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INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL BANGKOK

Lily Perrin Kindergarten 2012-2013

Page 1 ES Parent Handbook 2013/2014


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PARENT/STUDENT INFORMATION HANDBOOK 2013-2014 ISB Elementary School Parent/Student Information Handbook Message from the ES Principal and ES Vice-Principal ….................. ISB Vision for Learning/The ISB Advantage/History……………...….

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Section One - Academic Program Early Childhood Education Philosophy …………………….. Pre-Kindergarten ……………………………………………… Kindergarten …………………………………………………… First Grade …………………………………………………….. Second Grade …………………………………………………. Third Grade ……………………………………………………. Fourth Grade ………………………………………………….. Fifth Grade …………………………………………………….. Special Subject Areas …………………………………………

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 9 Page 11 Page 13 Page 15 Page 17 Page 19

Section Two –Expectations and General Information Emergency and Health Information…………………………. Admissions, Attendance, Tardiness, Absence…………….. Withdrawals, Checking in and out of School………………. Parent Visitation, After-School Supervision–Expectation… Middle School/High School Cafeteria and Booster Hut...…. Books and Class Supplies/ES Learning Hub……………… Toys and Personal Items at School ………………………… Pets and Animals on Campus/Field Trips …………………. Food Service/Food in Classrooms/Food Policy …………… Classroom Celebrations/Parties …………. ………………… ES Home Learning Guidelines ………………. …………….. ES Reporting System /Celebration of Learning …………… Channels of Communications /Complaint Procedures…… Discipline Policy………………………………………………. Harassment Policy ………………. ………………………….. Acceptable Use Policy for Internet and Network Permission………………………………………….. Dress Code …………………………...…………………......... Bicycle Safety/Parent Teacher Auxiliary (PTA) ………….... Support Services……………………………………………… Extra-Curricular Activities …………..................................... Elementary BISAC Athletics Teams ……………………..…

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 2

Page 26 Page 29 Page 30 Page 30 Page 30 Page 31 Page 31 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 37 Page 38 Page 42 Page 43 Page 45 Page 47 Page 48 Page 50 Page 51


Transportation/Student Bus Behavior Regulations ……..…

31.

Page 52

Section Three - Elementary School Quick Reference Guide and Calendar Elementary School Quick Reference Guide …………….… Calendar/Thai Holidays ………………………………….…...

32. 33.

Page 55 Page 56

Message from the Elementary School Principal and Vice-Principal Dear Parents: It is a pleasure to have your family be a part of ISB’s Elementary School! This handbook is designed to provide helpful information about the learning programs and procedures associated with our Elementary School. You and your child are about to embark on a memorable year at ISB. We seek to make our school a safe and friendly environment where students can achieve their academic potential, be passionate and reflective learners, become caring global citizens and lead healthy, active, balanced lives. We strive to make learning enjoyable and challenging. We ask that you read through the handbook with your child and discuss the content. This will ensure that we begin the school year with shared understandings and expectations. We believe that parents play a significant role in their child’s education and look forward to a positive home-school partnership. We know that strong partnerships between parents and school lead to positive learning results. We invite, and strongly encourage, your participation and involvement in our school. As we welcome you to a new academic year, here are a few practical things to keep in mind: •

Our first day of school for 2013-2014 is August 13 for grades 2-5, August 14 for grade 1 and August 15 for PK and Kindergarten.

Student class placement will be sent out via e-news and will also be posted in front of the Elementary School office in the afternoon of Friday 9th August 2013.

School supplies are provided by ISB, with the exception of head-phones and flash-drives – see p. 31 for details.

School uniforms, including the PE uniform, should be purchased from the Bookstore. We strongly encourage student names to be embroidered on the front outside of shirts. This can be arranged when purchasing uniforms before the start of the school year.

Being able to contact parents during the school day is essential to us providing a safe learning environment for your child. Please ensure that we have your correct contact details in our database at all times (home phone, mobile numbers and e-mail addresses). If you are unsure, please see the Elementary School Office or p.26 for how to update your personal info.

School communications are designed to inform parents about the learning that is occurring in classrooms and about what is happening in the Elementary School at classroom and whole school level. We expect that parents read all relevant communications and thank you in advance for your cooperation.

We are looking forward to a happy and successful learning year!

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In partnership, Kelly Armitage Elementary School Principal

Diana Drummond Elementary School Vice-Principal

ISB’s VISION, MISSION and DEFINITION OF LEARNING OUR VISION To be a model of excellence educating students for success in the world community

in

OUR MISSION Through outstanding teaching in a nurturing environment, ISB will inspire students to: √ Achieve their academic potential √ Be passionate, reflective learners √ Become caring global citizen √ Lead healthy, active, balanced lives

OUR DEFINITION OF LEARNING ISB values meaningful and transferable learning where we construct understanding by developing and applying knowledge, skills and attitudes. As learners, we develop and show our understanding when we: √ Apply our learning to new situations √ Inquire to extend our learning √ Create solutions √ Communicate our learning effectively to others √ Make connections across our learning √ Reflect critically on our learning

THE ISB ADVANTAGE ISB is … a learning focused international school with a North American educational philosophy and curriculum broadened and enriched with best practices from other nations. ISB offers … a balanced program focusing on the development of the whole student. ISB provides … our students with high standards of academic instruction, opportunities for service to others, and a well-rounded program of activities directed toward the development of their skills, talents, and self-confidence for lifelong learning.

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ISB prepares ‌ students to become leaders in meeting the ever-changing needs of the world and equips them with the knowledge to face challenges in a cross-cultural environment.

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF ISB International School Bangkok is a private, non-profit institution operated by the International School Association under the regulations of the Ministry of Education. All parents who send their children to International School Bangkok are members of the Association. Members of the Association elect a twelve-member Board of Directors responsible for school policy decisions. The Board employs highly trained and experienced administrative staff who are responsible for the operation of the school. International School Bangkok opened in 1951 on the grounds of the United States Embassy. School enrollment has ranged from 35 students in 1951 to 3,650 students in 1969. Throughout these years the largest percentage of students has been from the United States, but the ratio is constantly changing. ISB has students enrolled from more than sixty countries, a fact which promotes rich intercultural experiences.

COMMUNICATION EXPECTATIONS OF ALL ISB PARENTS We expect all parents and ISB to be able to communicate at all times. This includes phone calls when your child is absent from school, attending parent meetings, conferences and workshops, reading school e-communication and ensuring that your emergency contact information is up-todate at all times. To ensure we have correct contact information (home phone, mobile phones and e-mail for both parents, home address, safe haven/guardianship etc.) parents are asked to follow the procedures as set out below: ISB maintains records of mobile phone numbers in order to send out SMS communication directly to each parent. Therefore it is very important that parents ensure that the mobile phone number we have on record is accurate. Please check whether we have the correct phone number for you, by following these steps. 1. Go to the ISB website: http://www.isb.ac.th 2. Along the top menu bar on the page, click on “Parent Portal” – alternatively go here: http://inside.isb.ac.th/parentportal/ 3. Scroll down the page in order to sign in. a. If this is your first time using the Parent Portal. Use your ID number found on your ISB ID card as the “username” and use your last name (ALL CAPS) as your password. b. If you have signed in to the Parent Portal before and have changed your password, use that information to sign in. 4. After signing in, on the left hand side of the website, click on “Family Information”. 5. In the window that comes up, check the details listed and make any necessary changes/updates. 6. Click the Update button. 7. After you have completed these steps you may sign out or close the window.

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If you have trouble with any of the steps above and cannot ensure that your mobile phone number is accurate in our system, then please email your name, ISB ID number (if you have it), and your correct mobile phone number to phurasis@isb.ac.th who will update our records or contact the ES Office.

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Section One Academic Program

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ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Early Childhood Education Philosophy Our vision is to create a multicultural environment in which joyful learning will flourish. Children will possess the curiosity and confidence to explore, question, evaluate, create, and communicate. A partnership between parents, children and teachers will cultivate growth for each child and provide the foundation for them to become empathetic, and responsible global citizens. The Early Childhood Education Program at International School Bangkok is tailored to honor our beliefs about how young children develop cognitively, emotionally, socially, and physically. These beliefs are based upon current educational research and the vast professional experience of our teachers. Our goal is to develop in children a sense of excitement, curiosity and wonder about how our world works in the 21st century. Adaptability and a sense of empowerment are essential to impact our ever-changing world. Children thrive in a safe and nurturing environment that offers a balance of structure and freedom. Choices in learning experiences offer sufficient challenge, and a low degree of frustration. A multi-sensory environment appeals to varied learning styles and stimulates the multiple connections vital for deep understanding. Young children learn best in a state of relaxed, yet alert mental and physical involvement provided through playful exploration. This allows children the opportunity to explore and feel safe in taking risks, while connecting what is possible to the real world. Guided discovery inside the classroom and unstructured play outside the classroom provide children the freedom to creatively choose with whom they learn as well as what and how they learn. An interdisciplinary approach to learning connects children’s learning with many facets of the world through every aspect of the curriculum at ISB. The process of learning is valued as children make their thinking visible. Children learn best by constructing their own understanding through inquiry, exploration and hands-on experiences that are relevant and connected to prior knowledge. To help children know themselves as learners, we provide time for frequent reflection, choice, and feedback. Children flourish in a supportive environment in which the child, parent, and teacher create a partnership for learning. When parents and teachers cultivate the joy and excitement of learning in children, they are preparing them to be curious, confident, and self-motivated learners. Educating parents to understand our early childhood philosophy creates a strong partnership for learning between home and school. To this end, our young children will receive the transportable gifts of joyful learning and crosscultural understanding.

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PRE-KINDERGARTEN Our PK environment exposes children to a rich, meaningful curriculum of skills, attitudes and knowledge through developmentally appropriate activities. The activities and environment come together to encourage the children to be explorers, investigators and problem solvers.

1. Language and Literacy: Children develop language and literacy through meaningful experiences

2.

3.

4.

5.

such as read-alouds, book-making, storytelling, small and whole group conversations, as well as dramatic play. Language learning involves understanding increasingly complex language, using language to express thoughts and needs, as well as developing appropriate conversational skills. Literacy learning focuses on phonological awareness, letters and sounds, concepts of print, listening comprehension, and emergent writing. Mathematics: Children develop mathematical vocabulary, concepts, and process skills through hands-on experiences such as classroom routines, exploration with manipulatives, games, problem solving, play and interactions with the natural environment. Mathematical learning focuses on number concepts and operations, spatial relationships and shape, measurement, classification, and patterns. Inquiry and Cognitive Development: Units of inquiry provide a meaningful context for the integration of science, social studies, language, and math learning. During units of guided inquiry, children learn through investigative experiences using a variety of materials. Science and social studies learning focuses on using tools, developing inquiry skills, and making sense of themselves and the world around them. Cognitive goals include developing positive approaches to learning, remembering and connecting experiences, and symbolic communication . Social-Emotional Development: Play is the primary context in which children develop language and social skills. Through play, they learn to regulate their own emotions and behaviors, establish and sustain positive relationships, as well as participate cooperatively and constructively in group situations. Physical and Artistic Development: PK children develop their physical and artistic skills through classes taught by specialist teachers. Physical development involves traveling, balance, grossmotor, and fine-motor skills. Artistic learning involves musical concepts and expression, dance and movement concepts, as well as drama.

Units of Inquiry Mathematics

1st Trimester 2nd Trimester 3rd Trimester Welcome to PK Exploring Outside Healthy Eating Tools Number Concepts Number Concepts Number Concepts Patterning Patterning and Shapes Measurement Comparison Classification

Language and Literacy

Listening and understanding stories; Story telling and retelling; bookmaking; vocabulary development; print concepts; phonemic awareness; letter formation

Typical Day: 7:25-12:55 1st Learning Block: Language and Literacy Recess Snack Specials: Music, Physical Education, Library 2nd Learning Block: Mathematics and Inquiry Recess Lunch 3rd Learning Block: Choice Time

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KINDERGARTEN

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive readalouds, shared reading/writing; Phonics/Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions).

