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INA Secondary Newsletter

29 January 2016


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Dear Parents and Carers

T

his week six accomplished public speakers went head to head in Year 10 assembly to compete for two places in the Speak Out Challenge Finals. All six speeches, on a range of topical and emotive issues, were powerful and well delivered. Congratulations to Halima Anjum and Simran Larr who will go forward to represent the school in the finals. Congratulations too to the six Year 8 students who have been chosen to attend the Phillips Exeter Academy summer school in July and August: Thomas Cater, Jainna Bhalla, Cian Clinton, Aman Jagdev, Avihash Desai & Daniyal Khan. We had 29 very strong letters of application and Ms Abbott-Jones and I interviewed 16 students on Tuesday. We were bowled over by the quality of the answers given to some challenging questions and it was a tough task to choose the six successful candidates. Our successful six Year 8s were worthy winners and we are very excited to see them develop into skilled Harkness Champion With best wishes,

RP

achel Macfarlane, rincipal

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HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY: JANUARY 27TH 2016

J

anuary 27th each year is Holocaust Memorial Day. This is the day for everyone to remember the millions of people killed in the Holocaust, under Nazi Persecution and in subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, and Darfur. On this day we honour the people who were murdered and the survivors of these atrocities and challenge ourselves to use the lessons of their experience to help create a safer, better future.

This year the theme for 2016 is ‘Don’t Stand By. The Holocaust and subsequent genocides took place because the local populations allowed insidious persecution to take root. Whilst some actively supported or facilitated state policies of persecution, the vast majority stood by silently – at best, afraid to speak out; at worst, indifferent. Bystanders enabled the Holocaust, Nazi Persecution and subsequent genocides. Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel has written powerfully about the impact of bystanders:

I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. The Holocaust was a genocide, which is defined as acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group’. The Holocaust was the genocide of Jewish people, though many other groups were also targeted by the Nazis, including people from Gypsy communities, political prisoners, gay people, black people, Jehovah’s Witnesses and people with disabilities, and many others. On 27 January each year, we commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day to remember the victims of the Holocaust, and the other victims of Nazi persecution.

Jewish Holocaust: 1933-1945 You may have already seen some Holocaust memorials. These honour the victims and survivors of the Holocaust, which took place between 1941 and 1945, when the Nazis attempted to annihilate all of Europe’s Jews. From the time they assumed power in 1933, the Nazis used propaganda, persecution and legislation to deny human and civil rights to Jews. They used centuries of anti-semitism as their foundation. By the end of the Holocaust, six million Jewish men, women and children had been killed in ghettos, massshootings, concentration camps and extermination camps. Here is an example of a Holocaust memorial here in the UK. It is called ‘6 million +’. It is made up of over six million individual buttons, which were donated firstly by the local community and then from people all around the world. When the artist Antonia Stowe created ‘6 million +, she said its purpose was to ‘ignite and flame confidence, hope and passion, encouraging people to stand up as individuals and in groups to make a positive difference to the lives of others’

Cambodia: 1975 In April 1975 the communist Khmer Rouge seized power in Cambodia, south-east Asia and immediately imposed an extremist programme to take apart and reconstruct the country. The population was made to work as agricultural labourers and those living in towns and cities were forced to leave. It is estimated that over 2 million people were murdered by the Khmer Rouge. Most of the murders took place in rural plots of land, known as killing fields. These two photos show memorials on the site of former killing fields. The building is a stupa, a dome-shaped building erected as a Buddhist shrine. It is filled with 5,000 human skulls, of those who were murdered in the killing fields. As far as we know, no one escaped from the killing fields. Tourists are encouraged to visit the stupa to learn more about the Genocide in Cambodia, and to remember the people who were killed.

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1994: Rwanda In 100 days in 1994 approximately one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered in the Genocide in Rwanda, in Africa. The genocide took place following decades of tensions between Hutus and Tutsis, and a recent history of persecution and discrimination against Tutsis. It was ignited on 6 April 1994 when the plane carrying Rwanda’s president was shot down. Extremist Hutu leaders accused Tutsis of killing the president, and Hutu civilians were told by radio and word of mouth that it was their duty to wipe out the Tutsis. Despite its colossal scale, this genocide was carried out almost entirely by hand, usually using machetes and clubs. Tutsi men, women, children and babies were killed in their thousands in schools and churches. Frequently the killers were people they knew – neighbours, workmates, former friends, sometimes even relatives through marriage. These photos are of the memorial centre in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda. They show us the victims’ names and their faces, restoring their identities back to them, and giving us something to remember them by.

