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ISABEL BROSTELLA portfolio por po p orrrtt ol o


ISABEL BROSTELLA EDUCATION Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

May 2019

Master of Landscape Architecture Candidate

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Master of Science in Architecture Ecological Architecture Certificate (GPA: 3.96) (617) 678-6962 ibrostella@gsd.harvard.edu 39 Lee Street Cambridge, MA, 02138

Northeastern University, Boston, MA Bachelor of Science in Architecture Degree Honors College Minor in Urban Landscape Studies cum laude (GPA: 3.55)

Parsons School of Design, New York, NY Part-Time Student

August 2016 August 2017

August 2011 May 2016

July-December 2015

Product Design for the Home

Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany Semester Abroad

January-May 2014

Architecture and Urbanism Berlin Housing Studio Sustainability Seminar

EXPERIENCE Ageloff and Associates, New York, New York Architectural Associate

July-December 2015

Generated zoning analysis documents for various projects Produced elevations, detail sections, and diagrams Made graphic decisions for online porfolio

Moskow Linn Architects, Norwich, Vermont Studio North

August 2014

Participated in a one-week studio project Designed and constructed a Sugar Shack

Design Space Africa, Cape Town, South Africa Architectural Assistant

June-December 2013

Revised construction drawings (AutoCAD, Revit) Documented plans and site surveying Designed exposition for the 7th M. McWilliams Lecture

Judith Ferrer Interior Design, Panama City Design Assistant Measured and documented plans Revised construction drawings for residential projects Decorated the interior of stores and apartments

May-August 2011-12


RECOGNITIONS Platform Nominee Harvard Graduate School of Design

December 2017

The Adaptive City, Core III Studio Project, was nominated to be on Platform, Harvard GSD’s book

Will M. Mehlhorn Scholarship University of Pennsylvania

May 2017

Received the Will M. Mehlhorn Scholarship Award for achieving the best work in the theory sequence

International Grant Award Harvard Graduate School of Design

March 2017

Received the International Grant Award for my studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Berton Korman Fellowship University of Pennsylvania

March 2016

Received the Berton Korman Fellowship for my studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design

RISE Nominee Northeastern University Nominated twice for the 2015 Research, Innovation, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship Expo at NEU for my Urban Design and Honors Research Project

SKILLS Digital Rhino, Revit, AutoCAD, SketchUp, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, G.I.S, MSO

Manual Model Making, Photography

Language Spanish, English, Basic Portuguese

February 2015


03-08

The Adaptive City

Dredgescape - 2017 Cambridge, Massachusetts

09-10

LA+ Competition

Wang Weilin Island - 2017 South China Sea

11-12

Studio North Acer Hut - 2014 Norwich, Vermont

13-14

Honors Research Project

Sandbag Construction Method - 2015 Panama City, Panama

Ola, Ola, Cocle


Housing + Aggregation

15-20

2015 - (bio)Affiliation Boston, Massachusetts

Material + Structural Intelligence

25-26

2016 - Modular Pavilion Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Large-Scale Reclamation Project

25-26

2017 - Brownfield Remediation Oxford Township, New Jersey

Radcliffe Institute Public Art Competition 2018 - Partitioned Agendas Cambridge, Massachussets

27-28


DREDGESCAPE Phytoremediating to Create New Urban Conditions The Adaptive City, Core III Studio - 2017 Collab: Carson Booth + Andres Quinche Harvard GSD - Cambridge, Massachusetts

Our project aims at; first cleaning i a highly hi hl polluted ll d site i through h h a robust b phyh toremediation strategy; second utilizing dredge materials from the Boston harbor expansion and from a number of other port expansions along the east coast to construct new topographies, which react to climate contingencies, and third; create the physical framework for the future construction of new urban fabrics, that particularly address growing housing needs. This infrastructural and engineered landscape, although measured, analyzed, and constructed with detail, will ultimately have intangible emotional connotations (phenomenological) and will trace the physical manifestations of globalization, urbanity, and ecology. The Reserve Channel, along with the Outer Harbor and Main Shipping Channel are dredging from 7-10 ft excavations into the sea bed in order to allow for the Post-Panamax ships to be able to come in. These equals to around 7.68 million cubic meters of dredge material that would otherwise be dumped somewhere else. We became very interested in looking for a solution for this problem and basically on how to create new urban conditions utilizing this material. There are two types of remediation systems taking place on site, a slow speed one for the urban forests (growing 0.4 m per year), and a fast speed one for the other parcels (growing from 3 to 7 m, on a 12x12 m pixel depending on the area that is being developed). The parcels are composed by 3, 5 or 7 m high platforms that are these heights on purpose since they are responding to sea level rise and storm surge events; the 3 m high platform, for example, is allowed to flood while the others are not. The circles, located on the urban forest parcels, are an exception since they get to 12 m high; the reason for this is for them to serve as points where you can see the entire site and, most importantly, to extend as much as possible the tracing from the existing oil tanks.


