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All About Beagle Beagle is the world class British Country brand. Since the dawn of our time, our inspiration and guide has been real life experience; we believe that clothing should be designed to fit the needs of the people wearing it. This has been true since Beagle was first launched in Twenty Seventeen in County Durham, United kingdom, on a platform of innovation and an idea to create the best possible jeans for the country lifestyle and urban ways. With the idea of farms and manual work in our ideals, we added special features designed to add functionality to our jeans and country fashion; flat rivets that wouldn’t scratch your Land Rover seats, watch pockets, felled seams for a more comfortable day whether at work or play with the addition of seven belt loops rather than the official American standard of five. Functional design details are one of our greatest focuses in our jeans and are adapted to modern country. Jeans are worn by a multi-figure of people every day; we are forever committed to improving the everyday functionality of our jeans and therefore making a huge and positive difference to those lives in the heart of the British countryside, towns and valleys. Our high class standard country performance, started with our understanding of what is needed from country folk in the all new Twenty First Century; clothing that keeps you warm in the winter work, keep you cool in summer strut, stay dry and, just as they did way back when, clothing that keep the pocket inventory of every wearer safe in the elements – only now there is more to carry, even for the British Country Folk.


Introducing

Beagle ÂŽ

Heritage The past brought into the present, Beagle heritage is all about bringing that very vintage country aesthetic us as people of Great Britain truly to bring to life in excellent fashion. This range goes to back to the roots of the Durham farming and mining community, highlighting the heritage it set it place in the days manual labour; many years ago.


“In the wake of Summer, 2017, an idea was born. The idea to bring about the rebirth of a cultural phenomenon. A revival of the classic Northern English dress code of the late 19th Century to the mid 20th Century�


Where it all began, with an idea of nostalgia... At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the individual. It’s something that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on character,” says Eleanor Fenwick, from historic denim manufacturer Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness.

Fenwicks Countryman mill in Consett, Durham, which produces all of Beagles authentic premium vintage denim wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and dimension that happens with those looms,” says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none.

Levi Strauss is credited as the co-founder of the blue jean, created in 1873 in the wake of the California Gold Rush that had taken place a couple decades earlier. On its website, Levi’s shares the story of the Bavarian-born Strauss, who moved to San Francisco from New York in 1853 to open a wholesale dry goods business. There he was approached by one of his tailor customers, Jacob Davis, who was looking for a business partner to patent a trouser design featuring rivets positioned at points of strain to make them last longer. According to Levi’s, the first blue jean design – originally referred to as XX “waist overalls” – had a single back pocket with an Arcuate stitching design. This spread to the far away British Isles, and here we are.


BeagleÂŽ. 2018

The country Lass

Photographed by Isaac Stoker


Country Living It’s safe to assume that most young men have a couple pairs of jeans, some T-shirts, a sweatshirt or two, and maybe a few button-down shirts in their wardrobe. If you don’t have those, you’re either unusually well-dressed or very inventive. The way to go from looking like everyone else to looking sharp and stylish is to take those basic wardrobe pieces and swap a few of them out for pieces that are nicer, but aren’t necessarily any more formal. When everyone else is wearing jeans and T-shirts or hoodies, you stand out by being the guy in something a little different... Beagle.


The Beagle Countryman range... Wether at work or leisure, the elements can’t hurt.


KEEPING UP WITH THE TIMES The Beagle Countryman collection. A lifetime belonging.

At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the individual. It’s something that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on character,” says Eleanor Fenwick, from historic denim manufacturer Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness.

Fenwicks Countryman mill in Consett, Durham, which produces all of Beagles authentic premium vintage denim wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and dimension that happens with those looms,” says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none.

Levi Strauss is credited as the co-founder of the blue jean, created in 1873 in the wake of the California Gold Rush that had taken place a couple decades earlier. On its website, Levi’s shares the story of the Bavarian-born Strauss, who moved to San Francisco from New York in 1853 to open a wholesale dry goods business. There he was approached by one of his tailor customers, Jacob Davis, who was looking for a business partner to patent a trouser design featuring rivets positioned at points of strain to make them last longer. According to Levi’s, the first blue jean design – originally referred to as XX “waist overalls” – had a single back pocket with an Arcuate stitching design. This spread to the far away British Isles, and here we are.


