building,” Sparling said. “We really tried to cross the board to make our facility as efficient as possible.” The brewery will be a closed-loop facility, with an onsite well supplying the water required for the brewing process. For its beer, a low-energy brew kettle will reduce energy use by 50

per cent and water evaporation by as much as 80 per cent. Cowbell is targeting a water-to-beer consumption ratio of 4:1. “On average, craft brewers use 10 to 12 litres of water to make every litre of beer,” Sparling said. “A lot of people don’t realize how waterinefficient brewing is.” To neutralize emissions the brewery is unable to avoid generating, Cowbell created an onsite carbon sequestration program by planting trees on its farm. Since creating the program about six years ago, Cowbell partnered with a local conservation authority to reforest about 23 acres with 12,000 trees to offset its carbon production. “We think that’s a more authentic way to offset,” Sparling said. “If folks come and visit, they can see our efforts onsite.”

Molson Coors is now the world’s third largest brewer Molson Coors plans to offer Canadians a wider selection of imported beers following its acquisition of Miller brands. The deal, which closed in October for $12 billion US, makes Molson Coors the third largest global brewer. Molson Coors CEO Mark Hunter told The Canadian Press that several brands from the United States and Europe — including Leinenkugel, Miller High Life, Sharp’s, Staropramen and Franciscan Well — could find their way onto Canadian shelves in 2017. Also, Canadian craft beers like Creemore and Granville Island could be exported to the United States. The Denver and Montreal-based brewer has acquired SABMiller’s 58 per cent stake in MillerCoors, a U.S. joint venture formed in 2008. It also gained the international rights to Miller brands and royalty-free U.S. licences for SABMill-

er import and license brands including Peroni, Pilsner Urquell, Foster’s and Redd’s. The transaction stemmed from Labatt parent company Anheuser-Busch InBev’s $107-billion US acquisition of SABMiller that gave it about 31 per cent of the global beer market. To avoid regulatory concerns, InBev agreed to the Miller deal with Molson Coors. Molson Coors expects the doubling in size will reduce costs, while a more integrated North American network will create a more efficient supply chain. Part of that comes from using its Canadian facilities, for example, to brew and sell beers into the U.S. market. Hunter said any changes will emerge by the end of 2017 or early 2018. Its new facility in British Columbia is expected to open by the end of 2018. It is a few months away from announcing its modernization plans for Montreal.

Cowbell’s farmland will also be used to produce hops, barley, fruits and vegetables, which will be used to brew beer. “It will likely be enough for a couple of estate beers,” he said. “It’s enough for an education piece. Folks can see what’s grown on a farm, and follow the brewing process and see what natural ingredients are involved.” To ensure its operation is 100 per cent carbon neutral, Cowbell is working with Golder Associates to audit its carbon production and offset. “They’ve been involved in this process, going over all of our calculations,” Sparling said. “Once we’re up and running, they’ll be monitoring everything.” Cowbell expects to begin brewing in its new facility by spring of 2017.

Chic Choc rum now available in Ontario TORONTO – Chic Choc, the first spiced rum produced in Quebec, is now available in Ontario at the LCBO. Previously only available in Quebec, the rum is produced with six indigenous spices, creating a spicy bouquet with nuances of sugar cane and cinnamon, complemented by a subtle peppery tone. Drawing its inspiration from the boreal forest of the Chic Choc Mountains in Quebec, Chic Choc Spiced Rum’s flavour is created using peppery green alder, pine forest spikenard, witherod berries, lovage root, sweet gale seeds and wild angelica. The spices are harvested in the Gaspé region of Quebec. “Chic Choc Spiced Rum is all natural and uniquely Canadian,” said Charles Crawford, president of Domaine Pinnacle, producers of Chic Choc Spiced Rum. “The notes of ginger and Nordic spices make this a fantastic rum to sip on its own, or as the star in an amazing cocktail, such as a Dark & Stormy.” The product was released in 2014 and is the 15th beverage released by Domaine Pinnacle since the launch of its ice cider in 2001.

