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Middlebury College

Rohatyn Center

for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007


Following graduation from Middlebury, Sara Lowes ’07 set off to study Arabic in Jordan. In the fall, she will put her economics and political science training to work, first setting up micro-lending programs in Vietnam and then assisting with business development through the Peace Corps in east Africa.

Finding my Place in the World After spending four years at Middlebury, I have developed a new sense of “place.” I’ve come to appreciate how a community arises from the union of a beautiful campus, engaging and challenging professors, and motivated and friendly students. This rural Vermont community, nonetheless addresses with great rigor problems on a local to global scale. It has fostered my aspirations, my desire, and my ability to confront global issues. I explored many academic fields at Middlebury, and my interests migrated to coursework with an international focus. As an economics and political science double major, I learned multiple frameworks for understanding global issues. I also studied Spanish and French, attending the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Madrid and Middlebury’s summer French Language School. My studies culminated in two senior projects: an impact evaluation of a Nicaraguan anti-poverty program and an analysis of developing sectarian violence in Iraq. On campus and outside

the classroom, I worked for the Rohatyn Center, assisting professors in their internationally related research. Finally, I have been continually inspired by the dedicated efforts of various student groups to affect change, such as the Sunday Night Group’s work to curb global climate change and the Hope for Peace group’s efforts to cultivate discussion about the war in Iraq. My post-graduation plans bespeak how confident I have grown in working with global issues. After a summer studying Arabic in Jordan, I will move to Vietnam to work with a French NGO in setting up micro-lending programs. In the spring of 2008, I begin my service with the Peace Corps, working on business development programs in east Africa. Though these journeys will take me far from home, I know my Middlebury experience will guide me in facing the challenges ahead.


Middlebury College

Rohatyn Center

for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007


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RCFIA Mission

he Rohatyn Center for International Affairs (RCFIA) supports the College’s goal of advancing global understanding that radiates from a core linguistic and cultural competency. RCFIA works with a faculty committee to create cocurricular programming that expands opportunities for students, and supports faculty in their teaching and professional development. Programs include Executive in Residence, Scholar in Residence, the International Studies Colloquium, international symposia and lectures, and outreach activities. RCFIA disseminates current research through a Working Paper Series; we also administer institutional grants in international studies, an undergraduate international research travel grant program, and a sponsored internship program. We work with the Career Services Office and other campus organizations to expand opportunities for internships and other types of direct experience that give students a sense of how the world looks and works from perspectives other than their own.


Understanding Globally

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energy challenges, the centenary of Gandhi’s nonviolence movement, and resource wars in Africa.

he Rohatyn Center for International Affairs advances global understanding most visibly by supporting and facilitating the public events— lectures, panels, round tables, symposia—initiatied by our colleagues and listed in these pages. Our International Studies Colloquium offers a more informal opportunity for students and colleagues to discuss developing issues and approaches to them.

Further on the student side, we are proud of the high-level analysis and archival work done by our student interns in support of faculty research, four throughout the academic year and three during the summer months. We were fortunate as well to be able to fund research abroad by five rising seniors during the summer of 2006. The final week of the spring term boasted thesis presentations by some 30 seniors, stretching around the globe, using remarkably sophisticated methodologies, involving two and often three languages, and demonstrating the kind of personal and intellectual growth that keeps Middlebury in the forefront of international studies broadly defined.

Of special note this year were the symposium on “Muslims and the State in the Post 9/11 West,” convened by Erik Bleich of the political science department, and the Charles P. Scott Lecture Series on Immigrant Religions in America, organized by Burke Rochford and his colleagues in the religion department. This year we extended even further our collaboration with the Programs in Environmental Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies, as well as for a number of events related to the “Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur” exhibition at the Museum of Art. This interpenetration is clearly a wave of the future and increases our ability to deal with the complex nature of global affairs. Recordings of a number of these events can be found on our Web site and on the University Channel, of which the RCFIA is a charter member, along with the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, the Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs at Princeton University, and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas. We provide further outreach through our Working Papers Series, ably edited by Mark Williams, professor of political science. This year our executive in residence was James C. Foster P ’06, chairman, president, and CEO of Charles River Laboratories, which provides research products and services to the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. While on campus, Mr. Foster shared in depth his international experience in entrepreneurial leadership. We also collaborated with the Career Services Office on a number of career conversations, which allowed students to explore professional opportunities in the international sphere. We were pleased to support, once again, ambitious studentorganized symposia on themes as wide-ranging as global