Reading At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Kindergarten students will begin with a focus on narrative sense by retelling rich literature by “reading” the illustrations. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies with both fiction and non-fiction texts.

Writing Kindergarten students will begin with a focus on storytelling and personal narratives, moving from oral telling about the story they’ve drawn, to labeling and sentences. Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Listening and Speaking Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts throughout the year. The Kindergarten Mathematics Standards are . . . Number and Operations

• •

Understand the relationship between quantities and whole numbers up to 31.

• •

Recognize and sort basic two- and three-dimensional shapes; use them to model real-world objects.

Recognize, create, complete, and extend patterns.

Sort, classify, or represent a set of data.

Use objects and pictures to represent situations involving combining and separating.

Geometry and Measurement Compare and order objects according to location and measurable attributes.

Algebra Data Analysis and Probability

Science

All science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry activities that are designed to further the understanding of the content and foster the natural curiosity of elementary children. Wood and Paper: In this module, students are introduced to a wide variety of woods and papers in a systematic way. They will observe the properties of these materials and discover what happens when they are subjected to a number of tests and interactions with other materials. Our Garden: In this module, students observe how living things change over time. They become gardeners, learning how to care for a community of living plants. Kindergarteners collaborate to identify the needs of plants and how best to provide those basic needs. Through this authentic context, learners develop a deeper respect for living things, compare and contrast living and nonliving things, and reflect on how careful observation and recording can show how things change over time.

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Social Studies Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own cultural identities as well as to recognize and respect cultural similarities and differences within a global perspective. Kindergarten students will develop their social skills through the All About Me lessons, which are woven throughout the day and year as students look at Why am I Unique?, How am I Special?, and How Are We Alike and How Are We Different?

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Kindergarten Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study in the area of . . . Reading

Trimester I

• • •

Writing

Math

• • •

• •

Science Social Studies

Readers Explore Emergent Storybooks Readers Use Powers Making Books Illustration Study Small Stories from My Life

Who is In School Today (Routines and Materials) Counting and Comparing (Measurement and Number System 1)

Trimester II

Trimester III

• •

Patterns Readeing Partners, Reading Teachers

• • •

Nonfiction Reading Brave & Resourceful Getting to know characters

• • • •

Author Study Nonfiction Text Structures Small Stories 2

Nonfiction: o How-To books o All-About books Poetry & Songs

• •

What Comes Next? (Patterns and Functions) Measuring and Counting (Measurement and Number System 2)

• • •

Make a Shape, Build a Block (2-D and 3-D Geometry) How Many Do You Have? (Addition, Subtraction, and the Number System)

Wood and Paper Observing Our World Garden Unit All about me: How am I Unique? How are we Alike and Different?

Typical Kindergarten Daily Schedule 7:25-9:00 Core Learning Block 1

9:00-9:20 Recess 9:20-10:10 Core Learning Block 2 10:10-11:30 Specialists (Art, PE, World Language, Music)

11:30-12:15 Lunch and Recess 12:15-2:05 Core Learning Block 3

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FIRST GRADE

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive read-alouds, shared reading/writing; Phonics/Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions).

Reading At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies for both fiction and non-fiction texts.

Writing Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Listening and Speaking Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts throughout the year. The Grade 1 Mathematics Content Standards are: Number and Operations

• •

Count, compare and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an emphasis on groups of tens and ones. Use a variety of models and strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems in real-world and mathematical contexts.

Geometry and Measurement

• •

Describe characteristics of basic shapes. Use basic shapes to compose and decompose other objects in various contexts. Use basic concepts of measurement in real-world and mathematical situations involving length, time and money.

Algebra

• •

Recognize and create patterns; use rules to describe patterns. Use number sentences involving addition and subtraction basic facts to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems; create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Data Analysis and Probability

Sort, classify, and represent a set of data.

Science

Science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry-based activities that are designed to build understanding of the content and foster the natural curiosity of elementary children. Pebbles, Sand and Silt: The Pebbles, Sand, and Silt Module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide experiences that heighten students’ awareness of rocks as earth materials and natural resources. Insects: This unit provides experiences that heighten students’ awareness of the diversity of animal forms. They come to know firsthand the life sequences of a number of insects. Students observe life cycles of insects and compare the stages of metamorphosis exhibited by each species.

Social Studies Page 14 ES Parent Handbook 2013/2014


The purpose of the Social Studies program is to develop in students the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own cultural identities as well as to recognize and respect cultural similarities and differences within a global perspective. In building classroom and school community, Grade 1 students will build understanding of Rules, Responsibilities, Relationships, and Respect.

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Grade 1 Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study in the area of Reading

Writing

Math

Trimester I

• • •

Good Habits Tackling Trouble Meeting Characters

• • •

Illustration study Personal Narrative Writing for Readers

• •

How Many of Each (Addition, Subtraction Number System 1) Making Shapes and Designing Quilts (2-D Geometry)

Science Social Studies

Trimester II

• •

Trimester III

Nonfiction: Reading the World Be Your Own Teacher

Author’s study Nonfiction “HowTo” Realistic Fiction

Solving Story Problems (Addition, Subtraction & Number System 2) Fish Lengths & Animal Jumps (Measurement) Number Games and Crayon Puzzles (Addition, Subtraction & Number System 3)

• •

• • • •

Reading across genres to learn Performance Reading Dramatizing Characters Make Writing Interesting Literary NF Persuasive Letters Poetry Color, Shape, and Number Patterns (Patterns and Functions) Twos, Fives, and Tens (Addition, Subtraction Number System 4) Blocks and Boxes (Geometry)

Pebbles, Sand, & Silt Insects Rules, Responsibilities, Relationships, and Respect

Typical Grade 1 Daily Schedule 7:25-9:00 Core Learning Block 1

9:00-9:20 Recess 9:20-10:10 Core Learning Block 2 10:10-11:30 Specialists (Art, PE, World Language, Music)

11:30-12:15 Lunch and Recess 12:15-2:05 Core Learning Block 3 Page 16 ES Parent Handbook 2013/2014


SECOND GRADE

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive read-alouds, shared reading/writing; Phonics/Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions).

Reading At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies for both fiction and non-fiction texts.

Writing Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Listening and Speaking Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts throughout the year. The Grade 2 Mathematics Content Standards are: Number and Operations

• •

Compare and represent whole numbers up to 1000 with an emphasis on place value and equality. Demonstrate mastery of addition and subtraction basic facts; add and subtract one- and two-digit numbers in real-world and mathematical problems.

Geometry and Measurement

• • •

Identify, describe and compare basic shapes according to their geometric attributes.

• •

Recognize, create, describe, and use patterns and rules to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Understand length as a measurable attribute; use tools to measure length. Use time and money in real-world and mathematical situations.

Algebra Use number sentences involving addition, subtraction and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems; create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Data Analysis and Probability

• •

Sort, classify, and represent a set of data. Describe important features of a data set.

Science Science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry-based activities that are designed to build understanding of the content and foster the natural curiosity of elementary children. Air & Weather: This unit introduces earth science concepts to young students - they explore the natural world using simple tools to observe and monitor change.

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Solids & Liquids: This unit provides experiences that heighten students’ awareness of the physical world. This unit gives students introductory experiences with two of the three fundamental states of matter, solid and liquid.

Social Studies The purpose of the Social Studies program is to develop in students the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. Grade 2 students will study the following social studies areas: Peaceful Community, Global Community, and Endangered Animals.

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Grade 2 Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study Reading

• •

Writing

• • •

Math

Science & Social Studies

• •

Trimester I Taking Charge & Tackling Trouble Character

• • •

Building a Writing Life Special Memories Odes

Counting, Coins, and Combos (Addition, Subtraction Number System 1) Shapes, Blocks, and Symmetry (2D and 3-D Geometry) Stickers, Number Strings, and Story Problems (Addition, Subtraction & Number System 2) Peaceful Community Air and Weather

• •

• •

Trimester II Nonfiction Series Book Club Stamina, Fluency & Volume Specialists Projects Reviews Writing Gripping Stories

• •

Trimester III Nonfiction Reading Clubs Reading & Role Playing

• • •

Literary Nonfiction Fairy Tales Celebration and Choice

How Many Floors? How Many Rooms (Patterns & Functions) How Many Tens? How Many Ones? (Addition, Subtraction & Number System 3) Parts of Wholes, Parts of a Group (Fractions)

Partners, Teams, and Paper Clips (Addition, Subtraction Number System 4) Measuring Length and Time (Measurement) Math Projects

Global Community Solids & Liquids

• •

• •

Solids & Liquids Endangered Animals

Typical Grade 2 Daily Schedule 7:25-9:25 Core Learning Block 1 9:25-9:45 Recess

9:45-10:45 Core Learning Block 2 10:45-11:30 Lunch and Recess

11:30-12:35 (or

1:20 on two days) Core Learning Block 3

12:30 (or 1:20)-2:05 Specialists (Art, PE, World Language, Music)

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THIRD GRADE

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive readalouds, shared reading/writing; Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions).

Reading At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies for both fiction and non-fiction texts.

Writing Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Listening and Speaking Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts. The Grade 3 Mathematics Content Standards are: Number and Operations

• •

Compare and represent whole numbers up to 10,000 with an emphasis on place value and equality.

Understand meanings and uses of fractions in real-world and mathematical situations.

Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers; represent multiplication and division in various ways; solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic.

Geometry and Measurement

• •

Use geometric attributes to describe and create shapes in various contexts.

Use time, money and temperature to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Understand perimeter as a measurable attribute of real-world and mathematical objects. Use various tools to measure distances.

Algebra

• •

Use single-operation input-output rules to represent patterns and relationships and to solve real-world and mathematical problems. Use number sentences involving multiplication and division basic facts and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems; create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Data Analysis and Probability

Collect, organize, display, and interpret data. Use labels and a variety of scales and units in displays.

Science All science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry-based activities that are designed to further an understanding of the content, while fostering the natural curiosity of elementary children. Earth Materials: This unit includes investigations dealing with observable characteristics of solid materials from the earth - rocks and minerals. The focus is on taking materials apart to find out what they are made of and putting materials together to better understand their properties. Structures of Life: This unit deals with observable characteristics of organisms. Students observe, compare, categorize, and care for a selection of organisms. Students investigate structures of the organisms and learn how some of the structures function in growth and survival.

Social Studies The purpose of the Social Studies program is to develop in students the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action.

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Our Fragile Earth: This unit develops students’ understanding about biodiversity, ecosystems, and related issues of sustainability, linking human action to these issues. Marketplace: Making it Far! This unit focuses on beginning economic understandings of wants, needs, goods, services, supply and demand as well as making responsible choices as both a creator and a consumer.

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Grade 3 Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study Reading

Writing

• • • • • •

Math

• •

Science & Social Studies

• •

Trimester I Reading Life Character Nonfiction

Building a Writing Life Slice of Life Persuasive letter Trading Stickers, Combining Coins (Addition, Subtraction Number Sense) Surveys and Line Plots (Data) Collections and Travel Stories (Addition, Subtraction Number Sense 2) Earth Materials Our Fragile Earth

• •

Trimester III Reading to Become an Expert Author Study Social Issues

• • •

Feature Article Ad Campaign Poetry

Collections and Travel Stories (Addition, Subtraction Number Sense 2) Perimeter and Angles (2-D Geometry & Measurement) Equal Groups

Stories, Tables and Graphs (Patterns, Functions, and Change) Finding Fair Shares (Fractions) How Many Hundreds? How Many Miles? (Addition, Subtraction Number Sense 3)

• •

Our Fragile Earth Structures of Life

• •

• • • • • • • •

Trimester II Performance Reading Mystery Reading to Become an Expert Process Writing Indep Projects Travel Reviews Realistic Ficiton

• •

Structures of Life Market Place

Typical Grade 3 Daily Schedule 7:25-9:25 Core Learning Block 1 9:25-9:45 Recess

9:45-10:45 Core Learning Block 2 10:45-11:30 Lunch and Recess

11:30-12:35 (or 1:20 on two days) Learning Block 3 12:30 (or 1:20) Specialists (Art,

PE, World Language, Music)

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FOURTH GRADE

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive readalouds, shared reading/writing; Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions).