November/ December 2016 | 3 1


SUPPLY

Flanagan invests in Durham Region By Kristen Smith WHITBY, Ont. — The opening of a distribution centre in Durham Region, a $20 million project, marks Flanagan Foodservice’s largest single investment in its 39-year history. The company, which purchased an 80,000-square-foot facility at 295 South Blair Street in Whitby, Ont. in January, is adding an additional 100,000 square feet of refrigerated space to the new distribution centre, slated to open next spring. “This facility, once complete, will be an ideal location to service parts of GTA and east Ontario,” chief operating officer Paul Keery said at a groundbreaking ceremony on Oct. 25. Currently, Flanagan’s distribution is organized in three locations across Ontario: Kitchener, Owen Sound

and Sudbury. When the Whitby centre is operational, the warehouse and administrative portions of the Owen Sound location will move to Kitchener and Whitby. “The majority of our Owen Sound workforce such as sales, and our drivers, will be unaffected,” Keery said in an email. Joe Flanagan started the company in 1977 as a discount grocery operation in Waterloo, Ont. Now, the company — owned by his sons Dan, Rick, Murray and Jeff Flanagan — distributes more than 12 million cases of products to more than 6,000 foodservice customers, primarily in Ontario with some in Quebec. Flanagan Foodservice underwent a strategic planning session five years ago. During this process, it became

From left: Whitby Regional Councillor Derrick Gleed, Whitby Mayor Don Mitchell, Flanagan Foodservice president Dan Flanagan, Flanagan Foodservice chief operating officer Paul Keery and Marko Dzeletovich, president of Coldbox Builders. clear that the company’s strategy would be to “own Ontario,” explained president Dan Flanagan. This meant the company would focus its marketing and growth on its home province, a region representing more than 40 per cent of the Canadian market, said Flanagan.

“It also focused our attention on the fact that we had plenty of room to grow in large urban centres, like the GTA,” he said. “It meant we needed to build a stronger physical presence in the province to support our growing company.”

The leadership team at Flanagan Foodservice has been working on the Whitby expansion project for three years. “No matter how we sliced and diced the data, it kept pointing to the same solution: a distribution centre in Whitby,” said Flanagan.

Canada’s largest foodservice equipment companies merge By Bill Tremblay BROCKVILLE, Ont. — Canada’s two largest foodservice equipment dealers have become one company. On Nov. 21, Hendrix Hotel & Restaurant Equipment and Supplies and Russell Food Equipment announced the two companies are merging, and will operate under the name Russell Hendrix Foodservice Equipment. The move follows the announcement that private equity firm Blue Point Capital Partners acquired a controlling interest in Hendrix. In late 2015, Blue Point acquired Russell Food Equipment. “Across the board, there’s a lot of excitement in both the Hendrix and Russell teams,” said Larry Vander Baaren, chief executive officer of Russell Hendrix. He added the excitement is paired with questions and concerns. “I’d say generally we have a history of growth. So on the sales side, fears are allayed due to the fact that we intend to grow the business, Vander Baaren said. “When you intend to grow the business, you need sales people.” Hendrix, founded in 1981, is based in Brockville, Ont. Since its creation, the company

3 2 Restaurant News

Hendrix showroom has expanded nationwide, with nine locations and three distribution centres. Russell, founded in 1938, is based in Vancouver. It operates out of 14 distribution and three manufacturing facilities located across Canada. Russell offers an assortment of equipment, supplies, parts and services to more than

20,000 foodservice operators through its 14 showrooms nationwide. The creation of Russell Hendrix makes the company four times larger than its next competitor. “The complementary geographic exposure, product diversification and sales structure is game changing for our current platform investment in Russell,” said Mark Morris, a part-

ner with Blue Point. “We expect this merger to be transformative for both companies, as it will position the combined, seasoned management team to considerably expand capabilities and achieve greater growth.” Starting in Ontario and Halifax, the newly formed company will begin rebranding its locations. The previous head offices in Van-

couver and Brockville will maintain their roles, with both companies sharing resources. Vander Baaren expects the rebranding process to take about 10 months to complete nationwide. “In some cities we’re consolidating where we have a Hendrix and Russell branch,” he said, noting six municipalities are home to both brands. “At the end of the day, we’ll end up with 17 branch locations.” For the merger, Vander Baaren explained Russell brings its manufacturing capability as well as a parts and service network at the majority of its locations. Hendrix adds a large customer roster of arenas, convention centres, hotels and other quick service restaurants. “We didn’t really step on each others’ toes very much, it’s a great fit that way,” Vander Baaren said. While the combined power of the two companies might allow Russell Hendrix to expand into new markets, Vander Baaren said the first year would focus on the transition. “This year will be all about getting our systems aligned, our people in place and our customers serviced well during integration, that’s our number 1 priority,” Vander Baaren said.


