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TYPOGRAPHY

is changing fast, and designers need to stay abreast of developments.

DISCOVER 7

trends that will inspire you to think differently about your own use of typography.


Designed by: Isabella Escalon Published by Princeton Architectural Press 37 East Seventh Street New York, New York 10003 Š 2008 Princeton Architectural Press All rights reserved Printed and bound in US First Edition ISBN 978-3-89955-406-9 https://creativemarket.com/blog/2013/12/25/4-typography-trends-for-2014 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publiaher, except in the context of reviews. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions.


What’s the next TREND? Designed by Isabella Escalon


Trends Don’t love them too much. They change.

2014


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Glossary

Retro will never go away

Didone is Back

Type from objects

Geometric Sans makes a modern twist

Classics Revived

Moving back to Flat Design

Handwritten fonts fit just right


Handwri

ttenFonts

fitjust right


i

t

Today is an age of social media —and people are communicating more rapidly, more frequently and more publicly than ever before. With that comes the frequent need to personalize the font you are using, to make it feel as if whatever it’s saying is coming directly from a person.   With this new emphasis on written communication via the web is handwritten fonts; often they have irregularly sized letters and weights. Handwritten fonts are utilized to provide an emotive element and a feeling of personalization. this style of typography has been making more appearances than ever before, with print

and digital alike favouring it over more traditional offerings.   The desire to get back to socialization and to communicate with more emotion has led to this growing usage of clean-lined handwriting fonts. With the wide variety available, conveying emotion and adding a personal touch is now easier, and implemented.   To Do-It-Yourself Aesthetic has grown exponentially in the post-computer epoch. Whether it is the need to keep hands occupied or the desire to keep art from becoming overly mechanical. It is also something that everyone does.

Tips: Some great examples of handwritten fonts are: Everglow, Thin Skinned and leaning on Everlasting.

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Fla t Moving Back to


t De Flat Design started as a huge rise in sites designed with flat design. That trend is going to continue into 2015,* and many designers are going to favor sites that promote function over form, and place a clear emphasis on simplicity, minimalist and intelligibility. With that continued emphasis on flat design comes the trend of choosing fonts that are easy to read, use clean lines, and even strokes. The fonts that will become popular due to flat design are ones that are share and crisp but still visually interesting.

Tips:

Some example of great fonts for flat design: Duase, Bebas Neue and Mohave.

* Use Old Style Figures When Appropriate: Old Style Figures, also known as non-lining figures, do not line up on the baseline as do regular or lining numerals. Old style figures can be found in various fonts. If the body text has a significant amount of numbers, research a font family where they are included. If non-lining

numerals are not available use a slightly smaller point size for the lining numbers. Think of lining numbers as uppercase numbers and non-lining numbers as lowercase numbers.

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Classics

A B C D E F G HI J K L M N O PQR

S T U V W X Y Z


R

Z

Revived Type designers love reinterpreting classic fonts in new ways. There have been many examples over the past years. One of them is Bodoni.   Bodoni had a long career and his designs evolved and varied, ending with a typeface of narrower underlying structure with flat, unbracketed serifs, extreme contrast between thick and thin strokes, and an overall geometric construction. Though these later designs are rightfully called “modern”, the earlier designs are “Classic”.

Tips: Some examples of Classic Fonts are: Garcon Crotesque , Helvetica, and Bodoni.

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M

m a ode s e k a r

n

G st i w t

Geometric SANS


G

Pablo Abad’s custom typeface called Gara is a great example of a geometric sans serif with a modern twist. Other uses of geometric sans include Neo Sans by Seb Lester, Bank Gothic by Morris Fuller Benton and the incredible Gotham by Tobias Frere-Jones. Although ever-popular * and omnipresent in contemporary design, custom geometric sans seem more widespread in graphics than ever before.

Tips: Some example of great geometric fonts are: Gara,Futura pt ,Neo Sans and Lovelo.

* Use Proper “Em” Dashes, “En” Dashes and Hyphens. An “em” is a unit of measure equal to the point size that you are using. An “em” dash is a type of punctuation used to offset clauses in a sentence or to indicate an abrupt change in thought. An “en” dash is

equal to half the length of an “em” dash. “En”dashes are used to denote duration. You may kern small spaces before and after “en” and “em” dashes if you feel it is too tight. Shift+option+hyphen=–(em) Option + Hyphen= - (en)

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Type from Objects, is one of many companies creating imaginative, object-based typefaces. Often custom designed for a specific purpose, project or campaign.   This a great example of this medium, as the artist uses ink to construct a unique font.Drop Type is a handmade eps font used based on din-bold outlines. This type is free for personal and commercial use.

  Object fonts have seen a sharp rise over the last few years and will continue to be hugely popular throughout 2012 and beyond.

Tips: Some examples of funny object fonts are: Candy Cane,Unilever and Ka pizza. *

* Items in a series Items in a series do not use a comma before the word “and”.

