Issuu on Google+

1  

!"#!$%&!''($$  

)*'#*+,$'-$%./0"1%$

234562347$ !

!


2  

ISB High School Administrative Team Principal

Philip Bradley

Dean of Students

Peter Roback

Dean of Academics

Philip Rogers

Athletics Director

Andy Vaughan

Arts & Activities Dir Kerri Fitzgerald Marianne Derow

(up to Aug 2014) (from Aug 2014)

Head of Counseling

Debbie McDowell Andrew Weiser

(up to Aug 2014) (from Aug 2014)

HS Counselors

Kevin Callahan Cathy Curtis Ryan Haynes Jennifer Melton Jacquelyn Valenzuela Andrew Weiser

International School Bangkok 39/7 Soi Nichada Thani. Samakee Rd, Pakkret. Nonthaburi, 11120 Thailand Tel:  +662  9 63  5800   Fax:  +662  583  5431-­‐2   www.isb.ac.th

(up to Aug 2014) (from Aug 2014) (from Aug 2014)


3   Dear Parents and Students, Welcome to the ISB Program of Studies! Our online Program of Studies 2014-2015 contains information on graduation requirements, course planning, prerequisites, the IB Diploma and a detailed listing of all our High School courses. Our program has grown recently and this year is no exception, with a number of new offerings that provide students with a greater range of opportunities and flexibility. Please review this publication thoroughly and carefully select your courses for the 2014/2015 school year. You will find the contents page is easy to use and each course contains information about the appropriate grade levels, length of course, credits and prerequisites. It is advisable to consider the following as you make these choices: • Long range university and career plans • Academic interests, strengths and weaknesses • Commitment to a challenging high school program • Outside interest and responsibilities It is important for you to meet with your counselor as you make your course choices and develop a wellconsidered four-year plan. Students in grades 9 & 10 should discuss IB courses and the IB Diploma program with their counselor and parents. The success of past ISB students in the IB Diploma and the favourable consideration that our IB students receive from universities and colleges across the globe has resulted in a steady growth in student involvement. We look forward to the continued growth of participation as more ISB students seek a challenging university preparatory program. Annual curriculum review and revision has resulted in the following changes to course offerings for 2014 – 2015: Media Studies We are remodeling our Journalism course to include a wider range of presentation media to include paper, electronic and film. This course is open to all students and you will find a detailed course description within the English electives. World Languages We are expanding our offering of beginner languages this year by including IB Ab Initio Mandarin as an alternative to Ab initio Spanish and French. Mathematics We are introducing a new integrated mathematics program into grade 9 through Integrated Mathematics 1 at Higher, Standard or Studies level. The following year these students will continue with Integrated Mathematics 2. This new math course is offered at a standard level and higher level, as with all math courses, placement is dependent upon student aptitude and teacher recommendations. Please see the course description and if you have questions talk with your child's current math teacher. The Mathematics courses for students entering grades 10 to 12 will remain the same as in previous years. Please discuss with your teacher the appropriate level of challenge for your course choice next year.


4   Physical Education & Health Personal Fitness II allows students to explore in more depth topics introduced in Personal Fitness. Design & Technology This is a developing curriculum strand at ISB where students are encouraged to innovate and invent through the design cycle. This year we are excited to be moving to a new facility and are adding Design & Technology I to the course listings. If I can be of any assistance to you as you select courses for next year and plan for your future, or if you have any questions regarding ISB or the scheduling process, please feel free to contact the High School office. I am looking forward to working with all of you as we plan together for a productive and stimulating new school year. Sincerely Philip Bradley High School Principal


5   TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION

7

ADMISSION STATEMENT

7

CLASS PLACEMENT

7

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR COURSE SELECTION

7

CREDITS

8

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

9

MID-YEAR GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

9

HONORS DIPLOMA

10

WEIGHTED GRADES

10

CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE

10

REPEATING A GRADE / COURSE

10

COURSE SELECTION / PLACEMENT

10

CHANGING COURSES

10

SUMMER SCHOOL CREDIT OPTION POLICY

11

INDEPENDENT STUDY POLICY

11

On-LINE LEARNING POLICY

11

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

12

REQUIRED COURSES BY GRADE LEVEL (Credit Awarded)

12

       

 


6   TABLE OF CONTENTS     INTERTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

14

ADVANTAGES OF THE IB DIPLOMA

15

IB ENTRY GUIDELINES FOR 11TH GRADE

15

WHAT TO EXPECT

15

PLANNING FOR IB

15

CHOOSING YOUR PATH WITH IB

16

The IB Diploma student

16

IB Course student (non-Diploma)

16

IB LANGUAGES TUTORIAL PROGRAM

16

THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAM OF STUDIES

17

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK)

17

CREATIVITY, ACTION, SERVICE (CAS)

19

EXTENDED ESSAY

18

AWARD OF THE IB DIPLOMA

19

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION OF THE IB

20

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE

20

UNIVERSITY APPLICATIONS WITH IB DIPLOMA OR IB COURSES RECOGNITION POLICIES

20

PLANNING FOR IB DIPLOMA

21

A GENERAL IB DIPLOMA

21

FOUR YEAR EDUCATION PLAN

21

  ENGLISH

25

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

31

WORLD LANGUAGES

34

SOCIAL STUDIES

44

SCIENCE

49

MATHEMATICS

55

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH, DANCE

58

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS

62

DESIGN & TECHONOLOGY (APPLIED ARTS)

72

LEARNING SUPPORT

73


7   GENERAL INFORMATION ADMISSION STATEMENT The International School Bangkok will accept students who can be successful in the regular academic program. Admission is contingent upon receipt of application forms, all previous high school records, copies of students’ and parents’ passports, and results from previous academic testing. Placement tests guide admissions and placement decisions.

CLASS PLACEMENT Students who enter during the second semester, and have completed a grade level in their previous school, will be placed in the same grade level they completed. Before a student is officially accepted for enrollment, all high school records, or middle school records for grade 9 applicants, must be submitted to the Admissions Office and reviewed by the counselors. Grade 9 (Freshmen) will be those students who have earned fewer than six (6) Carnegie units 1. Grade 10 (Sophomores) will be those students who have earned six (6) or more Carnegie units. Grade 11 (Juniors) will be those students who have earned twelve (12) or more Carnegie units. Grade 12 (Seniors) will be those students who have earned eighteen (18) or more Carnegie units and will have met all ISB graduation requirements within a year.

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR COURSE SELECTION One of the more important decisions students are called upon to make is the selection of courses which will best meet their abilities, needs and future plans. The purpose of this booklet is to acquaint students with the courses at ISB, and to enable them to wisely plan an individualized program of studies that also incorporates specific requirements. This booklet contains descriptions of courses offered in Grades 9 – 12 2. It should be used when students plan their program of studies. Before selecting a course, students should find out as much about it as they can---its objectives, its requirements, its prerequisites (if any) and its credit value. If used properly, this booklet can effectively help students plan an appropriate program of study and help students answer these important questions: 1.

What courses are required in my grade level?

2.

Am I choosing courses that are appropriate to my abilities, interests, and career intentions?

3.

Am I taking advantage of all scholastic opportunities offered at ISB, including the IB Diploma program?

4.

Am I choosing courses that will fulfill the requirements for graduation?

5.

Am I choosing courses that will allow me to qualify for admission to the post secondary institution of my choice?

6.

Have I taken into consideration my homework, activities, and out of school responsibilities?

7.

Am I choosing courses that I am passionate about and allow me to understand my strengths and weaknesses?

                                                                                                                        A Carnegie unit is the amount of credit given for the successful completion of a course that meets 40 minutes daily, 5 days per week, for at least 36 weeks, or the equivalent amount of time within the school year. The equivalent time is 120 clock hours. 1

2

For the 2014/15 academic year


8   All students in grades 9-12 must enroll in seven courses each semester. Students are expected to remain in yearlong courses for both semesters. The only exception to this stipulation is that students with a high academic load during second semester of the senior year may enroll in six classes (i.e. full IB Diploma students in grade 12). Course registrations will be done electronically through an online registration process with PowerSchool. Due to the nature of the IB diploma program requirement it may be necessary to prioritize IB diploma students for IB courses. All Students enrolling in an IB class are expected to take the IB exam. Where students choose not to take the IB exam this will be reflected on their official high school transcript. Universities expect to receive results from in IB courses which can be communicated directly to the universities. Students and parents are encouraged to visit the Counseling Center in order to become familiar with the services offered. It will help toward a better understanding of yourself and of the opportunities open in higher education and the world of work. The Counseling Center will make formal appointments with students each year. While every attempt will be made to offer all the courses listed in the Program of Studies, please note that courses with insufficient enrollment may not be offered.

CREDITS 1.

One credit is given for the successful completion of a one-year course. Students are expected to remain in year-long courses for both semesters.

2.

One-half credit is given for the successful completion of a semester course.

3.

One-quarter credit is given for one semester’s satisfactory participation in the Teacher Internship and EAP Center. One quarter credit is given for satisfactory participation in Global Citizenship Week (GCW).

4.

Credit will be given only for courses taken while students are enrolled in grades 9 - 12.

5.

Auditing: although no credit is granted, students are required to do all class work. An audit must be granted by administrative approval. “Audit” will be entered on the permanent record.

6.

Late arrivals: Students must be present a minimum of 85% of the scheduled class periods for each course during a semester to receive credit, typically 7 class periods. Students admitted to ISB after 20 days of the beginning of a semester, and who have not attended school during the same school year, will be admitted on an audit basis for the semester with no credit being granted for course work.


9   Graduation Requirements Theory of Knowledge (ToK) OR Ways of Knowing (Wok) & Thailand and Southeast Asia (TSEA)

Community Service A distinguishing feature of ISB is a 40 hour community service requirement for graduation. Students are required to submit reflections on and verification of 10 hours of community service for each year that they are at ISB. While students may complete their requirement by participating in a single weeklong activity, we have high expectations that students will participate in community service each year at ISB. Student responsibilities for Community Service • Complete service activity (ies). • Keep a summary record of your service hours in your student planner. • Complete a community service verification form at the end of each activity or equivalent. • Submit the form to your Activity Sponsor for his/her verification and signature. • Submit the completed form to the Community Service Office. Global Citizenship Week (GCW) Global Citizenship Week is a required week-long program for high school students that enhance the curriculum outside the classroom learning experience. GCW may take place on or off campus, in or out of country. The program has been designed to ensure that student experiences are in keeping with ISB Vision and Guiding Principles. In addition, GCW adheres to the ISB Mission, which states “Through outstanding teachingin a nurturing environment, ISB inspires students to: Become caring global citizens.” The successful completion of each GCW course and all of the requirements of that course will provide students with a passing grade and a 0.25 credit toward required graduation credits. Additional information regarding GCW requirements may be found in the ISB Student Handbook and the GCW Program of Studies. These documents are located in the high school section of the ISB website http://www.isb.ac.th/High_School

Credit Requirements English

4.0 credits

Social Studies

3.0 credits

Science

3.0 credits

Math

3.0 credits

Physical Education

2.0 credits

Health

0.5 credit

Fine & Performing Arts

1.0 credit

ToK or

1.0 credit

TSEA & WoK Electives

7.5 credits

Community service

40 hours Total 25 credits


10   MID-YEAR GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The student must: 1. Complete a minimum of seven (7) semesters of high school level course work. 2. Complete the last two (2) semesters at ISB. 3. Meet ALL graduation requirements as listed in the Program of Studies, and earn a minimum of twenty-five (25) units of credit overall during the seven semesters. 4. Achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above (ISB grades only). 5. Demonstrate need for mid-year graduation: eg University entrance or family related issues Students interested in Mid-Year Graduation must complete an application (available in the Counseling Center) and submit to your counselor no later than April 1 of the 6th semester of high school. Prior approval of any course work taken outside of the regular ISB program must be obained before the course begins.

HONORS DIPLOMA Students who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.9 or higher will be graduated “With Academic Honors.” Determination of honors diploma is computed according to the following guidelines: 1. Only ISB work is considered. (including online IB courses) 2. Evaluation is made relative to other ISB students. 3. Attendance at ISB for 3 or more consecutive semesters is required. 4. Only semester grades are used. 5. Final projected grades for the semester prior to graduation will be used.

WEIGHTED GRADES In each subject area, all IB courses, both HL and SL, and AP courses are weighted. Except: IB Math Studies & IB ToK (IB Theory of Knowledge) Additional information of weighting may be found in the Student Handbook.

CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE A Certificate of Attendance may be granted to students who have completed four years of high school, but who do not meet the specific graduation requirements for an ISB diploma.

REPEATING A GRADE / COURSE Students in grades 9-12 who fail required courses need to take those courses again (or equivalent) either during the regular school year or through remedial courses offered during summer school. The total number of credits they have earned, however, will determine their grade placement. The repeated course grade will be counted for credit.

COURSE SELECTION / PLACEMENT Registration for classes is an annual responsibility that commits students to a schedule of classes for an entire year. Students may take two departmental offerings concurrently with the approval of counselors. However, students who have not completed the EAL program requirements may not enroll in two English classes concurrently. Current teachers will recommend students for IB courses and other course placement (see course prerequisites). Students wishing to take a course for which they have not been recommended should see their counselor.


11   CHANGING COURSES Students may drop or add courses during the first 8 school days of each semester. Students must seek advice/approval of counselors, teachers and parents before a course change can be made. Schedule Change forms must be completed with all signatures from teachers and a parent before any changes will be approved and made. Any request for a schedule change should be made only due to one of the following circumstances:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The change is necessary to meet graduation requirements. A prerequisite for the course in question is missing. Credit has already been granted for the course in question. There is a medical reason for a class change. An error occurred in course placement or course registration by the school.

(Note: students are expected to remain in year-long courses for both semesters.) The high school administration will determine if a course may be dropped after the 8th day of each semester under unusual circumstances. A “WP” (Withdraw Pass) or a “WF” (Withdraw Fail) will be recorded on the transcript for students who drop a class after the 8th day of the semester.

SUMMER SCHOOL CREDIT OPTION POLICY ISB students may enroll in summer school courses for one of the following reasons: 1.

Remediation: defined as replacing an “F” grade from the previous year. All remediation grades are calculated into the GPA

2.

Enrichment: defined as enrolling into a course for the purpose of improving skills and concepts. Credit may be received but grades will not be calculated into a student’s GPA

Students who a) b) c) d) e)

are interested in attending summer school for credit must meet the following criteria: Must have completed two semesters of high school. Must obtain prior approval from counselor. May not receive more than half credit in any curricular area. Summer school credit is generally granted as elective credit only. Credit may be given for remediation of a failed required course. • A course may be taken for remediation of an “F” grade received in the previous year. • 0.5 credit may be earned upon successful completion of the summer school course. • Remediation grades will replace an “F” grade and will be calculated into the GPA • The original grade will remain on the transcript but will not be calculated into the GPA

As the “gatekeepers” of all student transcripts, counselors will be responsible for informing the PowerSchool office if a student’s course is considered remediation or enrichment and if the grade is to be calculated into the GPA or not. This information is to be communicated no later than October 1st of the semester following the summer school course.


12   INDEPENDENT STUDY POLICY The requirements for independent study or a correspondence course are: • An independent study may not replace a core graduation requirement. • A proposal must be made to the counselor that includes time requirements, curriculum outline, supervisor, and assessment format of the course in question. • No course will be accepted for credit that is already offered by ISB. • No credit will be accepted from an unaccredited school. Approval by the HS Principal on the recommendation of the counselor is required for this course

On-LINE LEARNING OPTION STUDY POLICY ISB is offering students in grades 11 & 12 the opportunity to be learn an IB Course through an on-line learning environment. Both IB Film standard level and Information Technology in a gGlobal Society standard and higher level will be offered through Pamoja Education (http://www.pamojaeducation.com) who are a successful on-line learning provider for the International Baccalaureate (IB). Students who select to take these courses must demonstrate the capacity to: ü Self-motivated and well-structured in their approach to learning. ü Independent learner. ü Reasonably strong oral and written communication skills in the English language. ü Tech-friendly (though not necessarily experienced in online learning or Web 2.0 tools). ü High level of interest in the course.

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS Students should begin their university planning early in their high school careers. Since each university establishes its own particular requirements, it is important that students follow the suggestions given in the university catalogs and in ISB’s University Application Handbook. Counselors will assist in university planning.

Recommended Entrance Requirements are: English: Mathematics: Social Studies: Science: World Language

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 2-3 credits of the same language

Factors that determine university acceptances are: 1. A student’s overall four-year scholastic record that demonstrates growth and challenge. Choice of courses and grades constitute the single most important consideration for university admissions. 2. Recommendations of the counselor, teachers, and principal. 3. College admissions test scores and IB predicted grades. Most colleges require the College Board Examination (SATI/SATII), the American College Test (ACT), or their own entrance examinations. The importance of test scores relative to admission varies from college to college and country to country. 4. Participation in extra-curricular activities and community service. 5. Demonstration of interest in the university.