SUPPLY

Collaborative distribution and marketing in GFS project TORONTO — In a series of workshops, producers, associations and restaurateurs came together to discuss marketing tools and techniques for local food. Funded in part by the Greenbelt Fund, the Ontario Ingredients for Success project is a partnership between Gordon Food Service, Grain Farmers of Ontario, Mushrooms Canada, Ontario Greenhouse Vegetable Growers, Ontario Turkey Growers, Egg Farmers of Ontario and Dairy Farmers of Ontario to increase the sale of Ontario food. “Gordon Food Service is showing strong leadership in recognizing the value that buying local has for Ontario’s economy,” said Burkhard Mausberg, CEO of the Greenbelt Fund. “From match-making producers with restaurateurs to helping promote local food items on the menu, this project will mean more Ontarians will be able to eat local even when eating out.” Part of the project is The Future of Local workshop series, which aims to develop in-restaurant marketing approaches to help foodservice chains and independents benefit from the local products they already purchase. “We believe consumer interest in buying local ingredients will continue to grow,” Lisa MacNeil, president of Gordon Food Service Ontario, said during the Nov. 21 workshop at Centennial College. Combined, the six producer associations represent more than 30,000 farms and six million acres of Ontario farmland, according to MacNeil. “In addition to exploring the promotion of local, we want to help foodservice operators be on the leading edge,” she said. “With 7.5 million restaurant visits per day in Ontario, we believe working together, we can make a significant difference and add business value.” Collaboration was a key theme at the November event, part two of the workshop series. A panel discussion featured Nancy Cogger, director of business for Soy 20/20, John Hay, Ontario Craft Brewers Association president, and Suzanne Merrel, senior food and beverage program manager for the Greater Toronto Airport Authority. Hay described a culture of collaborative capitalism within the province’s brewing community. “For a lot of different reasons, our brewers collaborate tremendously,” he said, noting they often exchange information and when a fellow brewer is in a jam, they share ingredients and equipment. Merrel noted while innovation can come from the private sector, “you need strength of force to move that forward.” An inaugural workshop was held on Oct. 26 at Niagara College. A third event is being planned for the spring at the University of Guelph. Ideovation president Peter Henderson, who is consulting on the project, said Ontario Ingredients for Success is not intended to compete with Foodland Ontario or FeastON. Given many operators are national chains, he noted it is important the final campaign can work across all regions. Part of the process is determining marketing tools and a menu symbol to denote which items are sourced locally. “It’s both a question of buying local and promoting local … you almost have to separate the two,” he said.

coming Events Jan. 7-8: The Franchise Expo, Metro Toronto Convention Centre. www.franchiseshowinfo.com

Feb. 21-23: Hospitality Newfoundland & Labrador, Conference & Trade Show, Gander, N.L. hnl.ca/conference

Jan. 24-26: Hotel, Motel & Restaurant Supply Show, Myrtle Beach Convention Center. www.hmrsss.com

Feb. 25-26: The Franchise Show, Toronto Congress Centre. thefranchiseshow.ca

Feb. 9: CAFP Top Management Night Gala Dinner, Toronto Branch. The Boulevard Club, Toronto. cafp.ca/toronto/event-toronto

Feb. 25-28: Canadian Society of Club Managers National F&B Conference, The Fairmont Empress, Victoria, B.C. www.cscm.org

Feb. 9-11: The NAFEM Show, Orange County Convention, Center, Orlando, Florida. thenafemshow.org

Feb. 26-28: RC Show (Restaurants Canada), The Enercare Centre, Toronto. rcshow.com

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November/ December 2016 | 3 3


SUPPLY

New leadership at Chesher Equipment MISSISSAUGA, Ont. — As Chesher Equipment prepares for new ownership, Miles Chesher recalled when his parents started the wholesale distribution business out of their home almost half a century ago. John Chesher founded the company in 1967 with his wife Emilie, who still works at the Canadian foodservice equipment wholesaler and distributor. “They sold their house and bought a townhouse. I remember the basement was the parts area, my parent’s bedroom was the office,” Chesher said. From there, they rented warehouse space from a friend at $5 a month, before moving the business to Cawthra and Dixie in 1969. The Cheshers bought a lot on Watline Avenue and constructed a 14,000-square-foot facility. “That was a big milestone in 1981,” he said, noting that was Chesher headquarters until 2007, when the company moved to its current location at 6599 Kitimat Rd., Mississauga. “Over the years, the company has grown and shrunk and bumped along, then grown some more,” Chesher said. Chris Koehler joined the company as a partner three years ago, bringing with him foodservice experience gleaned though time with Rubbermaid, Libbey Glassware, Garland Canada and Rational (Canada and United States). “I came knocking on the door and Miles and I put a deal together for me to join the company as a minority shareholder with the plan of eventually creating a succession plan,” said Koehler,

