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Guide to IB the IB Diploma Year 12 - 13 September 2019 – June 2021

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Contents

ISB Mission Statement ................................................................................................................................................... 4 International Baccalaureate Organization Mission Statement ........................................................................................ 4 10 Reasons for choosing the IB ...................................................................................................................................... 4 The IB Learner Profile.................................................................................................................................................... 5 IB @ ISB ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6 Which subjects might you choose? ................................................................................................................................ 7 IB Option Selection Sheet ........................................................................................................................................ 10 What universities say about the IB ............................................................................................................................... 11 Some questions answered ............................................................................................................................................. 11 General information on the IBO ................................................................................................................................... 13 Individual Subject Information..................................................................................................................................... 14 Group 1 - Studies in Literature ................................................................................................................................. 14 English Language and Literature .......................................................................................................................... 14 English Literature ................................................................................................................................................. 15 Who is the course for? .................................................................................................................................................. 15 Turkish Literature ................................................................................................................................................. 16 School-Supported Self-taught Literature .............................................................................................................. 17 Group 2: Language Acquisition ............................................................................................................................... 19 English B .............................................................................................................................................................. 19 French B ............................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Spanish B .............................................................................................................................................................. 22 French Ab Initio ................................................................................................................................................... 24 Spanish Ab Initio .................................................................................................................................................. 25 Group 3: Individuals and Societies ........................................................................................................................... 26 Business and Management ................................................................................................................................... 26 Economics ............................................................................................................................................................ 27 Geography ............................................................................................................................................................ 28 History .................................................................................................................................................................. 30 Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) ........................................................................................... 30 Psychology ........................................................................................................................................................... 33 Group 4 – Experimental Sciences ............................................................................................................................ 35 Biology ................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Chemistry ............................................................................................................................................................. 36 Physics .................................................................................................................................................................. 37 Environmental Systems and Societies .................................................................................................................. 38 Group 5: Mathematics .............................................................................................................................................. 40 Mathematics Higher Level ................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Mathematics (Standard Level).............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Maths Studies ....................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Group 6: The Arts ..................................................................................................................................................... 40 Theatre .................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Visual Arts ............................................................................................................................................................ 46 The Award of the IB Diploma ...................................................................................................................................... 48 Conditions for the Award of a Diploma ................................................................................................................... 48 Failing Conditions .................................................................................................................................................... 48 A Bilingual Diploma ................................................................................................................................................ 48 Expectations of Sixth Form (IB) Students .................................................................................................................... 49

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ISB Mission Statement - Learn, Respect, Succeed The International School of Bucharest provides each student with a broad, balanced education in a safe and supportive environment. We promote an enjoyment of learning, creativity and excellence whilst working in close harmony with our diverse community. We enable students to reach their full potential and develop skills to become independent, respectful and caring adults who will be successful and contribute to global society.

International Baccalaureate Organization Mission Statement “The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.” [http://www.ibo.org/about-the-ib/mission/]

10 Reasons for choosing the IB 1. It Increases academic opportunity • IB Diploma students are more likely to gain entry to top-level universities and are more likely to see their studies through to completion. • The IB Diploma is recognized and welcomed by universities around the globe. 2. IB Students care about more than just results • IB Diploma students learn about themselves and others through their CAS activities. • The IB Diploma encourages students to develop emotionally and ethically as well as academically. 3. It encourages you to become a confident and independent learner • Through the Extended Essay and coursework requirements, students develop the essential skills required to direct their own learning. 4. The IB encourages critical thinking • Theory of Knowledge, and the approaches to learning used within the subjects, encourages students to think critically about the world around them and analyse and evaluate issues and consider new and alternative perspectives. 5. Graduates are globally minded • Through continued study of additional languages and through the incorporation of International Mindedness into course planning, students are well able to take their place, confidently and successfully, in a globalized world. 6. It’s an international qualification • Universities and employers across the globe recognize and value the skills developed by studying the IB Diploma. 7. DP students have proven time management skills • IB students have well-developed study habits and time management which they take with them to further education and their future careers.

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8. It assesses more than examination techniques • The IB requires students to understand their subjects and demonstrate that knowledge in a range of ways both within formal traditional exams and through coursework and assignments. 9. Subjects are not taught in isolation • Connections are drawn from and between all of their subjects. IB students understand how their learning in one field can benefit their understanding in another. 10. It encourages breadth and depth of learning. • Students study 6 subjects with 3 at Higher Level and 3 at Standard level as well as Theory of Knowledge.

The IB Learner Profile The IB learner profile is the IB mission statement translated into a set of learning outcomes for the 21st century. The learner profile provides a long-term vision of education. It is a set of ideals that can inspire, motivate and focus the work of schools and teachers, uniting them in a common purpose. IB learners strive to be . . .

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IB @ ISB The IB Diploma is a prestigious international pre-university qualification and is recognised by universities and governments throughout the world. It has been in existence since 1968 and the IB Diploma Programme is now taken by over 150,000 students annually. The IB Diploma Programme, as reflected in its mission statement, also reflects the mission statement of ISB, its aims and our philosophy. It is a two-year course of study for students aged between sixteen and nineteen and is designed to be broad, comprehensive and academically demanding. All IB Diploma students take six subjects and therefore maintain a breadth of study across a range of disciplines similar to that experienced in Key Stage 4. In addition to this, IB students study those subjects in much greater depth. For these reasons, it is best suited to students who are highly motivated and committed to serious study. Indeed, motivation, organisation and hard work could be said to be the prime pre-requisites for successful study at this level. Learning how to learn, and to evaluate information critically, is an important part of the IB Diploma programme. Emphasis is placed on this through the Theory of Knowledge course but more importantly is an integral part of each subject’s curriculum. This emphasis on critical thinking skills sets the IB Diploma apart from other post-16 qualifications. In addition, students have sufficient flexibility of choice in their subjects to allow them to follow their interests, whilst the deliberate combination of breadth and depth equips students with the skills and attitudes they require for higher education or employment. The students’ programmes help to engender international understanding and responsible citizenship. The international education gained through studying for an IB Diploma at ISB recognises that we are all part of a globalised and integrated world and is designed to equip these young adults with an education that allows them to live and to succeed in this rapidly changing environment. Fully trained specialist teachers in all subjects ensure students have the best opportunity to succeed in their chosen course of study. In deciding to study the IB at ISB, students will take a fully integrated and active part in the life of the school. There are many opportunities to take on leadership roles through the Eco-schools initiative, class representatives and the Prefect system and to develop their own projects through CAS which can also be linked to work towards the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. We want our Sixth Form students to see themselves as student leaders and as key stakeholders in our school. ISB will help them find opportunities for personal growth and development, alongside their academic progress. It is simply up to our students to grasp these opportunities for themselves. Building on our experience in supporting and guiding students through their applications to universities around the world, university counselling will remain a fundamental part of the programme in Year 12 and 13. University fairs, overseas trips and visiting speakers all form part of this essential support mechanism and our past success speaks for itself. The IB Diploma provides the school and our students a unique opportunity to build an educational experience which really does leave our students ready to face the world.

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Which subjects might you choose? The Diploma Model

The Diploma Model visualises the subject requirements for the IB Diploma programme. Students select one subject from each group, three of these at Higher Level (HL) and three at Standard Level (SL). However, there is an exception to this: You may select two subjects from Groups 3 or 4 and choose not to take an Arts subject from Group 6. This is made clear in the Options Choices form which accompanies this booklet. For example, if you do not wish to study an Arts subject, you may choose to take Chemistry in Group 6 as well as your first Science (say Physics) in Group 4. Higher Level subjects are different to Standard Level subjects in three principal ways:  They are broader in scope  They are studied to greater depth  This makes them more challenging in their content  So the questions asked in examinations are more demanding. Each Higher Level subject is studied for 5 lessons each week while a Standard level course is studied for only 3 lessons each week. The IB Diploma is a 2-year course, so there are no external examinations taken during Year 12. All exams are take n during a 3-week period in May of Year 13. There is a mixture of internal and external assessments which count towards the final grades and the internal assessment tasks will be spread throughout the course to help students in their time-management and planning. The results of the IB Diploma are published each year at the start of July, well in time for university entry requirements.