SPINES + CIRCULATION

WATERFRONT

CANOPY

BUFFER ZONE

DRAINAGE

PLATFORM GROWTH


YEAR 32

YEAR 16

YEAR 8

YEAR 2

Populus x. Candensis Hybrid Canada Poplar

Populus alba x. grandidentata Hybrid Grey Poplar

Populus nigra x. deltoides Hybrid Black Poplar


Cerc rcidiphyllum japonicum Kats sura Tree

Paulownia tomentosa Empress Tree

Catalpa speciosa Northern Catalpa


MACHINE TAXONOMY

PAVER

SPINES CONSTRUCTION

DREDGING BOAT

I. TAILING SUCTION HOPPER (122 ft dig depth) II. CUTTER SUCTION DREDGES (15-94 ft dig depth)

DUMPER

TRANSPORTING DREDGE

BULLDOZER

CLEAR + FLATTEN SITE

SOIL HYDRO SPRAYER

PLATFORM CONSTRUCTION

THINNING MACHINE CLEARING TREES FOR CONSTRUCTION

EXCAVATOR

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

CRANE

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

12 m 7m

5m

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

105 m

30 m

60 m

105 m

ZOOM-IN PLAN

3m

PLATFORM GROWTH

60 m

TRANSVERSE R NSV RAN V SECTION SE E


SECTION I

YEAR 0 TOP SOIL PLANTING

SECTION II

SECTION I

YEAR 2

SECTION II

DREDGING

SECTION I

YEAR 4 SECTION II TRAILS

SECTION I

YEAR 8

SECTION II

THINNING BUILDING CONSTRUCTION URBAN TREES PLANTNG

SECTION I

YEAR 16 RECREATIONAL SPACES COMMERCIAL SPACES

SECTION II

SECTION I

YEAR 32

SECTION II


WANG WEILIN ISLAND LA+ Competition - 2017 Collab: Miguel Espino South China Sea

VIETNAM TAIWAN PHILLIPPINES

Wang Weilin Island, named after the “Tank Man,” seeks to mitigate and regenerate reefs in the South China Sea since many of them have been destroyed; China is dredging on them to create illegal artificial islands, specifically in the Spratly Islands – an archipelagoCHINA of islands and over 100 reefs and atolls. As China is creating illegal islands to extend their maritime claim under their unrecognized 9-dash line drawn in the 15th century, the environmental and social implications have been devastating for marine life and communities in these highly disputed territories. China’s “cabbage strategy”, or the process of claiming land by surrounding sovereign islands with military, ends up starving their inhabitants and destroying fishing villages throughout the Spratly Islands. Wang Weilin Island conveniently located at the intersection of several maritime claims, acts as a haven for refugees that can integrate into a living, working, and productive floating community. Like an oyster, the island is formed by a shell of recycled plastic surrounding the islands that allows to protect its heart; the construction and generation of a submerged reef. The island hosts research centers and facilities that will aid in this endeavor and fabrics that collect plastic to create the growing structure. Once the proposed reef has grown to a desired maturity, the landforms can be towed to a different site that can benefit from the proposed infrastructure.

MALAYSIA


ACER HUT Norwich, Vermont

Vermont is known for its abundance of Sugar Maple Trees. The process of collecting sap from their trunks was efficient for the project since the chosen site in Norwich, Vermont was surrounded by them. For this project, I participated in a studio with Moskow Linn Architects where we designed and constructed a small-scale rural invention, a Sugar Shack. For the design of it, we were looking for efficient ways in which the hut could be active and work with its site year round. The hut is facing a pond and the stairs allow for people to use them as seating spaces. The process of creating maple syrup requires burning large amounts of wood, so a design strategy developed was taking all of the wood needed for an episode and placing it in between the primary structure. Besides being efficient to the process of making maple syrup, people have the chance to alter the design according to the time of the year; if it is hot, and it is not the maple syrup season, the wood can be completely removed or positioned in a way were cross-ventilation can take place. This strategy allowed the entire process more efficient, and at the same time it worked as a secondary structure for the Shack.