13   REQUIRED COURSES BY GRADE LEVEL (Credit Awarded)

Grade 9: English 9 (1) World Studies 9 (1) Science (at least 1) Mathematics (at least 1) Physical Education (1) Electives (2) Freshman Seminar (Semester 1) Global Citizenship (0.25) Community Service

Grade 11: English (1) Electives (balance of req’d courses) Global Citizenship (0.25) Community Service

Grade 10: English 10 (1) Social Studies 10 (1) Science (at least 1) Mathematics (at least 1) Physical Education/Health (1) 2 Electives (2) Global Citizenship (0.25) Community Service

Grade 12: English (1) Electives (balance of req’d courses) Global Citizenship (0.25) Community Service

Grade 11 or 12: Theory of Knowledge (1) OR Ways of Knowing & Thailand & Southeast Asia (1)

Notes: 1. Students must be in attendance at ISB for two consecutive semesters prior to receiving an ISB diploma. 2. Although not required, it is highly recommended that students earn three (3) credits of the same World Language. For native English speakers intending to attend US universities, World Languages may be required. 3. Students are required to enroll in seven classes each semester, except 2nd semester grade 12 for IB Diploma students 4. Students are required to participate in the Global Citizenship Week program during each year of attendance. 5. IB History of the Americas or US History are available for US citizens and may be taken in grade 11 or 12, this is no longer a compulsory requirement for US Colleges. 6. The Thai Ministry of Education requires all Thai nationals to enroll in Thai language classes each year they attend ISB. IB diploma students must enroll in the Thai diploma class if not taking IB Thai A Language & Literature.


14  

INTERTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE International Baccalaureate Course Chart

INTRODUCTION The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) is a rigorous two-year pre-university curriculum, primarily aimed at students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a qualification that is widely recognized by the world’s leading universities and many award advanced standing or university credit for successfully completed IB diplomas and courses. Students learn more than a collection of facts. The Diploma Programme prepares students for university and encourages them to: ü ask challenging questions ü learn how to learn ü develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture ü develop the ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and cultures (IBO, 2005) th th The IB Diploma program requires students in 11 and 12 grade to select a broad range of academic subject areas in addition to developing skills in writing research papers through the Extended Essay, thinking skills through the Theory of Knowledge course and all subject areas, and life skills and community service through the CAS core element. It is these elements that define the IB programme and the Diploma students. The IB Diploma is awarded independently of the ISB High School diploma. Students will graduate from ISB with their ISB High School diploma and receive their IB results in July and their official IB Diploma or IB Certificate (listing IB courses studied) in September.


15   ADVANTAGES OF THE IB DIPLOMA The IB Diploma programme is recognized by universities in many countries for its academic rigor and thoroughness in preparing students for university. In recent years the number of ISB students in the IB Diploma programme has increased along with the interest of universities in the IB and IB Diploma students. 1.

The Diploma programme provides a well-balanced rigorous course of studies, ensuring a broad academic exposure as well as opportunities for specialization.

2.

The IB curriculum is uniform in structure throughout IB schools worldwide. It is possible to transfer between IB schools if the same subjects and levels are offered.

3.

The IB Diploma is recognized for university entrance in over 140 countries. Individual subject examination scores, in particular Higher Level (HL) course, maybe accepted for advanced placement credit or advanced standing by many US universities. Total points scores and individual subject results are important for university entrance and, in some instances, IB scholarships or awards in UK and other European countries, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. As a student attending an IB Diploma school admissions will be interested in your choice to take or not take the IB Diploma.

4.

Students enrolled in IB classes are expected to take the individual subject examinations. Universities often follow up on transcript course listings with requests for the IB exam result. The IB exam scores are submitted for evaluation of credits during university registration.

IB ENTRY GUIDELINES FOR 11TH GRADE ISB feels that the program should include as many students as can benefit from it and that students have the right to attempt IB courses. As a guideline the following considerations should be made. Therefore, ISB offers the following entry guidelines: ü A ‘B’ (3.0) average is recommended. 80% of ISB students have this average or above. ü An overall ‘C’ (2.0) average is the minimum required to enter and continue in the IB Diploma program. 95% of ISB student have this average or above. Student performance is reviewed and support given when necessary. ü Competency in the language of instruction (English). ü Completion of the prerequisites for individual IB courses. ü Evidence of a high level of motivation. Approval of teachers, department heads, guidance counselors, and the Dean of Academics, as appropriate.

WHAT TO EXPECT A student participating in IB courses as a Diploma or Course candidate can expect to: ü Be motivated and work hard ü Approach tasks with a sense of purpose ü Demonstrate self-discipline and responsibility ü Develop sound time management and organizational skills ü Learn from fellow students as well as teachers ü Seek assistance when necessary to develop self-advocacy ü Share with, and contribute to, the community IB students should expect to be educated, amused, excited, delighted, and at times, disappointed and exasperated. The IB Diploma or IB Courses is a realistic goal for all ISB students.


16   PLANNING FOR IB 9th and 10th grade students are encouraged to discuss their need or interest in participating in the IB Diploma program with their counselor as early as possible.

CHOOSING YOUR PATH WITH IB The IB Diploma student The two year Diploma provides students with a breadth and depth of rigorous academic study which prepares them for the demands of university. Generally, students would choose to study their special interest subjects at Higher Level. Standard Level subjects complement the Higher Level choices, but may not require the same degree of specialized knowledge and understanding. In addition to the six academic subjects, Diploma students also take a Theory of Knowledge course, complete an Extended Essay and the required involvement in Creativity, Action and Service (CAS). IB Course student (non-Diploma) Students not pursuing the IB Diploma but keen to take one or more IB exams, may take any IB course, including all core IB components (Theory of Knowledge (ToK), Extended Essay & CAS). The IB courses cover the relevant IB curriculum which includes the final IB exam. All non-Diploma students in IB courses are required to register as an IB Course candidate for the exams. Non-registration will be reflected on the student’s transcript to avoid confusion during the university application process.

IB LANGUAGES TUTORIAL PROGRAM If a student is interested in pursuing the IB Diploma, and wishes to study a Language A in his/her native language, ISB may assist the student in finding an appropriate tutor. ISB will also provide tutors with the requirements of the IB in addition to administrative support and materials. In addition, ISB will require regular progress reports from tutors with the award of a pass/fail grade and credits. Interested students should contact the Dean of Academics. The ISB IB Language Tutorial Program policy is as follows: ü This option is only available for IB Diploma students wishing to pursue their ‘mother tongue’ language. ü ISB will reimburse for the actual costs incurred by a parent for tutoring up to a maximum of 75,000 Thai Baht per year if the cost for the tutoring is not normally paid by the employer of the parent(s). In the case of partial reimbursement by the employer, ISB will reimburse the difference up to 75,000 Thai Baht. ü Students may only pursue Language A languages not currently offered at ISB. ü Negotiations regarding the conditions of employment are between the tutor and the parent/ guardian of the student. The tutor is not the employee of ISB. ü Students must be of sufficient proficiency in the target language. ü Approval for participation in the Language A Tutorial program must be given by the student’s parents, counselor and Dean of Academics. ü All instruction will take place outside of regular school time unless agreed with Dean of Academics. ü Students who take this option must still fulfill ISB’s graduation and attendance requirements. ü IB diploma students with tutored language or self-taught language will have classtime scheduled for them to work in during the regular school day and the Dean of Academics, in consultation with tutors on progress, will award Pass/Fail on the semester report card and transcript. Students considering this option should read the course descriptions for English A Literature HL/SL or English Language & Literature HL/SL to gain an understanding of the nature of the course. These apply to any IB Language studied at either level. Additionally it must be understood that Language A Literature courses work with language while teaching literary analysis skills, but are not language classes. Significant amounts of reading are undertaken and assessment is through written tasks and oral presentations of literature knowledge, analysis and understanding. Language & Literature are based firmly on the study of both language and literature being designed for students with a high level of competence in the language prior to the beginning of the course. This course focuses on the refinement of language skills and provides the opportunity for students to explore the culture(s) of the language through discussion, argument and debate.


17   THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAM OF STUDIES The IB Diploma Program requires the study of six examination courses as well as completion of a Theory of Knowledge course, an Extended Essay and participation in the Creativity, Action, Service Program. Three courses are studied at Higher Level (HL) and three at the Standard Level (SL). The six courses must be chosen from each of the following disciplines. Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature Language A: Language & Literature courses English Japanese Mandarin Spanish Language A: Literature courses English

(all HL/SL – 2 yrs) Other languages by request

Group 2: Language Acquisition Language B (Experienced) English (HL only) Lanaguage Ab initio (Beginners) Spanish ab initio Group 3: Individuals & Societies Business & Management Economics Geography

(all HL/SL – 2 yrs) French Thai Dutch Other languages

(HL/SL – 2 yrs) French Mandarin Spanish Japanese (SL only – 2 yrs) French ab initio Mandarin ab initio (HL/SL – 2 yrs) History (HL-2 yrs, SL-1 yr) Psychology (HL/SL-2 yrs) Information Technology in a Global Society **

Group 4: Sciences (HL/SL – 2 yrs) Biology Chemistry Physics Computer Science (HL-2 yrs, SL-1 yr) SL only courses: Environmental systems & societies (ESS) Sports, Exercise & Health Science (SEHS) Group 5: Mathematics Math (HL/SL-2 yrs)

Math Studies

Group 6: The Arts & Options Visual Art (HL/SL-2 yrs) Dance Music (HL/SL-2 yrs) Theatre Second subject from group 1, 2, 3, or 4

(SL-2 yrs)

(HL/SL-2 yrs) (HL/SL-2 yrs)

Film

(SL-2 yrs)**

Three core compulsory requirements of the IB Diploma Program are: Theory of knowledge (TOK) Extended Essay Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) Program **Online course Pamoja education


18  

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK) Theory of Knowledge (ToK) is a one year seminar course in which students are asked to reflect upon their experiences in a comparative and critical way. It examines the origins and validity of various forms of knowledge. Students are challenged to compare and contrast their diverse attitudes and perceptions. With this focus on inquiry, there may not be right or wrong answers, but there are standards for judgment and defenses of knowledge claims. Aims and Objectives of ToK ü Develop a critical capacity and understand the importance of evaluating knowledge claims ü Be aware of subjective and ideological biases ü Develop a concern for rigor in formulating knowledge claims, and intellectual honesty ü Make connections between personal experience and Ways of Knowing and Areas of Knowledge through linking questions ü Demonstrate an understanding of the influence that personal views, judgments and beliefs have on own knowledge ü Use oral and written language to communicate ideas clearly and appropriately ü Demonstrate an understanding of knowledge at work in the world Note: ToK will be assessed as a Pass/Fail in the first semester of the course and graded in the second semester.


19   CREATIVITY, ACTION, SERVICE (CAS) Education neither begins nor ends in a classroom or exam room. Essential aspects of education exist outside of both. In recognition of this, IB Diploma students must meet key outcomes (during the 2 year program) participating in activities at ISB and in the community. CAS is the acronym for Creativity, Action, Service. The CAS requirement is designed to be an enjoyable, yet challenging, component of a student’s education. All three activity elements should be represented. ü Creativity - covers the range of art, craft, debate, forensics, drama, music, choir, film-making, photography and/or the application of creativity in designing and carrying out service projects. ü Action - includes participation in individual and team sports, physical training or expeditions. It may include the carrying out of creative and service projects. ü Service - includes a range of community or social service activities. Volunteer work helping the less fortunate or involvement in environmental projects are ideal service activities. As a result of their CAS experience as a whole, including their reflections, there should be eivdence that students have: Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth Undertaken new challenges Planned and initiated activities Worked collaboratively with others Shown perseverence and commitment to activities Engages with issues of global importance Considered the ethical implications of their actions Developed new skills

Documenting CAS Activities Students use Managebac to document their CAS activities and to reflect on their experiences using the 8 outcomes as guiding questions.

EXTENDED ESSAY The Extended Essay is another core component of the IB Diploma. It is an in-depth study of a limited topic within a subject, essentially, a piece of academic writing. The essay provides an opportunity to engage in independent research in a topic of interest to the student. Emphasis is placed on the communication of ideas and information in a logical and coherent manner, and on overall presentation of the Essay. Students should choose a topic in which they have a personal interest and that initial background research has proved there are sufficient sources to support the study as a whole. They will frame a thesis or research question which they will investigate and refine the question with the aid of an extended essay supervisor before embarking on the research, data collection, and writing of the 4000 word paper. Students should meet regularly with their Supervisor for guidance and feedback. The Extended Essay process begins in the Junior year. Extended Essays are completed in the first semester of the Senior year and formally graded by an external examiner.


20   AWARD OF THE IB DIPLOMA Each of the six IB subjects is graded on a point scale of 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). In addition, the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge may contribute up to 3 bonus points, making a maximum score of 45 points. 6 subjects x 7 points (max.) + 3 bonus points = 45 points Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge are graded on a letter scale of A (excellent) to E (elementary). Two E grades for these core areas will exclude the student from receiving the IB diploma. The award 1. 2. 3.

of the diploma requires students to meet defined standards and conditions including: A minimum of 24 points; Minimum of 12 points from 3 HL courses and no more than one score of 3 points; Satisfactory completion of the Extended Essay, Theory of Knowledge and CAS (completion and verification of participation and growth) These are the basic conditions for the award of the diploma. Additional minimum score conditions may apply to scores 24 – 28.

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION OF THE IB The International Baccalaureate Office in Geneva and the sub-regional offices have spent many years negotiating recognition agreements with national governments and universities. This has ensured that the IB Diploma is recognized as a universal qualification for entry to higher education.

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE It is important that students and parents carefully review university entrance requirements prior to selecting the subjects studied within the IB program at ISB. It is best to begin early in the event that specific subjects are required for entrance into particular university courses. The counselors and Dean of Academics will be able to assist you in getting current information about national and university requirements, admissions procedures and other pertinent material in addition to the creation of a four year plan including IB course options.

UNIVERSITY APPLICATIONS WITH IB DIPLOMA OR IB COURSES RECOGNITION POLICIES The range of credit, scholarships and other benefits awarded to IB Diploma and Course students is broad and changes from year to year. Students and their families are encouraged to check with institutional websites for the most current information. General information is available on the IBO website (http://www.ibo.org) in the university recognition directory. There are useful summary tables for a number of US and Canadian university but it is recommended that current specifics are checked on the individual websites.

UNIVERSITY APPLICATIONS with the IB DIPLOMA or COURSES • • • • • • •

There are a number of points to consider about IB and university applications Diploma and Course students must carefully research the recognition policies for the IB Diploma and individual course results in terms of credit, advanced standing and scholarships Students list their IB courses and/or provide a transcript for verification of academic standards to date Many colleges request predicted or forecast grades for IB exams, TOK and Extended Essay scores as part of their application process Recommendations will clearly state the known candidate status of the student - IB Diploma or IB Course (after registration only) Diploma students can indicate they have chosen the most rigorous academic program at ISB Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay and experiences in the Creativity, Action and Service program often provide valuable material or reflections for college essays


21   PLANNING FOR IB DIPLOMA IB Diploma students need to meet all ISB graduation requirements for PE, Health and Fine Arts. Community Service requirements will be met within the CAS program. All Thai nationals must take a Thai language class each year.

ISB IB DIPLOMA PROGRAM 2014-2015 Two year program

Select one subject from each Group. Three subjects must be studied at higher level and three at standard level. Higher level subject examinations can only be taken in May of the Senior Year and it is recommended that only one standard level subject is examined in the Junior year but up to two courses can be completed as anticipated subjects in 11th grade. *Environment systems and societies is transdisciplinary and may be included in the IB diploma as a Group 3 or Group 4 course. **Delivered as on-line courses through Pamoja Education (for further information about Pamoja and the online learning opportunities www.pamojaeducation.com


22   A GENERAL IB DIPLOMA PLAN Notes:

3 Higher level subjects, 3 standard level subjects and ToK scheduled. Extended Essay and CAS completed outside classtime. Minimum 7 instructional classes per semester.

The plans below are provided for general guidance. It is essential that all 10th grade students meet with their counselor and if further clarification is required the Dean of Academics.

IB DIPLOMA PLAN WITH SCIENCE BIAS (two Group 4)

Note: this student did not have the prerequisite language level for French B SL and so with no previous experience in Spanish, enrolled in Spanish ab initio. Students with no previous language may choose French, Mandarin or Spanish ab initio for their IB Group 2.


23   IB DIPLOMA PLAN WITH SOCIAL STUDIES BIAS (two Group 3) + BILINGUAL DIPLOMA (new language options)

Note: This student chose to continue with Jazz Band in Grade 11 and defer the completion of their PE credit to the 12th grade. Additional Note for IB Diploma students: The Extended Essay is completed out of class time starting in 11th grade and completed in the first half of 12th grade semester 1. CAS requirements are completed over the course of the two year program.


24   FOUR YEAR EDUCATION PLAN To help students prepare a smooth and connected progression through high school, the ISB counselors use a Four Year Plan. This blank plan shown below is a good way to look ahead and set goals for academic success. Counselors review these plans every semester with students and it is recommended that parents consider these considerations when guiding their children in making informed decisions about courses for the next and subsequent years.

Four Year Education Plan

Department

Gr. 9

Gr.10

Gr. 11

Gr. 12

Required

Recommend

ENGLISH

English 9

English 10

4

4

SOCIAL

World Studies 9

World Studies 10

3

4

3

4

3

4

0

2

1

1

2.5

2.5

1

1

7.5

2.5

25

25

STUDIES MATHEMATICS SCIENCE

Chemistry I

WORLD LANGUAGE FINE & PERFORMING ARTS PE+HEALTH

PE 9

Health

TOK OR WOK/TSEA ELECTIVES TOTALS PER YEAR

Total

Global Citizenship Community Service

(10)

(10)

(10)

(10)


25  

ENGLISH English Course Chart

Four credits are required for graduation. The IB English B course description can be found in the EAL section. An English course must be taken each semester of attendance.