Chesher chairman Miles Chesher (left) and president Chris Koehler. the newly minted Chesher president. During the transition period, Miles Chesher will stay on with the company as chairman, along with his mother and wife. He joined the company almost three decades ago. “It’s been a good run and the company’s in good hands — it’s time to start something else, not that I know what something else is [yet],” said Chesher. Over the years, Chesher has seen quite a few changes in the industry, such as many individual dealers being bought by larger groups. When it

comes to buying groups, Chesher noted paying rebates has become a larger part of doing business in Canada. When it comes to distributors, Chesher said there used to be more of them and now there “are more manufacturers’ sales reps instead.” There has been consolidation on both sides of the business within the end users and suppliers. Koehler suggests consolidation in the foodservice industry is still in its infancy. “I think that’s just starting, it’s not anywhere close to ending,” he said.

With all of the market changes, Chesher said one of the things the company did to react was bring on Koehler as a partner. “We were the smaller distributor in the Canadian scene. We didn’t have enough market share or share of mind with consultants, or dealers or buying groups and felt we had to get bigger, which we certainly have,” Chesher said. Koehler has brought on product lines and introduced a model of employing chefs as fulltime regional sales managers. “That is so they can provide a consultative sales process coming from a vantage point of the food,” he said. Chesher has also implemented more processes, procedures and systems. “We’re managing our inventory better, we have much higher fill rates than we used to,” Koehler said. “We’ve established a lot of key performance indicators in the business so we can measure and monitor all facets of the business: where our sales are, where our problem areas are and where the opportunities for improvement are,” he added. Koehler said Chesher Equipment has become more transparent both with its employees and with its suppliers. “We share our market intel with our supplier partners,” said Koehler, noting this includes how the company is working with end users to get products specified in their operations. “We’ve always been fairly transparent, but it helped secure some new lines,” Chesher added.

RATIONAL thinking The next generation of combi ovens is unveiled BRAMPTON, Ont. — RATIONAL recently launched its SelfCookingCenter line of combi ovens, including a compact unit. The next generation of RATIONAL units, introduced on Oct. 19, includes the SelfCookingCenter XS, which is 21 inches deep, 26 inches wide and 22 inches high. “We wanted to deliver the most food possible in the smallest footprint,” said RATIONAL national corporate chef Kevin Pelissier during a demonstration. The small-format cooking system can fit on a counter top and is intended to supplement larger units in a foodser-

vice or commercial kitchen, or stand alone in delis, supermarkets, convenience stores or smaller restaurants. “The new format opens up a whole new range of options for our Canadian customers,” said Louis-Philippe Audette, president and CEO for RATIONAL Canada. According to the company, the new line is faster and more efficient than RATIONAL’s previous combi ovens and comes with new features, such as LED lighting and energy consumption display. The SelfCookingCenter XS costs $14,500, while the price for the rest of the line remains the same.

Premium Brands buys North York-based Belmont Meats VANCOUVER — Premium Brands Holdings Corporation, a producer and distributor of branded specialty food products, has purchased 100 per cent of Ontario-based Belmont Meats. Premium Brands purchased Belmont Meats for $50 million, with payment consisting of $49.2 million and $800,000 in shares of the company. The deal was announced Oct. 13. “We are not only very excited about Belmont’s business and the potential for it to grow under the Premium Brands umbrella, but also the role it will play in creating value in several of our other businesses,” said George Paleologou, president and CEO of Premium Brands. “In particular, we expect to generate signifi-

3 4 Restaurant News

cant synergies between Belmont’s business, our burger operations in western Canada and our Centennial Foodservice business, which recently announced an initiative to expand into the Ontario market.” Belmont Meats opened in North York, Ont. in 1966. In its early years, the business primarily served as a foodservice provider. Summer Street Capital Partners purchased the company eight years ago. Today, with annual sales of about $120 million, Belmont Meats sells more than 40 million pounds of hamburgers to numerous chain restaurants, including Burger King, Dairy Queen and Hero Certified Burgers. “Furthermore, Belmont’s strong manage-

ment team significantly enhances our bench strength in the Ontario market,” Paleologou said. Belmont recently celebrated its 50th anniversary by expanding its product line into the United States. “We are very excited to be joining the Premium Brands family,” said Paul Roach, president and CEO of Belmont Meats. “Premium Brands has a great track record of partnering with management to build successful businesses. We are looking forward to working with them as we expand and grow our business in both Canada and the U.S.” Premium Brands owns a range of specialty food manufacturing and distribution businesses

with operations in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nevada, Ohio and Phoenix as well as Washington State. Its family of businesses includes Pillar’s, Grimm’s, Harvest, Quality Fast Foods, Deli Chef, Creekside Bakehouse, Stuyver’s Bakestudio, Gourmet Chef, Duso’s, Centennial Foodservice, B&C Food Distributors, Shahir, Wescadia, Harlan Fairbanks, Maximum Seafood, Ocean Miracle, Hub City Fisheries, C&C Packing and Premier Meats. The transaction will be funded through Premium Brands’ existing bank facilities and is expected to be immediately accretive to its earnings per share and free cash flow per share.