Side Elevation

Front Elevation


SANDBAG METHOD Honors Research Project - 2015 Cocle, Panama

Sand Extraction Points Concrete Block Factories Concrete/Cement Stores

This project involves a study of a new sandbag construction system in order to innovate new sustainable and low-cost applications that will improve the environmental impacts on a site. The sandbag construction is a method with successful results that has been applied mainly in South Africa. For this project, I researched its advantages, effects and limits, and analyzed how the application could be improved for another climatic region. The opportunity of adapting the sandbag method with techniques, as elongating the roof and resizing the windows, are advancements that respond to the tropical climate, making the building method more relevant to places as Panama City. The end product is the design of a low-cost school with the applied strategies that demonstrate the benefits and effects the sandbag construction method can bring to the community, environment and costs. Panama is a good testing ground for the idea of improving the sandbag system since there is a need for a low-cost construction method that is comfortable, efficient and affordable. The primary construction technique used for the construction of public schools is deteriorating and there are many low-income areas where the costs to build new schools are prohibitive. The efficiency of the sandbag construction will not only benefit Panama with its affordable costs, but will also integrate a new technique that can be learned by the community in order for them to apply later.


Sand Extraction

Ola, Ola, Cocle

Time: 1h 22 min Distance: 113 km

Inside

Inside

Outside

Outside

Site Existing School (1-6 grade) W

Sandbag

Concrete Block

8”

8”

16”

8”

96”

6” 96”

24” 12”

12”

40” 20”

Weight: 38-43 lbs

Weight: 15-20 lbs

Materials used: 1. Cement 2. Sand 3. Gravel 4. Water 5. Mortar

Materials used: 1. Sand 2. Wood 3. Metal

Wall cost ʜ (3.3 ft long, 8 ft tall)

Wall cost ʜ (3.3 ft long, 8 ft tall)

Construction time: PRQWKV

Construction time:PRQWKV

12”

48” 12”


(bio) AFFILIATION Northeastern University - Boston, Massachusetts

g

p

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For this project, I spatially explored the living spaces and was interested in creating an efficient space for the residents to live as a community. The site is located around numerous hospitals and universities, which allowed me to introduce this idea since it is an appropriate, effective, and wanted way of living. The community units, which are units that share all the living areas but at the same time provide the users with their own bedroom and bathroom, were introduced as a main part of the building; nursery or college students could inhabit these spaces, for example, by sharing the kitchen, library, study area and living room. The building rotates to create outdoor and indoor spaces throughout the entire building; there are three main spaces with different programs that are permanently open in all floors, allowing residents to inhabit them at all times. The ground floor of each building contains commercial and retail spaces that are open for everyone, and in between the buildings, where the low points of the triangulations covering the half-level underground parking occur, additional public program is available for the entire neighborhood. The idea of living as a community in different scales was explored, and by every unit being part of a bigger space through connectivity, it was successful.


Section Perspective

I

II


III

IV


MODULAR PAVILION Material and Structurall Intelligence - 2016 Collab: Fengyan Li University of Pennsylvania - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

For this project we wanted to design a pavilion that could be able to adapt to different conditions. For the structural design, we used the folding technique as a starting point: it dictated the structural stength we needed for a module to work. We discovered that by increasing the amount of folds in it, the better the system worked. There are eight different modules that together connect to create different the pavilion and the spaces within it. The structure allows us to create an external and internal circulation with the opportunity of creating seating as well; for adventurous people the entire pavilion can be climbed, but for cautious there are three designated spaces with stairs. The idea of assembling the structure on site allows us to use the existing natural conditions as they are and assemble the modules for them to work with it. The material we used is for the strcuture is Ultra Hight Performative Concrete (UHPC) which allows it to have a thin structure with strength for the pavilion to be resilient to its surrounding conditions and people. For the detailing, we have mainly focused on three different details that work together to joins the parts of the module together. In the folded areas we would be joining them with two extra layers, one on top and one on the bottom, made out of Keplar and glued to achieve the folding continuity and work as a structural component. Secondly, we have the metal clamps joining the long straight edges together and designed to allow a 2� break between them to get light inside. Lastly, we have a detail for when multiple pieces come together to hold them. The entire structure works with its immediate environment by responding to it, and has the advantage of being light but at the same time very strong.