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At ISB, the subjects offered are as follows: Group

Name of Group

Subjects

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Studies in Literature

English Literature English Language and Literature Turkish Literature School-Supported SelfTaught Literature(1) English Language B French Language B French ab Initio(2 Spanish Language B Spanish ab initio(2) Business & Management Economics Geography History Information Technology for the Global Society (ITGS) Psychology Biology Chemistry Environmental Systems & Societies (ESS) Physics Analysis and Approaches Applications and Interpretation Theatre Visual Arts

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3

Language Acquisition,

Individuals and Societies (3)

4

Experimental Sciences

5

Mathematics

6

The Arts

(3)

Higher Level  

Standard Level  

 

 

     

 

 

  

   

 

 

 

 

Students may follow a self-directed course of study in exceptional circumstances ab initio – ‘from the start’ i.e. no prior knowledge of the language (3) There are 2 routes for Mathematics at both Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) (1) (2)

Theory of Knowledge (TOK) The TOK course enables the student to ask fundamental questions about ‘knowledge’ and its role in our society. The course is almost entirely made up of questions such as ‘How do we acquire knowledge?’ or ‘How do I know that a proof is true?’ The course is designed to make students think and challenge ideas and preconceptions in a critical way. The TOK course is central to the entire Diploma programme and a dedicated TOK teacher will teach the course. Each subject teacher will be highlighting the relevance of TOK in his/her subject.

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The Extended Essay The four thousand word Extended Essay is compulsory and is another one of the core elements of the IB course. Its purpose is to develop the skills of critical research and independent study that will be required for higher education. A topic of interest, preferably one that will be studied later at university, should be chosen. A teacher will be assigned to each student to help and advise the students as they produce the final version of the essay. More information can be found in the Extended Essay handbook, a copy of which is issued to all IB students in January of year 12.

Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) The CAS programme aims to challenge, extend and build all IB students’ spirit of discovery as well as their interests and self-reliance. In order to complete the IB Diploma, a student must carry out a range of activities, covering the three strands and reflect on each of these. A failure to do so will result in the Diploma not being awarded. A student working towards their Duke of Edinburgh’s Award will be able to use the same activities for both CAS and the DofE. The school offers a wide range of CAS activities throughout the school year, mostly through the weekly activities programme. However, it is expected that many CAS activities will also take place outside of school hours. School holidays are another good time to take part in CAS. Due to the fact that many important IB assessments and deadlines take place in Year 13, it is advisable to take part in as many CAS activities as possible in Year 12. Creativity Creativity is the strand in which students generally take part in activities connected to the visual or performing arts. It is not strictly an arts course and could include projects like web design or organising advertising campaigns and producing posters for fundraising campaigns. Activity The Activity strand is associated with physical exercise and outdoor activities. It might include taking up a new sport or developing skills in a sport you already participate in. The weekly PE lesson can be used to help in this strand. Service Service can include community service and work within the school. It can also be much more than this. Students may find themselves teaching dance or sports to younger students, helping local children at an orphanage or working on environmental projects. Although these three strands make up CAS, they are not mutually exclusive and are, in fact, closely interwoven. Many activities or projects could provide opportunities in all three strands. Before starting any new CAS activity, students get the approval of the CAS coordinator and ensure that an adult is willing to supervise their activity. On completion of each CAS activity, students fill in the standard forms that will allow them to reflect upon their learning and achievements. A CAS log is completed over the two years which contain their plans and their reflections. The essence is to help the students understand the personal growth they are undertaking through this programme. The CAS Coordinator will check all logbooks periodically, but the student has the responsibility for completing the required number of hours in the right spirit.

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IB Option Selection Sheet (Draft) For the International Baccalaureate Diploma, students must choose 6 subjects, one from each Group in the table below. 3 subjects must be studied at Higher Level (HL) and 3 at Standard Level (SL) For each group, please write in the subject choice and also the level (HL or SL)

Choice 1 (Studies in Language and Literature) 2 (Language Acquisition)

3 (Individuals and Societies) 4 (Sciences) 5 (Studies in Mathematics) 6 (The Arts and Electives)

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1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

English Literature (HL Only) English Language and Literature (HL/SL) Turkish Literature (HL/SL) School Supported Self-Taught Literature (SL Only) English B (HL/SL) French B (HL/SL) French Ab Initio (SL Only) Spanish B (HL/SL) Spanish Ab Initio (SL Only) Business & Management (HL Only) Economics (HL/SL) Geography (HL/SL) Information Technology for the Global Society (ITGS) (HL/SL) Biology HL/SL Physics HL/SL Chemistry (SL Only) Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) (SL Only) Mathematics: Analysis and approaches (HL/SL) Mathematics: Applications and interpretation (HL/SL) Theatre (HL/SL) Visual Arts (HL/SL) Business & Management (SL Only) Chemistry (HL Only) History (HL/SL) Psychology (HL/SL)


What universities say about the IB The IB Diploma is recognised by universities around the world in more than 110 countries. Universities understand that the IB is a package which goes well beyond the academic disciplines. University admission offices know the considerable achievement of IB candidates across not only their three academically challenging Higher Level subjects, but also their three Standard Level subjects, the ToK course, the Extended Essay and CAS. Indeed, in university interviews, students can ‘stand out from the crowd’ by discussing their Extended Essay or their achievements in CAS. If you would like to see the requirements for British universities, it is simply a case of going to the ‘UCAS’ website: www.ucas.co.uk. To find the requirements for a particular course, simply go to the courses/undergraduate courses, select the university or subject of your choice, go to course details and click on IB qualification requirements. For other countries, go to the IB’s website www.ibo.org and click on ‘Diploma Programme’ then ‘University Recognition’. Given that most students in British schools only study three ‘A-Level’ subjects, each of which roughly equates to one Higher Level IB subject, it is clear the advantages that IB graduates enjoy over other graduates when it comes to gaining places at the top universities. A fairly typical offer from a UK university might be 30-34 points (see ‘How is the IB marked?’ below for an explanation of these ‘points’) which is about 5-6 points for each of the six subjects. Oxbridge might ask for around 38 points as well as a minimum of a grade 6 or possibly a 7 in a particular subject. Elsewhere in the world, you will find top-ranked universities with entry requirements ranging from simply passing (24 points) to 28 – 34 points.

Some questions answered Are there prerequisites for entry into the Diploma programme ISB? As a general rule, students wishing to enter the IB programme should have five IGCSE passes of A* to C or the equivalent, and at least a grade B in each subject to be studied at Higher Level. (Of course, for some subjects, it is not necessary to have studied it at IGCSE level to be accepted into the course.) Can I change subjects if I find I don’t like a particular subject? Students are advised to choose subjects very carefully and consider the level at which they are studied realistically. Changing subjects on a whim is unacceptable. Changes at the end of the induction at the start of the year are accepted, special cases only will be considered up to October half term. How many periods per week does the Diploma programme take? HL subjects will take 5 lessons and SL subjects 3. Hence, academic subjects take a total of 24 lessons per week. ToK will take 2 lessons per week. In addition to this, all IB students will take part in 1 lessons of PE each week and one for guidance and support. Hence, from the available 30 periods per week you will be occupied for 28, giving you 2 periods of ‘independent study’ where you will be able to work in the Common Room or Library. In year 13, TOK only takes 1 lesson per week until February so there will be up to 4 lessons per week of study time within the school day. The Extended Essay should take around 40 hours in total and is finished in November of your second IB year. CAS activities usually take around 2-3 hours per week and run until March of your second IB year.

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How much private study should I do? This, of course, depends on many factors such as how conscientious you are, how quickly you work, how efficient you are in your study habits, how much reading around a subject you wish to do, and so on. However, as a general rule of thumb, if you wish to be successful in the IB Diploma you will expect to spend around 3 hours per week of private study for each HL subject, and 2 hours for each SL subject. How much coursework is there? All IB courses have a coursework component, but the relative importance of coursework in contributing to your final grade varies from subject to subject. It is common for coursework to contribute 25% towards your final grade, with the final exams taking up the other 75% (though it is considerably different for Arts subjects). Some subjects, in particular the languages but also ToK, place considerable importance on oral presentations, as opposed to written assignments. Your teachers will explain the assessment requirements clearly to you at the beginning of the course. How is the IB Diploma marked? The IB exams take place at the end of the second year (May) and last for approximately three weeks. The maximum time for HL exams is 5 hours and 3 hours for SL exams, and most subjects have two separate papers, though some have three. The final results are published in early July and students can access these via a secure website using a PIN given to students in advance. In each subject you can gain a score of 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest). The maximum for 6 subjects is therefore 6 x 7 = 42 points. There are an extra 3 points available for good performance in a combination of the Theory of Knowledge course and the Extended Essay. Hence, the total score possible is 45. Usually a minimum of 24 points gains you the Diploma, though there are some technical ‘failing conditions’ as well (for example you may not score a grade 2 in a HL subject – please refer to the section ‘The Award of the IB Diploma’ at the end of this booklet). The average score globally is 30 points. Exam papers and the subject guides are written by teams of experienced IB examiners and teachers. Each team has members from many continents and cultures; to ensure the courses are kept relevant, each subject undergoes a stringent review process every seven years. Why take the IB Diploma? Is it hard work? Yes! Is it worth it? Yes! Many students around the world gain entry to university with A levels or other qualifications. However, the IB Diploma, rather than being a ‘key’ to open doors to local universities, provides you with a ‘passport’ with which you can ‘travel the world’ and decide on a university of your choice from almost anywhere in the world! Other than this major benefit, the IB Diploma course is also excellent preparation for life after school. With its international outlook and emphasis, students gain an understanding and appreciation of different cultures and ways of thinking, which fosters intercultural understanding and exposes you to various points of view. The individual courses place an emphasis on critical, ‘higher order’ thinking rather than ‘rote learning’ and demand that students take responsibility for their own learning. Students become very proficient at forming their own opinions and being able to back them up! It provides a challenging and solid education as well as a foundation for a lifetime of learning. The IB Mission Statement at the beginning of this booklet reflects the philosophy and beliefs of ISB. International education is a way of thinking that transcends national boundaries. In the words of a former director general of the IBO, Roger Peel: ‘…the honesty of the IB stems from the fact that we require all students to relate first to their own national identity – their own language, literature, history and cultural heritage – no matter where in the world this may be. Beyond that we ask that they identify with the corresponding traditions of others. It is not expected 12