It began simply because us at Beagle believed that by disguising yourself into the environment, you would be less likely to spook your prey and, therefore, enjoy a far more successful hunt. Adopting patterns and colours from various military units, men began painting their faces with war paint and donning ghillie suits to blend in with their surroundings. As years passed most men living in North America started to associate this attire as a uniform of sorts and for the few gentlemen left who enjoy dressing for the shoot, it’s become difficult to find proper shooting attire and even harder to convince fellow enthusiasts that you’re going hunting and not attending a wedding.

I am often shocked by how many people I meet who don’t believe me when I

tell them that a tweed jacket, a tie and a pair of breeks are traditional hunting apparel. In fact, to prove this, I stood outside a local hunting store and asked men and women how they would react if a friend showed up in a jacket and tie to go hunting. The answers ranged from laughter to shock and surprise that men actually dressed like that. One woman, however, remembered seeing similar apparel in a country show in Richmond, North Yorkshire.

Unfortunately for the dapper gentleman, shooting apparel has dwindled in the

same sense that men stopped wearing slacks and blazers in the 50s and 60s and reverted to tracksuits and hoodies as being the socially acceptable attire for a day out. However, there is a contingent of us still who enjoy dressing for the event and the daily elements, and there’s no reason we can’t wear traditional country attire for a day of rambling or working in the mud. Any man who claims you won’t have a successful ramble should be reminded that wax and tweed has been used for decades past.

The most important thing to remember when dressing for a day in Beagle is

to layer based on the weather and the season. Wearing bulky coats is a hindrance, but a proper Beagle wax jacket for hunting, rambling and working will be easy to move in, comfortable to shoot and easy to navigate rocky terrain with and will keep you warm and toasty in even the most inclement of British country elements.

It was the time to create clothes that met the ideals, standards and personalities that define the modern day country folk.

And 2017 was the year.


YEARS OF GREATNESS

RETURNING Rule Britannia! The best of the British...

It began simply because us at Beagle believed that by disguising yourself into the environment, you would be less likely to spook your prey and, therefore, enjoy a far more successful hunt. Adopting patterns and colours from various military units, men began painting their faces with war paint and donning ghillie suits to blend in with their surroundings. As years passed most men living in North America started to associate this attire as a uniform of sorts and for the few gentlemen left who enjoy dressing for the shoot, it’s become difficult to find proper shooting attire and even harder to convince fellow enthusiasts that you’re going hunting and not attending a wedding.

I am often shocked by how many people I meet who

don’t believe me when I tell them that a tweed jacket, a tie and a pair of breeks are traditional hunting apparel. In fact, to prove this, I stood outside a local hunting store and asked men and women how they would react if a friend showed up in a jacket and tie to go hunting. The answers ranged from laughter to shock and surprise that men actually dressed like that. One woman, however, remembered seeing similar apparel in a country show in Richmond, North Yorkshire.

Unfortunately for the dapper gentleman, shooting

apparel has dwindled in the same sense that men stopped wearing slacks and blazers in the 50s and 60s and reverted to tracksuits and hoodies as being the socially acceptable attire for a day out. However, there is a contingent of us still who enjoy dressing for the event and the daily elements, and there’s no reason we can’t wear traditional country attire for a day of rambling or working in the mud. Any man who claims you won’t have a successful ramble should be reminded that wax and tweed has been used for decades past.

The most important thing to remember when

dressing for a day in Beagle is to layer based on the weather and the season. Wearing bulky coats is a hindrance, but a proper Beagle wax jacket for hunting, rambling and working will be easy to move in, comfortable to shoot and easy to navigate rocky terrain with and will keep you warm and toasty in even the most inclement of British country elements.


Bottom: Beagle in action, whatever the role and whatever the weather. Opposite: A woodcutting lad, belonging in Beagle.