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123 456 7 Didone is Back


If there’s one font that sums up the revival of Didone typefaces, it’s Rick Banks’ F37 Bella. A useful and stylish font, Banks has just released a Heavy version for those wanting to use it a bit smaller (at smaller point sizes the originals serifs could disappear).   These hyper-thin hairline serifs and strong contrasts between thick and thin lines, make it a modern classic in the Didot classification. It’s a stunningly elegant font for headlines; Online and especially in print.

Tips: Nice examples for Didone fonts are: Neutura’s Estrella and F37 Bella.

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Let’s face it: the trend for retro typefaces will probably never go away. Sure, it’s faded a little, with more minimalist, modern faces taking precedent on the web, in print and in App UI design, but it’s always there, with designers seemingly not able to resist a bit of vintage typography. They don’t all have to be kitsch either — check out Font Squirrel’s list of free retro fonts for commercial use.

Tips: Great examples for Retro Fonts are: Canter and Street wear.

retro will never go away 14


Glossary 1

Insert only a single space after all punctuation Inserting two spaces after a period was common when typing on a typewriter. Monospace typefaces were designed to occupy the same amount of space no matter the width of the character. Therefore, two spaces were needed to identify the end of a sentence and the beginning of another sentence. With the introduction of the Mac and digital type, characters are designed proportionally which allows for the correct practice of using one space after all punctuation.

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Use proper “em” dashes, “en” dashes and hyphens An “em” is a unit of measure equal to the point size that you are using. An “em” dash is a type of punctuation used to offset clauses in a sentence or to indicate an abrupt change in thought. An “en” dash is equal to half the length of an “em” dash. “En”dashes are used to denote duration. You may kern small spaces before and after “en” and “em” dashes if you feel it is too tight. Shift+option+hyphen=—(em) Option + Hyphen=–(en)

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Use proper quote and apostrophe mark Use true quotation marks and apostrophes instead of using inch marks and feet marks (“ “ ‘ ‘ are correct. are incorrect.) Place all punctuations, except colons and semi-colons, inside the quotation marks. To access quotation marks on the Mac, hold down the option key +[ for the opening quote and shift + option+ [for the closing quotation mark. To access the reversed apostrophe/single opening quote (‘), type option +].


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Use true small caps When setting text that contains acronyms, select a typeface with small caps as a family. Selecting small caps from the style menus is a poor choice because the computer reduces the overall size of the type by 80%. This changes the stroke weight and the feel of the font. Expert sets in the Adobe Type Library have small caps options.

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Add letter spacing to capitalized text and small caps Letter spacing is the amount of space between characters in a word. Some software programs call letter spacing tracking. Use positive number values to open up the letter spacing for capitalized text and small caps to about 2 or 3.

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Use old style figures when appropriate Old Style Figures, also known as non-lining figures, do not line up on the baseline as do regular or lining numerals. Old style figures can be found in various fonts. If the body text has a significant amount of numbers, research a font family where they are included. If non-lining numerals are not available use a slightly smaller point size for the lining numbers. Think of lining numbers as uppercase numbers and non-lining numbers as lowercase numbers.

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7

Use caps properly Very rarely use all capital letters. With the options given by type families such as bold, larger point sizes, etc.; you will seldom need to use all caps to draw attention to your text. When type is set in all caps, readers have to read each individual letter rather than recognizing groups of letters. This slows the reader and the amount of information they are retrieving. Also, not all typefaces are readable when set in all caps. Readers have to read each individual letter rather than recognizing group letters. This slows the reader and the amount of information they are retrieving. Also, not all typefaces are readable when set I all caps. This is especially true about script typefaces and the most decorative typefaces. Short headlines may be one exception to this rule.

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Use bold text properly Use bold text, sparingly. Bold text stands out from body text. Bold text is better used in headlines, captions; logos drop caps, or other special type treatments. Usually italics are ma more bustle way to separate text from the rest of the body without drawing too much attention.

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Use copyright, register and trademark marks properly The copyright (©), register (®) and trademark ™ characters need to be reduced to work with body text. At times, depending on the typeface, you may need to reduce the mark between 50% and 70%. The goal is to try to match the x-height. © Should are approximately 70% of the surrounding text. Again, trying to set the size of the symbol to the x-height. Unlike the Tm symbol, the © symbol should not be superscripted.It should remain on the baseline is usually supercripted for the chosen font. ™ and ® are normally set higher than othermarks. If you choose to supercript ® it to 60% of the size.


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Ellipsis character Use the ellipsis character and not the three periods. You can access the ellipsis character by typing option +: (colon.) Allow a small amount of space before or after. If the ellipsis character doesn’t seem to be crowding the text, leave no space at all.

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Avoid underlines text Back in the typewriter days, underlining was the only way to draw attention to the text. Now with digital and their families, you have the options of using bolds, italics or obliques.