that they adopt alien points of view, merely that they are exposed to them and encouraged to respond intelligently. The end result, we hope, is a more compassionate population, a welcome manifestation of national diversity within an international framework of mutual respect. Ideally, at the end of the IB experience, students should know themselves better than when they started, while acknowledging that others can be right in being different.’ There is a wider range of abilities in students taking the Diploma than you might imagine. The very few (around 50 students each year worldwide) who gain the maximum 45 points are very able indeed, but there are many far less academically able students who successfully gain the Diploma with a score of 24 points or more. The secret is no surprise: hard work!

General information on the IBO

The International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) is an educational, not-for-profit, Swiss foundation which was registered in 1968 by a group of educationalists with funding from UNESCO, the Ford Foundation and others. It arose from the efforts of teachers in a group of international schools who wanted to develop a shared academic experience, critical thinking and intercultural understanding amongst young people. The IBO now administers four programmes in international education: the Primary Years Programme – PYP – for 3 to 11 year olds, the Middle Years Programme – MYP – for 11 to 16 year olds, and for Sixth Form students, the IB Diploma Programme and the Career-Related Programme. At ISB we are only offering the Diploma programme and have no plans to introduce any others. The three official languages of the IBO are English, French and Spanish, and exams are held around the world in these three languages, depending on which language the school is officially registered in. (ISB is obviously registered in English.) The number of students following IB programmes around the world is growing by about 10% per year – the actual demand is higher but the IB wants to limit its growth to around this figure! There are several hundred employees in the IBO working in around 15 offices around the world, with the main ‘curriculum and assessment centre’ based in very impressive facilities in Cardiff, Wales. The ‘headquarters’ are based in Geneva, Switzerland. The official IBO website www.ibo.org provides more information on the organisation and courses offered. Searching for ‘IB’ on your search engine will lead you to many more unofficial IB sites. If you would like to find out more about the IB Diploma programme at ISB, please contact Yusuf Orhan (our Diploma Programme Coordinator) by e-mail (yusuf.orhan@isb.ro)).

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Individual Subject Information. Group 1 - Studies in Literature English Language and Literature

Who is the course for? With the purpose of encouraging students to explore the place of English within society and its influence, English Language and Literature A is designed for students who have studied First Language English and English Literature at IGCSE. What is the content of the course? The course is divided into three parts: Readers, writers and texts Non-literary texts are chosen from a variety of sources and media to represent as wide a range of text types as possible, and works are chosen from a variety of literary forms. The study of the non-literary texts and works focuses on the nature of language and communication and the nature of literature and its study. This study includes the investigation of how texts themselves operate as well as the contexts and complexities of production and reception. Focus is on the development of personal and critical responses to the particulars of communication. Time and space Non-literary texts and literary works are chosen from a variety of sources, literary forms and media that reflect a range of historical and/or cultural perspectives. Their study focuses on the contexts of language use and the variety of ways literary and non-literary texts might both reflect and shape society at large. The focus is on the consideration of personal and cultural perspectives, the development of broader perspectives, and an awareness of the ways in which context is tied to meaning. Intertextuality: connecting texts Non-literary texts and literary works are chosen from a variety of sources, literary forms and media in a way that allows students an opportunity to extend their study and make fruitful comparisons. Their study focuses on intertextual relationships with possibilities to explore various topics, thematic concerns, generic conventions, modes or literary traditions that have been introduced throughout the course. The focus is on the development of critical response grounded in an understanding of the complex relationships among texts. How is the course assessed? At Standard Level, the course is assessed through two examinations: Paper 1, Guided Textual Analysis and paper 2, Textual Comparison. There is also an Individual Oral Contribution. At Higher Level, students sit Paper 1, Guided Textual Analysis and paper 2, Textual Comparison, the Individual Oral Contribution and write an essay of 1,200 to 1,500 words.

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English Literature

‘my books were always my friends, let fail all else.’ -Joshua Slocum. Who is the course for? The course is designed to increase the knowledge and appreciation of literature and to foster a life-long love of the subject. It is suitable for anyone who enjoys reading and who is intrigued by the concerns and conditions we share as human beings; universal concerns shared by generations of writers. What is the course content? The course is designed in such a way that students study a wide range of literature from different times, cultures and traditions. HL students study 13 works of literature; SL students study 10. The course is divided into four parts: Part One: Works in translation SL students study 2 (HL 3) works originally written in a language other than English. The works studied come from a range of cultures and encourage reflection and discussion on ideas from different cultural and social traditions. Possible writers include Chekov, Tolstoy and Kundera. Part Two: Detailed Study This part of the course encourages the study of writers who have made a significant contribution to English literature (HL: 3 works; SL: 2 works). Possible writers include William Shakespeare, Maya Angelou, Grace Nicholls, Wilfred Owen and Ted Hughes. Part Three: Literary genres- Prose SL students study 3 novels by different authors from a range of time periods and cultures, HL 4. Possible authors include Charlotte Bronte, George Orwell, Arundhati Roy, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Margaret Atwood. Part Four: Options The school has free choice to choose texts from different forms and genres that suit the aptitudes and interests of the students taking the course (HL: 4 works; SL: 3 works). Possible writers include John Steinbeck, Tennessee Williams, Harper Lee, Oscar Wilde and Thomas Hardy. How is the course assessed? The course is assessed using a combination of examination and coursework. Students sit two examinations at the end of Year 13, accounting for 45% of their grade. Written coursework accounts for a further 25%. Both the examinations and the coursework are externally assessed: The remaining 30% is oral assessment in different forms, including individual presentations and group discussions. These are assessed internally by the teacher and moderated by the IB.

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Turkish Literature

Who is the course for? This course is designed for students who have experience of using the language of the course in an academic context. The language background of such students, however, is likely to vary considerably— from monolingual students to students with more complex language profiles. The study of texts, both literary and non-literary, provides a focus for developing an understanding of how language works to create meanings in a culture, as well as in particular texts. All texts may be understood according to their form, content, purpose and audience, and through the social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts that produce and value them. Responding to, and producing, texts promotes an understanding of how language sustains or challenges ways of thinking and being. Group 1 courses are designed to support future academic study by developing a high social, aesthetic and cultural literacy, as well as effective communication skills. While there is significant difference in the texts presented for study in the three courses, they will clearly overlap somewhat. What is the content of the course? Turkish Literature is a flexible course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus. • Part 1: Works in translation, Study of three works in translation from the prescribed literature in translation (Prescribed literature in translation - PLT) list. • Part 2: Detailed study, Study of three works, each of a different genre (one of which must be poetry), chosen from the prescribed list of authors (Prescribed list of authors - PLA). • Part 3: Literary genres, Study of four works of the same genre, chosen from the (Prescribed list of authors - PLA). • Part 4: Options, Study of three works freely chosen How is the course assessed? Assessment component External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Guided literary analysis (1 hour 30 minutes) The paper consists of two passages: one prose and one poetry. Students choose one and write a guided literary analysis in response to two questions. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 30 minutes) The paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied in part 3. (25 marks) Written assignment Students submit a reflective statement and literary essay on one work studied in part 1. (25 marks) The reflective statement must be 300–400 words in length. The essay must be 1,200–1,500 words in length. Internal assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral commentary (10 minutes) Students present a formal oral commentary and answer subsequent questions on an extract from a work studied in part 2. (30 marks) Individual oral presentation (10–15 minutes) The presentation is based on works studied in part 4. It is internally assessed and externally moderated through the part 2 internal assessment task. (30 marks) 16