Reading At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies for both fiction and non-fiction texts.

Writing Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Listening and Speaking Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts throughout the year. The Grade 4 Mathematics Content Standards are: Number and Operations

• •

Demonstrate mastery of multiplication and division basic facts; multiply multi-digit numbers; solve realworld and mathematical problems using arithmetic. Represent and compare fractions and decimals in real-world and mathematical situations; use place value to understand how decimals represent quantities.

Geometry and Measurement

• •

Name, describe, classify and sketch polygons.

Use translations, reflections and rotations to establish congruency and understand symmetries.

Understand angle and area as measurable attributes of real-world and mathematical objects. Use various tools to measure angles and areas.

Algebra

• •

Use input-output rules, tables and charts to represent patterns and relationships and to solve real-world and mathematical problems. Use number sentences involving multiplication, division and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems; create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Data Analysis and Probability

Collect, organize, display and interpret data, including data collected over a period of time and data represented by fractions and decimals.

Science All science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry activities that are designed to further the child’s understanding of the content and foster the natural curiosity of elementary children. Water: This unit helps students explore properties of water, changes in water, interactions between water and other earth materials, and how humans use water. Magnetism and Electricity: This unit includes investigations designed to introduce or reinforce concepts in physical science. Students experience magnetism and electricity as related effects and learn useful applications of magnetism and electricity in everyday life.

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Social Studies The purpose of the Social Studies program is to develop in students the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. The two units of study will focus on developing the concepts of Influence (interactions of humans and the physical environment) and Fairness (children’s rights, civic action, and global citizenship.)

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Grade 4 Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study Reading

• • •

• • • Math •

Writing

• •

Science & Social Studies

• •

Trimester I Reading Life Characters Biographies Writing Life Family Stories Reviews Factors, Multiples and Arrays (Multiplication and Division Number Sense 1) Describing the Shape of the Data (Data Analysis) Multiple Towers and Division Stories (Multiplication and Division Number Sense 2)

• • • • • • •

• •

Influence Water

Trimester II Reading Seminar Book Clubs Author Study Biographies Writing Projects Short Fiction Multiple Towers and Division Stories (Multiplication and Division Number Sense 2) Size, Shape, and Symmetry (2-D Geometry & Measurement) Landmarks and Large Numbers (Addition, Subtraction, Number System)

Water Magnetism & Electricity

• • • • • • •

• •

Trimester III Performance Reading Reading Research Social Issues Poetry List Articles Op-Eds Fraction Cards and Decimal Squares (Fractions and Decimals, Number Sense) Penny Jars and Plant Growth (Patterns, Functions) How Many Packages? How Many Groups (Multiplication and Division Number Sense 3) Magnetism & Electricity Is it Fair?

Typical Grade 4 Daily Schedule

7:25-7:30 Homeroom 7:30-9:00 Specialists (Art,

PE, World Language, Music)

9:00-10:25 Core Learning Block 1 10:25-10:45 Recess

10:45-12:15 Learning Block 2 12:15-1:05 Lunch and Recess

1:05-2:05 Learning Block 3 Page 25 ES Parent Handbook 2013/2014


FIFTH GRADE

Language Arts Balanced Literacy: Recent classroom research shows that literacy develops best when a balanced program is in place. At the center of our program is the reading and writing workshop, which includes a mini-lesson (explicit modeling and guided practice), independent reading or writing, and partner time. In addition to the workshop, the other components of a balanced literacy framework include: Interactive read-alouds, shared reading/writing; Word Study; Small Group Instruction (guided reading, strategy lessons, and interventions). Reading: At ISB, our curriculum aims at creating independent, life-long readers through the development of students’ comprehension, fluency, and stamina. Throughout the year, students will focus on developing their reading skills and related strategies for both fiction and non-fiction texts. Writing: Students will develop their skills within the following types of writing: narrative, informational, and persuasive. During writers’ workshop, students will engage in the writing process of generating ideas, rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Listening and Speaking: Speaking and listening are woven into many areas of the curriculum throughout the year, especially in their partnership work in literacy, math, and science, as they strive to develop skills related to attentive listening, collaborative communication and clear presentation of ideas.

Mathematics The mathematics program takes an investigative approach, which helps students make the transition from the concrete to the abstract. Emphasis is placed on using mathematics process skills to solve practical problems in a variety of contexts throughout the year. The Grade 5 Mathematics Content Standards are . . . Number and Operations

• •

Divide multi-digit numbers; solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic.

Add and subtract fractions, mixed numbers and decimals to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

• •

Describe, classify, and draw representations of three-dimensional figures.

Read, write, represent and compare fractions and decimals; recognize and write equivalent fractions; convert between fractions and decimals; use fractions and decimals in real-world and mathematical situations.

Geometry and Measurement Determine the area of triangles and quadrilaterals; determine the surface area and volume of rectangular prisms in various contexts.

Algebra

Recognize and represent patterns of change; use patterns, tables, graphs and rules to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Use properties of arithmetic to generate equivalent numerical expressions and evaluate expressions involving whole numbers.

Understand and interpret equations and inequalities involving variables and whole numbers, and use them to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Data Analysis and Probability

Display and interpret data; determine mean, median and range.

Science

All science units are taught using hands-on, inquiry activities that are designed to further the child’s understanding of the content and foster the natural curiosity of elementary children. Variables: This unit helps students discover relationships between objects and events through controlled experimentation. Students develop understanding that relationships always involve interactions, dependencies, and cause and effect. Environments: This unit introduces students to the basic concepts in environmental biology : All living things depend on the conditions in their environment. The study of relationships between one organism and its environment builds knowledge of all organisms. Such knowledge is important because humans can change environments. Changing without awareness of possible consequences can lead to disasters.

Social Studies The purpose of the Social Studies program is to develop in students the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. Landforms: This unit introduces students to the ideas of interaction of humans with their geographical surrounds and change over time.

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Sustainable Energy: Students will investigate and build an understanding about why we need to find sustainable energy sources, evaluate proposed sustainable energy options, and take action towards using sustainable energy in their lives Human Response to Adversity: Students will study various locations and experiences during the World War II period to gain an understanding about how and why people deal with adversity in order to consciously make decisions about their own responses to adversity

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Grade 5 Yearly Overview of Curricular Units of Study Units of Study Reading

Writing

• • • • •

Math

Science & Social Studies

• •

Trimester I Reading Life Character Nonfiction

• • •

Writing Life & Memoir Literary Interpretive Essays

• •

Number Puzzles and Multiple Towers (Multiplication and Division Number Sense 1) 2D & 3D Measurment (3-D Geometry & Measurement) Thousands of Miles (Addition, Subtraction, Number System) Variables Environments

• •

Trimester II Reading Seminar Fantasy Social Issues Feature Articles Independent Projects Poetry What’s That Portion (Fractions and Percents) Decimals on Grids & Number Lines (Fractions and Decimals, Number Sense) Growth Patterns (Patterns, Function, Change)

Environments Sustainable Energy

• • • • • • •

• •

Trimester III Nonfiction Research Historical Fiction Personal & Persuasive Essays Research based articles Historical Fiction How Long Can You Stand on One Foot? (probability) How Many People, How Many Teams? (Multiplication and Division, 2) Math Seminar

Landforms Human Response to Adversity

Typical Grade 5 Daily Schedule

7:25-7:30 Homeroom 7:30-9:00 Specialists (Art,

PE, World Language, Music)

9:00-10:25 Core Learning Block 1 10:25-10:45 Recess

10:45-12:15 Core Learning Block 2 12:15-1:05 Lunch and Recess

1:05-2:05 Core Learning Block 3

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SPECIAL SUBJECT AREAS The Elementary School is proud of the high quality and large variety of special subjects available to students. These programs help to broaden the students’ interests and develop skills in a number of additional areas.

LEARNING HUB The Learning Hub is a dynamic space that offers a variety of experiences for ISB students. Students of all ages are encouraged to explore literature and to find books that match their interests. PK to Grade 2 students meet with the librarian once every six days, and they are exposed to powerful literature and quality authors. In addition, this age level uses technology to read online, to research using databases, and to develop digital storytelling skills. Grades 3-5 meet once a month with the librarian, and the focus is a blend of print literacy and digital literacy. Students have access to a number of different technologies in the Hub: computer programs, iPods, playaway audio books, and iPads. Parents are also invited to check out books from the Hub. They may take ten books at a time for a two-week period of time.

ART The Elementary Art Curriculum provides a framework for helping students learn the characteristics of the visual arts by using a wide range of subject matter, symbols, meaningful images, and visual expressions to reflect their ideas, feelings, and emotions. The program incorporates art history, production, critique and aesthetics. The following skills and related techniques are developed throughout the program using a variety of media: drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, and technology.

Overview of Art Units KG

All About Me

Gr 1

Plants and Animals

Gr 2

Egyptian Art

Gr 3

Out of This World

Gr 4

Aboriginal Art

Gr 5

Painting Landscapes and Landforms

Tell Stories With Pictures Illustrating Stories

Colors, Shapes, Textures Boxes and Blocks

Patterns Everywhere City Scapes and Common Shapes

Masks of Many Cultures Our Fragile Earth

Expressionism in Art Three Dimensional Shapes and Symmetry Shapes and Silhouettes (Ceramics) How Things Work: The Art of Design

Amazing World of Insects Rock and Fossil Art

Art That Tells a Story in Details and Mood Botanical Art

Paper Making and Poetry Sculptural Shapes in Art: Moving Sculpture

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MUSIC The elementary music program involves key music skills and related musical concepts in the seven key strands of the curriculum. Many opportunities are provided for students to perform for each other and for whole school and/or parent audiences. Through music we are able to transmit our cultural heritage and encourage students to become acquainted with other cultures. This is particularly important in an international community where cross-cultural experiences provided in part by the music program enhance ISB’s mission of developing caring global citizens.

The ES Music Standards 1. Vocal: Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music 2. Instrumental: Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

music Improvisation: Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments Composition: Creating and arranging music within specified guidelines Musical Literacy: Reading and notating music Musical Analysis: Listening to, analyzing, and describing music Metacognition: Setting goals, monitoring, and reflecting on learning Movement: Moving to music, alone and with others

Overview of Music Units Trimester I

Trimester II

Trimester III

KG

All About Me

All About Our School

All About Thailand

Gr 1

Singing Patterns

Instrumental Patterns

Nursery Rhymes

Gr 2

Movement Patterns

Recycled Rhythms

Fairytale Blues

Gr 3 Gr 4

Sign me a Note: Laying a Foundation Drumming Up an Ensemble

Let’s get Classy

Gr 5

World Music

Guitar

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Recorder


PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education is an integral dimension of each student’s education that aims to enhance the wellness of each individual’s life. Students participate in a sequential curriculum that promotes physical, mental, emotional, social, and moral wellbeing. The Physical Education program teaches students how to demonstrate basic skills and concepts, and then successfully apply them in more complex and realistic contexts. It allows students to make increasingly independent choices about the activities and roles they pursue. Each child has the opportunity to experience success in Physical Education and reach his or her potential within a safe environment, where managed risk taking is encouraged. They will relate to others in a positive manner and experience leadership opportunities while performing as individuals, in groups and in teams. Students will be encouraged to participate in creating healthy communities and environments by taking responsible and critical action. The Physical Education program will build progressively toward the ultimate goal: producing members of society who take lifelong personal responsibility for engaging in health-related physical activity because they recognize the intrinsic rewards of being active in ways they enjoy.