INTRODUCTION The English Department is committed to ISB’s Mission to inspire students to achieve their academic potential, be passionate, reflective learners, become caring, global citizens and lead healthy, active balanced lives. Specifically, we believe all learners need to be excellent communicators in reading, writing and speaking. Our goal is for students to reach their academic potential in writing, speaking and reading. We believe students should be exposed to a rich foundation of literature through a combination of teacher recommends and student choice. Through the exploration of literature and language, students will develop their powers of comprehension, expression and critical thinking, but will also grow an appreciation for the beauty and power of language, imagination, and a deeper understanding of the human spirit. The English Department is committed to the development of the reading and writing skills of all high school students with our standards-based curriculum and enthusiastic teaching. Reading is the single most important factor in determining a student’s language capacity, significantly improving oral and written communication skills. To this end, the English Department is committed to an independent reading program in efforts to maintain a love of reading as a life-long learning. The English Department is also committed to the writing process in an effort to ensure both best practice and best outcomes in the development of student writing.


26   ENGLISH COURSES ENGLISH 9 Grade: 9 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Grade 8 English or Humanities or equivalent English 9 is a standards-based curriculum that provides students with the opportunity to investigate a range of literary genres and written text types. Units of study are developed according to the adopted “Common Core State Standards,” which identify key essential questions and transfer skills. Each unit of study offers a variety of literary genres, written tasks, and oral communication opportunities. Students are introduced to a range of nonfiction and fiction text types as well as the associated literary terminology for each text type. Emphasis is placed on developing the argumentative, informational, and narrative writing skills of students through the teaching of the writing process. Students will use writer’s notebooks to reflect on what they are studying and develop new ideas that are later polished and edited into final pieces outside of class. Students can expect to have regular individual conferences with teachers to move forward as readers and writers. Students will further develop speaking skills through a variety of formal and informal oral activities. Grammatical usage and vocabulary will be studied within the context of reading and writing. Students will complete independent reading requirements designed to create a lifelong pursuit of reading for pleasure.

ENGLISH 10 Grade: 10 Length: 1 year Prerequisite: English 9 or equivalent

Credit: 1

English 10 is a standards-based curriculum that provides students with the opportunity to investigate a range of literary genres and written text types. Units of study are developed according to the adopted “Common Core State Standards,” which identify key essential questions and transfer skills. Each unit of study offers a variety of literary genres, written tasks, and oral communication opportunities. Students are introduced to a range of nonfiction and fiction text types as well as the associated literary terminology for each text type. Emphasis is placed on developing the argumentative, informational, and narrative writing skills of students through the teaching of the writing process. Students will use writer’s notebooks to reflect on what they are studying and develop new ideas that are later polished and edited into final pieces outside of class. Students can expect to have regular individual conferences with teachers to move forward as readers and writers. Students will further develop speaking skills through a variety of formal and informal oral activities. Grammatical usage and vocabulary will be studied within the context of reading and writing. Students will complete independent reading requirements designed to create a lifelong pursuit of reading for pleasure.

ENGLISH 10 CHALLENGE Grade: 10 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: English 9 teacher recommendation based on a history of responsibility, regular positive contributions in class, and the skills to read and write at an advanced level. Students must complete a reading and writing assessment and demonstrate a high level of proficiency before entering the class. English 10 Challenge is a one-year course designed to follow all of the learning outcomes of the English 10 course but with more challenging texts, assessments and assessment criteria. In addition to the expectations of the English 10 course, students in this course will need to be highly proficient in their comprehension and use of the English language in reading, writing and speaking. This course is designed for students who have a genuine interest in literary analysis and want to be further challenged to think critically and independently. Students will read a wide variety of sophisticated fiction (novels, poetry, etc.) and non-fiction (texts dealing with language, media, etc.) at an accelerated pace and will be expected to respond thoughtfully, defending their point of view intelligently while engaging in both written and oral debate. This is a challenging course in all aspects and expectations are demanding.


27   ENGLISH 11 Grade: 11 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: English 10 and recommendation of current English teacher English 11 is a one-year course that aims to provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through the knowledge of language. Students are exposed to the wide range of literature that they encounter in their everyday lives including short stories, novels, speeches, advertisements, cartoons and news editorials. Through the study of a wide range of texts, students are encouraged to develop and refine their own language skills through comparing and contrasting the purpose and effect language can have. The study of literature is enhanced by a focus on Media and Culture as students examine the manner in which language is employed in advertising, propaganda, news and editorials, and sensationalistic journalism. Additionally, through the study of Global Issues, students will gain an awareness and appreciation for the Global and Environmental concerns facing the world today. Through consistent written and oral work, students in English 11 will develop their awareness of the role of language, while refining their own effectiveness in writers and speakers of English. This course is modeled on the English A Language and Literature syllabus but does not lead to an IB exam.

ENGLISH 12 Grade: 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: English 11 and recommendation of current English teacher English 12 is a continuation of the English 11 program in that the course aims to provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through the knowledge of language. Students will continue their study of the purpose and subtleties of language in literature. The course also continues the examination of Global issues and Media and Culture as students come to a more advanced understanding of the role language plays in perception, persuasion, emotion and identity. Students will consistently produce written and oral work, and, in doing so, continue to develop their awareness of the role of language, while refining their own effectiveness in writers and speakers of the English language. This course is modeled on the English A Language and Literature syllabus but does not lead to an IB exam.

IB ENGLISH A LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Standard Level) Grade: 11-12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: English 10 and recommendation of current English teacher The IB English Language A course is a two year study of both language and literature. This program’s intent is to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of language, visual literacy, and the exploration of what is ‘text’. Through the study of 4 works of literature, this course seeks to facilitate the clear expression of ideas, to aid clear, precise presentation of argument and to assist in the understanding of both oral and written discourse. As stated by the IB: “Students develop the techniques needed for the critical analysis of communication, becoming alert to interactions between text, audience and purpose. An understanding of how language, culture and context determine the construction of meaning is developed through the exploration of a wide variety of texts, some of which are studied in translation. Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written coursework and oral activities. The formal examination comprises two essay papers, one requiring the analysis of unseen literary and non-literary texts, and the other a response to a question based on the literary works studied. Students also produce written tasks in a variety of genres, and perform two oral activities presenting their analysis of works read.” Students who take this course will be expected to take the standard level IB English A Language and Literature examination.


28   IB ENGLISH A LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Higher Level) Grade: 11-12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: English 10 and recommendation of current English teacher The IB English Language A course is a two year study of both language and literature. This program’s intent is to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of language, visual literacy, and the exploration of what is ‘text’. Through the study of 6 works of literature, this course seeks to facilitate the clear expression of ideas, to aid clear, precise presentation of argument and to assist in the understanding of both oral and written discourse. As stated by the IB: “Students develop the techniques needed for the critical analysis of communication, becoming alert to interactions between text, audience and purpose. An understanding of how language, culture and context determine the construction of meaning is developed through the exploration of a wide variety of texts, some of which are studied in translation. Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written coursework and oral activities. The formal examination comprises two essay papers, one requiring the analysis of unseen literary and non-literary texts, and the other a response to a question based on the literary works studied. Students also produce written tasks in a variety of genres, and perform two oral activities presenting their analysis of works read.” Students who take this course will be expected to take the higher level IB English A Language and Literature examination.

IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE (Standard Level) Grade: 11-12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: English 10 and recommendation of current English teacher Through the study of a wide range of literature, the IB Language A Literature course promotes the appreciation of the rich craft of literature and for students to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading and writing. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts through close and critical reading. Students are encouraged to make significant connections and insights and use a variety of written and oral tools to express their understanding. Through the study of 10 texts, divided into works in translation, detailed study, literary genres and options, students will develop a deeper understanding of various cultural perspectives and refine their command of language. Standard Level students will present a 10 minute formal oral commentary on one of two works studied in part 2 of the course, and paper 1 exam is a literary analysis on an unseen prose passage or poem. Standard level students will receive two guiding questions on this assessment to help guide their thinking. Students who take this course will be expected to take the standard level IB English A Literature examination.

IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE (Higher Level) Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite:

Length: 2 years Credits: 2 English 10 and recommendation of current English teacher

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the IB Language A Literature course promotes the appreciation of the rich craft of literature and for students to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading and writing. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts through close and critical reading. Students are encouraged to make significant connections and insights and use a variety of written and oral tools to express their understanding. Through the study of 13 texts, divided into works in translation, detailed study, literary genres and options, students will develop a deeper understanding of various cultural perspectives and refine their command of language. Higher Level students will present a 10 minute formal oral commentary on poetry studied in part 2 of the course and then engage in a discussion with teacher on one of the other two works studied. For Higher Level the paper 1 exam is a literary analysis on an unseen prose passage or poem without any guiding questions to help guide their thinking. Students who take this course will be expected to take the higher level IB English A Literature examination.


29   IB ENGLISH B (Higher Level) Grade: 11-12 Length: 2 year Credits: 2 (English credit) Prerequisite: EAL program placement within previous 3 years and English & EAL teacher recommendations The purpose of the course is to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an English-language environment. The students will have the opportunity to develop written and oral communication skills in English through the study of authentic examples of both written and spoken texts. They will be expected to create a range of texts that show an awareness of audience, purpose, structural elements, style, rhetorical devices, and register. Students must also engage in oral activities that require them to discuss issues related to the course in a meaningful way. The study of literature from English-speaking cultures is also a key component of the course and enables students to develop an understanding of both text and culture. Throughout the course there are ongoing assessments that reflect the IB assessment requirements but contribute to an overall ISB grade. IB English B HL fulfills ISB's English requirements for grades 11 and 12. IB English B HL may replace an EAP or ELW class for EAL program students at stage 5B who have passed 4 of the 6 EAL tests. EAL program students enrolled in IB English B HL are encouraged to take ELW classes if they are not yet reading at grade-level.

ENGLISH ELECTIVE COURSES MEDIA STUDIES (Previously Journalism) Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 year Credit: 1 (Elective credit only – may be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: None.

Students in the Media Studies Elective design, produce and distribute two Media Publications which serve the ISB community: The International magazine (both a print and online version) and Panther Productions (ISB’s weekly morning news show). Both publications are influenced by best practices and trends in journalism with a focus on news, events and issues relevant to high school students. Students develop the skills necessary to produce written and/or video accounts of news stories, features articles, editorials, and sports coverage that are then published in both online and hard copy formats. Students also generate topics, identify and maintain sources, conduct interviews with various school personalities, peer edit each other’s work, and ‘keep a finger on the pulse’ of HS student life at ISB. Added to this, students will have the opportunity to use industry standard technologies in Layout, Design, HTML Coding, Java Scripting and many other technologies. Those who select this elective must be responsible enough to meet deadlines, creative enough to produce engaging stories, and interested in the art of writing and video production to the point of seeking to continually improve the quality of both media platforms. Students may also elect to audit (contribute to the publications, but not eligible for credit) this class by joining the Panther Productions after school club. Students may apply to work as a “freelance journalist” where they can contribute to specific items or articles in either the International publication or Panther Productions. Expectations for “freelance” students are set by the Media Studies teachers. Students who are working “freelance” will not receive course credit. Learner Outcomes: • An exposure to a wide range of journalistic writing genres including news, editorials, sports, feature articles and script writing; • Independent use and application of writing and video editing skills to generate and produce engaging stories and articles (both written and video); • Development of tech skills involved with the production of both publications; • An understanding of the importance of working as a team; • Selection of appropriate content for The International and Panther Productions; • Clearly demonstrated organizational skills; • Selection, manipulation and editing of high quality photographs and video footage; • Working cooperatively within a group environment; • Effective communication with ISB Faculty, Staff, Students and Administration.


30   CREATIVE WRITING Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

(Elective credit only)

Prerequisite: None

The Creative Writing course aims to increase student skills in writing vivid, effective prose and poetry and to improve their critical awareness when reading and writing. The course aims to work on the student’s writing skills in a variety of different styles and genres, through critical examination of exemplary texts, through exploration of different techniques of composition, but most importantly, through close reflection on the student’s own writing. The primary teaching method will be tutor-led, full-class workshops (including peer editing), but there will also be one-to-one time with the tutor. The most important aim of the course will be to sharpen the student’s awareness of writing as a craft and as a means of concise communication. Students will be expected to produce written work every week.

SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

(Elective credit only)

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to improve students’ knowledge and skills of oral communication and active listening while providing opportunities to speak before a group and listen to other speak employing this knowledge and skills. Principles of effective oral communication including delivery, organization, content, and stress management will be taught. The course will include a functional approach to effective speaking with practical application in informative, impromptu, and persuasive speaking.


31  

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL) English as an Additional Language (EAL) Course Chart

Note: Students can test out of ELW & EAP courses at the end of semester 1

INTRODUCTION ISB supports a Sheltered Immersion Model (SIM) to develop English language proficiency for social and academic success. SIM aims to improve language learning, facilitate access to high school classes, maintain high academic standards, and develop cross-cultural understandings. Language instruction and content learning are supported in both EAL and mainstream classes. Students are encouraged to maintain their native language to aid content understanding and second language learning. EAL support is available to all EAL students throughout their years at ISB.

SHELTERED IMMERSION MODEL Sheltered means support to the EAL students through EAL classes, the EAP Center, and EAL and mainstream collaborative teams. EAL teachers work with the mainstream teachers to plan collaboratively and teach, co-teach, or provide in-class support to EAL students in the mainstream. Immersion means that EAL students and their peers are educated in the same classroom. The model immerses the student in the mainstream population while also providing support. In addition, the high school offers an EAL Foundations program designed to prepare academically able students with limited English language proficiency for entrance into ISB’s grade 9 or 10. Students receive direct English language instruction in EAL and integrated content and language classes, and also experience mainstream classes, providing an inclusive and authentic learning environment. Students learn the content and language specific to grade 9 English, social studies and science, which will provide a solid foundation in the content areas to ensure a smooth transition into the mainstream program.


32   GRADE PLACEMENT Grade placement of students is determined by the counselors and the High School Admissions Committee at the time of admission.

COURSE PLACEMENT

Course placement is determined by the EAL teachers on a yearly or semester basis, according to assessment of students’ English language proficiency (EAL testing), classroom performance and grades, and EAL and mainstream teacher recommendation.

GRADING Classroom and EAP teachers assist EAL students with the language necessary to show understanding of the course content. EAP teachers collaborate with content area teachers to develop accessible resources, materials, and assessments for EAL students. EAL students, in their first year of SIM, may take some courses on a pass/audit basis. The decision to award an alternate grade is made by the HS Dean of Academics in consultation with EAL and classroom teachers, and the student’s counselor. Parents and students will be informed of this eligibility and final decision in a timely manner. A student who audits a course must retake the course in order to earn credit. Refer to HS EAL webpage and “K-12 EAL Handbook” available on the ISB website http://www.isb.ac.th for more details and information about the EAL program.

EAL COURSES ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES (EAP 9, EAP 10, EAP 11, EAP 12) Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 0.5 (Elective credit)

Prerequisite: EAL program placement

EAP courses are designed to improve academic language for required English, social studies and science classes at ISB. Through targeted language instruction, students learn to use different kinds of spoken and written texts to communicate for a variety of purposes in a variety of situations. In addition, effective study skills, literary appreciation, reflective reading, vocabulary development, and creative expression are encouraged at various grade levels. For half of each period, teachers assist students with the language and content of required English, social studies and science classes. The goal of the EAP courses is for students to become more proficient in social and academic situations.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOP (ELW 1, ELW 2, ELW 3) Grade: 9–12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (Elective credit)

Prerequisite: EAL program placement

ELW is designed to develop language and academic literacy through an integrated listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills approach. ELW courses are leveled for beginning (ELW 1), intermediate (ELW 2), and advanced (ELW 3) English language learners. Students will engage in the same types of tasks frequently encountered in ISB content courses such as graded discussions, formal presentations, research reports, personal reflections and essay writing. Each ELW course provides a two-year curriculum to accommodate the varying rates of language acquisition of English language learners. Students may take one or two years to move from one level to the next. Language is developed through an independent reading program, writing for a variety of purposes, vocabulary building activities, need-based grammar instruction, and the use of language learning strategies. Collaboration and hands-on activities will engage students in the learning process to ensure that each student progresses towards greater linguistic competency.


33   IB ENGLISH B (Higher Level) Grade: 11-12 Length: 2 year Credits: 2 (English credit) Prerequisite: EAL program placement within previous 3 years and English & EAL teacher recommendations The purpose of the course is to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an English-language environment. The students will have the opportunity to develop written and oral communication skills in English through the study of authentic examples of both written and spoken texts. They will be expected to create a range of texts that show an awareness of audience, purpose, structural elements, style, rhetorical devices, and register. Students must also engage in oral activities that require them to discuss issues related to the course in a meaningful way. The study of literature from English-speaking cultures is also a key component of the course and enables students to develop an understanding of both text and culture. Throughout the course there are ongoing assessments that reflect the IB assessment requirements but contribute to an overall ISB grade. IB English B HL fulfills ISB's English requirements for grades 11 and 12. IB English B HL may replace an EAP or ELW class for EAL program students at stage 5B who have passed 4 of the 6 EAL tests. EAL program students enrolled in IB English B HL are also encouraged to take ELW classes if they are not yet reading at grade-level.