Bosnia 1992-1995 The population of Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims), Bosnian Serbs (Orthodox Christians who have close cultural ties with neighbouring Serbia), and Bosnian Croats (Roman Catholics who have close cultural ties with neighbouring Croatia). In the turmoil following the disintegration of Yugoslavia, Bosnia declared independence in 1992. This was resisted by the Bosnian Serb population who saw their future as part of ‘Greater Serbia’. Bosnia became the victim of the Bosnian Serbs’ determined wish for political domination, which it was prepared to achieve by isolating ethnic groups and, if necessary, exterminating them. With the backdrop of the on-going civil war, in July 1995 Bosnian Serb troops and paramilitaries descended on the town of Srebrenica and began shelling it. Despite the town being declared a safe zone by the United Nations, Bosnian Serb forces prevailed. Women and children were forced onto lorries and buses, men and boys remained. The deportation of Srebrenica’s population took four days. Around 8,000 Muslim men, and boys over 13 years old, were killed in Srebrenica. Up to 3,000 were shot or decapitated in the fields, many in the act of trying to escape. This memorial, to those who were murdered at Srebrenica, began as a cemetery, and it contains the bodies of 5,000 of the 8,000 people killed. Alongside the rows of headstones, there is a sweeping wall of names of the dead, both of which you can see in the picture. A second marker stone bears the figure of 8,372 – the number of the dead and missing. The cemetery provides a place for survivors and the families of those who were murdered to gather, to mourn and to remember their loved ones. A memorial room was opened in 2007 which is open to the public, to the world, for us to learn about the genocide in Bosnia.

Darfur: 2003 to present Darfur is a region in the west of Sudan, bordering Chad in north-east Africa. Before the conflict Darfur had an ethnically mixed population of around six million, with both black Africans and Arabs. In 2003, a civil war began in the region between the sedentary population of farmers and the nomadic population, who have been supported by the Sudanese Government. The Janjaweed, which is an Arab militia backed by the government, have destroyed hundreds of villages and murdered thousands of people. These atrocities have been condemned as genocide by the International Criminal Court and several governments around the world. This civil war has led to the deaths of between 200,000 and 400,000 civilians, although reporting varies greatly as it is difficult for the international peacekeepers to keep accurate records. Up to 2.5 million people are still displaced in Darfur. They have been forced to flee their homes to makeshift refugee camps in Darfur or Chad run by international aid agencies. The UN estimates that roughly 4.7 million people are still affected by the conflict and denied their basic human rights. How can we have a memorial when the conflict is still ongoing, when people are still affected and being denied their human rights? These are truly sad events in History. It is hoped by learning about them, people will learn the horror of them, and not repeat them in the future. Anne Frank sums up nicely: “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.”

Ms Priestley Lead Teacher of History

INA Newsletter 5


PE AT ISAAC NEWTON ACAD News & Results

Currie-Ward for persevering throughout the game.

Sky Sports Ambassador visit

Year 8 Basketball vs Beal

Last Tuesday we were delighted to welcome our new Sky Sports for Living Ambassador, Hannah Beharry. Hannah was nine years number one in the UK, two times European medallist and one of the first females to box for England. Having someone with such a high profile coming to deliver a motivational speech for the female students at INA was an incredible experience. We were lucky enough to have Hannah come in to INA due to the project the school is running; this is a brand new initiative looking to raise participation levels of females in sport. This will run every Tuesday at the start of lunch and we will have special guest teachers from around the school each week to help raise awareness also acting as positive role models. At the end of each speech INA students were given a sheet to log all their sporting activities; the 20 students with the most hours logged will be chosen to take part in a session run by Hannah on her next visit

Year 9 Basketball vs Chadwell The Year 9 Basketball team played their quarter final cup match against a very strong Chadwell side. Chadwell have Basketball teams in various years competing at both county and national level. The Year 9s showed unbelievable determination and desire to make a statement against Chadwell’s strong reputation by staying within 6-8 points of them throughout the first half. It was an exciting end to end game with great quality being shown by both teams. INA started to slip away slowly, entering the 4th quarter 10 points down. INA showed incredible hard work through this tough game and as a team showed great collaboration when the chips were down. Stand out performance goes to Ellis