ES Physical Education Overview Big Idea/Transfer Goals Students will be able to use their learning to . . . Spatial Awareness Continually assess, in a dynamic situation their current positioning and surroundings and independently choose the next best action. Strategies Continually analyze, in a dynamic situation, their performance and/or their opponents performance and independently choose the next best action. Social Responsibility: (cooperation, responsibility, honesty, etiquette, sportsmanship, teamwork) Consistently demonstrate cooperative and respectful behaviors that contribute to a positive experience. Fitness / Health & Wellness Make healthy choices and decisions regarding personal fitness and overall wellness. Motor Skills Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities, instinctively transferring these knowledge and skills to varied situations. NB: It is expected that students fully participate in all aspects of the physical education program, including the swimming unit. In addition, all students must wear their PE uniform and sneakers on the days their class receives PE instruction.

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WORLD LANGUAGE Following Thai government regulations, all Thai national ES students are enrolled in Thai language classes. Non Thai national ES students have the choice to learn Mandarin, Thai or Spanish as an additional world language. Following Thai government regulations, all new ISB students and all Kindergarten students will be required to take Thai for one complete academic year. After that, families may choose between Thai, Spanish or Mandarin. Our ISB K-12 World Language Philosophy is as follows: Communication is at the heart of the human experience. To thrive as global citizens, we need to effectively communicate within a wide range of multicultural contexts. We believe world language learners are able to . . . • communicate effectively and confidently in the international community,

understand and respond appropriately to spoken, written and body language,

clearly communicate ideas and information appropriate to a given audience,

generalize and apply language in new situations,

connect to prior learning and cross curricular concepts and ideas,

understand the nature of language and gain insight into other languages,

understand the concept of culture and gain insight into other cultures,

display cultural sensitivity to diverse perspectives, practices and products,

be flexible, tenacious, self-reliant, reflective, and take risks.

We believe world language learning happens best …with a communicative approach, where learners build upon prior knowledge to actively construct and monitor their understanding through meaningful engagement that often extends beyond the school setting. The language learning expectations and experiences are developmentally appropriate and aligned to a coherent proficiency-based curriculum with multiple entry points.

2013-2014 Yearly Overview of ES World Language Units Due to Thai Ministry of Education regulations, all ISB non Thai national Kindergarteners are required to take Thai for the World Language Choice. Here are the units for those students. Level KG

Trimester I Who am I?

Trimester II Why is Water Important?

Trimester III What does our world look like?

Beginning in Grade 1, students have the choice of learning Thai, Spanish, or Mandarin. The following is the list of units for across all three of these languages. Level 1 2 3 4 5

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Trimester I Me and My World Me and My Family Food Choices Home Sweet Home Health & Well-Being Fun & Friends

Trimester II Cultural Connections Our School Celebrations Our Community Travel Characters

Trimester III Citizens for the Planet Animals 2X2 Endangered Animals Plants Water Changes, Challenges,


Contributions, Celebrations

2013-2014 Yearly Overview of Native Thai Language Units Trimester I Me and My World Who am I About Me My family Friendship Thailand Helping our Community

Level NL K NL 1 NL 2 NL 3 NL 4 NL 5

Trimester II Cultural Connections Who are my friends? My feelings Thai Songs & Folk Tales Thai Folk tales Water Thai Local Wisdom

Trimester III Citizens for the Planet Our world: Plants & Animals My community Endangered Animals Wise Consumer Thai History News & Current Events

TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION LITERACY In ISB's Elementary School, technology and information literacy are integrated into units of study and into everyday classroom lessons. Teachers and students have access to a library media lab and mobile laptop carts with wireless internet connection. Students and teachers utilize a wide array of software and digital peripherals, which complement our hardware resources. Skills are taught independently and are integrated into learning throughout each unit of study. A Technology Learning Coach, and a Librarian provide a variety of teacher and student learning support with integration ideas, curricular links, resources, in-class support and specific professional development opportunities. This integrated model sees technology as a tool to enhance teaching and learning, and not as a discrete subject to be taught once a cycle. Each Elementary School classroom is equipped with a surround sound system, a digital projector, a SMART Board and wireless Internet. Our technology and information literacy model creates excitement amongst our students while giving them the skills that they need to help them achieve their academic potential.

ISB21 Technology and Information Literacy Standards At ISB, students will become: Effective Learners Standard 1: Students use appropriate tools to efficiently gather, critically evaluate, and effectively use information to make informed decisions when solving problems. Effective Communicators Standard 2: Students use appropriate media to effectively communicate ideas, knowledge, and understanding to audiences ranging from local to global. Effective Creators Standard 3: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using appropriate technology.

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Effective Collaborators Standard 4: Students connect with peers and recognized experts to collaborate, develop their own understanding, contribute to the learning of others, and contribute to the global society using a variety of media and online communities. Ethical Citizens Standard 5: Students practice legal and ethical behavior with an understanding of cultural and societal issues related to technology and information.

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Section Two

Expectations and General Information

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EMERGENCY AND HEALTH INFORMATION SCHOOL HOURS The school day for Pre-kindergarten is from 7:25 A.M. to 12:55 P.M. The school day for Kindergarten and Grades 1-5 is from 7:25 A.M. to 2:05 P.M. Reminder:

The first bell rings at 7:20 A.M. At this time, students should go to their homerooms.

AFTER SCHOOL COMMUNICATION In the event you need to contact the school after dismissal, please call the following numbers in the order identified: ES Office Switchboard ES Administrators Deputy Head of School

02-963-5898-9 02-963-5800 02-963-5898-9 02-963-5802

SCHOOL CLOSING On occasion, school may have to be closed, particularly due to flooding. This information would be communicated to you via an SMS Text Message to your mobile phone. Therefore please be sure we have your correct Emergency Contact information in our system at all times. Emergency contact information can be updated via ISB’s online Parent Portal. If you are unsure, please contact the ES Office.

1.

If the school bus does not arrive as scheduled, contact the school to make sure that school is open that day. PLEASE DO NOT SEND YOUR CHILDREN TO SCHOOL WITHOUT CHECKING FIRST.

2.

If you are not a bus rider, contact the school if there is any chance that school might be closed – heavy rains, a national emergency, etc.

3.

We try to make the closing decision by 5:00 A.M.

CAMPUS SAFETY In the event of a school emergency, ISB will contact you by SMS (text messaging your cell phone). The SMS will explain the emergency and advise you on next steps. Please check your mobile phone each morning. In emergency situations information will also be available on the school website. We highly recommend that you keep your mobile phone and email information up to date via ISB’s Parent Portal http://inside.isb.ac.th/parentportal/ . You will need to know your ID number, which can be found on your ISB ID card. See page 2 of this handbook for procedures. In the event of civil unrest, the school administration will be in contact with the local authorities and embassies to determine the seriousness of the situation. Should the need arise to send students home, the school will make every attempt to secure necessary transportation and will alter bus routes to avoid problem areas. However, situations may arise where the safety of ISB

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students is best served by having them remain on campus (enacting our “Safe Haven� procedures). Students who may be living in areas of town that are not accessible due to civil unrest will be taken to an alternative home. Please arrange for your child to have such an alternative with another family. In the event of a fire or bomb threat, students will follow the prescribed building evacuation procedures. Should the need arise to evacuate the students from campus, they will be directed to an appropriate site where transportation home will be arranged.

FLOODING The flooding of Bangkok streets can often disrupt the normal school day by adding to the traffic congestion. When flooding occurs, you may expect delays in the school bus pick-ups in the morning and drop-offs in the afternoon. Students riding the school bus will remain on the bus until they arrive at school or home. They will not be permitted to get off the bus and walk to their destination.

INSURANCE ISB carries public liability and property damage insurance. This does include protection against unavoidable student accidents which may occur in normal school activities.

HEALTH SERVICE Our health office is staffed by registered nurses who are trained and experienced in handling student health problems. In addition, for emergency cases, transportation is available to a hospital. Parents will be notified immediately should an emergency arise.

HEALTH SERVICE REFERRALS Students may go to the health office any time during the school day with a note or student visit slip from the teacher or office when ill or injured, or may be referred by the school staff for vision testing, personal hygiene or other problems related to health. When a student becomes ill at school, he/she is referred to the school nurse. If a child is possibly contagious or so ill that they cannot attend classes, the parents will be contacted to take the student home. If deemed necessary, the student will be transferred to the hospital, and parents will be notified. If a student is diagnosed as having a contagious disease, parents should notify the teacher or office who will then notify the Health Office. Exposure notices are distributed to parents of affected classrooms. In order to re-enter school, a student with a contagious disease/condition accompanied by a parent must present a written statement to the school nurse from a doctor attesting to the fact that the disease or condition is no longer communicable.

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HEALTH PROBLEMS AND MEDICATION Please keep your child at home if they have a temperature of 100.6F or 38 C, is not well enough to learn, has a cough or sneeze that he/she could give to other students, or has vomiting and/or diarrhea.

**PLEASE CALL THE ES OFFICE IF YOUR CHILD WILL NOT BE IN SCHOOL** The school nurses are not allowed to treat pre-existing injuries or prescribe treatment or medication for students. They may, upon verbal permission from the parent, administer Tylenol (also known as Panadol, Acetaminophen, Tempra) for minor headaches, earaches, sore throats and to reduce fever while waiting for the parent to arrive. In addition, they may administer medicine prescribed by a physician if the student brings a signed note from his parent or doctor, stating dosage to give and reason for needing medication and brings the medication in its original, labeled container. Please note that the nurses may not give any over-the-counter medications to your child during school hours (with the exception of Tylenol). Students are not allowed to carry medicine during school hours and should be reminded to take their medicine to the nurses’ office. If, for medical reasons, a student is not able to participate in physical education classes for a time exceeding three days, a written statement from a physician is required. For periods of less than three days, a note from a parent will suffice. Parents of students with recurring health problems (allergies, asthma, diabetes, etc.) should notify the teacher and the school nurse. Should a change occur in the status of your child’s health, please provide the appropriate updated information to the health office. Please maintain current emergency contact, work phone, and home phone numbers in the nurses’ office throughout the school year.

HEALTH SCREENING PROGRAM Hearing screening will be provided for students in Grades Pre-K, K and Grade 1 and all NEW students. Should the students require more extensive examination, the parents will be notified. Vision screening will be provided to students in Grades. 1,3, 5 and all NEW students to ISB. All students will be weighed and measured. All fifth grade students will be screened for scoliosis upon the start of their swimming lessons in the second semester.

Head Lice A child with a pediculosis or head lice infestation will be sent home from school with a letter and instructions for treatment. The school nurse will re-inspect the following day before the child is allowed to re-enter the classroom.

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GENERAL INFORMATION ADMISSIONS POLICY Students enrolling in the Pre-Kindergarten program shall be four years of age on or before September 1 of the year of admission. Students enrolling in the Kindergarten program shall be five years of age on or before September 1 of the year of admission. Students entering Pre-K and KG will be screened prior to admission to determine their academic, social and emotional readiness. Students enrolling in First Grade shall be six years of age on or before September 1 of the year of admission. Placement in Grade Two through Five will be determined by school administration based on the student’s age, evaluation of records from previous schools and tests administered by ISB. Returning students are enrolled and classes arranged at the end of the school year.