FOUNDATIONS PROGRAM FOUNDATIONS ENGLISH 9 Grade: 9

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (English Credit)

Foundations English 9 is designed to develop skills and knowledge through a range of literary genres and written text types. Units of study follow the English 9 curriculum with the same engaging essential questions. Each unit offers students a variety of literary genres, written tasks, and oral communication opportunities. Students are introduced to literary text types such as the novel, poetry, drama, feature article, book review, editorial, and infographic along with associated literary terminology. Students develop writing and speaking skills through the writing process and a variety of oral activities. Grammatical usage and vocabulary are studied in context. Students engage in an independent reading and writing program to improve English skills and to create a lifelong readers and writers. Open to Foundations 8 students in semester 2 for no credit.

FOUNDATIONS WORLD STUDIES 9 Grade: 9

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (Social Studies Credit)

In this course, students will examine global issues ranging from values, population geography, society, culture and politics. During the first semester, students will explore religion and social structures in India as well as causes of coherence within societies. In the second half of the course students study and debate political theory and patterns of human settlement. Throughout the course, students will practice and develop skills in critical thinking, writing and research, and public speaking - skills needed for success in their future high school studies and beyond. Open to Foundations 8 students in semester 2 for no credit.


34   FOUNDATIONS CHEMISTRY I Grade: 9

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (Science credit)

Foundations Chemistry I is an introductory chemistry course for beginning EAL students in their first semester of grade 9. The course is designed to simultaneously develop both scientific and English language literacy. The course provides an essential foundation in experimental skills including data logging with computers, scientific inquiry and communication, and data management techniques, as well as core chemistry concepts. Units of study follow the grade 9 Chemistry I curriculum. Students will develop knowledge and conceptual understanding of Chemistry topics such as Matter and Measurement, Atomic Structure and Theory, Chemical Bonding and Reactions, and Metals and the Reactivity Series. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester.

FOUNDATIONS BIOLOGY I Grade: 9

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (Science credit)

Foundations Biology I is an introductory biology course for beginning EAL students in their second semester of grade 9. The course is designed to simultaneously develop both scientific and English language literacy. The course continues developing the experimental skills, scientific inquiry and communication, and data management techniques introduced in Foundations Chemistry 1. Units of study follow the grade 9 Biology I curriculum. Students will develop knowledge and conceptual understanding of Biology topics such as Ecology and Biodiversity, Inheritance and Variation, Genetics, and Evolution. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course. Students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester. Open to Foundations 8 students in semester 2 for no credit.

FOUNDATIONS COMMUNICATION SKILLS 9 Grade: 9

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (Elective credit)

Students will improve oral (conversational, discussion, and presentation) and aural skills by sharing thoughts and feelings about their own life and learning experiences, as well as learn about the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others through discussion of readings, audio scripts and videos. Beginning with their own experiences, students will learn the vocabulary and structures and skills to discuss a range of relevant and interesting topics. Crosscultural understandings will give students the skill and confidence to participate in the English-speaking classrooms at ISB. Open to Foundations 8 students in semester 2 for no credit.

FOUNDATIONS EAP 9 Grade: 9

Length: 1 Year

Credit: 0.5 (Elective credit)

EAP Foundations 9 is designed to help students develop the language required for English, social studies and science classes at ISB. Through reading and writing workshops, students learn to use different kinds of spoken and written texts to communicate for a variety of purposes in a variety of situations. In addition, effective study skills, independent reading, journal writing, vocabulary development, and the use of language learning strategies are developed. For half of each period, teachers assist students with the language and content of required English, social studies and science classes. The goal of the EAP courses is for students to become more proficient in social and academic situations. Open to Foundations 8 students semester 2 for no credit.


35  

WORLD LANGUAGES Language and Literature Course Chart (Native)

Language B Course Chart (Non Native)

Language ab initio Course Chart

Although World Languages is not a requirement for graduation, it is highly recommended that students enroll in at least two years of the same World Language. Important note: native/near native speakers may not take non-native courses in their mother tongue.


36   INTRODUCTION The World Language Department is committed to preparing our students to meet the challenges of living in multicultural and multilingual societies, as well as to succeed in the global work environment. To learn other languages and to appreciate other cultures will not only increase future career opportunities, but also prepare students to communicate efficiently in a changing world. Critical thinking, creativity and essential skills will be fostered in our students through learning World Languages.

WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES

FRENCH I Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite:

no previous study of French

This course is designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the French language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where French is spoken.

FRENCH II Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite:

French I

This course continues to develop the language skills in French through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading and writing activities relate to topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall and creativity. Students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the French language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the students’ reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the French speaking world.

FRENCH III Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: French II

In this course, previously learned vocabulary and structures are reinforced, serving as a transition into new material. The students’ understanding of how the language functions is expanded allowing them to become more confident in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, while continuing to make the French language relevant to their daily lives. The stress is on continued authentic communication, cultural awareness and relying on French for comprehension.


37   IB FRENCH B (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: French III and recommendation of current French teacher The focus of this program is on language acquisition and on awareness of the cultures of the French World. The aim of the program is to give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in French and to develop an appreciation and awareness of the cultures where French is spoken. Authentic materials will be used to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The language of instruction is French.

IB AB INITIO FRENCH (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: little or no previous study of French The ab initio French is a two-year, IB standard level program for students who have little of no previous experience of learning the target language. The approach is communicative in that it focuses principally on interaction between speakers and writers of the target language. The main aim of the program is to prepare the learner to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. Equal emphasis will be given to the teaching of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. An additional aim is for students to develop an awareness of the cultures of the French World. Note: this course may will run only with sufficient student enrolment.

IB FRENCH A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: native or near-native speaker and recommendation of current French teacher The IB French A Language & Literature course is a two-year program that aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students engage in the close study of literary works, and examine issues generated by the study of topics such as gender, history and evolution of the language, language and power, and language and mass communication. Requirements of the course include comparative written tasks on language and literature, individual oral commentaries and presentations.

FRENCH NATIVE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1-4 years

Credits: 1 - 4

Native French is designed to help native or near native speakers to develop their language proficiency and to prepare them for further study of the language.


38  

SPANISH I Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite:

no previous study of Spanish

This course is designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the Spanish language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where Spanish is spoken.

SPANISH II Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite:

Spanish I

This course continues to develop the language skills in Spanish through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading and writing activities relate to the topics which reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall and creativity. Students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the Spanish language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPANISH III Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Spanish II

In this course, previously learned vocabulary and structures are reinforced, serving as a transition into new material. The students’ understanding of how the language functions is expanded allowing them to become more confident in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, while continuing to make the Spanish language relevant to their daily lives. The stress is on continued authentic communication, cultural awareness and relying on Spanish for comprehension.

SPANISH IV Grade: 10-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Spanish III

This course is designed to provide strong preparation for success in the Spanish Language B program, particularly for those interested in taking IB Spanish B at the Higher Level or those that need additional preparation for the Standard Level course. Students will benefit from an additional year of Spanish study, enabling them to further develop language skills and knowledge of the Hispanic world. Students will also be able to study Spanish for all four years of High School and consequently gain greater fluency in the language.


39   IB SPANISH B (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Spanish III or Spanish IV or recommendation of current Spanish teacher The focus of this program is on language acquisition and on awareness of the cultures of the Hispanic World. The aim of the program is to give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in Spanish and to develop an appreciation and awareness of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Authentic material will be used to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The language of instruction is Spanish.

IB AB INITIO SPANISH (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: little or no previous study of Spanish

The ab initio is a two-year, IB standard level program for students who have little or no previous experience of learning the target language. The approach is communicative in that it focuses principally on interaction between speakers and writers of the target language. The main aim of the program is to prepare the learner to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. Equal emphasis will be given to the teaching of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. An additional aim is for students to develop an awareness of the cultures of the Hispanic World.

IB SPANISH A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: native or near-native speaker and recommendation of current Spanish teacher The IB Spanish A Language & Literature course is a two-year program based on the study of both language and literature. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students engage in the close study of literary works, and examine issues generated by the study of topics such as gender, history and evolution of the language, language and power, and language and mass communication. Requirements of the course include comparative and textual analyses, essays, written tasks on language and literature, individual oral commentaries and presentations.

SPANISH NATIVE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1-4 years

Credits: 1 – 4

Prerequisite: Native Spanish speaker

Native Spanish is designed to help native or near native speakers to develop their language proficiency and to prepare them for further study of the language.


40  

JAPANESE I Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: no previous study of Japanese

This course is designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the Japanese language. The students will learn the Japanese sound system. The Hiragana and Katakana writing notations are introduced from the outset. The basic characters of Kanji are learned in the second half of the second semester. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the Japanese culture.

JAPANESE II Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Japanese I

This course continues to develop the language skills in Japanese through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading and writing activities relate to the topics which reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall and creativity. Students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the Japanese language. One hundred Kanji symbols classified according to radicals, shape, categories, and elements will be introduced after a review of Hiragana and Katakana. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the students’ reading and writing skills as well as a continued awareness of the Japanese culture.

JAPANESE III Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Japanese II

In this course, previously learned vocabulary and structures are reinforced, serving as a transition into new material. The students’ understanding of how the language functions is expanded allowing them to become more confident in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, while continuing to make the Japanese language relevant to their daily lives. The stress is on continued authentic communication, cultural awareness and relying on Japanese for comprehension.

JAPANESE NATIVE I Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 – 4 years

Credit: 1 per year

Prerequisite: native or near native speaker

This course is designed to help Japanese native or near native speakers develop their language proficiency and to prepare them for further study of the language. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students will be encouraged to read various selected articles from magazines, newspapers and literary works. In addition, students will learn 600 Kanji Characters from the Education Kanji List regulated by the Japanese Ministry of Education and Science, in order to gain the reading and writing skills necessary for IB Japanese A language and literature course.


41   JAPANESE NATIVE II Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 – 4 years Prerequisite: Japanese Native I or teacher approval

Credit: 1 per year

Japanese Native II is a continuation of Japanese Native 1. In this course students will continue expanding their knowledge of Japanese language and culture and refining their language skills. Students will read a range of texts including articles from magazines and newspapers, and literary works. The stress of this course is on continued authentic communication and on achieving high proficiency in the Japanese language, as well as cultural understanding.

IB JAPANESE B (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Japanese III and recommendation of current Japanese teacher The focus of this program is on language acquisition and on awareness of Japanese culture. The aim of the program is to give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in Japanese and to develop an appreciation and awareness of the aspects of Japanese culture. Authentic material will be used to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The language of instruction is Japanese.

IB JAPANESE A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Native speaker & teacher recommendation The IB Japanese A course is a two-year program based on the study of both language and literature. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students engage in the close study of literary works, and examine issues generated by the study of topics such as language, culture, society, media, global issues and change. Requirements of the course include both oral and written critiques, comparative commentaries, essays and creative writing assignments.


42  

MANDARIN I Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: no previous study of Mandarin This course is designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the Mandarin language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where Mandarin is spoken. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.

MANDARIN II Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Mandarin I

This course continues to develop the language skills in Mandarin through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading and writing activities relate to the topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall and creativity. Students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the Mandarin language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the Mandarin speaking world. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.

MANDARIN III Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Mandarin II and teacher recommendation In this course, previously learned vocabulary and structures are reinforced, serving as a transition into new material. The students’ understanding of how the language functions is expanded allowing them to become more confident in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, while continuing to make the Mandarin language relevant to their daily lives. The stress is on continued authentic communication, cultural awareness and relying on Mandarin for comprehension. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.

IB MANDARIN B (Standard & Higher Levels) Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Mandarin III and teacher recommendation The focus of this program is on language acquisition and on awareness of Chinese culture. The aim of the program is to give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in Mandarin and to develop an appreciation and awareness of the cultures where Chinese is spoken. Authentic materials will be used to integrate the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The language of instruction is Mandarin. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.


43   IB AB INITIO MANDARIN (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Little or no previous study of Mandarin

The ab initio Mandarin is a two-year, IB standard level program for students who have little or no previous experience of learning in the target language. The approach is communicative in that it focuses principally on interaction between speakers and writers of the target language. The main aim of the program is to prepare the learner to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. Equal emphasis will be given to the teaching of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. An additional aim is for students to develop an awareness of the cultures of the Chinese World.

IB MANDARIN A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: native or near native speaker and recommendation of current Mandarin teacher The IB Mandarin A course is a two-year program based on the study of both language and literature. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students engage in the close study of literary works, and examine issues generated by the study of topics such as language, culture, society, media, global issues and change. Requirements of the course include both oral and written critiques, comparative commentaries, essays and creative writing assignments. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.

MANDARIN NATIVE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1-4 years

Credits: 1 – 4

Mandarin Native is designed to help native or near native speakers to develop their language proficiency and to prepare them for further study of the language. Students will learn both traditional and simplified characters so that they can function in any Chinese speaking country.

SURVIVAL THAI Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: no previous study of Thai

This course is designed especially for students who are interested in exploring Thailand and who want to learn enough Thai to get around. It will focus mainly on oral communication and Thai culture. Students will be immersed in Thai through the communicative approach. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven in the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and appreciation of the Thai culture. In this course, students will learn functional Thai in an enjoyable way and gain an appreciation of our host country’s culture.


44   THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS - LANGUAGE Grades: 9 – 12

Length 1 – 4 years

Credits: 1 – 4

Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation

This course is designed to help “near native” speakers develop their language skills and to prepare them for further study of the language. The aim of this course is to target the individual needs of students so that they can become proficient in all the language skills.

THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS IV Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

This course is designed for Thai Native Speakers. It aims to continue developing the language skills and expanding student’s knowledge and understanding of the target culture. During this course, the three modes of communication (Receptive, Productive, and Interactive Skills) will be used to study and analyze Thai language and culture.

THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS V Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Thai IV or teacher recommendation

This course is designed for Thai Native Speakers. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and culture, and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. During this course, the three modes of communication (Receptive, Productive, and Interactive Skills) will be used to study and analyze Thai Language and Culture.

THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS VI Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Thai V or Teacher recommendation

This course is designed for Thai Native Speakers. It aims to continue developing and refining a variety of linguistic skills, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and literature, and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. During this course, the three modes of communication (Receptive, Productive, and Interactive Skills) will be used to study and analyze a range of texts and literary works.

IB THAI A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard & Higher Levels) Grade: 11-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Thai Native VI or Teacher recommendation

The IB Thai A Language & Literature course is a two-year program based on the study of both language and literature. It aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts, to promote an appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. Students engage in the close study of literary works, and examine issues generated by the study of topics such as gender, history and evolution of the language, language and power, and language and mass communication. Requirements of the course include comparative and textual analyses, essays, written tasks on language and literature, individual oral commentaries and presentations. DIPLOMA THAI Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 year

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Native Thai speaker taking IB Diploma

This course is a two-year program designed for full IB diploma Thai native speakers who are not taking Thai A as an IB subject. Students meet every other day for 45 minutes and are grouped by ability level. The aim of this course is to continue developing the language skills and to expand their knowledge and understanding of the target culture. During this course, the three modes of communication (Receptive, Productive, and Interactive Skills) will be used to study and analyze Thai Language.


45  

SOCIAL STUDIES Social Studies Course Chart

Three credits are required for graduation. IB Information Technology in a Global Society SL/HL is an online course

INTRODUCTION The high school Social Studies program is designed to develop the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own cultural identities, and to recognize and respect cultural similarities and differences within a global perspective. Three credits of Social Studies at the high school level (grades 9-12) are required for graduation. 9th and 10th grade students will take courses indicated for their grade levels, while 11th and 12th grade students should select from those courses indicated for junior and senior status.


46   SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES WORLD STUDIES 9 Grade: 9

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

In World Studies 9 students will examine a wide range of aspects of human societies, both in our past as well as our present. Major course themes include Sociocultural Complexity, Conflict and Perspective, Political Theory vs. Political Reality and Population Geographies. Students will investigate the causes of human conflict and learn to identify bias and examine multiple perspectives through case studies. Emphasis is placed on students’ understanding of their own perspectives and how this shapes individual thinking both historically and in modern debate. Students will also practice and develop skills in research, critical thinking, and oral and written communication needed for success in their future Social Studies courses.

WORLD STUDIES 10 Grade: 10

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: World Studies 9

In World Studies 10 students will investigate some of the major ideas and events of the past two hundred and fifty years that have shaped the world of today. The course focuses on the development of modern economic, social and political systems as well as the impact humans have on geography; looking at how changes have affected the way people live. Major course themes include Economic Development, Imperialism, Political Change, Morality & Conflict and Global Issues. Primary importance is placed on making connections between broad themes and current issues facing nations today. Students will be asked to consider events from a variety of viewpoints, to develop research, analytical thinking and oral and written communication skills to help them successfully complete future Social Studies courses.

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (ToK)

Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 semesters Credit: 1 Prerequisite: None This is a required course for all IB Diploma students and may be taken by other grade 11 students not enrolled in the full IB Diploma. More information can be found in the IB Diploma section of this document.

THAILAND & SOUTH EAST ASIA (TSEA) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: None This required course provides students with an opportunity to gain a more comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the economic, social, political, and cultural contexts of the region in which they reside. Students will explore contemporary issues in the region and will be encouraged to relate these issues to their own experiences of living in Thailand and Southeast Asia. Major themes will be: the scope of History as a subject and its uses in developing a sense of national identity in the region; Southeast Asia as a crossroads; conceptualisations and processes surrounding political transformation, and sustainable development.

WAYS OF KNOWING Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: None A one-semester class is a graduation requirement for all students except those taking the Theory of Knowledge course. The course is based on the Theory of Knowledge course. Final assessments include an interview in which students apply theory and concepts from class in a metacognitive analysis of one or more significant experiences from their high-school careers. This is videotaped and embedded in a student blog. The course is a graduation requirement for all students who do not take IB Theory of Knowledge.