SUPPLY

Bring home the bacon A&W now guarantees all of its pork products are 100 per cent Canadian, and all of its protein is sourced from animals raised as naturally as possible VANCOUVER — A&W is now guaranteeing all of its menu’s meat and poultry products are sourced from animals raised as naturally as possible. In October, the quick service restaurant chain announced a Pork Guarantee, a promise to serve sausage links and patties that are 100 per cent Canadian and raised without the use of antibiotics. “People bring ideas to us, we brings ideas to others, and together we form really powerful partnerships that can help us discover new ways of doing things,” said Susan Senecal, president and chief operating officer of A&W Foodservices of Canada Inc. “Sometimes it is things people say would be completely impossible,” she added. A&W’s menu transformation began in 2013, when the company announced it would serve beef raised without the use of added hormones or steroids.

A&W’s customer base is what inspired the The following year, the company announced it would serve chicken raised without the use of change to natural ingredients. “Whether it’s grocery stores, fine dining or antibiotics and eggs from hens fed a vegetarian anywhere food is diet. found, you’re seeing Earlier this year, We needed to make that interest,” SeneA&W announced sure everyone from cal said. its bacon would be “We wanted to made from pork farmers to ranchers understand what that raised without the were lined up to means for A&W and use of antibiotics. do this. how do we respond. As well, the bacon Susan Senecal That’s what started curing process no A&W president and us on that path.” longer includes artifichief operating officer Changing incial ingredients. gredients wasn’t an Outside of protein, the restaurant chain also serves fair trade easy task, Senecal noted. Implementing its Pork Guarantee, for example, required more than 18 coffee as part of its Ingredients Guarantee. “We’ve had really enthusiastic responses months of preparation. “We needed to make sure everyone from from our guests,” Senecal said. “I think that is something that’s kept us go- farmers to ranchers were lined up to do this,” she explained, adding the evolution of ingrediing and inspired us.”

ents required retrofitting farms as well as seeking new suppliers. “We have been delighted with the response from the farming community and producers, all of those people we work with as partners.” The shift in ingredients also came with increased product costs. Senecal explained the increase was not passed onto the consumer. “It is a bigger investment on the part of the ranchers and farmers we work with, but we’ve not increased our menu prices to consumers as a result of the changes,” Senecal said. “We feel like if we do the right thing and do what our guests are looking for, they will visit more often and things will work out in the end.” She added the strategy is working for the 861 restaurants within the company. “We do see lots of growth in our business,” Senecal said. “That is a result of a range of things, but for us, it really did start with listening to our guests.”

Sodexo shares sustainability expectations with its suppliers By Bill Tremblay BURLINGTON, Ont. — When Sodexo wants to make a change to how it does business, it ensures its suppliers are kept in the loop. In October, the facilities management and foodservice provider invited its suppliers to an in-house summit at its Burlington, Ont., office to outline how they plan to enhance services in the coming years. About 175 representatives from food and facility supply companies attended the annual summit. “The idea of the afternoon is to really give our suppliers an insight into what we want to accomplish in the next 12 to 18 months,” said Chris Fry, vice-president of supply management for Sodexo. “The idea is for them to come away from that with the question, ‘How does my organization fit into what Sodexo wants to do and achieve?’