ATTENDANCE, TARDINESS, ABSENCE It is expected that all students be present and on time each day. After 7:30am, latecomers must get a tardy slip from the Elementary Office. Students who have been absent should, on their return, bring a note from their parents explaining the cause and date(s) of absence. THE SCHOOL STRONGLY ENCOURAGES YOU TO PLAN YOUR VACATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SCHEDULED HOLIDAYS LISTED ON THE SCHOOL CALENDAR. Should you anticipate your child’s absence from school, please inform the school in advance as soon as possible. Because regular attendance is critical for optimal learning to take place, the ES office will closely monitor attendance. When students are excessively absent from school, a letter will go home with the report card. Additionally, a student could be placed on conditional enrollment if attendance does not improve. For a short-term absence due to illness, it is not necessary for parents to catch up missed work unless suggested by your child’s teacher. If you do take holidays outside of the ISB holidays, teachers are not responsible for providing extra home learning. IF YOUR CHILD IS GOING TO BE ABSENT FROM SCHOOL, PLEASE CALL OR E-MAIL THE ES OFFICE (tinaratr@isb.ac.th) AND YOUR CHILD’S TEACHER BY 8:00 AM.

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WITHDRAWALS A student withdrawing should give the Elementary Office a minimum of 7 days notice via a note or phone call from the parents. Notice of withdrawal and student clearance slips should be completed before clearance can be given. The school will issue the necessary school records to the student for his/her new school. The progress report and other pertinent school records will not be released if the student owes money for lost Learning Hub books, textbooks, school fees, etc. Parents must resolve all financial business prior to the last day of school. Parents should drop by the office on the last day to check their child out and to pick up the transfer papers.

CHECKING IN AND OUT OF SCHOOL Once at school, students are not permitted to leave campus without parental permission. A gate pass, obtainable from the Elementary Office, is necessary when a child is taken out of school during school hours for dental/doctor appointment, etc.

PARENT VISITATION and MESSAGES We encourage parents to visit classrooms but ask that you make arrangements with the Elementary Office and the classroom teacher before doing so. Parent messages may be delivered to students if they are received in the office by 1:30 p.m.

AFTER SCHOOL ON-CAMPUS SUPERVISION - Expectations All students are expected to go home at the end of the school day (2:05pm) unless they have a school-sponsored After-School Activity. Students may not be on campus after school unless supervised by an adult and have a pre-arranged plan for transportation home. If your child will be staying after school, we ask that you assist us by reviewing the following expectations:  All students must be in a supervised location after school. This may include our schoolsponsored After School Activities, or other special activities where there is adult supervision. Your child should understand that s/he is not free to roam the campus or go to the sports fields, gymnasiums or playgrounds without direct adult supervision.



Students are welcome to use the Learning Hub after school with an adult supervisor provided by the family. ISB staff cannot supervise students after 2:05 in the Learning Hub. Please note that the Learning Hub closes at 3:30pm and is occasionally closed at 2:05 for special events. Bus service provided for students at 3:30pm is home-drop off. No Elementary School students are permitted on the 5:00pm bus as it is not home-drop off unless accompanied by an MS or HS sibling and have written permission from parents. For more details, contact ISBs Transportation Office on 02-963-5884.

Middle School/High School Cafeteria and Booster Hut Elementary School students may eat in the Middle/School High School Cafeteria during morning recess and lunch only if they are accompanied by an adult. The ISB Booster Club sells ISB logo clothing and other items at the Booster Cart in the Middle/School High School Cafeteria every Friday. Grade Two to Five Students may purchase items at the Booster Cart during both morning and lunch recesses. PreKindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade students must be accompanied by an adult in order to use the Booster Cart.

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INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND CLASS SUPPLIES Most books, instructional materials and school supplies are issued directly to the students by the classroom teacher. If a student loses or damages a book, workbook, calculator, etc., he/she must pay for it before a replacement is issued. Parents are asked to purchase/supply earphones and flashdrives each school year. These are available at the ISB Bookstore.

ES LEARNING HUB RESOURCE CENTER The ES Learning Hub is a dynamic and flexible teaching and learning space that enables, encourages, and empowers teaching and learning for all members of our Elementary School community. It is central to our Elementary School and is open from 6:30 AM until 3:30 PM on school days for all ISB students. Our print collection contains more than 15,000 volumes and can be accessed via the Web while digital resources can be accessed via wired and wireless technology throughout our spacious and inviting facility.

TOYS AND PERSONAL ITEMS AT SCHOOL Toys and other personal items may be brought to school for “Show and Tell” or other organized school activities. All personal property, except appropriate items such as: soccer balls, footballs, jump ropes or stuffed toys, should remain in the classroom during school hours. iPods, electronic games and other electronic items may be used on the bus, but not on school grounds or in classrooms during school hours. Mobile phones need to be turned off during school hours and left in back packs. They may be used appropriately after school. The school will not be held responsible for the damage or loss of personal property brought to school. Please ensure your child’s name is clearly marked on all items brought to school.

PETS AND ANIMALS ON CAMPUS Pets and animals are not permitted on school grounds without express written permission from the administration.

FIELD TRIPS Classes and grade levels may take learning-focused field trips off-campus during the year. Parents will be informed of the time of departure and arrival, the mode of transportation and the site to be visited. Appropriate adult supervision will be maintained at all times. Parent/guardian permission must be obtained in writing for a student to participate on the trip. Permission by telephone will not be acceptable. Failure to have a signed permission slip will mean that the child will not participate on the trip but should be in attendance at school.

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FOOD SERVICE/ FOOD IN CLASSROOMS/ FOOD POLICY All students have already paid for their snacks, drink and lunches through their tuition fees. One of ISBs Mission points is to inspire students to lead healthy, active, balanced lives. Research has shown that the school environment has a vital role in shaping children's eating behaviors. ISB has formulated Healthy Snack Guidelines to ensure that its students are provided nutrient-dense foods while at school. Healthy Snack Guidelines Parents are highly encouraged to provide snacks that will make a positive contribution to their child's health, with an emphasis on providing fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and whole-grains as the primary snacks and water as the primary beverage. Portion sizes should be ageappropriate. On special occasion parties and events, ISB would like parents and teachers to limit the quantity of food and to have most of the food (75% or more) comply with the Healthy Snack Guidelines. Healthy Snack Ideas • Fresh fruit, fruit kabobs, fruit salad • Cut fresh vegetables (may be served with hummus, bean dip or cheese spreads) • Dried fruits (raisins, apricots, mango) • Seeds (sunflower, pumpkin) • Edamame (Japanese boiled soy beans in the pods) • Mini bean and cheese burritos • Tortilla roll-ups with sliced chicken, cream cheese and vegetables • Yogurt (low-sugar or unsweetened) • Cheese with whole-grain crackers or pita bread • Fruit smoothies • Popcorn (light or air-popped) • Muffins and breads (low-sugar varieties including bran, zucchini, carrot) • Hard boiled eggs/deviled eggs Because of allergies, ISB is a Nut-free campus. ISB or any of the school's official groups will not be selling or providing products that contain peanuts or tree nuts*. We insist that adults and students refrain from bringing nut products on campus. *including almonds, cashews, macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, chestnuts, beechnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts, gingko nuts, hickory nuts

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CLASSROOM CELEBRATIONS/PARTIES: We are a learning-focused school where time is a key factor. The purpose of these celebration guidelines is to maximize learning time. They help us to stay consistent as a school and have been shared with the Elementary PTA and the room parents of each classroom. We thank everyone for supporting the following guidelines. First and foremost, please communicate with your child's teacher about any classroom celebration. When planning food, please consult our Healthy Foods Guidelines (found on p. 36). Also, ask about any food allergies that students might have. Please remember that we are a nut-free campus. All classes are welcome to have a celebration/party in the final week of school in December and in June. Birthdays: If a parent wishes to bring in one thing to share, such as muffins, cupcakes OR cake to celebrate a birthday, please be sure to schedule it with the classroom teacher for the final 10 minutes prior to recess or the end of the day. International Day: This is an excellent time for us all to celebrate food, music, art, literature, etc. of various cultures. We encourage all classes and grade levels to fully immerse themselves in the international culture of ISB and of our families. Halloween, Christmas, Thanksgiving, Valentines, Easter, etc.: ISB is an international school. We do not have time to celebrate all holidays from all of our students’ countries. Therefore, it is not appropriate to celebrate these particular holidays during school time. If a room parent wishes to celebrate a theme with learning-focused activities for a short period of time, such as Halloween math, Chinese New Year story, Hanukkah game, or Diwali craft, etc., this is appropriate. However, costumes are not appropriate for school time. Please contact Kelly or Diana if you have any questions about these Celebration Guidelines.

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HOME LEARNING GUIDELINES The Elementary School Home Learning policy is grounded in the idea that “it is about the quality of home learning sent home, not quantity of home learning sent home”. We believe that our students should also enjoy the rich learning opportunities afforded them by the outstanding extra-curricular activities offered within our school and local community. These learning opportunities support our students in becoming life-long learners. The Purpose of Home Learning in the Elementary School is: √ To foster positive attitudes, habits and character traits √ To practice a skill or process that students can do independently, but not fluently √ To provide opportunities for students to explore topics of their own interest √ To foster a love for reading (daily reading 7 days/week) is included in the home learning and involves a child being read to by the parents and independent reading when developmentally appropriate). Time Guidelines for Home Learning in the Elementary School: √ These are daily guidelines, knowing that all students are different and may work at different rates. Written home learning will not necessarily be assigned every night. √ If you see your child continuously struggling to complete their home learning within these time guidelines, contact your child’s teacher. √ It is an Elementary School Policy not to assign home learning during school holidays and not necessarily on weekends. (Children should continue to read/be read to daily). Grade Level Pre-K KG 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade

Daily Home Reading Time 20 minutes 20 minutes 20minutes 20 minutes 20 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes

Additional Daily Home Learning Time (max.) None None 10 minutes 15 minutes 20 minutes 25 minutes 30 minutes

Weekend Home Learning None None None None None Rarely Rarely

The Role of Parents with Home Learning: Parents should be involved in daily reading and talking about books with their children. We expect parents to communicate if the home learning time guidelines are consistently exceeded. Some parents may wish for other home-learning opportunities to do with their children. These could include learning how to keyboard, exploring some math problems or further investigating in-school connections. For these home-learning opportunities and other suggestions, we direct your attention to the Home Learning Ideas tab of the ISB Elementary School website: (www.isb.ac.th) for age-appropriate suggestions.

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Communicating Student Learning Our system of communicating student learning is designed to communicate student growth of knowledge, skills, attitudes and understandings over time. The system also communicates student achievement in relation to grade level expectations at a given time. We aim to provide a framework of communication and collaboration that fosters passionate, reflective learning so that all students reach their academic potential as global citizens. Our system of communicating student learning is comprised of the following: Component Portfolios and Student blogs On-going parent/teacher communication • Open House (Aug.) • Celebrations of learning  Emails, blogs  newsletters,  phone calls Conferences • Parent/Teacher • Student-led Formal Report Cards

External Reports • MAP Test (Grs. 3, 4, 5) • ISA Test (Grs. 3 & 5)

Timeline Throughout the year and shared with parents towards the end of the school year (March-May) Throughout the school year

• •

Beginning of Oct. End of March

• • •

November February June

November, June

March

Purpose To observe learning growth over time Positive feedback Sharing growth and concerns

To communicate learning growth. Student-led conferences-students reflect critically on their own learning and communicate it to others. To communicate student growth of knowledge, skills, attitudes and understandings over time. The report card also communicates student achievement in relation to grade level expectations at a given time. Achievement in relation to external, standardized populations.

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CELEBRATION OF LEARNING In the ES, we celebrate learning in many ways with events such as art shows, PE, Music and World Language Celebrations of Learning, classroom celebrations, portfolio sharing, grade level learning, international assemblies and many others. We encourage our teachers to involve parents in celebrating the learning throughout the year. Please look out for these special learning celebrations and participate with enthusiasm.