US HISTORY: Modern America in Historical Perspective Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

This course examines three themes in U.S. History: the evolution of Democracy, the Role of the United States in the World (Foreign Policy), and the characterization of the U.S. as a Nation of Immigrants. While the course will follow a chronology from the American Revolution to the present, it will forgo a traditional textbook in favor of primary and secondary source readings focused on the three areas above. Reference to current events in the U.S. will be ongoing throughout the course, and final assessments will include writing a foreign policy and an immigration policy for the present day United States. US History is recommended for US citizens and non-US citizens who are planning to attend a university in the USA, although it is no longer compulsory.


47   BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT Grade: 11-12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 The Business and Management course is designed for students with a genuine interest in participating in business classes in university. The emphasis of the course is an overview of business practices and disciplines to include: the business environment, innovation, production, personal finances and accounting, retail, marketing and new developments in technology.

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to basic micro and macroeconomic topics with particular emphasis on analyzing the role of economics in daily life. Topics of study include: demand, supply and price determination, market structures, business organization, the stock market, money and banking, economic performance, the role of government in the economy including fiscal and monetary policy, international trade and globalization, and economic challenges facing countries today. Students will be expected to share their ideas in a persuasive and coherent manner through written, spoken, and visual presentations, to research necessary information and make decisions regarding its validity and usefulness, and to develop strategies for finding solutions to challenging, current problems.

IB BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT (Standard & Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation The aim is to develop an understanding of business theory as well as an ability to effectively apply principles, practices and skills to business case study situations. Students will examine a diverse range of cultural and economic situations in which modern-day businesses operate and will be asked to consider ethics and social responsibility in an international business context. Syllabus topics for both SL and HL include: marketing, types of organizations, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations.

IB ECONOMICS (Standard and Higher Level)

Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation This course is equivalent to a first-year university level Economics course. The HL course has a quantitative component (basic Algebra) and one of the three IB HL exam papers at the end of the course is only quantitative. The SL course does not have a quantitative component. The topics covered in both of these courses are: examination and application of basic economic theories and principles, government intervention in the market, market failure, and macroeconomics including monetary and fiscal policy in the first year; resource allocation and economic decision making, national income analysis, employment, money and banking, inflation, international economics, trade, balance of payments, exchange rates, economic development and theory of the firm in the second year.

IB GEOGRAPHY (Standard and Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation

The core subjects of this class are the interrelated themes of population, resources and development. In addition to the core, students will study 3 options that are divided among various themes in physical and human geography and an additional unit on global interactions. Physical geography concentrates on human management of climatic natural hazards and geographic processes of riverine and coastal systems, tectonics, volcanoes, and weather. Human geography focuses on the human impact on our planet with topics including urbanization, globalization and sustainable development. In addition, IB geography involves statistical and scientific analysis and there will be a continuing thread incorporating the distinctive use of mapping, and similar techniques used by geographers. An emphasis of this class is fieldwork. There is a required trip (3-days) in year one to do fieldwork on river processes in Northern Thailand. The internal assessment can count as TSEA credit for full IB diploma students.


48   IB HISTORY Please note prior to registration: * One year History SL: (OPTIONAL) * Two year History HL: Americas

Grade11 or 12 - take 20th Century World. See description below *Require Flextime Grade11- take 20th Century World then

Grade12 - one of Asia and Oceania or

Students wishing to take Asia and Oceania or Americas as a single non-examination class will have IB History: Americas or IB History: Asia and Oceania on their transcript with no HL designation. HL indicates completion of a two-year course.

IB HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY WORLD (Standard Level ONE YEAR OPTION) Grades: 11 - 12 (SL), 11 (HL) Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation *require flextime This is a fast paced in-depth course, analyzing the following three Twentieth Century themes: Peacemaking, Peacekeeping and International Relations 1919-1936, Democratic States Challenges and Responses and The Cold War. Detailed studies include Post-World War One Treaties, Weimar Germany and the rise of Hitler, Post World War-Two reconstruction in Japan, the Cold War and the United States Civil Rights Movement. A variety of primary and secondary sources are utilized. Essay writing and ability to analyze historical documents are the skills developed in the course. Students are expected to monitor current events closely as these developments are intertwined with the themes listed above. During Flex- classes students will work on IB History skills and a 40 hour research project will be undertaken by students on a teacher approved topic. Students are expected to monitor current events closely as these developments are intertwined with the themes listed above. One year SL students will take the IB exam at the end of the year.

IB HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY WORLD (Standard Level TWO YEAR OPTION)

Grades: 11 - 12 (SL) Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation This is an in-depth course, analyzing the following three Twentieth Century themes: Peacemaking, Peacekeeping and International Relations 1919-1936, Democratic States Challenges and Responses and The Cold War. Detailed studies include Post-World War One Treaties, Weimar Germany and the rise of Hitler, Post World War-Two reconstruction in Japan, the Cold War, the United States Civil Rights Movement and South Africa in the 1990’s. A variety of primary and secondary sources are utilized. Essay writing and ability to analyze historical documents are skills developed in the course. Students will also conduct secondary research on a topic of interest and write a 1,500 word paper based on their findings. Students are expected to monitor current events closely as these developments are intertwined with the themes listed above.

IB HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY WORLD (Higher Level TWO YEAR OPTION) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation This is the first of a 2 year course in IB History. It is an in-depth course, analyzing the following three Twentieth Century themes: Peacemaking, Peacekeeping and International Relations 1919-1936, Democratic States Challenges and Responses and The Cold War. Detailed studies include Post-World War One Treaties, Weimar Germany and the rise of Hitler, Post World War-Two reconstruction in Japan, the Cold War and the United States Civil Rights Movement. A variety of primary and secondary sources are utilized. Essay writing and ability to analyze historical documents are skills developed in the course. Students are expected to monitor current events closely as these developments are intertwined with the themes listed above. Following this first year course, students will study a regional course either Asia & Oceania or The Americas.

IB HISTORY: ASIA & OCEANIA (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of China and Japan from the early 1800’s to the early 1970’s. There is a focus on the political, social and economic development of East Asia and its changing relationship with Western nations. Students are required to undertake a research project on a topic approved by the instructor. The course can be taken as a one year elective by motivated students (non-IB Credit) or as the second part of a two-year IB History (HL) program culminating in the IB history exam.


49   IB HISTORY: THE AMERICAS (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation

This course covers the time period from the mid-18th century to 1995 in the United States, Latin America, including the Caribbean, and Canada. The major components of the course are the key political, social, economic and cultural events and themes that have had an impact on the Americas including: characteristics of colonial rule; achievement of independence; slavery and its effects; evolution and changes in governments; the US Civil War; causes and effects of the Great Depression; civil rights and social movements of the mid-late 20th century. Students are required to undertake a research project on an approved topic. The course may be taken as a one year elective by motivated students (non-IB Credit) or as the second part of a two-year IB History (HL) program culminating in the IB history exam.

IB PSYCHOLOGY (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation

This exciting two-year course allows students to acquire an in-depth knowledge of the most important theories and studies in the discipline of Psychology. Students are asked to develop critical thinking abilities and well-developed writing skills in order to evaluate psychological studies. The first section of the course deals with the main factors that influence behavior: biology, cognition, society and culture. In the second section the course focuses on the fascinating field of abnormal psychology. Students are required to conduct their own experiment and write a report for their internal assessment.

IB PSYCHOLOGY (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Social Studies teacher recommendation

This course is designed for students with a sincere interest in a scientific approach to human behavior. Students will be asked to develop critical thinking abilities and well-developed writing skills in order to effectively evaluate and interpret a wide range of psychological studies. Students will investigate the biological, cognitive, social and cultural influences of human behavior. In addition to these major theoretical perspectives, the fields of abnormal psychology and the psychology of human relationships will be covered in the first and/or second years. Students must also learn how to conduct qualitative scientific research as well as apply inferential statistics. The internal assessment project will be undertaken in the second year requiring students to plan and conduct their own experimental research.

IB INFORMATION TECHONOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY (ITGS) (SL & HL)* ON LINE COURSE Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Students need to demonstrate an appropriate skill set to be successful online learners IB Information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of IT on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences, it also considers social and ethical considerations. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This increasingly widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions with regard to the social and ethical considerations that shape our society today.


50  

SCIENCE Science Course Chart

Science program requirement: ü All ISB students must take Chemistry 1, Biology 1, and Physics 1 in Grades 9/10 ü All students enrolling in IB HL Sciences in Grade 11 must take a level II course in that subject area. ü All semester courses are 0.5 credits.

INTRODUCTION The goal of science education at ISB is to develop scientifically literate students who think critically to solve problems and make informed decisions in their world. The science curriculum is designed to develop conceptual understanding, skills, process and attitudes through exploration and inquiry. Through a rich program of activities, labs and lectures, students will be challenged to develop individual thinking and critical attitudes concerning the methods of science and the limitations of the scientific method. We believe that the acquisition of knowledge through laboratory inquiry is the basic activity of science. Therefore, students will be continually challenged to explore through a well-designed series of laboratory activities in each course, including the use of technology to help students form valid conclusions of their experimental results and communicate those findings effectively.


51   SCIENCE COURSES CHEMISTRY I Grade: 9 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: None Chemistry I is the introductory science course for all 9th Grade ISB students in their first semester. This course provides an essential foundation in experimental skills including data logging with computers, scientific inquiry and communication, and data management techniques, as well as core chemical concepts. Students will develop knowledge and conceptual understanding of Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding and Reactions, and Metals and the Reactivity Series. As the study of chemistry is considered ‘the central science’, this course will prepare students for Physics I or Biology I courses in their second semester. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus where students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester.

BIOLOGY I Grades: 9 – 10

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

Biology I is an introductory Biology course. This course continues developing experimental skills, scientific inquiry and communication, and data management techniques. Students will develop knowledge and conceptual understanding of Biology topics such as Ecology (Including Biodiversity) & Evolution; Cells and Systems: Physiology Respiratory System; and Photosynthesis and Respiration. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester.

PHYSICS I Grades: 9 – 10

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

Physics I is an introductory course where students investigate the physical world using both traditional and computer-based data logging and analysis. This course introduces students to the study of energy and motion, including both conceptual understanding and analytical problem solving involved in the study of Kinematics, Dynamics and Work and Energy. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester.

CHEMISTRY II Grade: 10 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Science 9 or Chemistry I Chemistry II continues the study of fundamental chemical concepts with a focus on environmental chemistry, and further develops scientific inquiry skills, data management and analysis, and communication skills. Knowledge and understanding of chemistry principles are investigated in the topics of Energy and Combustion of Fossil Fuels, Polymers, and Acid in the Environment. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester. Chemistry II is a requirement for students wishing to pursue IB Chemistry HL.

BIOLOGY II Grade: 10 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Science 9 or Biology I Biology II continues the study of fundamental biology concepts and further develops scientific inquiry skills, data management and analysis, and communication skills. Knowledge and understanding of biological principles are investigated in the topics of Speciation; DNA & Genetics; Reproduction; Cardiovascular System. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester. Biology II is a requirement for students wishing to pursue IB Biology HL.

PHYSICS II Grade: 10 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Science 9 or Physics I Physics II continues the study of fundamental physics concepts with a focus on energy transfers and transformations. Knowledge and understanding of physics principles are investigated in the topics of Waves and Sound, Electricity and Nuclear Physics. Students will further develop their scientific inquiry, data management and analysis, and communication skills. Scientific investigation and inquiry is a primary focus throughout the course, and students will complete an Independent Research Project during the semester. Physics II is a requirement for students wishing to pursue IB Physics HL.


52   GENERAL BIOLOGY Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Biology I

This course has been designed to help students grasp the complex challenges of living and leaving a sustainable way of life for future generations. The “lens” of sustainability will focus upon 5 units of biological study: Sustainability, Cell Biology, Ecology, Genetics and Evolution. Students will develop knowledge and skills to understand and evaluate global issues in Biology as related to sustainability. The learning will occur through hands on labs, hands on models, interactive computer simulations of scientific concepts, readings to understand how scientific theories are developed and applied today, and discussion and debates. Meaningful opportunities to connect the learning to oneself, one’s community and the world will be frequently provided.

GENERAL CHEMISTRY Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

In this course, students are given broad exposure to topics in chemistry, with a practical approach to the subject. Different aspects of environmental chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry will be explored in a ‘real world’ context. Students will be involved in an extensive inquiry-based laboratory program, and develop strong experimental and communication skills while developing conceptual understanding. This course is recommended for students who want a one-year introduction to chemistry.

GENERAL PHYSICS Grade: 11-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Physics I

In this course, the natural laws of the universe will be explored and related to everyday life. Students will use their natural curiosity, logic, and mathematics to solve problems about the physical world. Emphasis will be on learning by inquiry and experimenting. Students will be involved in an extensive inquiry-based laboratory program. Topics may include: data analysis; mechanics-motion, forces, momentum, gravitation, and energy; thermodynamics; waves, acoustics, and optics; electromagnetism; and modern physics -atomic, nuclear, and relativity. Connections between physics and other areas of study; for example astronomy, chemistry, and engineering will be emphasized. This course is recommended for students who want a one-year introduction to senior physics.

IB BIOLOGY (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or Biology II or Biology I & teacher recommendation This course allows for a broad study of biology topics, including biochemistry of life, cellular organization, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human physiology, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Standard Level syllabus; human nutrition and health, physiology of exercise, cells and energy, evolution, neurobiology and behavior, microbes and biotechnology, and ecology and conservation. Students will be involved in an extensive inquire-based laboratory program. In addition, each student must participate in a multidisciplinary project (Group 4 Project).

IB BIOLOGY (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or Biology II & teacher recommendation This is a two-year course that is equivalent to a first year university level Biology course. The topics studied in this course include biochemistry of life, cellular organization, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human physiology, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Higher Level syllabus: human nutrition and health, physiology of exercise, cells and energy, evolution, neurobiology and behavior, microbes and biotechnology, and ecology and conservation. Each topic is studied in-depth. Students will be involved in an extensive inquiry-based laboratory program. In addition, each student must participate in a multidisciplinary project (Group 4 Project).


53   IB CHEMISTRY (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or Chemistry II or Chemistry I & teacher recommendation This course allows for a broad study of chemistry topics, including atomic structure, stoichiometry, bonding, energetic, states of matter, equilibrium, kinetics, periodicity, organic chemistry, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Standard Level syllabus: human biochemistry, medicines and drugs, environmental chemistry or food chemistry. Students will be involved in an extensive laboratory program including a multi-disciplinary project (the Group 4 Project).

IB CHEMISTRY (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or Chemistry II & teacher recommendation This two-year course is equivalent to a first year university level chemistry course. The topics are covered in- depth and include atomic structure, stoichiometry, bonding, energetic, states of matter, equilibrium, kinetics, periodicity, and organic chemistry, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Higher Level syllabus: human biochemistry, medicines and drugs, environmental chemistry or food chemistry. Students will be involved in an extensive laboratory program including a multi-disciplinary project (the Group 4 Project).

IB PHYSICS (Standard Level) Grade: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or Physics II or Physics I & teacher recommendation This course allows a broad study of physics topics. Year One topics are kinematics, Newtonian mechanics and gravitation, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, waves and electromagnetism. Year 2 topics are atomic and nuclear physics, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Standard Level syllabus: geometrical optics, relativity, astrophysics, particle physics, electronic systems, or thermodynamics. Advanced laboratory work is a large component of this course. Students will develop their own independent research projects under the advisement of the instructor.

IB PHYSICS (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Physics II or Science 10 & teacher recommendation This two-year course is equivalent to a first year university level Physics course. Year 1 topics are kinematics, Newtonian mechanics and gravitation, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, waves and electromagnetism. Year 2 topics are atomic and nuclear physics, and two choices from the optional topics of the IB Higher Level syllabus: geometrical optics, relativity, astrophysics, particle physics, electronic systems, or thermodynamics. Advanced laboratory work is a large component of this course with students doing their own independent research under the advisement of the instructor. IB extended essays may develop from these projects.

IB SPORTS, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE (SEHS) (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science10 or any Science II & PE 9 teacher recommendation This is an innovative Group 4 Science course, which enables students to investigate the scientific background to success in sport, exercise and health. The syllabus contains a combination of experimental work, in which students will be actively involved providing a contextual opportunity for students to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and analyze human performance. The course will offer Anatomy, Exercise Physiology, Energy Systems, Movement Analysis year one. In year two topics will be Skill in Sport, Measurement and Evaluation of Human Performance and a choice of two option topics between, Optimizing Physiological Performance, Psychology of Sport, Physical Activity and Health or nutrition for sport, exercise and health. Enrolment in this course includes participation in the IB Group 4 project. Note: This course provides 2 Science credits and for students completing the two-year course, they may request 0.5 credit of the 2 credits for PE credit.


54   IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Standard Level/HL 1) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Trig

Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. It draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge that enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Computational thinking involves thinking procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, and recursively. This promotes thinking ahead while utilizing an experimental and inquiry-based approach to problem solving. Students learn to develop algorithms and express them clearly, as well as, understand the difference between theoretical and practical limitations of a solution. Students also develop the ability to identify a problem as well as design, prototype and test a proposed solution. This all leads to the preparation for the Standard Level IB Computer Science exam in May of the first year.

IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Higher Level Year 2) Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Computer Science SL or HL1

A continuation from the Standard Level Computer Science course, the Higher Level course is an extension of the material that is more advanced in both breadth and depth of the computer science subject. Students will learn additional topics in the areas of abstract data structures, resource management, computerized control and the demanding content of the option selected which include databases, modeling and simulation, web science, or object-oriented programming (OOP). There is also an additional externally assessed component based on a pre-seen case study of an organization or scenario. This will require students to research various aspects of computer science and technology, which may include new technical concepts and additional subject content that is in greater depth. This clear distinction between the SL and HL Computer Science will help to properly prepare the students for success on the final exam.

IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES (ESS) (Standard Level) Grades 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or any Science II & teacher recommendation IB Environmental systems and societies is a two-year course in which students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between natural processes, natural resources, and human activities on the Earth. Students will evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of a wide range of pressing environmental issues including their own relationship with their environment. Topics of study include the ecosystem, human population changes, conservation, biodiversity, pollution management, global warming and environmental value systems. Field research skills are also developed and a field trip is part of the course. The students will learn to plan and carry out field studies, statistically analyze data, evaluate their findings, and effectively communicate their results in lab reports. Note: If included in an IB Diploma this course may be designated either as Group 3 or Group 4 or both.


55  

MATHEMATICS Mathematics Course Chart (Current Grades 10 – 12)

Mathematics Course Chart (Grade 9 for 2014/15)

Three credits are required for graduation. Four credits are recommended.


56   INTRODUCTION The high school mathematics program is intended to provide mathematical skills to university bound students. The curriculum offers courses that develop a core mathematical knowledge for all students as well as advanced courses to those wanting additional mathematics. The high school mathematics program is undergoing some curriculum changes which will be phased in, beginning with the 9th grade, during the 2014-15 school year. The changes will progress with that cohort of students throughout their high school mathematics program. Next years’ 10-12th will continue with our current math curriculum throughout the remainder of their high school courses. The curriculum changes will affect the courses normally offered at the 9th and 10th grade level: ALGEO 1, Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2/TRIG at both the regular and accelerated levels. Advanced courses consisting of IB Mathematics SL, IB Mathematics HL, AP Statistics and AP Calculus are intended for highly motivated students. Students wanting to enter these courses during their junior or senior year must have taken all courses in the core block. Grade 10 students who have taken Algebra 1 in grade 9 may take two math courses (Geom. and Algebra2/TRIG) concurrently in grade 10 or if they qualify, Geometry Summer School after consultation with their counselor. The graduation requirement for mathematics is three years. It is strongly recommended that all students take a mathematics course during their senior year. All students are required to have a graphing calculator (TI 84 plus recommended).

MATHEMATICS CORE COURSES INTEGRATED MATH 1 (Standard & Studies) Grade: 9 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: none Students completing Math 8 in middle school will begin in this course. It is the first year of a two-year sequence of courses introducing students to the beauty of the language, structure and applications of mathematics. Emphasis is placed on balancing the skills of Algebra and Geometry, problem solving, real life applications, and using technology. The general topics of study will focus on numeracy using number sets and Venn diagrams and then move to reinforce algebra skills associated with simplifying and solving linear equations and inequalities. Towards the end of the first quarter students will be re-grouped based on readiness to proceed with one of two courses: Integrated Math 1 Studies or Integrated Math 1 Standard.

INTEGRATED MATH 1 STANDARD This courses aim is to reinforce and cover topics in a regular Algebra I class integrated with aspects of a standard Geometry course. The course continues from the algebra in Integrated Math 1 and moves to develop an understanding of geometrical concepts involving this algebra. Data analysis with statistics and probability is then investigated in the remainder of the first semester. The second half of the course will begin with a study of congruence and similarity, then move to a look at right triangle trigonometry, area and volume. It will conclude with topics to develop skills related to more advanced algebra and functions including quadratics.

INTEGRATED MATH 1 STUDIES The focus of this course is to reinforce and cover topics in a traditional Algebra I class integrated with aspects of a standard Geometry course at a more deliberate pace than Integrated Math 1 Standard. The course continues to reinforce the algebra concepts presented in Integrated Math 1 then moves to develop an understanding of geometrical concepts involving this algebra through the use of triangle and circle properties. The second half of the course will begin with a study of congruence and similarity, then continue to a unit on probability and statistics and conclude with the introduction to right triangle trigonometry.


57   INTEGRATED MATH 1 (Higher) Grade: 9 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (MS Algebra) Integrated Math 1 Higher will be offered at the 9th grade level. This course's aims are: to review and reinforce early linear algebra concepts and number sense, to develop an understanding of geometrical concepts and reasoning, to begin a study of triangle trigonometry, to continue data analysis with statistics and probability and to expand skills related to more advanced algebra and functions.

ALGEO 2 Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algeo 1

Algeo 2 is the second year of a two-year sequence of courses. Emphasis continues on balancing the skills of Algebra and Geometry, problem solving, real life applications, and using technology. Topics follow the same course of study as a second semester Algebra 1 course, taken at a more deliberate pace, with additional focus on the integration of geometry. Topics include: systems of linear equations, and polynomials, quadratics and probability radicals. Topics include: systems of linear equations, polynomials, quadratics and probability, additionally this course builds on the geometric concepts of area of polygons and volume of solids.

GEOMETRY Grades: 10 – 11

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra I

In this course, students will learn geometry through the process of discovery. They will learn inductive and deductive reasoning, basic geometric terms, geometric shapes and constructions, areas and volumes, transformations, the Pythagorean Theorem, coordinate geometry, trigonometry, and geometric proofs. An emphasis is placed on problem solving, real-life applications, and using technology.

ALGEBRA 2 WITH TRIG Grade: 10-12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

This course is designed to complete the development of mathematical core knowledge. The course includes further work in solving equations, graphing, quadratics, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations, complex numbers, polynomials, rational expressions, probability and statistics. Topics in trigonometry include circular functions, solving triangles, identities, inverses and trigonometric equations. An emphasis is placed on problem solving, real-life applications, and using technology.

ACCELERATED ALGEBRA 2 WITH TRIG Grade: 9-10

Length: 1 year Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Accelerated Geometry & teacher recommendation

This course is designed for exceptionally talented and ambitious math students who wish to enter IB Mathematics Higher Level. Topics found in Algebra 2/TRIG as well as additional topics are covered. Polynomials, rational expressions, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions will be covered in depth. Students must have the maturity and motivation to work productively alone or in small groups. An emphasis is placed on problem solving, real-life applications, and using technology.

MATHEMATICS FURTHER COURSES IB MATHEMATICAL STUDIES (Standard Level) Year 1 and 2 Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry or Algeo 1 & Algeo 2

The IB Mathematical Studies course is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds and abilities. The course encourages an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for advanced mathematics in their future studies. Emphasis is given to the applications of mathematics in real life situations using investigations, projects and technology where mathematical techniques are used to define and solve problems. Topics include: use of the graphics display calculator; number theory and algebra; financial mathematics; functions; statistics; further statistics; geometry and trigonometry; sets; logic; probability and introductory differential calculus. As a course requirement, students submit a 2000 word written project. This course is not weighted in the GPA calculation.


58   MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with trigonometry

This course is intended to provide a sound mathematical basis for those students planning to pursue further studies in such fields as mathematics, chemistry, physics, engineering, economics, or business administration. Course content will include the following topics: number, algebra, exponents, logarithms, coordinates geometry, geometry and trigonometry, functions, basic calculus, and analytic geometry.

ADVANCED COURSES IB MATHEMATICS (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with Trig & teacher recommendation

This course provides a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability for students. It is a demanding course since it contains a variety of mathematical topics: including algebra, sequence, series, functions, trigonometry, vectors, statistics, and probability and during the second year, an extensive study of differential and integral calculus. It requires a strong mathematical background.

IB MATHEMATICS (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credits: 2

Prerequisite: teacher recommendation.

This is an integrated course giving students a broad foundation in algebraic structures, circular functions and trigonometry, complex numbers and coordinate geometry. There will be a full treatment of derivatives and integrals of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric and exponential functions. The derivative will be applied to curve plotting, maxima and minima problems and related rates. The integral will be applied to areas, volumes, linear motion and differential equations. Students are given a broad mathematics foundation in the areas of vectors, 3D Geometry, probability and statistics and proof by induction. The students will complete one of the following four options; probability and statistics, sets, relations and groups, series and differential equations or discrete math.

AP STATISTICS Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Trig

The AP Statistics course is for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2 Trig. This course in statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collection, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns: sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study; anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation; and statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Students in this class take the AP Statistics exam in May.

IB MATH SL 2/AP CALCULUS AB Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: IB Math SL1

Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and application. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. This course compares to a calculus courses in university. Students in AP Calculus take the AP Calculus AB exam in May. Due to the parallel nature of the IB SL 2 curriculum and AP Calculus AB an option for high achieving students in IB SL 1 is to take IB SL 2/AP Calculus AB course. This course will meet with the AP Calculus AB class but also cover the remainder and review the IB SL material. In May, these students may take both the IB Standard Level Exam as well at the AP Calculus AB Exam. IB Math HL1 students who wish to take the AP Calculus BC exam may do so by guided independent study.


59  

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH, DANCE Physical Education, Health, Dance Course Chart

Two credits of PE and 0.5 credit of Health are required for graduation.

INTRODUCTION Physical Education and Health Education is an integral dimension of each student’s education that aims to enhance the wellness of every individual’s life. Fulfilling ISB’s vision and mission, we inspire students to lead healthy, active, and balanced lives. The framework of each course parallels the national Standards for Health & Physical Education. A focus on improving fitness is basic in each class and aims to increase one’s level of activity on a daily basis. Students participate in a curriculum that promotes physical, mental, emotional, social, and moral well-being. Through the Physical Education program, students learn how to demonstrate basic skills and concepts, then successfully apply them in more complex and realistic contexts. It allows students to make increasingly independent choices about the activities and roles they pursue. The PE program builds progressively toward the ultimate goal: producing members of society who take lifelong personal responsibility for engaging in health-related physical activity because they recognize the intrinsic rewards of moving in ways they enjoy. The goal of health education is to empower students with the health literacy needed to lead lifelong healthy lives. Students leave with a bank of personal resources to help them live a long, happy, and fulfilling life. Students must successfully complete four semester courses in Physical Education and one semester of Health prior to graduation. All grade 9 students will complete a full year of physical education. Following the grade 9 curriculum, students choose between a menu of elective offerings to fulfill their requirement. Health is taken during Grade 10. Students are encouraged to balance their studies with physical activity throughout their four years. Classes may not be repeated for credit requirement, as variety is encouraged. After the completion of the two-year requirement, we welcome student participation in elective course offerings for personal interest and for continued development of personal fitness and daily activity.


60   PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9 Grade: 9 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: none The course focuses on individual and team sports and provides an introduction to the principles and components of health related fitness. Students are required to demonstrate the skills and techniques necessary to perform a variety of physical activities. Students must also demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts, strategies and rules, applying them in various contexts. Assessment and maintenance of one’s personal fitness level is a daily focus and understanding the concepts and principles to improve one’s health and performance is an expected outcome. This course is required for all grade 9 students.

HEALTH Grade: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: PE 9 (or equivalent) The Health curriculum focuses on developing health literate students by building a firm foundation of knowledge and skills in all five dimensions of health: mental, social, physical, emotional and spiritual. The course encourages students to reflect deeply on their own health and the things that influence health. Emphasis is placed on helping students lead healthy, active and balanced lives and to be resilient, responsible members of the global community. This class is required for graduation and is generally taken in grade 10.

PE ELECTIVE COURSES PERSONAL FITNESS I Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: PE 9 Various aspects of physical fitness, strength and conditioning will be covered to help students reach personal fitness goals. This class will explore the many facets of fitness training and will give students the understanding and ability to develop a personalized program to meet a variety of fitness and/or training goals. Students will explore personal adaptation to training by focusing on strength and conditioning that pertains to their specific goals. A primary goal is for students to realize their personal pathway to health and fitness. Progress will be monitored through personal fitness plans and fitness logs demonstrating student growth, adaptation, and understanding.

PERSONAL FITNESS II Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Personal Fitness I Prerequisite: Personal Fitness I & Approval by Fitness Instructor This course is designed for the fitness enthusiast and student athlete who can independently design, implement, and apply him or herself to a fitness plan for personal achievement. Heart rate monitors will be used daily to record cardio output. Each student will be responsible for assessing and adjusting their personal fitness plan. Pre and Post assessment measurements, along with heart rate and daily work-out logging are required. Detailed work out plans that identify their understanding and knowledge of fitness and sports specific training will provide them with the skill sets to meet any fitness goal. The students will be expected to meet with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their plan.

LIFETIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: PE 9 This course offers students the opportunity to experience a range of activities to enhance their health now and in the future. The four elements of fitness that thread throughout each main unit are cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, strength, and balance/self-awareness. A variety of activities will be compared to assess the effect they have on the cardio-respiratory system. The range of activities will include a combination of aerobic activities as well as those designed to calm and relax the body and mind. Three main units explored are Circuit/Interval/Boot Camp training Pilates/Yoga, and Martial Arts, which includes Muay Thai, Tai Chi, and Self-Defense.


61   SPORTS FOR LIFE Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: PE 9 This class focuses on individual and dual sporting activities. Individualized attention and the ability to advance to the next level of expertise are dependent on one’s active participation. This class is designed to allow choices for specific sports or activities and based on availability of venues. The activities may include all racquet sports, golf, archery, swimming, kayaking, orienteering, running, gymnastics, rock climbing and more. A focus on fitness will be a daily practice in maintaining and improving one’s level of fitness and developing an attitude for daily activity.

TEAM SPORTS CONCEPTS Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: PE 9 Team Sports will explore a variety of activities through the lens of concepts with a focus on skills and tactical strategies. The role in sports will include being a participant but also as a coach and referee. The sports offered will be somewhat determined by the availability of venues but also will provide an opportunity for the class to make suggestions. The daily focus on fitness continues and training will be sports specific.

LIFEGUARD SPORTS TRAINER Grades: 10 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Swim 300 meters continuously This course encompasses all the requirements necessary to be a certified American Red Cross lifeguard with training in CPR, First Aid, and AED. Through classroom learning and hands-on practice, you will learn surveillance skills to help you recognize and prevent injuries, rescue skills in the water and on land, first aid training and professional rescuer CPR. This training will help you prepare for any emergency. Upon successful completion of all the course requirements and skills, each student will earn certification as an American Red Cross Lifeguard and First Aid/CPR/AED. Students will be expected to volunteer for one lifeguarding practicum to show their skills and duties as a lifeguard.

HS DANCE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May be repeated for credit)

This dance and movement class is available for boys and girls with all levels of ability. Each semester students will learn basic movement in three of the following dance styles: Jazz, Hip-Hop, Contemporary/Modern, Partnering, Musical Theater, Social/Ballroom, “World Dance” – Latin, Capoeira, Belly Dance, West African. Basic steps, rhythm, coordination, and flexibility will be developed throughout the semester. Simple dance critiques will comprise the written assessment portion of the course, based on viewing dance performances in and outside of ISB. Students will also explore creating their own short dance combinations. This class can be taken for either PE (may not replace grade PE9) or Fine Arts credit, but not simultaneously.

ADVANCED DANCE Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite(s): Prior dance and/or choreography training, and/or teacher recommendation. This one-year course is designed as an alternative for students who wish to challenge themselves in developing more dance technique and performing skills. Students will enhance their performance quality and technique - with emphasis placed on contemporary, inversions, and lifts/partner work. These skills will be integrated into material used for choreography and performances in a formal dance concert. Students will also develop their own sense of style and ‘dance aesthetics’ through improvisation practices. Students are expected to perform once each semester and to dedicate outside class time for the rehearsal process.

IB SPORTS, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE (SEHS) (SL) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Science 10 or any Science II (Biology, Chemistry or Physics) & PE 9 & teacher recommendation The Sports, Exercise & Health Science course incorporates the disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sport, exercise and health. A combination of syllabus content and experimental work provides the opportunity for students to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and analyze human performance. Students may receive 0.5 PE credit upon completion in their second year in the course.


62  

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS Fine Arts Course Chart

Performing Arts Course Chart

One credit of Fine/Applied Arts is required for graduation. The courses listed in the right hand column are all advanced level courses. Please check individual course descriptions for entry requirements.


63  

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS INTRODUCTION The Fine & Performing Arts Department is composed of a body of specialized subject areas including jewelry, media arts, photography, visual arts, dance, music and theatre. Arts education benefits the student because it cultivates the whole child, gradually building many kinds of literacy while developing intuition, reasoning, imagination and dexterity into unique forms of expression and communication. An education in the arts helps students learn to identify, appreciate, and take part in the traditional art forms of their community. The arts are often an impetus for change, challenging old perspectives from fresh angles of vision, or offering original interpretations of familiar ideas. The HS Fine & Performing Arts Department seeks to engage students in a process that helps them develop the self-confidence, self-discipline, co-operation and self-motivation necessary for success in life, whilst equipping them with the skills that will enable them to enjoy, appreciate and participate in some aspect of the arts throughout their lives.

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS COURSES JEWELRY Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

Sculpture/Jewelry is an entry-level course for students with no required prerequisites. Students interested in exploring work in precious metals will gain a general knowledge of the traditional jewelry trade with modern metal fabricating techniques, in one semester. The course covers proper use of tools of the trade, safety, preparation of silver and gold sheet and wire, workshop disciplines, the techniques of piercing, torch soldering, casting and setting gemstones. Students start hands on, from day one, to make plans with hand drawings and computer 3D renderings for rings, pendants, pins, chains and bezel and prong setting of gemstones. The elements of design are also, integrated in class instruction, for students to work to high standards, in an exceptional studio environment. This class also includes work in small and large-scale traditional sculpture, with wood, plaster, stone and metal. Students can focus on carving, arc welding, gas cutting and brazing. Students may elect this class a second semester for advanced study. Students can, also, experience techniques in Kinetic and electronic sculpture.