“It’s basically a level set for suppliers to understand how to do business with us and to understand where we’re headed so they can tailor their offer to us.” At the meeting, the company explained its plan to purchase locally-grown produce, ensure a higher standard of animal welfare and source cage-free eggs, support sustainable seafood and source fair trade coffee and tea. “What I’ve found from a supply chain perspective is the more you share with Chris Fry suppliers, the easier it is to look at solutions — we certainly don’t have all the solutions,” Fry said. “It creates more engaged and forward-think-

ing results from sharing where we want to be.” Sodexo serves about 9,000 clients in North America as well as 32,000 customers in 80 countries worldwide. Each year, the company purchases $48 million in produce grown in the region where it is served; 3.3 million pounds of coffee; 267,000 pounds of tea; 16.9 million pounds of sustainably-sourced fish and seafood, and 15.4 million cagefree eggs. As part of its Better Tomorrow Plan, the company considers how its supply chain impacts individuals, its communities and the environment. “We look at that as a corporate citizen, as a

service provider and as an employer,” Fry said. Sodexo’s achievements in sustainability are also subject to a third-party audit. “As a service provider, we’re able to provide to our clients something that’s been vetted and certified in many cases,” Fry said. “That sets us apart from others who are probably doing great jobs of self reporting.” The annual supplier summit was created about eight years ago and paired with a fundraising dinner for the Sodexo Foundation, which is funded solely by the company and tasked with providing meals to at-risk youth throughout Canada. The summit was intended to increase the draw to the charitable dinner. “A part of it was how do we entice people to come in and spend the money for dinner?” Fry said. “This gives them something to go away with.”

November/ December 2016 | 3 5


Canada

Experiential growth U-Feast’s membership base increases to 6,000 diners By Kristen Smith TORONTO — Following steady growth over a year and a half, an acquisition has catapulted U-Feast into expansion. The experiential dining company purchased competitor Pass the Table earlier this year. Specializing in off-menu food experiences, U-Feast held its first dinner in Toronto in May 2015. The dining program offers curated events at restaurants during typically off-peak days of the week. “The platform is really an e-commerce marketplace, so we’re tapping into that unused inventory of restaurant capacity, a little bit like Airbnb for food experiences,” said U-Feast chief executive officer Terry Mocherniak. “Our value proposition for the restaurant is: we’re going to come in, we’re going to do an event at your restaurant, we’re going to pay you to be sold out that night and you get a marketing benefit for free,” said Mocherniak, adding restaurants not only get exposure to U-Feast’s members, but also those members’ social media reach. “Consumers, particularly millennial food and drink lovers, are always looking for new life experiences and they are always looking for something unique,” he said. The typical price point for U-Feast events, which include about five courses, beverages and gratuity, is $60. Co-marketing and sponsorships help U-Feast to offer this

price point while food and drink brands are incorporated into the events. “Our platform is an experiential marketing platform that connects brands to consumers and to a lesser extent, connects brands to restaurants. It’s a really synergistic ecosystem between those three stakeholder groups: the consumers, the restaurants and the brands,” Mocherniak said. “We’re a B2C business, but a lot of our revenue is actually generated from B2B through these sponsorship packages. Usually a business is one or the other, you’re either a B2B model or a B2C model. We’re kind of this unique blend of monetizing from both sides.” Through the acquisition, U-Feast added more than 2,000 new users to its member base of about 3,500 people, bringing it to about 6,000. It also added about 125 new eateries to U-Feast’s 30 restaurant partners. In addition, Pass the Table founder Jason Finestone has joined U-Feast as the company’s chief experience officer. By the end of November, Pass the Table’s events — which are typically more frequent and smaller— will be integrated under the U-Feast banner. Next year, the company plans to move into Vancouver, Montreal and Chicago, in that order. “As we enter a market, we’ll hire a dedicated city manager and start growing it from there,” said Mocherniak.

products Organic soybean oil Bunge introduced Whole Harvest USDA certified organic soybean oil and Non-GMO Project Verified milled ancient grains at the 2016 SupplySide West (October 6-7) and IBIE (October 8-11) shows. “Organic, non-GMO, and clean label will continue to be key growth drivers in the U.S. food market, which is why we’re excited to help our customers leverage these trends across many categories from savoury snacks to bakery,” said Mark Stavro, senior director of marketing, Bunge North America. “Our new offerings will help food companies introduce organic oils and non-GMO milled ancient grains into more food applications than previously possible.” The introduction of Bunge’s organic soy-

Personalized coffee creations Frank Coffee Systems recently released its A1000 machine. The fully automated system focuses on personalized coffee creations. Features include: six flavours, refrigeration unit for two milks, automated cleaning system, multi-media touchscreen, and accessibility via the Internet. bean oil expands upon the brand’s existing range of Non-GMO soybean oil, canola oil and pan sprays. Bunge’s new line of ancient grains — including millet, sorghum, and quinoa — adds to its range of non-GMO milled corn and rice ingredients.

Lower GR potato Glassware for high volumes Libbey introduced Neo, the newest addition to its Master’s Reserve Performa Collection. Neo is American-made glassware that combines innovative design and technology to craft a highperformance experience for banquet, event or high-volume environments. Neo withstands repetitive use while maintaining its integrity, even after 2,000 washings in professional-grade dishwashers.