6  INA Newsletter

The Year 8 Basketball team played their second fixture of the season and after last year’s meeting with Beal School where we heavily defeated they knew they were in for a competitive match. INA started brightly, taking a 4 point lead in the first quarter. Through incredible hard work and precise passing, INA maintained their lead after the second quarter but only by two points. The belief was starting to grow amongst the team that they could cause an upset, however they knew it was their determination, perseverance and collaboration skills that had got them this far. The 4th quarter started and was a very intense 10 minutes with both teams missing valuable points to break free, with 0.2 seconds to go and the score being 18-18, INA were awarded 2 free throws from a foul committed by Beal. Unfortunately we couldn’t convert the free throws and the game went into overtime, something that rarely happens in basketball, let alone school league basketball. With 3 minutes overtime added INA battled on, however a few costly mistakes in the wrong areas lost us the game. It was a tremendous fixture and Year 8 squad can hold their heads high after that performance; stand out performance goes to Faruq Sultan for his precise passing and excellent composure.

Year 7 Joga Bonito (Play Beautiful) 4v4 Football Tournament As part of the school and PE department’s Girls Can initiative, the Year 7 student council team will be organising and running a year 7 4v4 football tournament to take place throughout this term on Mondays after school on the Primary Muga. Each form will be expected to enter at least 1 team and the team must include at least 3 girls. The team must have 5 players in the squad in total. The Girls Can initiative is aimed at trying to encourage more girls to take part in sport and physical activity and our Joga Bonito football tournament will be a great way of showing off the footballing talents of the Year 7 girls. Results for the overall winners of the tournament will be announced later in the term, with each member of the squad being awarded a sporting prize. Good luck to all players and Joga Bonito, Play Beautiful.


DEMY Upcoming fixtures 4th February • Year 10 Basketball vs Wanstead (Home) • Year 9 Basketball vs Beal (Away) 5th February • London Lions trip

PE department extra-curricular and enrichment clubs

After school

Lunch time

DAY

CLUB

TEACHER

VENUE

Mon

Handball

DB

Sports Hall

Netball

EH

MUGA

Table Tennis

GW

Activity Studio

Tues

Judo Club

External

Sports Hall

Wed

Yr 9 S+C

BH

Sports Hall

Rugby Club

OT

Wed

Yr 10 Football

AT

Knox Field/ MUGA MUGA

Table Tennis

BW

Activity Studio

Thur

Thur

Fri

Yr 8 Basketball JL

Sports Hall

Seated MB Volleyball Football/ TB Cricket Yr 7 Badminton club External

Activity Studio

Girls’ Sports club Bike Club

AN

MUGA

EC, DH, BB

MUGA

Football/ Cricket Yr8

AG

Knox Field

MUGA Sports Hall

Day

1st Lunch (Year 10)

Mon

Badminton Boys and Girls

Tues

Fri

Basketball club Boys and Girls

2nd Lunch (year 7,8 &9) Badminton (Year 7, 8 & 9) Boys and Girls Girls Can! (Year 7,8 & 9 Girls) Basketball (Year 8 & 9) Boys & Girls Handball (Year 7, 8 & 9) Boys and Girls Basketball (Year 7) Girls and Boys

Improve your skills! Try something new! Keep fit! Make new friends! Unleash your energy! Increase your chances of getting into a team! INA Newsletter 7


Well done to the following students who are this week’s Mathematicians of the Moment. Please collect a merit from Mr Dukes

This week’s Mathematicians of the Moment Simra Kazi  (7W)   )    

Harkirat Singh  (7I)    

Simonida Hajredini  (8A)    

Ekam Sehmbi  (8S)    

Aishah Patel  (9E)  

Giulia Cozma  (9N)    

Here are the scores so far

7I

130

8I

7S

40

8S

90

9S

7A

130

8A

500

9A

7C

30

8C

30

9C

7N

330

8N

100

9N

1070

7E

90

8E

10

9E

320

7W

230

8W

9W

540

8T

9T

1200

7T 8  INA Newsletter

9I 890


The Mathematics department would like to encourage all students to enter next week’s Mathematician of the Moment competition. Have a look at the problem below. Answers to be written on a Maths postcard to be placed in the Maths post box no later than 4.10pm on Wednesday 10th February. Good luck and may the best form win!!!

YEAR 7 - PROBLEM OF THE WEEK Monday 1st February to Thursday 11th February

Answers on a postcard to be handed to Mr Dukes (G42) by Thursday 4.10pm latest!