YEARBOOK-ERAWAN Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Computer and photographic skills are desirable. This year long course involves the production of the High School yearbook, Erawan. Specialist publication skills and knowledge, which contribute to the success of the book, are taught over the length of the year. Students who wish to participate in this course should be well motivated, responsible and prepared to work hard. Students will learn many skills, and some of these include: layout and graphic design using desktop publishing software from Adobe: In Design CS and Photoshop. All publication software is used within a Macintosh computer environment. Furthermore, students will be involved in page layout techniques, photography of school activities, digital imaging, proofreading, and meeting production deadlines. Previous experience in photography or journalism is desired but not necessarily a prerequisite. Note: This course may be combined with Media Studies


64   SOUND ENGINEERING AND DESIGN Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: Students need to demonstrate an appropriate skill set to be successful online learners Sound Engineering and Design is a new e-learning course that offers a comprehensive introduction to recording, editing, distributing and reproducing sound using GarageBand, the popular digital audio software from Apple. In this course students will learn to use the tools and techniques necessary to create, edit, and publish music and podcasts using GarageBand. These include proficiency with external device interfacing, adding Apple Loops, recording live instrumental and vocal tracks, creating successful mixes, and performing edits using Flex Time and Groove Matching. Through shared individual and collaborative sound production projects and discussion groups and critiques using interactive sites such as SoundCloud, and Posterous Spaces, students in this course will be asked to listen actively, think critically, and respond thoughtfully to sound products created by themselves and others.

PHOTO 1: PHOTOGRAPHIC FUNDAMENTALS Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: none

The purpose of this class is to provide training in the fundamentals of camera use and traditional black and white darkroom techniques. Students will integrate concepts of image composition and design with a study of the specific functions of the camera (each student uses a 35mm, fully manual SLR camera). Students explore a variety of projects addressing both the technical and the creative aspects of photography. Studies in photo history as well as exploring the work of both master and contemporary photographers are incorporated in this semester’s work. Students should expect their best work to be mounted and displayed for the school community, uploaded to the ISB webpage and offered for publication to the “The International” and the Yearbook.

PHOTO 2: PHOTOGRAPHIC FUNDAMENTALS 2 Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Photo 1 or equivalent.

Photo 2 is designed to continue developing upon the student’s technical and creative skills already identified and developed in Photo 1. Whilst continuing to spend time working with analog photography processes and refining traditional skills, students will begin working in a digital capacity, learning to shoot digitally and to manipulate their images using the appropriate software (Photoshop CS4). Project work includes studies in photojournalism, advertising, the photo essay, night photography and various creative processes. Students also begin to use journals to document and enhance the conceptualizing process of each assignment. Students will study master and modern photographers as well as the history of photography. Students should expect their best work to be displayed for the school community, uploaded to the ISB photography web page, and offered for publication to The International and the Yearbook.

PHOTO 3: ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Photo 2 or equivalent.

This third course in photography is designed, amongst other things, to introduce the extended image and project work. Students will choose a term-long topic as the basis for their own extended photographic essay. Assignments given this semester will see students experiment with alternative processes, through both film and print manipulation (digitally and in the darkroom), as well as learning to use a variety of cameras. Students will work both digitally and with film for assignments, however, students determine the most suitable approach for their own portfolio work. Journal work is continued to support conceptual development for both project and portfolio work. Historical and contemporary issues in photography are discussed and explored via written and visual means. Students should expect their best work to be displayed for the school community, uploaded to the ISB photography web page, and offered for publication to The International and the Yearbook.


65   PHOTO 4: SPECIAL TOPICS AND PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Photo 3 or equivalent.

The purpose of this fourth course in photography is to provide the students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in greater depth. Using previously acquired knowledge, and applying their preferred working methods to documentary, studio or experimental imaging. This course will emphasize the development of a portfolio of work for display, publication and university application. Journal work is continued to support conceptual development for portfolio work. Historical and contemporary issues in photography are discussed and explored via written and visual means. Students participating in this course will be expected to offer work for publication in The International and Yearbook through personal projects and assignment shooting.

IB FILM (Standard Level) – ON LINE COURSE Grade: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Students need to demonstrate an appropriate skill set to be successful online learners Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The IB Film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. This course will be offered as an on-line course through Pamoja Education. Students will need to be able to demonstrate independence and a clear motivation to complete this course through an on-line experience. Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, the course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures. At the core of the IB film course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis that is achieved through practical engagement in the art and craft of film. Note: This course maybe offered at ISB if sufficient interest is shown.

STUDIO ART Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: none

The Studio Art course focuses on printmaking, ceramics and 3D work. There will be an element of observational study required, working from primary source material to provide initial stimulus for design ideas. This will include both drawing and basic photography. Students will produce an art journal as part of their semester work, documenting and evaluating their studio practice. They must also study the work of other artists, relating this to their own work. Printmaking techniques include relief-cut, monoprint, collagraph, etching and silk-screen print. Ceramics will include relief work and can extend to slab and coil-building techniques.

MIXED MEDIA ART Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: none

Mixed Media Art is a more advanced art course, combining elements of drawing, painting, printmaking and 3D work. Students will record from primary sources, and develop skills in a range of media, becoming increasingly independent in their approach. To enable this, students will produce an art journal in which they include drawings and photographs, record their working processes and investigate, explore and refine their choice of media. Students will also use the journal to reflect on their project on their project’s development, and make connections with work by other artists. Assignments will be thematic, and process-led. The journal work produced will be as important as the resulting artwork, and will be graded as such.


66   FINE ART Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: none

The Fine Art course focuses on drawing and painting. The approach is more traditional at the beginning of the semester, developing into more contemporary practice later. Students must develop supporting studies in an art journal, documenting and evaluating the art processes they are learning. They will also complete journal pages recording artist research and visual responses to these sources. Drawing will be taught both as an end in itself and as a part of the art-making process, feeding into painting work. Students will use a range of dry and wet media, including graphite, charcoal, pastel, pen and ink, watercolor and acrylic paint. This course is thematic, so all work produced during the semester will relate to one overall theme.

IB VISUAL ARTS (Standard Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Minimum of three semesters of fine arts, including at least two semesters of Mixed Media Art, Fine Art or Studio Art. Or up to two semesters of Photography and one of Mixed Media Art, Fine Art or Studio Art. IB Visual Arts is a two-year course culminating in an exhibition and interview. It requires a background in the study of art. The IB rubric includes the following assessment areas: creativity and imagination, persistence in research, understanding of media, understanding of the elements of art, critical analysis and the inclusion of social, historical and cultural themes. IB students select a focus and work in that specific area. IB requires that students keep a sketchbook/workbook. Students with art and design skills and self-motivation will succeed in this course. The course consists of 120 hours instruction in addition to weekly independent research.

IB VISUAL ARTS (Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 2 years Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Minimum of three semesters of fine arts, including at least two semesters of Mixed Media Art, Fine Art or Studio Art. Or up to two semesters of Photography and one of Mixed Media Art, Fine Art or Studio Art. This course is similar to, but more extensive in scope than IB Visual Art SL. An extensive research workbook will be developed over the course of two years. The course consists of 240 hours of instruction and weekly independent research. Students with art and design skills and self-motivation will succeed in this course.

PERFORMING ARTS HS DANCE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

This dance and movement class is designed for boys and girls with all levels of ability. Each semester students will learn basic movement in three of the following dance styles: Jazz, Hip-Hop, Breakdance, Contemporary/Modern, Partnering, Musical Theater, Social/Ballroom, “World Dance” – Latin, Capoeira, Belly Dance, West African. Basic steps, rhythm, coordination, strength, and flexibility will be developed throughout the semester. Simple dance critiques will comprise the written assessment portion of the course, based on viewing a live dance performance. Students will also explore creating their own short dance combinations. This course can be taken for either P.E. or Fine Arts credit.


67   ADVANCED DANCE Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite(s): Prior dance and/or choreography training, and/or teacher recommendation. This one-year course is designed as an alternative for students who wish to challenge themselves in developing more dance technique and performing skills. Students will enhance their performance quality and technique with emphasis placed on contemporary, inversions, and lifts/partner work. These skills will be integrated into material used for choreography and performances in a formal dance concert. Students will also develop their own sense of style and ‘dance aesthetics’ through improvisation practices. Students are expected to perform once each semester and to dedicate outside class time for the rehearsal process.

IB DANCE Year 1 (Standard and Higher Levels) Grades: 11 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 Prerequisite: One semester of dance class at ISB and teacher recommendation. IB Dance Year 1 is the first of a 2-year intensive dance class for students who want to study dance as an expressive art form and will require a higher level of commitment. The first year focuses on performance and choreography skills. Students will learn movement skills appropriate to their ability, while exploring the creative and expressive possibilities of dance – individually and collaboratively. Students will learn basic choreography and are expected to perform for an audience. This class also includes beginning investigations of “World Dance” – each semester there will be an historical introduction to dance traditions from different regions. The course will simultaneously develop critical-thinking skills in movement analysis and interpretation of dance/art aesthetics by comparing Western dance history (Ballet, Jazz, and Contemporary) to that of another dance form. Students are expected to keep a journal.

IB DANCE Year 2 (Standard and Higher Levels) Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: IB Dance Year 1

IB Dance – Year 2 is a continuation of the Year 1 course. It will focus on three required sections for the IB Dance exam: Performance, Composition and Analysis, and World Dance Investigations. Specific requirements are as follows: Performance - Students will perform 1-2 dances (SL) or 2-3 dances (HL) in any style or styles to show technical proficiency and expressive ability appropriate to the dance style chosen; Composition and Analysis - Students will choreograph 2 dances (SL) or 3 dances (HL) for videotaped submission for the IB exam. Dances must be solo and group choreographies; Dance Investigation Students will write a compare/contrast essay drawing from research investigating two different dance forms and the cultures they exist in. One of the dance forms should be from a familiar tradition or culture, and the other unfamiliar. IB Dance students submit their performance and composition/analysis examinations in the form of a DVD portfolio. Note:

IB Dance students may request consideration of the alternate award of P.E. credit on a semester basis. This request must be made in advance of registration through the Dean of Academics after consultation with the appropriate counselor.


68   KING’S MEN & LES CHANTEUSES Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

These two courses run simultaneously, provide opportunities for students to develop their musical potential and aesthetic understanding through singing. Men should sign up for King’s Men. Women should sign up for Les Chanteuses. Study includes music literacy, vocal production, communication, cultural context and artistic citizenship. Students will strengthen listening skills and enhance their ability to perform as a group in performance. Attention will also be given to relating musical experiences to personal development and confidence. Students will be encouraged to audition for Chamber Choir at the end of the school year.

CHAMBER CHOIR Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

Chamber Choir represents ISB through performances at school and throughout the community. In addition, there may be an opportunity to travel out of town on a tour. Chamber Choir members are eligible to participate in IASAS Cultural Convention. In Chamber Choir, instruction in vocal/choral technique and music reading is at an advanced level. A wide variety of choral music is prepared. A uniform is required. Daily class participation, singing tests, concert participation, and independent singing comprise the grade, although written quizzes may be given if appropriate. Previous members are encouraged to repeat the course for credit.

CLASS VOICE Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

Class Voice is open to anyone who wishes to learn to sing as well as those wishing to pursue advanced voice training. Proper vocal technique, stage preparation, and diction will be the focus of this class. This class is highly recommended for those students planning to participate in events such as the school musical or Cultural Convention.

INTERMEDIATE BAND Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: Beginning Band

The intermediate band class is designed to meet the needs of students wishing to continue playing a musical wind or percussion instrument. Students playing in the intermediate band are working on skills that will prepare them for wind ensemble. Students should practice extensively at home, and expect to play in concerts both on and off campus. Repertoire will be wide-ranging and cover many styles.

WIND ENSEMBLE Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: Approval from MS band director or by audition with HS director The Wind Ensemble represents ISB in the community and demands high standards both of playing and dedication. The repertoire of the band is wide-ranging and encompasses many styles. Students should expect to practice extensively at home to prepare for performance assignments and concerts, both of which make up the main body of assessment. Students who participate in this class may wish to audition for co-curricular groups such SEA Honor Band and IASAS Cultural Convention. Students are encouraged to sign up for wind ensemble to extend their band experiences each year in high school.

JAZZ BAND Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: 2 years instruction on instrument; selection by audition Jazz band is a course designed to familiarize students with the theory, styles, performance practices and repertoire associated with jazz music. One of the major components of jazz is improvisation. This class will cover basic technique needed to become a competent improviser. This will require much diligence and practice on the part of the student. When appropriate, aspects of jazz arranging, orchestration, and history will be presented to help the student gain a better understanding of the development of jazz style. Educational objectives will be accomplished through regular listening, analysis, and performance of various compositions for the big band jazz ensemble during weekly rehearsals and sectionals. The schedule placement for this class will depend upon the students selected and determined after auditions.


69   STRING ENSEMBLE Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 year Credit: 1 (May be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: Approval from MS Orchestra director or by audition with HS director String Ensemble is a course designed for students who already have experience in playing a string instrument and who wish to play more string ensemble/ orchestra music. The String Ensemble represents ISB in the community and demands high standards both of playing and dedication. There may be opportunities to play orchestral music and also to play with students from other schools. The repertoire of the String Orchestra is wide-ranging and encompasses many styles. Students should expect to practice extensively at home to prepare for performance assignments and concerts, both of which make up the main body of assessment. Students who participate in this class may be considered for Cultural Convention. Students who have previously completed this course are encouraged to sign up again for further credit.

GUITAR Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May not be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

This class is designed for guitar students who are interested in incorporating active musical participation into their daily life experience. Students will develop competency in functional guitar techniques, basic music theory fundamentals, and the use of the guitar as a solo, ensemble, and accompanying instrument. Guitar Techniques include proper sitting and hand positions, tuning a guitar, stringing a guitar, hammerons, pull-offs, slides, vibrato, alternate picking, strumming patterns, fingerpicking patterns, movable bar chords, chording in open and first position, using a capo. Music Theory Fundamentals are note reading, reading tablature, understanding and counting rhythmic values, chord qualities and relationships, blues form, scales, scale patterns for soloing, time signatures, key signatures. The course requires students to have a tuneable guitar, notebook folder for all handouts and a pencil, an electronic tuner is optional. A certain amount of dedication is needed to achieve our goals. In this case that goal is to play well. This translates into practice time, which is about 30 minutes a day.

HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL Grade: 9-12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: none

History of Rock and Roll is an introductory course for students interested in learning about the influences of culture and traditions in societies that brought about the rise of rock and roll music. The course covers the decades from post WWII to present. Areas of study will include performers, styles, instruments, social and cultural influences, and some introductory music theory. Throughout the course students will be listening to musical examples in order to identify particular styles, instruments, performers, as well as the social impact of the music performed. Students will be required to do some research and listening assignments outside of class.


70   IB MUSIC (Standard and Higher Level) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 2 years

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: teacher recommendation

The IB Music Course will give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world. Students will develop perceptual skills through a breadth of musical experiences where they will learn to recognize, speculate, analyze, identify, discriminate and hypothesize in relation to music. Through musical performance, study, and composition, students will creatively develop their knowledge, abilities and understanding of music. In pursuing IB Music, students will have four options from which to choose: 1)

Higher level: Designed for the specialist music student with a background in musical performance and composition, who may pursue music at university or conservatoire. Main components are: Musical Perception and Analysis; Solo Performance (voice or instrument), one or more recitals; Creating - three contrasting compositions and written work

2)

Standard Level Solo Performance Option: Designed for the student who has a background in musical performance. Main components are Musical Perception and Analysis; Solo performance (voice or instrument) - one or more recitals

3)

Standard Level Group Performance: Designed for students with a general interest in music, or those with prior experience, particularly members of ensembles. Main components are Musical Perception and Analysis; Group Performance - two or more public performances

4)

Creating Option: Designed for the student who has a background in musical composition. Main components are Musical Perception and Analysis; Composition - two contrasting compositions and written work

STAGECRAFT AND THEATRE DESIGN Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (may be repeated for elective credit) Prerequisite: none

Stagecraft and Theatre Design encompasses the technical aspects of theatre production. Students will learn to identify and explain the technical terms of theatre design and production, and will gain knowledge and handson experience of the technical equipment used in the theatre and in theatre design. Students will be exposed to following specialized areas: set design and construction; stage lighting design; theatre sound systems and sound engineering; costume design and construction; props design and construction; make-up design; stage management. Course material and projects for this one semester course will support classroom presentations and HS productions (drama, dance, and music). Work on HS productions may necessitate some time to be spent after school. Students will be expected to know major theatre design terms and have an understanding of all areas of stagecraft and design. Students will be able to complete ‘modules’ in their specific areas of interest in stagecraft and design.

EXPLORING DRAMA Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (May be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: none

This course offers experienced and non-experienced drama students the opportunity to develop skills in characterization, improvisation, acting styles, voice, movement, blocking, non-verbal communication, interpretation through devising drama and working with a range of published texts. Improvisation is an important component in developing artistic confidence and growth and is used throughout. Students will work individually and in groups and learn the importance of collaboration in ensemble work. They will apply their learning to published scripts and developing their own scripts. Students will perform in class and will be filmed to aid peer and self-assessment. Students will maintain a drama notebook for day-to-day reflections on class work, and will maintain a formal drama portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in two consecutive semesters to prepare for Advanced Drama and/or IB Theatre.