Weighting 70% 20% 25%

25%

30% 15% 15%


School-Supported Self-taught Literature

The IB Diploma by its very nature appeals to a wide variety of students in many different educational circumstances. One of the unique aspects of the diploma is the ability to self-study your own A1 language. This is available in special circumstances where a class is not available due to low numbers, or the unavailability of a teacher. It is a timetabled class and you will be assigned a teacher who will guide you through the work required and help you develop your skills in literary analysis. Please be aware that this teacher will not be able to mark any of your assignments so it is strongly advised that you secure a tutor outside of school who will be able to help you with this. Such tutors can support you from overseas via the internet. This course should only be taken by students who have a first language other than English or Turkish. Furthermore, the student must have a strong educational background in this language. It is not sufficient that the language is merely the spoken language at home. You will be required to read novels, poems and plays in this language and produce lengthy essays and commentaries on these works. Standard Level (Self-Taught Candidates.) The Standard Level syllabus for self-taught candidates is divided into four compulsory parts. Total Number of works: 11 (6 in the language being studied & 5 World Literature works) Part 1. Works in Translation (2 works) Students choose 2 works from the Prescribed list of Literature in Translation (PLT) The works studied come from a range of cultures and encourage reflection and discussion on ideas from different cultural and social traditions. Possible writers include Chekov, Tolstoy and Kundera. Part 2. Detailed Study (2 Works) This part of the course encourages the study of writers who have made a significant contribution to literature in the chosen language. Students study 2 works of different genres. Part 3. Literary Genres (3 Works) Three works in the language being studied chosen from the same genre category from authors included on the PLA. Each work by a different author Part 4. Student’s Free Choice (3 Works) Students have the freedom to choose 3 works which suit their interests and abilities. Choosing Works A Work In the programme, a work is broadly defined and includes items such as: • • • • • • 17

A single major text Two or more shorter texts A selection of short stories A selections of poems A selections of essays A selection of letters


Prescribed List of Authors (PLA) The PLA consists only of works originally written in the language being studied. There is a different PLA for every language offered within the IB. Prescribed list of Literature in Translation (PLT) Only the specified works listed for an author may be studied, other works by the same author may not be chosen. Single Author Choices Although authors may not be repeated within a part of the syllabus the same author may be studied in two different parts of the syllabus.

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Group 2: Language Acquisition English B Who is the course for?

Language B is a language acquisition course for students with some background in the target language. While acquiring a language, students will explore the culture(s) connected to it. The focus of these courses is language acquisition and intercultural understanding. The language B syllabus approaches the learning of language through meaning. Students build the necessary skills to reach the assessment objectives of the language B course through the expansion of their receptive, productive and interactive skills. What is the content of the course? Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B and language ab initio; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest. The five prescribed themes are: • identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet. The themes are prescribed, but the recommended topics and possible questions for each theme are not prescribed. The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP. Literature

Reading literature in the target language can be an enjoyable journey into the culture(s) studied. It will help students to broaden their vocabulary and to use language in a more creative manner, developing fluent reading skills, promoting interpretative and inferential skills, and contributing to intercultural understanding. Students are required to read two works of literature originally written in the target language. The term “literary works” refers to works of prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry and drama. HL students are expected to understand fundamental elements of the literary works studied, such as themes, plot and characters. It must be emphasized that literary criticism is not an objective of the language B course; literary criticism lies within the remit of the DP studies in language and literature courses. In language acquisition courses, specifically language B HL, literature is intended as a stimulus for ideas to be explored, principally through oral assessment. How is the course assessed? The assessment for this course comprises internal and external assessment. •

SL

External assessment (75%)

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 250–400 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment - Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB - (25%) Internal assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. 19


Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme. (30 marks)

HL

External assessment (75%) Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 450–600 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (2 hours) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (1 hour) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes. Internal assessment (25%) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus. (30 marks) French B Who is the course for?

Language B is a language acquisition course for students with some background in the target language. While acquiring a language, students will explore the culture(s) connected to it. The focus of these courses is language acquisition and intercultural understanding. The language B syllabus approaches the learning of language through meaning. Students build the necessary skills to reach the assessment objectives of the language B course through the expansion of their receptive, productive and interactive skills. What is the content of the course? Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B and language ab initio; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest. The five prescribed themes are: • identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet. The themes are prescribed, but the recommended topics and possible questions for each theme are not prescribed.

The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP. Literature

Reading literature in the target language can be an enjoyable journey into the culture(s) studied. It will help students to broaden their vocabulary and to use language in a more creative manner, developing fluent reading skills, promoting interpretative and inferential skills, and contributing to intercultural understanding. Students are required to read two works of literature originally written in the target language. The term “literary works” refers to works of prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry and drama. HL students are expected to understand fundamental elements of the literary works studied, such as themes, plot and characters. It must be emphasized that literary criticism is not an objective of the language B course; literary criticism 20


lies within the remit of the DP studies in language and literature courses. In language acquisition courses, specifically language B HL, literature is intended as a stimulus for ideas to be explored, principally through oral assessment. How is the course assessed? The assessment for this course comprises internal and external assessment. •

SL

External assessment (75%)

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 250–400 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment - Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB - (25%)

Internal assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme. (30 marks)

HL

External assessment (75%) Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 450–600 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (2 hours) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (1 hour) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes. Internal assessment (25%) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus. (30 marks)

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Spanish B Who is the course for?

Language B is a language acquisition course for students with some background in the target language. While acquiring a language, students will explore the culture(s) connected to it. The focus of these courses is language acquisition and intercultural understanding. The language B syllabus approaches the learning of language through meaning. Students build the necessary skills to reach the assessment objectives of the language B course through the expansion of their receptive, productive and interactive skills. What is the content of the course? Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B and language ab initio; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest. The five prescribed themes are: • identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet. The themes are prescribed, but the recommended topics and possible questions for each theme are not prescribed. The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP. Literature

Reading literature in the target language can be an enjoyable journey into the culture(s) studied. It will help students to broaden their vocabulary and to use language in a more creative manner, developing fluent reading skills, promoting interpretative and inferential skills, and contributing to intercultural understanding. Students are required to read two works of literature originally written in the target language. The term “literary works” refers to works of prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry and drama. HL students are expected to understand fundamental elements of the literary works studied, such as themes, plot and characters. It must be emphasized that literary criticism is not an objective of the language B course; literary criticism lies within the remit of the DP studies in language and literature courses. In language acquisition courses, specifically language B HL, literature is intended as a stimulus for ideas to be explored, principally through oral assessment. How is the course assessed? The assessment for this course comprises internal and external assessment. •

SL

External assessment (75%)

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 250–400 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment - Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB - (25%)

Internal assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme. (30 marks) 22


HL

External assessment (75%) Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) One writing task of 450–600 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (2 hours) Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (1 hour) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes. Internal assessment (25%) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus. (30 marks)

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French Ab Initio Who is the course for? The language ab initio course is designed for students with little or no prior experience of the language they wish to study. All final decisions on the appropriateness of the course for which students are entered are taken by coordinators in liaison with teachers, using their experience and professional judgment to guide them. The most important consideration is that the language ab initio course should be a challenging educational experience for the student. Three areas of study—language, texts and themes—provide the basis of the two-year language ab initio course. These three fundamental areas are interconnected and should be studied concurrently. Interactive, productive, and receptive skills are developed through study in these three areas and are of equal importance. Intercultural understanding is defined as an ability to demonstrate an understanding of cultural diversity and/or similarity between the target culture(s) and the student’s own. The student develops a greater awareness of his or her own culture(s) through learning about another. Intercultural understanding provides both the link between the three areas of the course and the lens through which they should be addressed. What is the content of the course? The three themes - Individual and society, Leisure and work, Urban and rural environment - are made up of a series of 20 topics. These serve as the foundation for the acquisition of the language and the study of different text types. Through the study of the three interrelated themes, students will develop the skills necessary to fulfill the assessment objectives of the language ab initio course. It is important to note that the order of the content is not an indication of how the themes and topics should be taught. They are interrelated and teachers are encouraged to adopt an integrated and cyclical approach to teaching. The topic of shopping, for example, may be treated under any of the three themes and could be revisited at several stages of the two-year course. During the course, students will be taught to understand and produce a variety of texts. In the context of the language ab initio course, a text can be spoken, written or visual. For the purposes of language ab initio, a visual text is one that contains an image, a series of images, or is a film. How is the course assessed?