YEAR 8 - PROBLEM OF THE WEEK Monday 1st February to Thursday 11th February

Mrs Mess was buying a set of garden furniture. The bill was seventy pounds. She gave the attendant what she thought were two £50 notes, (actually two £100 notes). The attendant was sleepy and didn't notice either, so he gave Mrs Mess what he thought were three £10 notes (actually three £50 notes). Who ended up better off than they should?

Answers on a postcard to be handed to Mr Dukes (G42) by Thursday 4.10pm latest!

YEAR 9 - PROBLEM OF THE WEEK Monday 1st February to Thursday 11th February

WHOSE PET? Emma, Farhan, Gabriel and Harry have different pets: a cat, dog, rabbit and hamster. Emma doesn’t have a dog. Gabriel and Harry do not have a hamster. Farhan has a rabbit. Harry used to have a cat but now has a different pet. What pet does he have?

Answers on a postcard to be handed to Mr Dukes (G42) by Thursday 4.10pm latest!

INA Newsletter 9


Praise & Recognition

Merits - a change has been made!

Year 7 C T S W N I E A

146 137 130 83 69 48 44 34

Year 8 W N C I E A S T

156 152 135 121 118 115 101 97

Year 9 T N E S A W C I

111 79 78 63 55 52 31 28

Year 10 N S W I E T A C

113 82 67 55 52 45 34 0

Ahmed Al-Khafaji Award (Peer Commendation Award) Ahmed was well known for being kind, for helping others and for being extremely polite. He was also someone known for his hard work and absorption; the idea, therefore, is that the winner should be someone that encapsulated one of these qualities in that week. Year 7: Keshan Beckett Edwards 7S Year 8: Mohammed Ahmed 8N Year 9: Huzaifah Malik 9W Year 10: Sneha Prasanna, 10N Good Deed Feed Ms Taylor: Nazifa Monzur 10S – The other day when I was walking from the learning room to S38 I dropped one of my piles of resources and they went everywhere. Nazifa saw this from a quite a distance away, and walked over to help me pick it all up and sort it all out. Ms Walsh: Kamil 7E and Jay 10S often offer to tidy the Art room end of the day making my time tidying much faster. Ms Rudd: Hadeeqah Raja in 9N dropped in and offered invaluable help to me over lunchtime: running errands and helping to set the room up for learning 10  INA Newsletter

Jennifer Byrne Year 9 Pastoral Leader, i/c Praise and Recognition


Year 8 Progress meetings - Tuesday 9th Feb

Y8 Progress meeting are calendared for Tuesday 9th February 2016 from 2:30-6:30. Representation at the event is an expectation outlined in the home school agreement signed by all parents and students. All students will complete lessons p1 – 4a (Y10 students will complete lesson 4a as per KS3 timings).

FANCY TRYING OUT THE OLYMPIC TRACK ON A BMX? INA HAS THE OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE UP TO 15 STUDENTS TO THE OLYMPIC VELO PARK AT STRATFORD ON TUESDAY AFTERNOON 9TH FEBRUARY. OUR LOCAL CYCLE HERO JEREMY GAVE FURTHER DETAILS DURING THE ASSEMBLIES ON 25TH & 26TH JANUARY. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED YOU WILL NEED TO COLLECT A FORM FROM MRS VANLINT. UNFORTUNATELY IT IS NOT OPEN TO YEAR 8’S DUE TO THEIR PROGRESS MEETINGS TAKING PLACE ON THAT DAY.

P4a will finish for all students at 1:05. Students will return to tutor groups from 1:05-1:15. Students who are eligible for Free School Meals who request lunch in advance (via form tutors) can collect a lunch bag from the KS3 desk area as they leave. Tutors will escort students to the KS3 gate at 1:15 where students are expected to go directly home and return between 2:30-6:30 with parents. Students are expected to attend with an adult family member in full school uniform. The progress meeting will take place in the KS3 Hall. The last appointment is 6:25 for a 6:30 finish. Staff will set independent learning for Y7, 9 and 10 in advance for p5 and 6. The school will be closed to Y7, 9 and 10 from 1:15. Enrichments and detentions will not take place.