3 6 Restaurant News

EarthFresh Farms recently debuted the Carisma potato, which has a lower glycemic response (GR), according to research conducted by Glycemic Index Laboratories in Toronto Ontario-grown, Carisma is farmed from traditional seed and without the use of biotechnology. “Glycemic response is reflective of the quality and quantity of carbohydrate in a food, which plays an important role in regulating blood sugar levels,” said Jane Dummer, registered dietitian and author. The Carisma potatoes have been grown and consumed in the Australia and the Netherlands for years. “As a Canadian company specializing in pre-

mium produce, we’re focused on growing and distributing healthy and delicious products,” says Tom Hughes, president, EarthFresh Farms. Carisma potatoes are currently grown and sold only in Ontario and available in limited quantities.


+ Some things are simply better together . . .

Like the classic combination of macaroni and cheese, Russell Hendrix is a dynamic duo that can’t be beat. Over the next several months, Canada’s two largest foodservice equipment dealers will become one. The merged company, Russell Hendrix Foodservice Equipment, will supply customers from seventeen showrooms and five distribution centers across Canada. Stay up to date at russellhendrix.com


Canada

Culinary Olympics Canadian teams shine

ERFURT, Germany — As the 2016 Culinary Olympics concluded in Erfurt, Germany, Junior Culinary Team Canada came out shining with gold and silver medals. Comprised of recent graduates from Niagara College’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute, the team represented Canada at the IKA/Culinary Olympics in October. The team won gold at its first competition on Oct. 22 — the edible buffet program. They also earned a silver medal at the second and final competition, the hot program, on Oct. 24. “This could not be possible without the hard work, dedication and passion put in by each team member,” said team captain Ben Lillico after learning of the team’s gold medal win. With final results totalling 177.56 points from both competitions, Junior Culinary Team Canada left the Culinary Olympics in sixth place overall behind Sweden (first place), Switzerland (second place), Norway (third place) and just behind Austria and Denmark. “I was absolutely thrilled with the team’s performance. They gave their best in the kitchen this week,” said team manager Craig Youdale, dean of Niagara College’s Canadian Food

and Wine Institute. “It was the best buffet I’ve ever seen them do, and it was probably the best hot run I’ve ever seen them do.” Youdale applauded the work and dedication from the team members and the sacrifices they made to participate in the competition. “They put their lives on hold for three years. They took everything in their lives and put it aside because they wanted to do this,” he said. “No money. No pay. Out of sheer pride for their country. I think that’s pretty cool.” Lillico said the team has become a family. “We didn’t win, but we all won. We came here to really cook our hearts out. We did our best and we put everything on the table,” said Lillico. “It’s not really about the medal. It’s about the journey.” Medals were granted based on scores achieved at each competition — gold for 90 or higher, silver for 80 or higher, bronze for 70 or higher, and diploma for less than 70 points. Junior Culinary Team Canada was one of 20 junior national teams — among 2,000 chefs from more than 50 countries around the world — competing at the 24th IKA/Culinary Olym-

Gold Medal Plates

Nine chefs competed on Nov. 3 at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. From left: Albert Ponzo (silver), Amanda Ray (gold) and Ross Midgley (bronze). Chefs from across the country are on the road to the Canadian Culinary Championships after winning Gold Medal Plates regional heats competitions held in October and November in 11 Canadian cities. All the first-place chefs will compete at the finale in Kelowna, B.C., Feb. 3-4, 2017. Here are the winning chefs, in chronolgical order: In a drive-around competition held at five Montreal restaurants Oct. 12, Sophie Tabet, of Chez Sophie, took gold with fried veal sweetbreads with sautéed shiitake, honey and king

3 8 Restaurant News

mushrooms garnished with a raviolo filled with pulled côte de boeuf. Underneath were two sauces: foie gras cream and vin jaune emulsion. Accompanying Tabet’s winning plate was Cuvée Natashquan 2014 from Vignoble de l’Orpailler, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. Prairie Noodle Shop’s Eric Hanson went head-to-head with 10 of Edmonton’s finest chefs on Oct. 20. Hanson prevailed with his dish of spot prawn, peach and plum preparations, partnered with Summerhill 2014 Ehrenfelser, from Okanagan Valley, B.C.