External assessment (75%)

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) Two written tasks of 70–150 words each from a choice of three tasks, choosing a text type for each task from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (2 hours)

Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment (25%) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus and at least one additional course theme. (30 marks) 24


Spanish Ab Initio

Who is the course for? The language ab initio course is designed for students with little or no prior experience of the language they wish to study. All final decisions on the appropriateness of the course for which students are entered are taken by coordinators in liaison with teachers, using their experience and professional judgment to guide them. The most important consideration is that the language ab initio course should be a challenging educational experience for the student. Three areas of study—language, texts and themes—provide the basis of the two-year language ab initio course. These three fundamental areas are interconnected and should be studied concurrently. Interactive, productive, and receptive skills are developed through study in these three areas and are of equal importance. Intercultural understanding is defined as an ability to demonstrate an understanding of cultural diversity and/or similarity between the target culture(s) and the student’s own. The student develops a greater awareness of his or her own culture(s) through learning about another. Intercultural understanding provides both the link between the three areas of the course and the lens through which they should be addressed. What is the content of the course? The three themes - Individual and society, Leisure and work, Urban and rural environment - are made up of a series of 20 topics. These serve as the foundation for the acquisition of the language and the study of different text types. Through the study of the three interrelated themes, students will develop the skills necessary to fulfill the assessment objectives of the language ab initio course. It is important to note that the order of the content is not an indication of how the themes and topics should be taught. They are interrelated and teachers are encouraged to adopt an integrated and cyclical approach to teaching. The topic of shopping, for example, may be treated under any of the three themes and could be revisited at several stages of the two-year course. During the course, students will be taught to understand and produce a variety of texts. In the context of the language ab initio course, a text can be spoken, written or visual. For the purposes of language ab initio, a visual text is one that contains an image, a series of images, or is a film. How is the course assessed?

External assessment (75%)

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks) Two written tasks of 70–150 words each from a choice of three tasks, choosing a text type for each task from among those listed in the examination instructions. Paper 2 (2 hours)

Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment (25%) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual oral assessment A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus and at least one additional course theme. (30 marks)

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Group 3: Individuals and Societies Business and Management

Who is the course for? The Diploma Programme business management course is designed to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of business management theories, as well as their ability to apply a range of tools and techniques. Students learn to analyse, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels. The course covers a range of organisations from all sectors, as well as the sociocultural and economic contexts in which those organisations operate. No prior knowledge of business management is necessary for students to undertake a course of study based on this specification. However, a familiarity with business concepts would be an advantage and it is it is recommended that students have an IGCSE Business studies Grade D or above for standard level and Grade B or above for higher level. What is the course content? The curriculum model for Diploma Programme business and management is a core curriculum for higher level (HL) and standard level (SL) consisting of five topics with general content and learning outcomes. In addition to the core, HL students are expected to complete extension areas of study, in all five topics, adding both depth and breadth to the course. HL students also study one extension topic listed below as topic 6, business strategy. •Topic 1: Business organisation and environment •Topic 2: Human resources •Topic 3: Accounts and finance •Topic 4: Marketing •Topic 5: Operations •Topic 6: Business strategy (HL) The business strategy topic is intended to provide a framework and overview for the students to think in an integrated way about the future strategy of a business or businesses. These skills are particularly relevant when examining the case study and when researching for and writing the internal assessment components. How is the course assessed? For SL, we run external assessment (3 hours) and internal assessment (written commentary). Students produce a written commentary based on three to five supporting documents about a real issue or problem facing a particular organisation. Maximum 1500 words. For HL, we run external assessment (4 hours and 30 minutes) and internal assessment (Research project). Students research and report on an issue facing an organisation or a decision to be made by an organisation (or several organisations). Maximum 2000 words.

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Economics

Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. Who is the course for? The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world. What is the content of the course? At both standard level and higher level, candidates are required to study four topics: microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics and development economics with some sub-topics within these reserved solely for higher level. Microeconomics deals with demand and supply, elasticity, market failure and theory of the firm. Macroeconomics focuses on the level of overall economic activity, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, fiscal policy, monetary policy and supply-side policies. International economics includes international trade, the balance of payments, exchange rates and economic integration. The final chapter, development economics, covers economic development, measuring development, the role of foreign aid, foreign direct investment and international debt. How is the course assessed? This course is assessed both externally and internally. There are three papers in the exam. Paper 1 is an extended response paper on microeconomics and macroeconomics. Paper 2 is a Data response paper on international and development economics. Paper 3 is the higher level extension paper on all syllabus content. There is also a portfolio that consists of three commentaries based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media.

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Geography

"The study of geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map. It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it's about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together." Barack Obama 2012 Who is the Course For? Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies and physical processes in both time and space. Within individuals and societies subjects, it is distinctive in its spatial dimension and occupies a middle ground between social or human sciences and natural sciences. Geography is considered to be a “facilitating subject” by universities; these are the subjects most frequently required or favoured by universities to get on to a wide variety of degree courses. Geography helps you keep your options open when it comes to university applications. Furthermore, Geography helps students develop life skills and have an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas. By its very nature, Geography is second-to-none in enabling students to address aspects of the IB core and encourage international-mindedness. The IBDP Geography course requires no specific prior learning as the skills needed for the course are developed within the context of the course itself. However, it is recommended that students have an IGCSE Geography Grade D or above for standard level and Grade B or above for higher level. What Is The Course Content? There are 3 parts to the course. Part 1: Geographic themes There are seven Geographic themes: • Freshwater—drainage basins • Oceans and coastal margins • Extreme environments • Geophysical hazards • Leisure, tourism and sport • Food and health • Urban environments Two options are studied at SL and three at HL Part 2: Geographic perspectives—global change This form the core content of both the standard and higher level courses and all candidates will study the following 3 topics: • Population distribution—changing population • Global climate—vulnerability and resilience • Global resource consumption and security In addition higher level students will study these 3 topics: • Power, places and networks • Human development and diversity • Global risks and resilience •

Part 3: Internal assessment 28


Both standard and higher level students will undertake geographical fieldwork, and produce a written report that uses primary and secondary data to answer a question related to a topic from either Part 1 or Part 2. This gives students the perfect option to demonstrate many aspects of their IB learner profile particularly inquiry and reflection as students will need to evaluate their own work. How is the course assessed? Standard level Assessment component

Weighting

External assessment (2 hours 45 minutes) Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Geographic themes—two options (40 marks)

75% 35%

Paper 2 (1 hour 15 minutes) Geographic perspectives—global change (50 marks)

40%

Internal assessment (20 hours) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Fieldwork (20 hours) Written report (25 marks)

25%

Higher level Assessment component

Weighting

External assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 (2 hours 15 minutes) Geographic themes—three options (60 marks)

80% 35%

Paper 2 (1 hour 15 minutes) Geographic perspectives—global change (50 marks)

25%

Paper 3 (1 hour) Geographic perspectives—global interactions (28 marks)

20%

Internal assessment (20 hours) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Fieldwork (20 hours) Written report (25 marks)

20%

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History

Who is the course for? Students hoping to study History, archaeology, law or politics at University level. The course aims to: - Develop an understanding of, and continuing interest in, the past - Encourage students to engage with multiple perspectives and to appreciate the complex nature of historical concepts, issues, events and developments - Promote international-mindedness through the study of history from more than one region of the world - Develop an understanding of history as a discipline and to develop historical consciousness including a sense of chronology and context, and an understanding of different historical perspectives - Develop key historical skills, including engaging effectively with sources - Increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection of the past. What is the content of the course? Paper 1 Students will study one of the prescribed topics from the following list. 1. Military leaders 2. Conquest and its impact 3. The move to global war 4. Rights and protest 5. Conflict and intervention Paper 2 Students will study 2 World History Topics. The current Year 12 are studying: Topic 10: Authoritarian states This topic focuses on exploring the conditions that facilitated the rise of authoritarian states in the 20th century, as well as the methods used by parties and leaders to take and maintain power. The topic explores the emergence, consolidation and maintenance of power, including the impact of the leaders’ policies, both domestic and foreign, upon the maintenance of power. Topic 12. The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th cent.) This topic focuses on the impact of Cold War tensions on two leaders (Truman and Stalin), and two countries (excluding the USSR and the US) through Case Studies detailed study of any two Cold War crises from different regions. Currently our students are studying the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962) and the Berlin Wall (1958 - 1961). Paper 3 (Higher level extension) Students undertake a depth study focusing 3 aspects of the History of a particular region. The current Year 12s are studying The History of Europe. Topic 11: Italy (1815 - 1871) and Germany (1815 - 1890) This section deals with the history of both Germany and Italy from 1815; in the case of Italy, from the Congress of Vienna to 1871, and in the case of Germany, up to 1890. Topic 14: European states in the inter-war years (1918–1939) This section deals with domestic developments in certain key European states in the period between the two world wars. It requires the study of four European countries: Germany, Italy, Spain and any one other country. The section considers the impact of the end of the First World War, then examines the economic, social and cultural changes in each country during the 1920s and 1930s. 30


Topic 15: Versailles to Berlin: Diplomacy in Europe (1919–1945) This section addresses international relations in Europe from 1919 to 1945 with initial emphasis on the Paris Peace Settlement: its goals, impact and the problems relating to its enforcement. How is the course assessed? Standard Level External assessment (2 hours 30 minutes)

75%

Paper 1 (1 hour) Source-based paper based on the five prescribed subjects. Choose one prescribed subject from a choice of five. Answer four structured questions. (24 marks)

30%

Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes) Essay paper based on the 12 world history topics. Answer two essay questions on two different topics. (30 marks)

45%

Internal assessment (20 hours)