01 | height

02 | vegetation

04 | external + internal circulation

03 | entry points

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Brownfield Remediation Large-Scale Land Reclamation Projects - 2017 Collab: Ishaan Kumar University of Pennsylvania - Oxford Township, New Jersey

469+ 468 466 464.5 463.5 462

FOREST

SCRUB SCHRUB

WETLAND MEADOW

EMERGENT

SUBMERGED

469+ 468 466 464.5 463.5 462

UPLAND

FOREST

SCRUB SCHRUB

WETLAND MEADOW EMERGENT

This project is located in Oxford Township in New Jersey, and one of the reasons it is highly contaminated is because it is a brownfield site. This land is separated into three main sectors that were selected because of their levels of contamination and thus previous land-use. For our proposal we explored multiple strategies that could increase the speed of remediation on site. An important aspect of our project was to bring in not only endangered specie to the site, but also multiple specie that had a history in the surrounding areas. Some interventions were small, as creating ways to slow down some of the water sources through the site, but some of them required a different level of detail since they were at a larger scale: the extension of the main river flow into the site, for example, required an analysis of the curves in the x, y and z axis in order to certain species, as trout, to come in. Thus all of the design strategies included and needed an analysis of the habitat requirements per specie. The EPW Manual, Evaluation for Planned Wetlands, was our main source for the creation of this design. It helped to guide the process of selecting the percentages of different systems implemented on site, for instance. The zonation was a crucial aspect and foundation to the design of this project since it was the one dictating the types of regions and thus uses encountered throughout the site. It responded not only to the existing conditions of the site, but the proposed ones, which responded to an analysis of the contamination levels. Human intervention was extremely concidered in all the sectors; there is a research facility strategically located on an area that connects to a main street and is elevated. Paths cut throughout the site in order to show the diversity there is.

SUBMERGED


50

0

52

0

ZONE C

490

48

0

470

54 53

0

0

520

ZONE B 510

500

0

53

0

49

48

0

47

0

ZONE A

46

0

0

510

510

490

46

0

48

0

47

0

500

460

550

46

0

46

500

0

550

0 46

48

530

470

0

0

46

46

0

460

49

0

460

570 56 0

580

540

590

530

520

46

520

470

0

510

470

0

0

46

0

48

0 54

560

550

47

48

48

PERRENIAL MEADOW

0

RESEARCH FACILITY VERNAL POOL EXIST. FOREST 0 48 0

480

49

470

49

0 48

UPLAND FOREST

490

47

0

FOREST SCRUB SHRUB

470

WET MEADOW 480 490

0

EMERGENT

500

SUBMERGED

490

WATER 500

500

PATH 51

0

SCALE| 1:150 0’

150’


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Partitioned Agendas Surveying the Gender Gap in Education Radcliffe Institute of Public Art Competition - 2018 Collab: Isabel Preciado Harvard GSD - Cambridge, Massachussets

It is eminent to acknowledge the gender disparities in Harvard University and remember the trajectory of how women achieved full educational inclusion here. The growing educational gender gap is one of the most antique controversies of the contemporary world. With our design, we seek to question Harvard University’s historic masculine agenda, while rendering history in a new interactive way. Located by the former campus for Radcliff College, our site sits in the epicenter of the coalition between women and men in education. The long trajectory of gender equality between Radcliff College and Harvard College is one that needs not to be forgotten, but rather re-visited and rendered. We question the role of a retaining wall by re-thinking its sole structural role and imposing other significant functions for the project. We designed a space of duality – open and enclosed, intimate and civic – to provide different environments within the site. The duality of the design represents the distinct male and female activist agendas, positioning the wall as the centered hard barrier between the two. It also serves as a chronographic representation of the struggle young Radcliffe College female students encountered with the then machismo agenda of Harvard College. As soon as you get to the site there is a literal barrier that does not allow you to see across, but as you get closer to the present, you start to be able to connect the spaces and understand how by working together they become stronger. Specific historic events are inscribed in the design, cutting the ground and wall as a metaphor to the historic disjunction of men and women. With this project, we aim to implement a dynamic gathering space that serves as a physical metaphor to women’s acceptance trajectory at Harvard. While reflecting on the struggles of educational opportunities inequalities at Harvard, our design provides intimate and communal landscapes for the daily visitor and its surroundings. We see the space being potentially used by both the student community and campus visitors, serving as an outdoor classroom or as a quiet spot for reading


partitions - chronological representation of events that took place before the full integration of Radcliffe College with Harvard College

scatters - pavement pattern design that physically depicts the scattering and slow patter of incorporation of Radcliffe students to Harvard College

high ground - topographic manipulations designed to serve as metaphor for the masculine agenda of Harvard College

barrier - dynamic wall that represents the barrier Radcliffe College students faced against their inclusion at Harvard College. The wall gradually changes in height to depict different inclusion gradients


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