Cycling Revolution Attached to this newsletter is a letter outlining the cycle confident training sessions we are running, through Cycle Confident Ltd, at Isaac Newton Academy over the February half term break, together with a bikeability and bike maintenance course running on 2 Saturdays in March. Please note that the dates on the letter last week were incorrect for the bikeability level 1 and 2 courses which are running during the half term break. These are fantastic opportunities for your son or daughter to gain confidence in their cycling skills. Which they heard about from our Bikeit Plus Officer in assemblies this week. If your son/daughter would like to attend any of these sessions, can you please complete attachment (or your son/daughter can collect a letter from me) and return it to the Key Stage 3 reception by Monday 1st February . Many thanks Mrs Chamberlain INA Newsletter 11


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INA Newsletter 13


INA BRIDGES

14  INA Newsletter


Reasoning

INA Newsletter 15


BRIDGES How we build learning power and develop character at Isaac Newton Academy “We build too many walls and not enough bridges.” Isaac Newton The secondary BRIDGES programme commences on Monday 14th September. BRIDGES are habits of mind or learning characteristics that develop a student's character and learning power and enable them to grow into well rounded individuals and resilient learners. On a two weekly cycle throughout the year, Year 7 and 8 students are introduced to one or two new habits of mind or learning characteristics that will permeate throughout the curriculum. This will take place through a range of interactive activities. In addition, the students will experience BRIDGES learning objectives in each and every lesson throughout Isaac Newton Academy. Year 9 BRIDGES lessons will focus on strengthening certain BRIDGES learning characteristics through exploration of PHSE topics and themes. Each fortnight you will find top tips in the newsletter of ways of supporting your child to develop the BRIDGES habits of mind and learning characteristics within the home.

ATTENDANCE Regular attendance is a crucial factor in students’ educational development and ability to achieve their full potential.

7T

100

8C

99.1

9I

99.5

10A

100

7A

99.2

8T

97.4

9T

98.7

10T

99.1

7C

99.1

8S

96.5

9C

98.6

10S

98.3

7W

99.1

8W

96

9S

98.3

10E

98.2

7S

98.3

8E

95

9N

98.2

10C

96.4

7N 97.7 At Isaac Newton Academy every 7I 94.3 student is set the 7E 94.1 target of 100% attendance. We know that attendance has a direct link to progress, and would urge you to really consider if a day off school is necessary.

8A

93.9

9W

97.8

10I

96.2

8I

91.4

9A

97.3

10N

96.1

8N

90

9E

93.9

10W

90.4

Well done to 7T and 10A for meeting their 100% target!

Ms. Abbott-Jones Lead Pastoral Leader 16  INA Newsletter

Year 7 96.5% Year 9 97.8%

Year 10 96.8%


Key Dates for the Spring Term 2015: Secondary Spring Term Monday 4th January - Thursday 24th March Half Term 15th - 19th February INSET days: Monday 4th January and Friday 12th February Saturday 30th January Medicine Saturday Stretch: Cambridge University Monday 1st February P6: Year 7 Spelling Bee Wednesday 3rd February P5: (IASC) and P6 (NEWT) Year 8 Spelling Bee Friday 4th March P6: Year 9 Spelling Bee Friday 4th March Visit from Ian Hislop Monday 8th February Future Engineers Workshop Tuesday 9th February Year 8 Progress Meetings (2.30 -6.30pm). Years 7, 9 & 10 studying at home in the afternoon Thursday 11th February Year 7 trip to Oxford University Friday 12th February INSET Day. School closed to students Tuesday 22nd February Debate Competition Friday 26th February Science Live Trip for Year 9s Saturday 27th February Modern Languages and Linguistics Saturday Stretch: Cambridge University Monday 29th February Year 10 Jaguar Land Rover trip Thursday 3rd March Year 10 Progress Meetings (2.30 -6.30pm). Years 7, 8 & 9 studying at home in the afternoon Thursday 3rd March World Book Day Friday 4th March Year 10 Study Skill Workshop Friday 4th March Year 9 Maths Exam Friday 11th March Guest speaker from Institute of Civil Engineers Monday 14th March Year 7 Progress Meetings (2.30 -6.30pm). Years 8, 9 & 10 studying at home in the afternoon Wednesday 16th March UK Team Maths Challenge Finals Wednesday 16th March PE Spring Spectacular Wednesday 16th March Natural History Museum Trip (Triple Science students) Thursday 16th March Natural History Museum Trip (Double Science students) Friday 18th March Year 9 Maths Challenge Friday 18th March Year 9 Battle of the Bands Saturday 19th March Biology Saturday Stretch: Southampton University Monday 21st March Year 8 Big Band Competition Wednesday 23rd March Spring Concert Thursday 24th March Awards Assemblies. End of Term. Half day.

Summer Term Monday 11th April - Wednesday 20th July Half Term 30th May - 3rd June INSET days: Thursday 23rd and Friday 24th June, Friday 8th July

INA Newsletter 17

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