25%

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Historical investigation Students are required to complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice. (25 marks)

Higher Level

External assessment (5 hours)

80%

Paper 1 (1 hour) Source-based paper on prescribed topic

20%

Answer four structured questions. (24 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes) Answer two essay questions on two different topics. (30 marks) Paper 3 (2 hours 30 minutes)

25% 35%

For the selected region, answer three essay questions. (45 marks)

Internal assessment (20 hours) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Historical investigation Students are required to complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice. (25 marks)

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20%


Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS)

Who is the course for? The IB Diploma Programme information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences, it also considers social and ethical considerations that are common to other subjects in group 3. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This increasingly widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions with regard to the social and ethical considerations that shape our society today. ITGS offers an opportunity for a systematic study of these considerations, whose range is such that they fall outside the scope of any other single discipline. What is the content of the course? At either level (SL or HL) the ITGS course consists of three compulsory interconnected strands that reflect the integrated nature of the course: • Strand 1: Social and ethical significance • Strand 2: Application to specified scenarios • Strand 3: IT systems The project (practical application of IT skills) Strand 1: Social and ethical significance Social and ethical considerations linked to specified IT developments. HL extension Social and ethical considerations linked to the two HL extension topics and the issues raised by the annually issued case study. Strand 2: Application to specified scenarios Scenarios based on real-life situations must be used when addressing specified IT developments. HL extension Scenarios based on real-life situations must be used when addressing specified IT developments in the two HL extension topics and the annually issued case study. Strand 3: IT systems The terminology, concepts and tools relating to specified IT developments. HL extension 3.10 IT systems in organizations 3.11 Robotics, artificial intelligence and expert systems 3.12 Information systems specific to the annually issued case study The project (practical application of IT skills) The application of skills and knowledge to develop an original IT product for a specified client. How is the course assessed? Standard Level Students sit 2 examination papers totalling 3 hours (70%) and complete an independent 30 hour project (30%) Higher Level Students sit 3 examination papers totalling 4 hours 45 minutes (80%) and complete an independent 30 hour project (20%) 32


Psychology

Who is the course for? Psychology is the rigorous and systematic study of mental processes and behaviour. It is a complex subject which draws on concepts, methods and understandings from a number of different disciplines. This course addresses to students interested in the study of behaviour and mental processes, keeping in mind that this study requires a multidisciplinary approach and the use of a variety of research techniques. No previous knowledge or study of the subject is required. What is the content of the course? Psychologists employ a range of research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, in order to test their observations and hypotheses. As a part of the core syllabus, DP psychology promotes an understanding of the various approaches to research and how they have been used in order to critically reflect on the evidence as well as assist in the design, implementation, analysis and evaluation of the students’ own investigations. Whereas the core provides a general overview, the options allow students to study a specialized area of psychology to apply their learning. What is learned in the core forms the foundation for the learning in the options. The options provide the opportunity to integrate learning in an applied context. Students will study the followings: • Approaches to researching behavior (Core) • Biological approach to understanding behaviour (Core) • Cognitive approach to understanding behaviour (Core) • Sociocultural approach to understanding behaviour (Core) • Health psychology (Option) • Abnormal psychology (Option) • Experimental study How is the course assessed? SL External assessment (3 hours) 75% •

Paper 1 (2 hours)

Section A: Three short-answer questions on the core approaches to psychology Section B: One essay from a choice of three on the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches to behaviour •

Paper 2 (1 hour)

One question from a choice of three on one option Internal assessment 25% Experimental study - A report on an experimental study undertaken by the student Students will investigate a published study, theory or model relevant to their learning in psychology by conducting an experimental investigation and reporting the findings.

33


HL External assessment (3 hours) 80% •

Paper 1 (2 hours)

Section A: Three short-answer questions on the core approaches to psychology Section B: One essay from a choice of three on the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches to behaviour. One, two or all of the essays will reference the additional HL topics. •

Paper 2 (2 hours)

Two questions; one from a choice of three on each of the two options • •

Paper 3 (1 hour) Three short-answer questions from a list of six static questions on approaches to research.

Internal assessment 20% Experimental study - A report on an experimental study undertaken by the student Students will investigate a published study, theory or model relevant to their learning in psychology by conducting an experimental investigation and reporting the findings.

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Group 4 – Experimental Sciences Biology

Who is the Course For? Biology is the scientific exploration of the vast and diverse world of living organisms; an exploration that has expanded enormously within recent years revealing a wealth of knowledge about ourselves and about the millions of other organisms with whom we share this planet Earth. Today, biological research, worldwide, spans an almost infinite spectrum of studies from molecules to ecosystems. Students who undertake the Higher Level Biology course are generally interested in pursuing studies in Biology or related Sciences at University level. Students who undertake the Standard Level Biology course are not particularly interested in studying Biology or Science further but so have a genuine curiosity about living things and a desire to understand how the world works.

What is the Course Content? Biology is the study of living organisms. This course covers the study of cells, biochemistry, genetics, ecology, evolution, human health and physiology, and plant science. The course is divided into the following topics: Core (both SL and HL) 1. Cell Biology 2. Molecular Biology 3. Genetics 4. Ecology 5. Evolution and Biodiversity 6. Human Physiology

Additional Higher level (HL only) 7. Nucleic acids 8. Metabolism, Cell respiration and photosynthesis 9. Plant biology 10. Genetics and evolution 11. Animal Physiology

In addition to the topics listed above, one option topic is studied from a choice of 4 topics.

How is the Course Assessed? The external assessment consists of three papers and accounts for 76% of the final grade: Paper 1 - Multiple Choice questions Paper 2 – Data analysis, short answer and extended response questions Paper 3 – Data analysis and short answer questions based which includes questions on the chosen option. Internal assessment Students spend at least 10 hours on practicals, investigations and experiments. The reports which are produced from this work constitutes 20% of the overall mark.

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Chemistry

Who is the Course For? All students are required to take a Science course as part of their diploma. The IB Chemistry course offers students a chance to build on the knowledge of the subject gained at IGCSE level. Students should have a keen interest in the subject. What is the Course Content? Core Level: All students study the following topics:

Higher Level students use the knowledge gained at core level to examine these different areas in greater depth:

Stoichiometric relationships Atomic Structure Periodicty Chemical bonding and structure Energetics/thermochemistry Chemical kinetics Equilibrium Acids and bases Redox processes Organic Chemistry Measurement and data processing

Atomic Structure The periodic Table – the transition metals Chemical bonding and structure Energetics/thermochemistry Chemical kinetics Equilibrium Acids and bases Redox processes Organic chemistry Measurement and analysis

In addition to the topics listed above, one option topic is studied from a choice of 4 topics. How is the Course Assessed? The external assessment consists of three papers and accounts for 76% of the final grade: Paper 1 - Multiple Choice questions Paper 2 – Data analysis, short answer and extended response questions Paper 3 – Data analysis and short answer questions based which includes questions on the chosen option. Internal assessment Students spend at least 10 hours on practicals, investigations and experiments. The reports which are produced from this work constitutes 20% of the overall mark.

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Physics

Who is the Course For? All students are required to take a Science course as part of their diploma. The IB Physics course offers students a chance to build on the knowledge of the subject gained at IGCSE level. Students should have a keen interest in the subject. What is the Course Content? All students study the following topics: Measurements and uncertainties; Mechanics; Thermal physics; Waves; Electricity; Circular motion and gravitation; Atomic, nuclear and particle physics; Energy production. In addition, Higher Level students also study: Wave phenomena; Fields; Electromagnetic induction; Quantum and nuclear physics In addition to the topics listed above, one option topic is studied from a choice of 4 topics. How is the Course Assessed? The external assessment consists of three papers and accounts for 76% of the final grade: Paper 1 - Multiple Choice questions Paper 2 – Data analysis, short answer and extended response questions Paper 3 – Data analysis and short answer questions based which includes questions on the chosen option. Internal assessment Students spend at least 10 hours on practicals, investigations and experiments. The reports which are produced from this work constitutes 20% of the overall mark.