71   ADVANCED DRAMA Grades: 10 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: teacher recommendation

This one year course is designed as an alternative for students who wish to expand their drama abilities, but who are unable to commit to the IB Theatre 2-year course requirement. As ‘makers’ of theatre, students will explore and have the opportunity to increase their knowledge and skills in specific areas of performance and production by working as researchers, writers, designers, performers and technicians. They will participate in the annual IB Theatre 24 Showcase. Students will complete reflective writing, rehearsal journals, research tasks, and self/peer assessment.

IB THEATRE Year 1 (Higher and Standard Level) Grade: 11

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: teacher recommendation

Students will learn through participation in a range of theatrical activities and research. As ‘makers’ of theatre, students will explore and have the opportunity to increase their knowledge and skills in specific areas of performance and production by working as researchers, writers, designers, performers and technicians. Every member of the class participates in theatrical productions that are directed, acted, and technically crafted by the students themselves and presented in class and in the IB Theatre 24 Showcase. Students develop confidence to explore ideas in the presentation of creative, exciting projects either individually or in collaboration with others. Students attend and critique external theatrical productions. Students attend theatre workshops, both in and out of school as such opportunities present themselves. Students will complete reflective writing, rehearsal journals, research tasks, and self/peer assessment.

IB THEATRE Year 2 (Higher and Standard Levels) Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: IB Theatre Year 1

The second year of this advanced theatre course continues work on the exploration of world theatre traditions, theatre practitioners, and devising theatre. In addition, students apply their learning from year 1 of the course to complete IB assessments in these four areas: Research Commission; Practical Performance Proposal; Individual Project Portfolio; Theatre Performance and Production Presentation. The distinction between HL and SL requirements lies in the word count of major assessments, and the addition of a written commentary (1000 - 1250 words) in the practical performance proposal for the HL course. Students will have the opportunity to increase their knowledge and skills in specific areas of performance and production by working as researchers, writers, designers, performers and technicians. Every member of the class participates in theatrical productions that are directed, acted, and technically crafted by the students themselves and presented in class and in the IB Theatre 24 Showcase. They also attend and critique external theatrical productions. Students attend theatre workshops, both in and out of school as such opportunities present themselves. Students will complete reflective writing, rehearsal journals, research tasks, and self/peer assessment.


72  

DESIGN & TECHONOLOGY

(APPLIED ART)

Design & Technology Course Chart

INTRODUCTION Design & Technology is necessary for students to succeed at ISB and in their lives. It is vital in ISB achieving its vision, in supporting the school’s Guiding Principles, and in the school’s dedication to targeting individual student’s learning. Integrated technologies at ISB provide a nurturing and supportive learning environment for students to critically, creatively, and effectively use design thinking & technology throughout their lives. Students integrate design & technology in their core and elective courses and in their co-curricular activities throughout the school. Many assignments in courses help students develop the skills expected of them before leaving ISB.

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY COURSES DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY I Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

Design & Technology is a CAD/CAM course which uses a scientific approach to research, design and construction of solutions for needs in the community. The course utilises a collaborative approach to the design process and students will engage with a range of ethical considerations. It is ideal for students interested in community service, sustainability, engineering, industrial design and architecture.

MOBILE APPS FOR A CONNECTED SOCIETY Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 semester Credit: 0.5 Prerequisite: none Students will learn the basics of programming and logical design through the development of mobile applications (apps). This course introduces students to relevant technologies and equips them with skills in the design and development of mobile applications using up-to-date software development tools and APIs (application programming interface).


73   INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 (repeatable for credit)

Prerequisite: None

Industrial Design has an integral association with science, mathematics and art. The course is built upon Design Thinking and encompasses design, fabrication and evaluation. Students will write design briefs, produce working drawings, using Google Sketchup and fabricate sustainable solutions for a real-world client. Through a context of service-based learning, assignments deal with real-world problems in the many faceted careers of the design field. Students will become familiar with a large assortment of hand and machine tools. The design process, teamwork and safety procedures are stressed throughout. The purpose of the class is to give the student practical experience in design, project management, commercial fabrication and work habits for students thinking of a future career in engineering and design fields while engaging in service to the community. The course is offered both semesters and can be repeated for credit while working to a more advanced level.

ENGINEERING AND DESIGN - ROBOTICS I Grades: 9 – 12

Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

The objective of this course is to use a hands-on approach to introduce the basic concepts in robotics, mechanical design, and programming. The course utilizes the VEX robotics platform to teach concepts including the design cycle, C based programming, engineering documentation, and the technical aspects of principles such as gear systems, sensor control, DC motors, transmitters and microprocessors. This course will be an introduction to the basics of the VEX robotics platform, and will include elements of basic programming, use of design software, and some basic mechanical principles. Later units will be project based and require students to follow the engineering design cycle to create a solution to a prescribed challenge.

ENGINEERING AND DESIGN - ROBOTICS II Grades: 9 – 12 Length: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Engineering & Design - Robotics I

More advanced physics and engineering principles relevant to specific project challenges will be introduced in each unit. Students will design and build robots to address the task at hand, and will appropriately document and evaluate the process and product in an engineering portfolio.

IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Standard Level/HL 1) Grades: 11 – 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Trig

Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. It draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge that enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Computational thinking involves thinking procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, and recursively. This promotes thinking ahead while utilizing an experimental and inquiry-based approach to problem solving. Students learn to develop algorithms and express them clearly, as well as, understand the difference between theoretical and practical limitations of a solution. Students also develop the ability to identify a problem as well as design, prototype and test a proposed solution. This all leads to the preparation for the Standard Level IB Computer Science exam in May of the first year.

IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Higher Level Year 2) Grade: 12

Length: 1 year

Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Computer Science SL or HL1

A continuation from the Standard Level Computer Science course, the Higher Level course is an extension of the material that is more advanced in both breadth and depth of the computer science subject. Students will learn additional topics in the areas of abstract data structures, resource management, computerized control and the demanding content of the option selected which include databases, modeling and simulation, web science, or object-oriented programming (OOP). There is also an additional externally assessed component based on a pre-seen case study of an organization or scenario. This will require students to research various aspects of computer science and technology, which may include new technical concepts and additional subject content that is in greater depth. This clear distinction between the SL and HL Computer Science will help to properly prepare the students for success on the final exam.


74  

LEARNING SUPPORT LEARNING SUPPORT INTRODUCTION The Learning Support Program at ISB provides academic assistance for students with learning differences. The support each student receives is based on individual need. The purpose of the Learning Support Program is to ensure students are successful in the academic program at ISB and reach their potential.

INTENSIVE STUDIES Grades: 9-12 Length: 1 year/ on-going Credit: 0.5 (Elective credits per semester) The Intensive Studies program is designed for students having academic difficulties and/or a diagnosed learning difference. The program focuses on identifying what is preventing the student from achieving academic success and developing a plan to meet their needs. As part of this process, students will analyze their learning styles, learn how to effectively set and achieve goals, implement effective study skills, and embrace healthy academic risk taking. Students will also learn how technology can assist in improving their learning. In addition, students have time set aside to study and work on class assignments.

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY (component of the intensive studies program) Grades: 9 – 12 Length: individually determined Speech and language therapy involves a progression of activities to achieve specific goals. Depending on the nature of the communication disorder, therapy may focus on learning new behaviors, modifying behaviors that interfere with successful communication, relearning skills that were lost, and improving speech sound production and producing fluent speech. Speech therapy is based on a meticulously designed series of practice. The speech therapist selects communication skills that are taught through drills, practice, play interactions, and/or dialogues. The frequency and length of therapy sessions depends on the nature and severity of the individual’s disorder.


75   LIST OF COURSES Course

Page

ACCELERATED ALGEBRA 2 WITH TRIG  ...............  57   ADVANCED DANCE  ....................................................  61,  67   ADVANCED DRAMA  .........................................................  71   ALGEBRA 1  ............................................................................  57   ALGEBRA 2 WITH TRIG  .................................................  57   ALGEO 2  ..................................................................................  57   AP CALCULUS AB/IB MATH SL2  ...............................  58   AP STATISTICS  ...................................................................  58   BIOLOGY I  ..............................................................................  51   BIOLOGY II  ............................................................................  51   BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT  .......................................  47   CHAMBER CHOIR  ..............................................................  68   CHEMISTRY I  ........................................................................  51   CHEMISTRY II  ......................................................................  51   CLASS VOICE  ........................................................................  68   CREATIVE WRITING  ........................................................  30   DIPLOMA THAI  ...................................................................  44   DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY i  ............................................  72   ENGINEERING AND DESIGN - ROBOTICS I  .........  73 ENGINEERING AND DESIGN- ROBOTICS II  ........  73   ENGLISH 9  .............................................................................  26   ENGLISH 10  ...........................................................................  26   ENGLISH 10 CHALLENGE  ..............................................  26   ENGLISH 11  ...........................................................................  27   ENGLISH 12  ...........................................................................  27   ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES (EAP 9, EAP 10, EAP 11, EAP 12)  ............................................  32   ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOP (ELW 1, ELW 2, ELW 3)  ...............................................  32   EXPLORING DRAMA  ........................................................  70   FINE ART  ................................................................................  66   FOUNDATIONS BIOLOGY I  ............................................  34   FOUNDATIONS CHEMISTRY I  ......................................  34   FOUNDATIONS COMMUNICATION SKILLS 9  ....  34   FOUNDATIONS EAP 9  .....................................................  34   FOUNDATIONS ENGLISH 9  ..........................................  33   FOUNDATIONS WORLD STUDIES 9  ..........................  33   FRENCH I  ................................................................................  36   FRENCH II  ..............................................................................  36   FRENCH III  ............................................................................  36   FRENCH NATIVE  ................................................................  37   GENERAL BIOLOGY  ..........................................................  52   GENERAL CHEMISTRY  ....................................................  52   GENERAL PHYSICS  ...........................................................  52  

Course

Page

GEOMETRY  ............................................................................  57   GUITAR I  ................................................................................  69   HEALTH  ..................................................................................  60   HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL  ...................................  69   HS DANCE  .......................................................................  61,  66   IB AB INITIO FRENCH (Standard Level)  .................  37   IB AB INITIO MANDARIN (Standard Level)  .........  43   IB AB INITIO SPANISH (Standard Level)  ...............  39   IB BIOLOGY (Higher Level)  ...........................................  52   IB BIOLOGY (Standard Level)  .......................................  52   IB BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT (Standard and Higher Level)  .....................................  47   IB CHEMISTRY (Higher Level)  .....................................  53   IB CHEMISTRY (Standard Level)  .................................  53   IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Higher Level Year 2)  .............................................  54,  73   IB COMPUTER SCIENCE (Standard Level/HL 1)  ...........................................  54,  73   IB DANCE Year 1 (Standard and Higher Levels)  ..  67   IB DANCE Year 2 (Standard and Higher Levels)  ..  67   IB ECONOMICS (Standard and Higher Level)  .......  47   IB ENGLISH A LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Higher Level)  ..................................................................  28   IB ENGLISH A LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Standard Level)  .............................................................  27   IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE (Higher Level)  .........  28   IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE (Standard Level)  .....  28   IB ENGLISH B (Higher Level)  ..................................  29,  33   IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES (ESS) (Standard Level)  .................................................  54   IB FILM (Standard Level)  ................................................  65   IB FRENCH A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels)  ...................................  36   IB FRENCH B (Standard and Higher Levels)  ..........  37   IB GEOGRAPHY (Standard and Higher Level)  ......  47   IB HISTORY  ...........................................................................  48   IB HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY WORLD (Standard and Higher Level)  .....................................  48   IB HISTORY: ASIA & OCEANIA (Higher Level)  ...  48   IB HISTORY: THE AMERICAS (Higher Level)  .......  49   IB INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY (Higher and Standard Levels)  ..............  49   IB JAPANESE A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels)  ...................................  41 IB JAPANESE B (Standard and Higher Levels)  ......  41    


76   IB MANDARIN A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels)  ...................................  43   IB MANDARIN B (Standard and Higher Levels)  ..  42   IB MATHEMATICAL STUDIES (Standard Level)  .  57   IB MATHEMATICS (Higher Level)  ..............................  58   IB MATHEMATICS (Standard Level)  .........................  58   IB MUSIC (Standard and Higher Level)  ....................  70   IB PHYSICS (Higher Level)  ...........................................  53   IB PHYSICS (Standard Level)  ........................................  53   IB PSYCHOLOGY (Higher Level)  .................................  49   IB PSYCHOLOGY (Standard Level)  ............................  49   IB SPANISH A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels)  ...................................  39   IB SPANISH B (Standard and Higher Levels)  ........  39   IB SPORTS, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE (SEHS) (Standard Level)  ........................................  53,  61   IB THAI A LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (Standard and Higher Levels)  ...................................  44   IB THEATRE Year 1 (Higher and Standard Level)  .....................................  71   IB THEATRE Year 2 (Higher and Standard Levels)  ...................................  71   IB VISUAL ARTS (Higher Level)  ..................................  66   IB VISUAL ARTS (Standard Level)  .............................  66   INDUSTRIAL DESIGN  ......................................................  73   INTEGRATED MATH 1 (Studies & Standard)  .......  56   INTEGRATED MATH 1 (Higher)  .................................  57   INTENSIVE STUDIES  ........................................................  74   INTERMEDIATE BAND  ....................................................  68   INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS  ............................  47   JAPANESE I  ...........................................................................  40   JAPANESE II  ..........................................................................  40   JAPANESE III  ........................................................................  40   JAPANESE NATIVE I  .........................................................  40   JAPANESE NATIVE II  .......................................................  41   JAZZ BAND  ...........................................................................  68   JEWELRY  ................................................................................  63   KING’S MEN & LES CHANTEUSES  ...............................  68   LEARNING SUPPORT  ......................................................  77   LIFEGUARD SPORTS TRAINER  ..................................  61   LIFETIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY  .................................  60   MANDARIN I  ........................................................................  42   MANDARIN II  .......................................................................  42  

MANDARIN III  .....................................................................  42   MANDARIN NATIVE  ........................................................  43   MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS  .......................................  58   MEDIA STUDIES (Previously Journalism)  ...............  29   MIXED MEDIA ART  ...........................................................  65   MOBILE APPS FOR A CONNECTED SOCIETY  .....  72   PERSONAL FITNESS I  ......................................................  60   PERSONAL FITNESS II  ....................................................  60   PHOTO 1: PHOTOGRAPHIC FUNDAMENTALS  .  64   PHOTO 2: PHOTOGRAPHIC FUNDAMENTALS 2  ................................................................................................  64   PHOTO 3: ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY  ...............  64   PHOTO 4: SPECIAL TOPICS AND PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT  ..............................................................  65   PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9  ..............................................  60   PHYSICS I  ...............................................................................  51   PHYSICS II  .............................................................................  51   SOUND ENGINEERING AND DESIGN  ......................  64   SPANISH I  ..............................................................................  38   SPANISH II  ............................................................................  38   SPANISH III  ...........................................................................  38   SPANISH IV  ...........................................................................  38   SPANISH NATIVE  ..............................................................  39   SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY  ...............................  74   SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS  .......................................  30   SPORTS FOR LIFE  ..............................................................  61   STAGECRAFT AND THEATRE DESIGN  ..................  70   STRING ENSEMBLE  ...........................................................  69   STUDIO ART  .........................................................................  65   SURVIVAL THAI  .................................................................  43   TEAM SPORTS CONCEPTS  ...........................................  61   THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS - LANGUAGE  ......  44   THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS IV  ..............................  44   THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS V  ................................  44   THAI FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS VI  ..............................  44   THAILAND & SOUTH EAST ASIA (TSEA)  .............  46   THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (ToK)  ..............................  46   US HISTORY  .........................................................................  46   WAYS OF KNOWING  .......................................................  46   WIND ENSEMBLE  ...............................................................  68   WORLD STUDIES 10  .........................................................  46   WORLD STUDIES 9  ...........................................................  46   YEARBOOK-ERAWAN  .....................................................  63  


77  

IB LEARNER PROFILE  

INQUIRERS

Their natural curiosity is nurtured. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct constructive inquiry and research, and become independent active learners. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

They explore concepts, ideas and issues which have global relevance and importance. In so doing, they acquire, and are KNOWLEDGEABLE   able to make use of, a significant body of knowledge across a wide range of disciplines.

THINKERS  

They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to approach complex problems and make reasoned decisions.

They understand and express ideas and information confidently COMMUNICATORS   and creatively in more than one language and a variety of modes of communication.

   

RISK-TAKERS  

They approach unfamiliar situations with confidence and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, idea and strategies. They are courageous and articulate in defending those things in which they believe.

PRINCIPLED  

They have a sound grasp of the principles of moral reasoning. They have integrity, honesty, a sense of fairness and justice and respect for the dignity of the individual.

CARING  

They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to action and service to make a positive difference to the environment and to the lives of others.

OPEN-MINDED  

Through an understanding and appreciation of their own culture, they are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and cultures and are accustomed to seeking and considering a range of points of view.

BALANCED  

They understand the importance of physical and mental balance and personal well-being for themselves and others. They demonstrate perseverance and self-discipline.

REFLECTIVE  

They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and personal development. They are able to analyse their strengths and weaknesses in a constructive manner.


78    

What path are you walking down?

 


High school program of studies 14-15 v2