Daniella Germond (Junior Culinary Team Canada) in the edible buffet competition. pics in Erfurt, Germany from Oct. 22 to 25. The senior team, Culinary Team Canada, also finished well, placing eighth in the world with a final standing of silver and a score of 179.531. The team finished behind Singapore (first), Finland (second) and Switzerland (third), but earned an impressive gold medal score in the hot kitchen of 92.38. In the cold kitchen, Culinary Team Canada earned silver with a total score of 87.086 (81.44 in pastry art and 90.85 in culinary art). A number of regional teams also participated in the Culinary Olympics. Regional Team Prince Edward Island brought home gold medals in both pastry art and culinary art, earning a fourth place stand-

ing and final score of 91.04. Culinary Team Humber placed ninth, earning gold and a total score of 90.21 (90 in pastry art and 90.35 in culinary art). Ontario Culinary Team placed 15th with a silver medal standing and a total score of 85.362 (93.33 in pastry art and 80.05 in culinary art). Placing in the top 30 were: Golden Horseshoe Culinary Team Canada with a score of 77.818 (81.67 in pastry and 75.25 in culinary); Culinary Team Nova Scotia, who scored 76.458 (83.670 in pastry and 71.64 in culinary); and Trillium Chefs Canada with a total score of 75.692 (80.33 in pastry and 72.6 in culinary).

In St. John’s, N.L., at the Oct. 21 cook-off, Ruth Wigman, of Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland’s Oppidan restaurant, placed first. Wigman’s creation featured crisp seasoned chicken feet, Sichuan-style glazed dumplings, charred scallion puree, crustacean reduction and mixed pickle. She paired her dish with a 2015 Gewurztraminer from Arrowleaf Cellars, in B.C.’s Okanagan Valley. The Oct. 27 Halifax competition saw Mark Gray from Battery Park Beer Bar & Eatery prove his culinary prowess via a tasting of classic French charcuterie preparations made from a Nova Scotia-raised Berkshire pig and paired with accoutrements and garnishes. Complementing the charcuterie was Ironworks Gin, from Lunenburg, N.S. In Regina on Oct. 28, seven chefs competed. Coming out on top was Garrett “Rusty” Thienes, from Harvest Eatery and Freshmarket, who impressed the judges with smoked wild boar tenderloin with morel and sage crust, butternut squash veloute, beet puree, dehydrated crabapple chips, Saskatoon berry ‘air’ and rhubarb gastrique. He paired it with Pinot Noir 2014 from Dirty Laundry Vineyards, in Summerland, B.C. Hauling in gold at the Saskatoon competition held Oct. 29 was Scott Torgerson, from Radisson Hotel Saskatoon and Aroma Resto Bar. Torgerson’s winning dish: black trumpetcrusted roast elk and Cactus Lake beef tenderloin with porcini and sunchoke foam, plated with broccoli puree, parsnip, beef tendon puff, pearl onion and micro cress. The dish was paired with 2014 Inniskillin Discovery Series

Zinfandel from Inniskillin, Okanagan, B.C. At Calgary’s Telus Convention Centre on Nov. 2, Jinhee Lee, from Vintage Chophouse, captured first place with Cha Ca La Vong, a turmeric fish mosaic with dill. She paired her creation with Bartier Bros. 2014 Gewürztraminer, from Oliver, B.C. Nine chefs competed on Nov. 3 in Toronto. Winning gold was Amanda Ray, from O&B Canteen, who prepared milk-braised piglet with turnip choucroute. Ray’s wine pairing featured a 2014 The Adam Step Riesling from Cave Spring Cellars, in Jordan Station, Ont. Joe Thottungal, chef/owner of Coconut Lagoon, took first place at the Nov. 7 Ottawa event. Winning over the judges was Thottungal’s halibut poached in spiced oil and accessorized with fish curry crumbs, woodland mushroom aviyal and lentil emulsion. Thottungal paired the halibut with a 2015 Riesling from Huff Estates, in Ontario’s Prince Edward County. Pizzeria Gusto’s Jesse Friesen took home gold at the Winnipeg event held Nov. 9. Friesen’s dish highlighted tartare of yellowfin tuna paired with unagi sauce and avocado mousse. Friesen matched the tuna to a 2012 Riesling from Thirty Bench, in Beamsville, Ont. Hay-smoked rutabaga partnered with onion and pear vaulted Jesse McCleery, from Pilgrimme, to gold at the Victoria, B.C., competition held Nov. 17. Accompanying the vegetarian dish was Sea Star Estate Farm & Vineyards’ 2015 Blanc de Noir, from Pender Island, B.C. Since 2004, Gold Medal Plates has raised more than $11 million for the Canadian Olympic Foundation.


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