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Environmental Systems and Societies

“Enough is enough. The truth is our planet’s alarm is now going off and it’s time to wake up and take action.” Leonardo DiCaprio, United Nations Messenger of Peace for climate change Who is the Course For? Environmental systems and societies (ESS) is an interdisciplinary group 3 and 4 course that is offered only at standard level (SL). The prime intent for the course is to provide students with an understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues will we will inevitably come to face. Students will evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of a wide variety of environmental issues. The aims of the course are to enable students to: • acquire the knowledge and understandings of environmental systems at a variety of scales • apply the knowledge, methodologies and skills to analyse environmental systems and issues at a variety of scales • appreciate the dynamic interconnectedness between environmental systems and societies • value the combination of personal, local and global perspectives in making informed decisions and taking responsible actions on environmental issues • be critically aware that resources are finite, and that these could be inequitably distributed and exploited, and that management of these inequities is the key to sustainability • develop awareness of the diversity of environmental value systems • develop critical awareness that environmental problems are caused and solved by decisions made by individuals and societies that are based on different areas of knowledge • engage with the controversies that surround a variety of environmental issues • create innovative solutions to environmental issues by engaging actively in local and global contexts. The IBDP ESS course requires no specific prior learning as the skills needed for the course are developed within the context of the course itself. Students who have studied Global Perspectives, Geography and/or Biology at IGCSE will have a particularly solid foundation from which to build upon. What is the Course Content? Students will study 8 core topics: Topic 1—Foundations of environmental systems and societies Topic 2—Ecosystems and ecology Topic 3—Biodiversity and conservation Topic 4—Water and aquatic food production systems and societies Topic 5—Soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies Topic 6—Atmospheric systems and societies Topic 7—Climate change and energy production Topic 8—Human systems and resource use They will also complete 20 hours of practical activities and undertake an individual investigation

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How is the course assessed? Standard level Assessment component

Weighting

Duration

Paper 1 (case study)

25%

1 hour exam

Paper 2 (short answers and structured essays)

50%

2 hour exam

Internal assessment (individual investigation)

25%

10 hours practical investigation and write-up

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Group 5: Mathematics Mathematics: analysis and approaches

Who is the Course For? Mathematics: analysis and approaches is for students who enjoy developing their mathematics to become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and develop strong skills in mathematical thinking. They will also be fascinated by exploring real and abstract applications of these ideas, with and without technology. Students who take Mathematics: analysis and approaches will be those who enjoy the thrill of mathematical problem solving and generalization. This course recognizes the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL. The course allows the use of technology, as fluency in relevant mathematical software and hand-held technology is important regardless of choice of course. However, Mathematics: analysis and approaches has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Mathematics: analysis and approaches SL/HL is for students interested in mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, and some economics at top universities. Distinction between SL and HL Students who choose Mathematics: analysis and approaches at SL or HL should be comfortable in the manipulation of algebraic expressions and enjoy the recognition of patterns and understand the mathematical generalization of these patterns. Students who wish to take Mathematics: analysis and approaches at higher level will have strong algebraic skills and the ability to understand simple proof. They will be students who enjoy spending time with problems and get pleasure and satisfaction from solving challenging problems. What is the Course Content? The course covers the five key areas of Mathematics (the topics in italics are the additional topics required to study at the HL): Number & Algebra: Sequences and series, Indices and logarithms, Permutations and combinations, Partial fractions, Complex numbers, Proof by induction Functions: Equations of straight lines, Curve sketching, Definition of function, Quadratic functions, Graph transformations, Factor and remainder theorem, Modulus function Geometry & Trigonometry: Coordinate geometry, Volume and surface areas of 3D shapes, Trigonometry, Bearings, Circles, Reciprocal trigonometric ratios, Compound angle identities, Vectors Statistics & Probability: Classification of data, Sampling, Presentation of data, Measures of central tendency and dispersion, Linear correlation, Introduction to probability, Venn diagrams, Discrete random variables, Normal distribution, Binomial distribution, Conditional probability, Regression line x on y, Bayes’ Theorem, Continuous random variables Calculus: Introduction to limits, differentiation of polynomials and basic trigonometric functions, equations of tangents and normal, Definite integrals, Chain, product and quotient rules, Kinematics, Indefinite integration and integration by substitution methods, Numerical methods, Understanding of limits, Differentiation from first principles, L’Hopital’s Rule, Implicit differentiation, Related rates and optimisation, Derivatives of more complex functions, Integration by parts, Volumes of revolution, First order differential equations, Maclaurin expansions 40


How Is the Course Assessed? Throughout the course students will be expected to produce several pieces of work (projects, tests, quizzes) marked as summative and formative assessment providing information of the academic progress. The final examination in May of the second year of the course consists of two papers for SL and three papers for HL externally assessed that will be worth 80% of the final mark. Another piece of written work that involves investigating an area of Mathematics worth 20% of the final mark and is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. SL Assessment components External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1 (90 minutes)

Weighting 80% 40%

Paper 2 (90 minutes)

40%

Internal assessment

20%

No technology allowed. (80 marks) Section A Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. Section B Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus. Technology required. (80 marks) Section A Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. Section B Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Mathematical exploration

Internal assessment in mathematics is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics. (20 marks)

HL Assessment components External assessment (5 hours) Paper 1 (120 minutes)

Weighting 80% 30%

Paper 2 (120 minutes)

30%

Paper 3 (60 minutes)

20%

Internal assessment

20%

No technology allowed. (110 marks) Section A Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. Section B Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus. Technology required. (110 marks) Section A Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. Section B Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus. Technology required. (55 marks) Two compulsory extended response problem-solving questions. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Mathematical exploration

Internal assessment in mathematics is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics. (20 marks)

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Mathematics: applications and interpretation

Who is the Course For? Mathematics: applications and interpretation is for students who are interested in developing their mathematics for describing our world and solving practical problems. They will also be interested in harnessing the power of technology alongside exploring mathematical models. Students who take Mathematics: applications and interpretation will be those who enjoy mathematics best when seen in a practical context. This course recognizes the increasing role that mathematics and technology play in a diverse range of fields in a data-rich world. As such, it emphasizes the meaning of mathematics in context by focusing on topics that are often used as applications or in mathematical modelling. To give this understanding a firm base, this course also includes topics that are traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course such as calculus and statistics. The course makes extensive use of technology to allow students to explore and construct mathematical models. Mathematics: applications and interpretation will develop mathematical thinking, often in the context of a practical problem and using technology to justify conjectures. Mathematics: applications and interpretation SL/HL for students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, engineering, some economics, psychology, and design. Distinction between SL and HL Students who choose Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL should enjoy seeing mathematics used in real-world contexts and to solve real-world problems. Students who wish to take Mathematics: applications and interpretation at higher level will have good algebraic skills and experience of solving real-world problems. They will be students who get pleasure and satisfaction when exploring challenging problems and who are comfortable to undertake this exploration using technology. What Is the Course Content? The course covers the five key areas of Mathematics, note the topics in italics are the additional topics required to study at the HL: Number & Algebra: Sequences and Series, Indices and Logarithms, Approximations and solving systems of linear and polynomial equations, Complex numbers, Matrices, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Functions: Equations of straight lines, Curve Sketching, Modelling, Inverse and composite functions, Transformations of functions, Linearizing data Geometry & Trigonometry: Coordinate geometry, Volume and surface areas of 3D shapes, Trigonometry, Bearings, Circles, Radians, Vectors, Graph Theory Statistics & Probability: Classification of data, sampling, Presentation of data, Measures of central tendency and dispersion, Linear correlation, Introduction to probability, Venn diagrams, Discrete random variables, Normal distribution, Binomial distribution, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, Hypothesis testing, Chi Square test, Reliability and validity tests, Non-linear regression, Interpolation and extrapolation, Linear transformation of a single random variable, Sample means and the central limit theorem, Confidence intervals, Poisson Distribution, Type I and II errors and Transition matrices Calculus: Introduction to limits, differentiation of polynomials functions, equations of tangents and normal, Definite integrals, numerical methods, Derivatives of basic trigonometric functions, Chain, product and quotient rules, related rates of change, Volumes of revolution, Kinematics, First order differential equations

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How Is the Course Assessed? Throughout the course students will be expected to produce several pieces of work (projects, tests, quizzes) marked as summative and formative assessment providing information of the academic progress. The final examination in May of the second year of the course consists of two papers for SL and three papers for HL externally assessed that will be worth 80% of the final mark. Another piece of written work that involves investigating an area of Mathematics worth 20% of the final mark and is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. SL Assessment components External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1 (90 minutes)

Weighting 80% 40%

Paper 2 (90 minutes)

40%

Internal assessment

20%

Technology required. (80 marks) Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. (80 marks) Technology required. (80 marks) Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus. (80 marks) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Mathematical exploration

Internal assessment in mathematics is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics. (20 marks)

HL Assessment components External assessment (5 hours) Paper 1 (120 minutes)

Weighting 80% 30%

Paper 2 (120 minutes)

30%

Paper 3 (60 minutes)

20%

Internal assessment

20%

Technology required. (110 marks) Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus. Technology required. (110 marks) Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus. Technology required. (55 marks) Two compulsory extended response problem-solving questions. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Mathematical exploration

Internal assessment in mathematics is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics. (20 marks)