It began simply because us at Beagle believed that by

like that. One woman, however, remembered seeing similar

disguising yourself into the environment, you would be less

apparel in a country show in Richmond, North Yorkshire.

likely to spook your prey and, therefore, enjoy a far more

successful hunt. Adopting patterns and colours from various

apparel has dwindled in the same sense that men stopped

military units, men began painting their faces with war paint

wearing slacks and blazers in the 50s and 60s and reverted

and donning ghillie suits to blend in with their surroundings.

to tracksuits and hoodies as being the socially acceptable

As years passed most men living in North America started

attire for a day out. However, there is a contingent of us still

to associate this attire as a uniform of sorts and for the few

who enjoy dressing for the event and the daily elements, and

gentlemen left who enjoy dressing for the shoot, it’s become

there’s no reason we can’t wear traditional country attire for

difficult to find proper shooting attire and even harder to

a day of rambling or working in the mud. Any man who claims

convince fellow enthusiasts that you’re going hunting and not

you won’t have a successful ramble should be reminded that

attending a wedding.

wax and tweed has been used for decades past.

I am often shocked by how many people I meet who

Unfortunately for the dapper gentleman, shooting

The most important thing to remember when

don’t believe me when I tell them that a tweed jacket, a tie

dressing for a day in Beagle is to layer based on the weather and

and a pair of breeks are traditional hunting apparel. In fact,

the season. Wearing bulky coats is a hindrance, but a proper

to prove this, I stood outside a local hunting store and asked

Beagle wax jacket for hunting, rambling and working will be

men and women how they would react if a friend showed up

easy to move in, comfortable to shoot and easy to navigate

in a jacket and tie to go hunting. The answers ranged from

rocky terrain with and will keep you warm and toasty in even

laughter to shock and surprise that men actually dressed

the most inclement of British country elements.


It’s safe to assume that most young men have a couple pairs of jeans, some T-shirts, a sweatshirt or two, and maybe a few but ton-down shirts in their wardrobe. If you don’t have those, you’re either unusually well-dressed or very inventive. The way to go from looking like everyone else to looking sharp and stylish is to take those basic wardrobe pieces and swap a few of them out for pieces that are nicer, but aren’t necessarily any more formal. When everyone else is wearing jeans and T-shirts or hoodies, you stand out by being the guy in something a lit tle different... Beagle, you can’t go wrong; only belong.


The Beagle Countryman, the style of outfit for every countryside Lad or Lass and very unisex. After all, this life isn’t for the faint hearted...


The Beagle Countryman range, taking a walk down the valley of Durham after a day working the fields. Outfit available at www.beagle.com Jacket - £199.99 Beanie - £29.50 Jumper - £65 Jeans - £93 Boots - £125


The leading line of Tunstall. Where adventure begins! Photographed by Isaac Stoker Beagle Archive, 2017.


The North Country... No matter the weather, the day never grinds to a halt in the country! Photographed by Isaac Stoker Beagle Archive, 2017.


Give it a rest marra’...


Introducing

Beagle ÂŽ

Rebel

The past brought into the present, Beagle Rebel is all about bringing that very post war aesthetic us as people of Great Britain truly to bring to life in excellent fashion, mixing vintage with post modernism. This range goes to back to the roots of the Durham youth from the fifties and sixties, highlighting the heritage it set it place in the original juveniles; Not long after World War Two.


Past no longer, only post war nostalgia...

At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the individual. It’s something that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on character,” says Eleanor Fenwick, from historic denim manufacturer Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness. Fenwicks Countryman mill in Consett, Durham, which produces all of Beagles authentic premium vintage denim wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and dimension that happens with those looms,” says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none. Levi Strauss is credited as the co-founder of the blue jean, created in 1873 in the wake of the California Gold Rush that had taken place a couple decades earlier. On its website, Levi’s shares the story of the Bavarian-born Strauss, who moved to San Francisco from New York in 1853 to open a wholesale dry goods business. There he was approached by one of his tailor customers, Jacob Davis, who was looking for a business partner to patent a trouser design featuring rivets positioned at points of strain to make them last longer. According to Levi’s, the first blue jean design – originally referred to as XX “waist overalls” – had a single back pocket with an Arcuate stitching design. This spread to the far away British Isles, and here we are.