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CHANNELS OF COMMUNICATION Clear and timely communication between school and parents is one of the cornerstones of ISB. ISB communicates with parents through a variety of methods, including via e-communications. It is an expectation that parents read the weekly e-communication newsletters and contact the school immediately if they are not receiving them. The Board of Trustees recognizes the need for proper communication between and among students, parents, teachers, the administration and the Board. To assist in achieving this objective, the following general procedures are recommended for all concerned parties:

1. When a problem concerns your son/daughter and his/her work in school, the best person to see is the classroom teacher. An appointment to see an elementary teacher may be made by calling the Elementary Office or emailing the teacher directly. Problems of a personal nature or questions about a student’s program, his/her overall potential and progress, may be discussed with the Elementary Principal or one of the Elementary Counselors.

2. The Head of the School is the normal channel of communication between the Board and the public. Questions about school policy should be directed to the Head of School. Normally, communications directed to the Board will be referred to the Head of School for reply or action. Individual Board Members shall refrain from directly involving themselves in administrative matters involving students, teachers and administrators.

COMPLAINT PROCEDURES From time to time, parents may have problems or concerns that they wish to bring to the attention of appropriate school officials. To assist parents in this regard, the following general guidelines may be helpful: • Any concern regarding a school-related matter should first be raised by the parent with the staff member most directly involved (i.e., questions regarding the content of instructional materials or home learning assignments should be raised with the teacher involved.)

If the matter remains unsolved, the parent may wish to speak with the building principal. Appointments can be scheduled by contacting the office of the Principal involved.

If the matter is still unresolved, the parent may wish to speak with the Head of School. For an appointment, simply contact the Head of School’s office. NOTE: Disciplinary actions taken by the building administrators that have long term consequences for students (i.e., expulsion recommendations, future restrictions while attending ISB) may be appealed to the Head of School.

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DISCIPLINE POLICY Philosophy The staff and parents of ISB Elementary School are committed to creating a safe, positive, and challenging learning environment which will enable our students to acquire a solid knowledge base and develop a sense of themselves as life-long learners, skillful decision makers, and responsible citizens. Students are expected to demonstrate responsible behavior and demonstrate growth in their capacity for self-control and self-management. Our behavioral goals for students are that they be trustworthy, respectful, responsible, fair, caring, and demonstrate good citizenship. We believe in fair and consistent discipline practices and good classroom management. When problems arise, we will work positively to find solutions. The ISB Policy Regarding Student Conduct The conduct of students on and off campus shall reflect standards of citizenship desired by the School Community and the people of Thailand. Students should strive to be self-disciplined and to be responsible for their actions. Students shall respect constituted authority, and the rights and privileges of others and shall cooperate with all school and civil authorities.

STUDENT CONDUCT AND CONSEQUENCES FOR INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR: I. TEACHER AND STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES Teachers and ISB staff members are responsible for setting and teaching specific expectations for responsible and productive behavior in their classroom and the common areas of the school. They appropriate steps or corrective actions to resolve problems when they occur. These include, but are not restricted to, individual or group discussion of the problem, redirection (have the child do it the right way), classroom time out, loss of classroom privileges, the use of time out, school service work, and parent contact. II. PRINCIPAL/VICE PRINCIPAL RESPONSIBILITIES Most student behavior problems are effectively resolved by the staff member directly responsible for supervising a group of students. When a problem persists or is of a serious nature the situation might be referred to the Principals for further investigation. The Principals will review the situation and determine when an issue requires further disciplinary measures or follow-up. When a situation is referred to one of the Principals and it is deemed of a serious nature, the parents of the students involved will be notified by phone, email or in person. III. PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES If you have an issue or concerns regarding your child’s behavior, contact your child’s teacher in the first instance.

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RESPONDING TO SEVERE OR PERSISTANT POOR BEHAVIOR CHOICES: Some behaviors require immediate and elevated attention and specific follow-up. Such cases will involve the Principal(s) and include: 1. Disrespect or Defiance of Adults: Disrespectful or defiant behavior is defined as the direct and immediate refusal to comply with a reasonable adult instruction within a specified period of time. It also includes verbally abusive and/or threatening language. Examples include: walking away while being corrected, sassing or back talking, name calling, and threatening physical harm. 2. Chronic Defiance of a School Rule or Procedure: Chronic defiance of a school rule or procedure is when a student continues to defy minor classroom and/or school expectation after a number of corrective actions have been taken by a staff member. Examples include: talking out in class, and disturbing others. 3. Dangerous Violation of a School Rule or Procedure: When a student does something that has the potential to cause harm or injury to themselves or another it is considered a severe misbehavior. Examples include: jumping off the top of the "Big Toy," or pulling the chair out from under another student. 4. Classroom Disruption: A classroom disruption is willful behavior that significantly disrupts the learning of others or self. Examples include: extreme emotional outburst and persistent interruptions of the learning process. 5. Physically Dangerous Behavior: Fighting and Assault: Fighting and physical acts such as hitting, kicking, slamming, choking, tripping and throwing object that cause injury to another student are considered physically dangerous behaviors. 6. Verbal Abuse or Intimidation: Language that is intended to harass, humiliate, and intimidate another student is considered severe misconduct. This includes racial slurs, threats of physical harm, and derogatory sexual language. 7. Truancy: Truancy is an unexcused absence from school. School staff is to notify the office as soon as possible if they suspect that a child is not at school without parental knowledge or permission. 8. Tobacco, Alcohol, and Other Illegal Substance Use or Possession: Students who use or possess at school these items are to be immediately referred to the office. 9. Stealing: Students who purposely take items that do not belong to them are to be referred to the office for corrective action. Only the Principal has the authority to conduct student searches. Staff may search a student's clothing and other personal property only if there is reasonable cause to believe that something is concealed that may be of immediate danger to the student or to other students, in violation of school rules or in violation to the law.

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10. Damaging Personal or School Property: Acts of arson, vandalism, and willful destruction of property is considered severe misconduct. Students will be required to pay for the repair or replacement of the item(s) damaged. 11. Threatening the Safety or Well Being of Others or Bullying: Acts by students which have the potential to cause significant injury to others. Examples include pulling the fire alarm, possession of firearms or explosive devices, use or threatening the use of sharp objects and clubs, and hitting another student with a fist in the head area. This could also be verbal threatening towards another student. Language that is intended to harass, humiliate, and intimidate another student is considered severe misconduct. This includes racial slurs, threats of physical harm, and derogatory sexual language. 12. Bullying and Cyber-bullying: As written by our ISB students: Bullying is repeatedly targeting a person to make them weaker physically and emotionally. It hurts your feelings and makes you feel bad. It includes physical bullying (hitting, spitting, poking, slapping, kicking, etc.) and emotional bullying (name calling, teasing, telling secrets, gossiping, leaving people out, threatening, etc.). Cyber-bullying is also unacceptable. It is not acceptable to make fun of people because of the following reasons: what people look like, sports ability, popularity, culture, race, personal life, family background, religion, or saying they are gay. There will be consequences for bullying. 13. Abuse of Technology Acceptable Use Policy Disregarding or abusing the Technology Acceptable Use policy at ISB is unacceptable. Please see policy below. * The Acceptable Use Policy will be sent home at the beginning of the year to be signed by parents and students.*

RESPONDING TO POOR BEHAVIOR CHOICES As we work through particular issues, our aim is to be fair and respectful of all parties. This includes being:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Consistent from day to day and student to student Balanced against the severity of the misconduct Appropriate to the student's nature and prior behavior Fair to the student, parent, and others Effective.

Depending upon the age of the student and the nature of the misconduct, the following actions may be taken by school officials: Warning/Student Conference: Staff or Principal will discuss the incident with the student. The circumstances leading up to the misbehavior will be discussed and the behavior expectation will be clarified. Recess Detention: The student will be detained either in the classroom by the teacher or in the office by the Principal for recess. Page 51 ES Parent Handbook 2013/14


School Service Work: The student may be required to do simple tasks such as cleaning walls or sweeping sidewalks as a service to the school for misbehavior that causes damage to school property. Denial of Privilege: The student may lose a classroom or school privilege, such as using a hall or Learning Hub pass and special equipment for a specific period of time. Restriction: The student will be restricted from certain areas of the classroom, school building, or playground for a specific period of time. Parent Conference: School staff will conference with the parent or guardian of a student either via the telephone, or at school. Suspension (Board Policy No. 8.5050): Violation of school policy or regulations as set out in the handbooks or non-payment of tuition and fees may result in suspension by the Head of School or Deputy Head of School. Parents and the Head of School shall be notified immediately of a suspension by a Principal or Vice Principal. For each suspension there must be at least one parent conference. A Principal may suspend a student for a period of no more than five days. Any suspension longer than five days shall be approved by the Head of School. Any suspension longer than ten days shall be approved by the Board. Parents have the right to be heard by the Board in cases involving suspension of more than ten days. Students under suspension shall not attend school-sponsored activities or be present on campus without the written permission of the appropriate school principal. No tuition or any other fees will be refunded in cases of suspension. Social Probation (Board Policy No. 8.5060): A student consistently in violation of school rules and regulations may be placed on social probation. The student may be prohibited from participating in extra-curricular activities. Probationary status will be reviewed at least on a semester basis. The student and his/her parents or guardians will be informed in writing and through conferences of the terms and reasons for social probation. A student failing to show the required improvement may be expelled from ISB. Academic Probation (Board Policy No. 8.5070): A student whose academic performance indicates insufficient progress will be placed on academic probation on a semester basis. The student may be prohibited from participating in extra-curricular activities. In addition, students on probation will be closely monitored and parent conferences will be required on a regular basis. Tutorial assistance may also be recommended. Page 52 ES Parent Handbook 2013/14


The student and his/her parents, or guardians will be informed in writing and through conference of the terms and reasons for academic probation. A student failing to show the required improvement may be expelled from ISB. Expulsion (Board Policy No. 8.5080): A student violating school policies, regulations and/or terms of probation or suspension may be expelled from the school upon recommendation of the administration and a majority vote of the School Board. Expulsion for academic reasons may occur should a student fail the same grade level for a second time. Only the assessment fee will be refunded in accordance with the assessment fee policy in cases of expulsion.

Harassment Policy and Procedures: Harassment is prohibited in our school. Each of us is responsible for helping to create a positive educational environment. A positive educational environment is free of harassment or intimidation based on any criteria including, but not restricted to, age, race, religion, disability, creed, color, ethnic origin or ancestry, gender or sexual orientation. Harassment of any employee or student by any other employee or student or by anyone with whom a student or employee may interact in order to fulfill job or school responsibilities is a violation of ISB policy (Policy 1.1016). Students are to report acts of sexual or other harassment to their teachers, counselors, school administrators, or other adults in the school. Once informed, the adult will refer the student to the appropriate school authority who will take action in accordance with school policy and/or the school division’s code of conduct and corrective action procedures as stated in the student handbook. Acts of sexual or other harassment by adults should be referred to the Division Principal. Students and their parents may choose to file a formal grievance. Depending on the type of harassment and whether or not the harassment is a repeat offense, disciplinary action up to and including expulsion will be taken.

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ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY For Internet and Network Permission Purpose of the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) International School Bangkok believes that all students should have access to technology when they act in a safe, responsible, respectful and lawful manner. Internet access and other online services offer unlimited global resources. Networks give schools the ability to share educational and research resources from around the world with all students. These resources include access to instructional applications, interactive collaboration between teachers, students and other users, document sharing, communications of all forms with people, libraries, museums and research facilities from around the world. Our goal is to enhance the educational development of our students by providing these services. Acceptable uses of technology are activities that support teaching and learning. The following are the guidelines for the use of technology at International School Bangkok: 1. Respect and protect the privacy of self and others A. I will respect the work and files of others and agree not to open, copy, change, delete, or damage files or folders that I did not create, help to create, or have permission from the author(s) to collaborate on.