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Group 6: The Arts Theatre

All the world’s a stage... Who is the course for? The aims of the programme in Theatre Arts are to help you understand the nature of theatre; to understand it by making it is as well as by studying it; to understand it not only with your minds but with your senses, your bodies and emotions; to understand the forms it takes in cultures other than your own; and through this understanding to better understand ourselves, our society and our world. It is a challenging and exciting course that will appeal to students who are committed to all aspects of performance and production. You can expect to be asked to use some additional time outside class to attend rehearsals and you are strongly advised to take the opportunities offered by school drama productions and trips to outside productions. Course Outline The course is divided into three inter-related areas. Students are required to explore these areas from the perspective of ‘dramaturg’, director, performer, group ensemble, production team and spectator. 1. Theatre in context a. Research and examine the various contexts of at least one theatre theorist (HL only) and at least one published play text and reflect on live theatre. b. Research and examine the various contexts of at least one world theatre tradition. c. Reflect on personal approaches, interests and skills in theatre. Research and examine at least one starting point and the approaches employed by one appropriate professional theatre company, and consider how this might influence personal approaches. 2. Theatre processes a. Explore at least one theorist and collaboratively engage in creating theatre based on their theory (HL only) b. Take part in the practical exploration of at least two contrasting published play texts and engage with the process of transforming a play text into action. c. Practically examine the performance conventions of at least one world theatre tradition and apply this to the staging of a moment of theatre. d. Respond to at least one starting point and engage with the process of transforming it collaboratively into an original piece of theatre. 3. Presenting theatre a. Create, present and evaluate at least one theatre piece based on an aspect of a theatre theorist’s work (HL only). b. Direct at least one scene or section from one published play text which is presented to others. c. Present a moment of theatre to others which demonstrates the performance convention(s) of at least one world theatre tradition. d. Participate in at least one production of a collaboratively created piece of original theatre, created from a starting point, which is presented to others. 44


How is the Course Assessed? Standard Level External Assessment: 65% a. Director’s Notebook - Develop ideas regarding how a play text could be staged for an audience. (35%) b. Research Presentation - Deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes maximum) that outlines and physically demonstrates research into a convention of a theatre tradition. (30%) Internal Assessment: 35% a. Collaborative Project - Collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13–15 minutes) for and to a specified target audience. (35%) Higher Level External Assessment: 75% a. Solo Theatre Piece - Create and present a solo theatre piece (4-8 minutes) based on an aspect(s) of theatre theory. (35%) b. Director’s Notebook - Develop ideas regarding how a play text could be staged for an audience. (20%) c. Research Presentation - Deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes maximum) that outlines and physically demonstrates research into a convention of a theatre tradition. (20%) Internal Assessment: 25% a. Collaborative Project - Collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13–15 minutes) for and to a specified target audience. (25%) The Theatre course is structured for the assessment tasks to be ongoing with skills being developed throughout the course and the material for assessment developed throughout the latter part of the course. In conclusion, IB Theatre is a journey which will build on your knowledge of yourself as well as many aspects of World Theatre.

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Visual Arts Course Overview The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts. The role of visual arts teachers should be to actively and carefully organize learning experiences for the students, directing their study to enable them to reach their potential and satisfy the demands of the course. Students should be empowered to become autonomous, informed and skilled visual artists. The distinction between HL and SL allows for a breadth and a greater depth in the teaching and learning and is outlined clearly in the visual arts syllabus and Assessment Outline. HL students are encouraged to produce a larger body of work during two-year enrolment which demonstrates a deeper consideration of how their resolved works communicate with a potential viewer. SL students demonstrate growth and proficiency during the two-year enrolment in IB Visual Arts. Internal Assessment: EXHIBITION (Weighting: 40% of your grade) a. Resolve ideas and mediums b. Demonstrate technical skill c. Realize meaning, function, and purpose d. Articulate curatorial rationale External Assessment: EXHIBITION (Weighting: 40% of your grade) e. Resolve ideas and mediums f. Demonstrate technical skill g. Realize meaning, function and purpose h. Articulate curatorial rationale PROCESS PORTFOLIO (Weighting: 40% of your grade) a. Develop skills, techniques, processes b. Critically investigate c. Communicate ideas/intentions d. Review, refine, reflect COMPARATIVE STUDY (CS) Analyse and compare artworks by different artists. This independent critical and contextual investigation explores artworks, objects and artefacts from differing cultural contexts. Externally assessed (20%) SL- 10–15 screens which examine and compare at least 3 artworks, at least 2 of which should be by different artists and a list of sources used

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HL - 10–15 screens which examine and compare at least 3 artworks, at least 2 of which need to be by different artists. 3–5 screens which analyse the extent to which the student’s work and practices have been influenced by the art and artists examined and a list of sources used PROCESS PORTFOLIO (PP) Students submit carefully selected materials which evidence their experimentation, exploration, manipulation, research and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during the two-year course. Externally assessed (40%) SL- 9–18 screens which evidence sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of at least three different art-making activities. HL -13–25 screens which evidence sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of at least three different art-making activities. EXHIBITION (EX) Students submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks from their exhibition which have been curated to fulfil stated intentions. Internally assessed (40%) SL -A curatorial rationale that does not exceed 400 words, 4–7 artworks , an exhibition text (stating the title, medium, size and intention) for each artwork HL -A curatorial rationale that does not exceed 700 words, 8–11 artworks , an exhibition text (stating the title, medium, size and intention) for each artwork

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The Award of the IB Diploma A maximum of 7 points is available for each of the 6 subjects studied. In addition, a maximum of 3 points is available from the Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay matrix, making a combined total of 45 points available. A total of 24 points must be obtained in order to receive the IB Diploma.

Conditions for the Award of a Diploma  Grades have been awarded in the six subjects the diploma totalling a minimum of 24 points (including bonus points)  A course of Theory of Knowledge (TOK) has been followed and the TOK assessment requirements have been met.  An Extended Essay (EE) has been submitted and assessed to be of a satisfactory standard.  The student has engaged appropriately in creativity, activity, service (CAS) activities.

Failing Conditions •

CAS requirements have not been met.

Candidate’s total points are fewer than 24.

An N (no award) has been given for theory of knowledge, extended essay or for a contributing subject.

A grade E has been awarded for one or both of theory of knowledge and the extended essay.

There is a grade 1 awarded in a subject.

Grade 2 has been awarded three or more times (HL or SL).

Grade 3 or below has been awarded four or more times (HL or SL).

Candidate has gained fewer than 12 points on HL subjects.

Candidate has gained fewer than 9 points on SL subjects.

A Bilingual Diploma The IB awards bilingual diplomas for  two different languages for Group 1 – Studies in Literature,  a group 3 or 4 subject taken in a language other than the candidate's language A1

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Expectations of Sixth Form (IB) Students Registration and PSHE The IB is a challenging academic programme which requires a high level of commitment for the students undertaking it. Students are required to maintain attendance levels of at least 95% and to be punctual to registration each morning. Their tutor is responsible for supporting them through their studies and is the main contact point for information relating to their studies and the school in general. University Application The ISB fully supports students through their application to university wherever their destination. There is time built into the programme for guidance and counselling on this important aspect of their education. The school organises a number of visits to and by universities. There are certain key documents which are required for university application, we will guide the students through the process of compiling these documents and will hold them on file to use to support their applications whilst at school or in the future. Homework and Study Students are expected to develop independent learning skills throughout the course as they become IB Learners and prepare themselves for life at University. On average, successful IB students will spend between 18 and 24 hours per week on their study (approximately 3 hours per week per HL subject and 2 hours per week per SL subject plus 3-4 hours on CAS and 2 to 3 hours on ToK and Extended Essay). This work will include set homework tasks; extended projects and assignments; recapping, revising and reflecting; wider reading and preparatory study. It is important that they develop good, regular work habits, have a quiet organised environment to work and maintain good eating and sleeping habits/ PE It is important that the year group develop a sense of belonging and mutual support network. In order to assist in this, we hold a compulsory PE/Sports lesson each week. This session uses sports for fun to build team spirit, to give students an opportunity to “let off steam� and to help develop healthy living habits. All students are required to attend unless they have additional timetabled classes. This lesson can also be used to gain experiences as part of their CAS programme. Dress Code Sixth Form students do not wear school uniform but wear business dress. The dress code is detailed in the Uniform Policy. As a guideline, students should consider the dress worn by employees in traditional professional occupations such as banking and law offices. After-School Activities Programme The school’s After-School Activities programme runs every day throughout all three terms. We encourage all Sixth Form students to choose their activities carefully (and early) and to make full use of the programme to support their CAS requirements and to help develop their sporting, arts or performing interests. Students are required to participate fully in their activities and non-attendance to activities is treated in the same way as non-attendance to a lesson. 49


Involvement in Extra-Curricular Activities ISB offers a wealth of opportunities for students to become involved in a wide range of extracurricular activities. We fully support our students in their holistic development but we always urge students (and parents) to consider the workload of the IB and the implications of missed study time when deciding what activities to become involved with. It is very sensible for students to limit their involvement in such activities throughout year 13.

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Profile for International School of Bucharest

IB Handbook 2019  

IB Handbook 2019