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Increase line spacing to improve readability in body text. Line spacing or leading refers to the space between lines of text. It is important for the purpose of readability and appearance. Leading is measured from baseline to baseline. As a rule of thumb, allow leading that equals 120% of point size. For Sans serif you may need 135%. Leading should be increased proportionally as line length increases. When setting headlines, negative or solid leading may be appropriate. Solid leading means that the leading equals to point size.

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13

Body text size You can probably set body text to point size smaller than your original choice. Body text is usually set from 9–12 points. When you print text it is usually larger than what it looked like on the screen. So, print out your text before finalizing your layout. Type studies will help you determine the proper size before you proceed with your layout.

14 Altering fonts Don’t alter the widths, weight, or shapes of the characters. Type design is an art. Each character has been carefully designed taking into consideration the width and the shape of each character. Graphic software allows us to destroy/alter the original design. Inexperience designers use this option to “force” type to fit. Select typefaces with large families if you need the flexibility in widths and weights.

15 Legibility of fonts Sans serif typefaces are often less legible than serif fonts. In the western world, we learn to recognize shapes as opposed to words and the serifs help link the shapes making it easier to read. Sanserif typefaces wok well for headlines and to set text that is aligned to vertical/horizontal lines. Certain sans serif typefaces, which are not very geometrical, work well for body text such as Gill Sans, Optima and Goudy Sans.


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Decrease line length and increase margins Line Length is the measure of the text on one line. Any measure between 45 and 75 characters is comfortable for single volume widths. The ideal measure for body text length is 66 characters (counting both letters, punctuation and spaces.) Multiple columns; a measure between 40—50 characters is ideal.

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Avoid letter spacing lowercase body text As a rule, don’t add letter spacing in body texting. It hampers legibility these formatting instances should only be applied when working with all caps, small caps, and numbers and display text where looser type spacing may increase legibility.

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Word spacing should be fairly close Text mean for extended reading, the amount of space between words in a paragraph, should be fairly close—about the width of a lowercase “I”. If the word spacing is too close, it appears as one giant word and legibility is hampered. To aid legibility, keep the spaces between words not only fairly thin, but also consistent and even.

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Ideal column width For single column pages, 4.25 inches is ideal. For two-columns width columns can be as narrow as 2 inches. Turning on the hyphenation feature can improve word spacing.

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Justification of text Justification can be appropriate in certain places. However, justification can create certain problems such as rivers and word spacing. Some solutions may work but, they need to fit into whatever guidelines the design of the page is requiring. Adjusting the size of your margins. Deep seeing size of your text, typing on auto hyphenates and much hyphenation the text are all examples of solutions. Again if the guidelines of the design require 2 margins and none of the other solutions work, then change the text into a different alignment.

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Choose the alignment that best suits the text Make sure that the alignment chooses for all areas of text, are legible and consistent with the design and guidelines. Left-aligned text is easier to read and easier to set. Justified text is more difficult to set, without the inevitable works spacing problems. Right aligned and centered is generally not used for body text due to hampered legibility.


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Rules of hyphenation Do not rely on the software to judge where hyphens should be placed. At the end of lines, leave at least two characters behind and take at least three forward. For example, “ele-gantly” is acceptable, but “elegant-ly is not because it takes too little of the worked to the next line. Avoid leaving the stub end of a hyphenating or breaking proper names and titles creating a non-breaking space before and after the name will ensure that the name will not break.

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Avoid beginning three consecutive lines with the same word

Since Software programs deal with line breaks automatically based upon a number of variables, it is possible to have paragraphs with consecutive lines beginning with the same word. When this happens simply adjust the text to avoid the problem.

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Always, always spell check Once the design is complete, spell-check all of the text. This is done two ways and both muse be used. First, in most software, there is spell-check available. Use it. Second, print the document will make text look perfect when in actuality. It may not be even if it is text given to you by client, spellcheck it. Never assume that is it correct. Keep a dictionary nearby and use it.

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Always, always spell check Once the design is complete, spell-check all of the text. This is done two ways and both muse be used. First, in most software, there is spell-check available. Use it. Second, print the document will make text look perfect when in actuality. It may not be even if it is text given to you by client, spell-check it. Never assume that is it correct. Keep a dictionary nearby and use it.

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Avoid widows and orphans Widows are either single word alone on a line or singles sentences alone on a new page. Orphans are singles lines of copy lone at the end of a page.

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Hierarchy Decide what to emphasize. Which elements will receive the most emphasis? Which one or two messages do you want to get attention? Play up these elements. Everything else is secondary to those pieces of information. Use white space to bring the elements closer together or to isolate the element and draw attention to them.


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Kerning in headlines Adjust the space between two particular letters to allow for more consistent, negative space.

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Indents In continuous text, mark all paraphrases alter the first with an indent of at least one “em” (3 spaces.)

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Items in a series Items in a series do not use a comma before the word “and”.

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What's the next trend?  

Design a style booklet about the 7 Next Trends in 2014, involving fundamental rules of treating typography.