B. I will keep my password and login name private and will only use my own accounts. C. I will never give out personal information (full name, address, phone number, photo, school name) about myself or anyone else while online. 2. Respect, and protect all electronic resources like they were your own. A. I will use computers, keyboards, digital cameras, printers, microscopes and scanners only with the supervision or permission of an adult.

B. I will use all equipment and networks carefully and avoid any damage or change to the computer system, its software, settings or network.

C. I will not change, delete, add to, or download any school software. 3. Respect and protect the intellectual property of others I will respect and obey international copyright laws and not participate in the making of illegal copies of music, games, movies, or written work belonging to others. 4. Respect and practice the principles of community A. I will be polite to other people when writing to them while I am on the Internet. I will not use curse words or any language that my teacher or parents would not want me to use in my classroom.

B. I will never use any form of electronic communication to harass, frighten, intimidate or bully anyone.

C. I agree not to explore adult-only areas of the Internet. Page 54 ES Parent Handbook 2013/14


D. I will tell an adult if I read or see something on the computer that is inappropriate or makes me feel uncomfortable. I will immediately LEAVE any site that shows anything that is inappropriate by using the back arrow.

E. I will use the computer and the Internet for schoolwork only. I will use only the programs and websites that my teacher has suggested or approved.

F. I will print with permission. G. I agree not to use instant messaging or chatrooms at school unless for school purposes and under the supervision of a teacher.

H. If I have an e-mail account, I will use it responsibly in the following ways: •

I will always identify myself as the sender of an e-mail message.

I will be kind and respectful of others and use appropriate language in my messages.

I will only use my account to send e-mail messages, and not someone else's e-mail account.

I. I will not subscribe to, sign up for, or access game sites, Hotmail, or chatrooms while at school without permission from my teacher. As the use of school technology is a privilege for students, the school may restrict, suspend, or terminate any user’s access to the school’s technology resources or execute other disciplinary measures deemed appropriate by the school administration, for not respecting this policy. Our main oversight of elementary students’ acceptable use is during the school day. However, violations of acceptable use outside of school hours can negatively affect the school and members of its community (students, faculty, parents). As a result, violations of the above guidelines outside of school that come to the attention of ISB personnel may be treated in a disciplinary manner.

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DRESS CODE Students are expected to wear the prescribed dress every school day except on designated out of school uniform days. The dress code is in effect during the school day from 7:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. with the exception of sports or with special permission.

THE ISB SCHOOL UNIFORM All shirts, shorts, skirts, and pants must be purchased at ISB, fit properly, be clean, and properly pressed with no holes, tears, frayed areas or patches. As long as the school Principal has granted prior permission, dress of the student’s country or religion will be acceptable. It is not intended that these regulations be viewed as exhaustive. A student who attends ISB accepts that the Principal is the final arbitrator in all cases. Shirt: Must be a white or red knit ISB shirt for Elementary School with sleeves and a collar, purchased from ISB. Other articles of clothing worn under the shirt must not be visible. Team shirts of any kind cannot be substituted for the required school shirt. Prior approval must be given by the Principal to wear team shirts. Shorts: Must be khaki or black and mid-thigh in length and of a proper fit. Shorts must be fastened at the waist. Skirts: Must be khaki or black, fit properly and the length should be below the fingertips when extending arms to one’s side while standing. Pants: Must be khaki or black, and of a proper fit. Pants must be fastened at the waist. Footwear: Sneakers, street shoes or leather sandals with a back strap must be worn. Single plug thongs (flip flops) are not permitted. Footwear must be laced where appropriate and must be free of holes, rips or inappropriate markings. Footwear should not be elevated more than two inches. Accessories and hair: Any accessories or hairstyles that distract from learning are not allowed. School principals will make the judgment.

P.E. UNIFORM The P.E. uniform is to be worn on P.E. days. Socks are required with running shoes or athletic footwear suitable to the activity. Only safe jewelry is to be worn. The principals will make the judgment.

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A uniform hat must be worn outside of the classroom in PE classes, outdoor activities, or recess in uncovered areas. Hats may not be worn inside the building.

OUT OF UNIFORM DAYS The Student Dress Regulations shall apply throughout the school year except on days designated by the Principal as Out of Uniform Days, usually on the first Thursday and Friday of each month. On out of uniform days, the general rules and guidelines for good grooming and good taste as outlined above shall apply. Please consider the following:

• Students may wear denim or blue jeans as part of their attire. The jeans must be clean, neat and presentable (not ripped, ragged, or cut-off).

• Sweatshirts and T-shirts may be worn, as long as they are clean and in good repair and not

crude, rude or lewd. • Students may not wear sleeveless shirts/blouses on campus. If the general rules and guidelines for Alternate Dress Days are not followed, students will lose their Special Dress Day privileges. VIOLATION OF DRESS AND GROOMING REGULATIONS All faculty and staff members are responsible for administration of the dress regulations. Questionable situations will be referred to the school administrators.

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BICYCLE SAFETY We expect all students to follow safe biking precautions at all times while riding to and from school. Most importantly, we require all students, parents and staff to WEAR A HELMET. Students who ride their bikes to school within Nichada Thani are expected to follow guidelines for safe riding. These include:

• • • • •

• •

Use bike lanes at all times. Zebra crossings are in place for pedestrians’ and cyclists’ safe passage. Pay attention when using them. Take extra care when rounding corners. Riding bikes through the school parking lot when buses are arriving in the morning or departing in the afternoon is not permitted. Once on campus, students should “walk” their bikes through the parking lot to one of the two bike racks on campus where the bikes should be secured with locks. Bikes are NOT PERMITTED on any part of the ISB campus except the designated parking areas. Bikes should not be left on campus overnight. WEAR A HELMET

PARENT TEACHER AUXILIARY (PTA) ISB has a very active Parent Teacher Auxiliary. The Elementary School Coordinators are members of the General PTA Board and in turn, chair the Elementary branch of this organization, otherwise known as the ES PTA. Through the ES PTA, many parents serve the Elementary School as volunteers. Activities may include welcoming new parents, assisting teachers with class activities, supervising on field trips, providing refreshments for class parties, assisting with fund raisers, and assisting the administration with parent related activities. Parents are also welcome to contribute to and enjoy the PTA publication entitled Touchstone, which is sent out to the parent community quarterly. Our Booster Club purpose is to promote and encourage school spirit in all three schools. Activities include special events in conjunction with HS sporting events and weekly sales of school spirit items at the Booster Cart. They have a unique collection of ISB clothing in small sizes, especially for our young students. If you have any questions or concerns, please email the ES Coordinators at escoord@isb.ac.th

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SUPPORT SERVICES ELEMENTARY COUNSELING CENTER ISB’s Elementary School Counseling Center is staffed by two full time counselors. One counselor is dedicated to serving our Pre-K-Grade 2 students, parents and teachers while the other serves the students, parents and teachers of Grades 3-5. We also have an EducationalPsychologist on staff. Our comprehensive counseling program includes: Orientation and Transition It is our goal to ensure that each new student has a smooth transition to ISB. Welcoming new students and their parents, providing them with an orientation of our Elementary School, and supporting each student’s adjustment to his/her new environment comprise the foundation that we build upon to make certain that each student succeeds socially and academically. Classroom guidance lessons Our comprehensive guidance program focuses on activities and lessons that are consistent with identified student needs. To this end, we conduct formal and informal assessments to determine these needs and priorities as perceived by students and staff. Small group counseling A variety of small group counseling activities occur throughout the year which focus on issues that include academic and social development. Individual counseling Our counselors provide an environment that is conducive to students communicating freely and openly with them. Within this environment we strive to know each student as an individual providing them with the tools to overcome academic challenges, maintain a positive self-image, and utilize problem solving strategies. Teacher and parent consultation Collaborating with teachers and parents in a unified approach to find the most effective methods to help each child reach his/her academic potential is the cornerstone of our program. Always operating with the best interest of the student in mind, we work together to help each child achieve academic and social success. Parent presentations and workshops Parent presentations and workshops are given on a wide array of educational issues designed to help parents become familiar with special topics of interest, and our programs and services, all with the aim of better serving each child and strengthening the bond between home and school.


ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL) The English as an Additional Language Program has been designed to meet the needs of students who speak a language other than English. The primary goal is to develop language skills, which will allow children to be successful in their academic work as well as in everyday communication. The EAL teachers go into each EAL student’s homeroom class on a regular basis to provide classroom support for EAL students. Our EAL faculty also provides English for Academic Purposes (EAP) classes, which focus on grade-level curriculum. The purpose of these EAP classes is to develop the competencies, coping strategies, and thinking skills necessary for success in the child’s homeroom class. The EAL teachers collaborate with homeroom teachers to plan grade level support and align EAP classes with grade-level curriculum. The EAL teachers and homeroom teachers work together to plan grade-level units for all students, which incorporate special teaching strategies for EAL students; develop assessments.

LEARNING SUPPORT The Learning Support Program (LS) assists students with learning difficulties to function more successfully in the homeroom classroom. The classroom teacher and learning support teacher collaborate to use a variety of strategies which enable students to increase in skill level while meeting their individual goals. Individual Education Plans (IEP’s) are sometimes developed to assist students in meeting their learning goals at ISB. This LS support can be delivered in a variety of models (in-class and out of class), depending upon the level of intervention that is needed.

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE A speech and language teacher is located in the Elementary School. The therapist works with children who are experiencing speech or language difficulties related to their native language, and is responsible for hearing screenings, testing and diagnosis of speech and language disorders, making recommendations for therapy and implementing therapy when necessary.


EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES The school offers a variety of extra-curricular activities during the school year. Activities may include: Australian Rules Football archery basketball chess clay cooking

dodge ball lego challenge little gym (pre-K) mosaic craft painting Scouts

soccer Tae Kwon Do Toy making volleyball and many other activities

The school provides late bus service for students who participate in any of these activities. See the section on Transportation for further information. Students who are involved in extra-curricular activities and do not take the late bus are to be picked up immediately after their activity is completed. We stress the importance of parental responsibility in this matter and work with parents to insure that their children arrive home at a reasonable hour given the nature of traffic in Bangkok. The After School Activities Booklet, published on-line (http://www.isb.ac.th/ES_After_School_Activities/default.aspx ) early in each semester, provides detailed descriptions and schedules of activities offered.


Elementary BISAC Athletics Teams Philosophy: We believe that at the U-11 level our BISAC athletic teams should be inclusive – that all students who try-out, attend all practices and display sportsmanship and effort during games should play on our BISAC teams and represent ISB. While we will strive to be competitive, we will ensure that all students receive equal playing time and opportunities to learn and grow through differentiated teams based on appropriate skill and development levels. There could be situations where due to large numbers of students, we are unable to enter all students in the tournament, however, we will do our best to accommodate as much as possible. Our boys and girls participate in the Bangkok International Schools Athletics Conference sports league in the following sports: • Cross-country running • Basketball • Soccer • Track and Field • T-Ball • Swimming (run by Panther Swim Club) • Gymnastics (run by Panther Gym Club) The BISAC competitions are structured at the U-11 level with a Cup, Plate and Bowl divisions, with each school allowed to enter one competing team per division. BISAC (Bangkok International Schools Athletics Conference) U11 Eligibility: • Open to students in Grades 3-5 ISB eligibility for BISAC Teams: • Open to students in Grades 4-5 only (in line with the majority of BISAC schools) • Parents of students who are in Grade 3 may ask for an exception to play on a BISAC Team. This exception must be made in writing by the child’s parent and could be granted by the Elementary Principal in consultation with the BISAC Coordinator and possible input from ES PE teachers.