At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the

individual.

It’s

something

that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on

character,” says Eleanor Fenwick,

from historic denim manufacturer

Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness.

Fenwicks Countryman mill in

Consett, Durham, which produces all of

Beagles authentic premium vintage denim

wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a

collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle

looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th

anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and

dimension that happens with those looms,”

says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend

began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting

vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to

emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none.


At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the individual. It’s something that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on character,” says Eleanor Fenwick, from historic denim manufacturer Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness. Fenwicks Countryman mill in Consett, Durham, which produces all of Beagles authentic premium vintage denim wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and dimension that happens with those looms,” says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none. Levi Strauss is credited as the co-founder of the blue jean, created in 1873 in the wake of the California Gold Rush that had taken place a couple decades earlier. On its website, Levi’s shares the story of the Bavarian-born Strauss, who moved to San Francisco from New York in 1853 to open a wholesale dry goods business. There he was approached by one of his tailor customers, Jacob Davis, who was looking for a business partner to patent a trouser design featuring rivets positioned at points of strain to make them last longer. According to Levi’s, the first blue jean design – originally referred to as XX “waist overalls” – had a single back pocket with an Arcuate stitching design. This spread to the far away British Isles, and here we are.

Right: Beagle, moody post war modernism. Opposite: Beagle takes you far, to the highest bridges.


Below: Beagle, moody post war modernism. Opposite: Beagle takes you far, to the highest bridges.


KEEP IT

ROCKIN’ At once esoteric – with a sacred status among workmen and country folk as a not so mainstream wardrobe staple, the humble denim jean remains one of the most deceptively complex and mysterious garments of all time; one that creates an emotional and physical connection with the wearer through hard work and long hours of wear. “It’s a very personal thing because of the uniqueness of the dyeing… as you start to wear in your jeans they kind of take on their own personality; each wear pattern is unique to the individual. It’s something that you wear over time and that moulds to your body and takes on character,” says Eleanor Fenwick, from historic denim manufacturer Durham Wears, main supplier of Beagle in their quest for greatness. Fenwicks Countryman mill in Consett, Durham, which produces all of Beagles authentic premium vintage denim wears for the ranges on hand; and boasts a collection of British Draper X3 model shuttle looms from the1880’s, will celebrate it’s 170th anniversary on 20 April. “There is a depth and dimension that happens with those looms,” says Paul, for whom the authentic denim trend began in the ‘80s, “when people started collecting vintage jeans and there was this idea of trying to emulate or replicate that authenticity. We’re always looking at the same jeans from the turn of the century throughout the 1900s for inspiration, experimenting with the yarns or different dye formulas,” He says. Here at Beagle, we believe, why not bring back the sacred connection between the working people of Northern England; reviving a heritage that was second to none. Levi Strauss is credited as the co-founder of the blue jean, created in 1873 in the wake of the California Gold Rush that had taken place a couple decades earlier. On its website, Levi’s shares the story of the Bavarian-born Strauss, who moved to San Francisco from New York in 1853 to open a wholesale dry goods business. There he was approached by one of his tailor customers, Jacob Davis, who was looking for a business partner to patent a trouser design featuring rivets positioned at points of strain to make them last longer. According to Levi’s, the first blue jean design – originally referred to as XX “waist overalls” – had a single back pocket with an Arcuate stitching design. This spread to the far away British Isles, and here we are.


Beagle® | Newspaper Lookbook  

The Beagle® Country Clothing brand, 2018/2019 Lookbook designed and delivered in a tabloid newspaper format; keeping the brand to its vintag...

Beagle® | Newspaper Lookbook  

The Beagle® Country Clothing brand, 2018/2019 Lookbook designed and delivered in a tabloid newspaper format; keeping the brand to its vintag...

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