TRANSPORTATION BUS Student school bus service is available through the school’s bus provider, Montri Transport Corporation, and should be applied for at the time of enrollment. Elementary children should return home immediately after school on the 2.15 p.m. buses unless they have a school sponsored activity to attend. Students riding on school buses are expected to obey the monitors and are expressly forbidden to behave in a manner that could endanger the safety of the other passengers or distract the driver. The school Transportation Office issues copies of student behavior regulations at the time of enrollment. A copy of these regulations is included on the back of this form. Parents will be notified of any violations. For serious misconduct or second offenses, students will be restricted from riding the bus for a period of time. In extreme cases, students may be restricted from using the bus service for the entire semester or year. Students who wish to ride on another bus to visit or stay overnight with a friend must have a note from their parents. Under NO circumstances will students be permitted to ride on a different bus without a note. Children who have not signed up for regular bus transportation may not ride the bus home with a friend without prior arrangement and payment with the Transportation Office for the bus trip. Parents volunteering at or visiting the school may ride the bus if prior arrangements are made and space is available. In addition to regular bus routes in the morning and at school dismissal time, there are activity buses provided at 3.30 p.m. for students who remain after school for school sponsored activities. Students who take part in regularly scheduled activities such as the Beginning Band and Strings Programs, the Thai Native Language Instruction Program, the After School Activities Program, and the Elementary School Choir will be provided with home drop-off services. Elementary students may not ride the (5:00pm) top of the soi drop-off activity buses unless accompanied by middle school or high school siblings and with prior parental permission.

Student Bus Behavior Expectations Students using the school buses shall conduct themselves at all times in a manner which reflects credit upon themselves, their school and their country. Students must comply with the following rules at all times:

1. Only students regularly assigned to the school bus for a specific route and schedule may ride the bus. No exceptions will be made except by written order of the Transportation Supervisor.

2. Students shall show proper respect for the Thai Monitors and follow their directions.

3. Bus passes shall be shown upon the request of the Thai Monitors. 4. After boarding the bus the students shall take their seats immediately, fasten seat belts and remain seated while the bus is in motion.

5. Students shall not be in the driver’s area, on or around the driver’s seat or the bus controls nor block the vision of the driver in any manner.


6. In the process of off loading, the students shall remain seated until the bus comes to a complete stop. Students will get on or off the bus at the predesignated point only.

7. Students shall not open the doors and /or windows of the bus at any time. 8. Students shall keep books, lunch boxes and other objects out of the bus aisles and off the seats.

9. Students shall keep their heads, arms, hands, feet and legs inside the bus at all times.

10. While on the bus students shall not participate in: a. Fighting, wrestling or “rough housing”. b. Smoking, eating or drinking. c. Using vulgar or abusive language, yelling or loud and boisterous talking. d. Throwing object in or out of the bus. e. Marring, defacing, or causing damage to the bus or its equipment. 11. Students shall board and leave the bus in an orderly manner. 12. Seats shall not be “saved” for another student. Specifically the placing of books in a seat does not reserve it.

13. After arrival at school, the students shall not leave the campus nor loiter around the gates.

14. Affectionate behavior aboard a school bus may result in loss of school bus privilege. Violations of the above regulations shall result in notification of the parents. For serious misconduct or second offenses, students will be restricted from riding the bus for a period of time. In extreme cases, students may be restricted from using the bus service for the entire semester or school year. For further information, contact ISBs Transportation Office on 02-963-5884.


Section Three Elementary School Quick Reference Guide and Calendar


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Below is a list of some topics and activities and the appropriate contact people and/or phone numbers, which you might find useful. Much information is contained in the ELEMENTARY SCHOOL INFORMATION HANDBOOK; however, this Reference is provided as a guide on how to find additional or more specific information. It should be emphasized that the most important contact person for you as a parent will be your child’s teacher(s). If you want more information or have concerns about your son’s or daughter’s initial progress and adjustment, teacher(s) are the one(s) to communicate with, and they will welcome your inquiries and partnership throughout the school year. Additionally, any questions you may have about the classroom or grade level program and issues relating to the student’s learning should be directed to the homeroom teacher. The following telephone numbers all begin with the prefix 02-963-5800, followed by the extension.

Topic/Activities Absences/Attendance Activities Buses Address Change Administration Admission Advertising Annual Fund/Donations Aquatics Building/Facilities Bus Passes Chevron Theatre Clubs/Youth Organizations Community Sports Program Counseling Services Curriculum Discipline Policy & Issues Elementary After School Activities Facilities Use (Sports) Food Services ID Card Instrumental Lesson, Instrumental Rental Leaving Campus Before End of School Learning Hub Montri Bus Company Newsletter Submission Health Information PTA Photocopying/Printing Psychological Services (Pre-K to Gr 5) School Board Meeting School Calendar School Records – Preparation & Check out

School Supplies/PE Uniforms Sport/Athletics Substitute Teaching Visitor’s Pass Tuition/Billings Tutoring Withdrawal from School

Contact ES Office, Ext. 5502, Ext. 5504, Ext. 5505 Khun Suthida, Transportation Office, Ext.7704 Khun Thiti-ornn, Business Office, Ext. 1121, ES Office, Ext. 5502, 5504

Kelly Armitage Ext. 5502; Diana Drummond Ext. 5504 Wendy vanBramer/Susan Bates, Admissions Main Office, Ext. 1125

Tony Arnold, Director of Marketing, Ext. 1170, Ext.1153 Tony Arnold, Director of Marketing, Ext. 1170, Ext.1153 Ext. 6604 Khun Natchalai, Building and Grounds Office, Ext. 7702 Khun Suthida, Transportation Office, Ext. 7704 & 7706 Khun Sathit, Ext. 8807 Kerri Fitzgerald, Activities Office, Ext. 8801 Andy Vaughan, Athletics Office, Ext. 6612 Pre-K-Gr.2 Kate Kersey, Gr.3-5 Doug Williamson, Counseling Office, Ext. 5507

Bronwyn Weale, Ext. 4409; Elizabeth Rossini, Curric.Office, Ext. 4421

Kelly Armitage Ext. 5502; Diana Drummond Ext. 5504 Livnat Ziskinder, Ext. 5537 Khun Siwinee (Khun Kae), Athletics Office, Ext. 6613 Epicure Catering Co., Ltd. - Michelle Ihrig Ext. 7728 New ID-Admissions Office Ext.1125-1126; Lost ID–Cashier Ext. 1121

Community Activities Office (Khun Fon) Ext. 1191 ES Office, Ext. 5502, Ext. 5504 Nat Whitman Ext. 5509, 5510 02-517-9203;02-906-0160-5 Khun Tina, ES Office, Ext. 5502 Nurses’ Office, Ext. 1129, 1143 Ext. 1140 Printshop, Ext. 7714 Cindy Warner-Dobrowski, , Ext. 5574; Ext. 4451 Head of School Office, Ext. 1102 Activities Office, Ext. 8803 Khun Tina, ES Office, Ext. 5502 Khun Bon, Bookstore, Ext. 1130; K. Ann Ext. 1114 Khun Siwinee (Khun Kae), Athletics Office, Ext. 6613 Khun Kaew, MS Office, Ext. 4405 Entrance Front Gate, Ext. 7705 Khun Thiti-ornn, Business Office, Ext. 1121 Counseling Office, Ext. 5507 Khun Tina, ES Office, Ext. 5502

Calendar


AN EXPLANATION OF THAI HOLIDAYS 23 October 2013 – CHULALONGKORN DAY (October Break No School) Chulalongkorn Day celebrates the date of death of the great fifth King of the Chakri Dynasty. King Chulalongkorn passed away in 1910. Thousands of people place floral tributes and incense at the foot of his statue located in front of the National Assembly Hall. 5 December 2013 – H.M. KING’S BIRTHDAY (No School) The King’s Birthday is observed and celebrated throughout the Kingdom with colorful pageantry. There is a parade of Royal Guards pledging their Oath of Allegiance to His Majesty the King. For three days public buildings as well as stores and private homes are decorated with spectacular lighting displays. 10 December 2013 – CONSTITUTION DAY Constitution Day commemorates Thailand’s first constitution granted by the last absolute monarch, King Prachatthipok (Rama VII), on 10 December 1932. A year or two after the event, this date was declared a nationwide public holiday. The Kingdom continues to observe this holiday despite the changes in government. 14 February 2014 – MAKA BUCHA DAY (No School) This is the Buddhist Saint’s Day which takes place on the day of the full moon during the third lunar moth. This holy day commemorates a gathering of over 1200 disciples who met before the Lord Buddha without prior summons. Taking the opportunity of addressing this coincidental meeting, the Lord Buddha delivered his sermon summarizing his cardinal doctrines. To celebrate this day, Buddhists recite formulas in praise of the Triple Gems, and make a clockwise candle procession around the temple hall. 07 April 2014 – CHAKRI DAY (Substitute for April 6 no school for students and classified staff) This is the commemoration of the enthronement of King Rama I, who founded the present Chakri Dynasty in 1782. It is an important day in Thai history as it is an anniversary of the establishment of the Chakri Dynasty. It was King Rama I, commonly known as Phra Buddha Yod Fa, who moved the capital of Thailand across the Chao Phraya River from Thonburi to Bangkok. 13-16 April 2014 – SONGKRAN HOLIDAYS (No School) Songkran is known most widely for the throwing of water; however, the setting free of fish and birds is also an important part of the celebration. In observing this holiday, water is sprinkled on the Buddha’s image, on monks, and on parents and elders as a gesture of veneration. This festival is still widely observed throughout Thailand, but is at its best in Chiang Mai. 05 May 2014 – CORONATION DAY (No School) In this event Their Majesties, the King and Queen proceed to Royal Chapel to preside over the ceremony commemorating the anniversary of Coronation Day. 13 May 2014 – VISAKA BUCHA DAY This is one of the most important festivals of Buddhism. It takes place on the day of the full moon during the sixth lunar month and commemorates the triple episodes of the Birth, Enlightenment and passing into Nirvana of the Lord Buddha. There are candle processions in the monastery grounds with elaborate lanterns made for the occasion. Many participate in the procession making three clockwise trips around the main chapel.

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL BANGKOK

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Purit Todd Amatayakul Grade Four 2012-2013

IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS ADMINISTRATION Ms. Kelly Armitage ES Principal Ms. Diana Drummond ES Vice-Principal Elementary Office Ms. Kate Kersey ES Counselor Mr. Doug Williamson ES Counselor ES Counseling Office After School Emergency

PHONE 02-963-5898 02-963-5899 02-963-5898-99 02-963-5897 02-963-5897 02-963-5897 02-963-5800

Transportation Office

02-963-5854

Montri Transportation Parent Teacher Auxiliary

02-517-9203-5 02-963-5800 ext. 1140 02-963-5800

ISB Main Switchboard

ADMINISTRATION Dr. Andy Davies Mr. Graeme Scott Dr. Ugo Costessi Ms. Usa Somboon Mr. Andy Vaughan Ms. Wendy van Bramer Mr. Tony Arnold Mr. Chad Bates Ms. Elizabeth Rossini Ms. Bronwyn Weale Health Office

Head of School Deputy Head of School for Learning Deputy Head of School/CFO Headmistress Athletics Director Admissions Director Director of Marketing Director of Information Tech Director of Curriculum and Professional Learning PK-12 Curriculum and Learning Specialist 02-963-5800 Ext. 1129, 1143

PHONE 02-963-5801 02-963-5802 02-963-5803 02-963-5804 02-583-5435 02-963-5808 02-963-5882 02-963-5896 Ext. 4421 Ext. 4409

ISB Address: P.O. Box 20-1015 Ha Yaek Pakkret, Nonthaburi 11121, THAILAND TEL:66(0) 2963-5800, FAX: 66(0) 2583-5431 until 32 www.isb.ac.th

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2013-2014 ES Parent-Student Information