We look forward to involvement in two of the most exciting adventures on the College’s agenda: the affiliation with the Monterey Institute for International Studies, which will add new opportunities and programs to the College’s international palette, and the College’s strategic Liberal Arts–Global Action initiative. Both promise to enhance Middlebury College’s ability to make an even stronger contribution to Americans’ understanding of the world and their ability to make a difference in global affairs in the 21st century. My work as acting director this year was made immeasurably easier by the thoughtfulness and legendary efficiency of the RCFIA staff—Charlotte Tate, Martha Baldwin, and Carolann Davis. Working closely with Ian Barrow, director of international studies, and Thierry Warin, director of international politics and economics, further enriched my own perspectives. It has been a great personal honor to direct a center named for a man whose work as U.S. ambassador to France remains a high-water mark in our relations with that country. It has also been a treat to sit in for RCFIA Director Allison Stanger during her leave. I congratulate her on the distinguished achievements of the center and wish her every continued success as she returns to the position. Edward C. Knox College Professor Emeritus, French Acting Director

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007




Top Row: Martha Baldwin, Ian Barrow, and Thierry Warin Bottom Row: Ed Knox and Charlotte Tate Photos: Patrick Baldwin and Carolann Davis

Getting In Touch Edward C. Knox Acting Director, RCFIA College Professor Emeritus, French 802-443-5972 knox@middlebury.edu Charlotte Tate Assistant Director, RCFIA 802-443-5795 tate@middlebury.edu Martha Baldwin Program Coordinator, RCFIA 802-443-5324 baldwin@middlebury.edu Carolann Davis Program Coordinator, International Politics and Economics, and International Studies 802-443-2319 cadavis@middlebury.edu



Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

International Affairs 2006–2007

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Middlebury College

Thierry Warin, Director, International Politics and Economics Ian Barrow, Director, International Studies Cynthia Atherton, Director, South Asian Studies Gloria Gonzalez-Zenteno, Director, Latin American Studies Paul Monod, Director, European Studies Robert Schine, Director, Middle East Studies Stephen Snyder, Director, East Asian Studies Jacob Tropp, Director, African Studies William Pyle, Director, Russian and East European Studies Michael Geisler, Dean, Language Schools and Schools Abroad Jeffrey Cason, Dean, International Programs Kathy Foley-Gorgio, Dean, International Student and Scholar Services

RCFIA Web Site www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia

Annual Report 2006-2007


Inside 3

Understanding Globally

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Getting in Touch

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Symposia and Series

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Lectures and Events

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Colloquia

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Language, Mind, and Culture

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International Research Travel Grants

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Executive in Residence

Cover: Bridget Besaw

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International Thesis Forum

Featured throughout are images from Middlebury College’s 2006 study abroad photo contest.

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International Thesis Awards

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Student Internships

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Working Paper Series

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Selected Faculty Books 2006-2007

Pondering the Dusk. Andrigatra, Madagascar, 2005-2006 Photo: Josh Hendrickson ’07

Photography

Printed on Mohawk Options 100% PCW, 80-lb. cover and 80-lb. text. This paper is manufactured entirely with non-polluting, wind-generated energy, using 100% post-consumer recycled fiber, is Process ChlorineFree, and is certified by Green Seal and SmartWood to the Forest Stewardship Council Standard.

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007




Symposia and Series

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ymposia and series with an international focus are an enriching part of life at Middlebury. Each year, the Rohatyn Center collaborates with a wide range of College departments and student groups to bring scholars and professionals to campus for in-depth and extended discussions. “Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur” Middlebury College Museum of Art Exhibition and Related Events September 14 “Discovering ‘Ur of the Chaldees’: Inside Woolley’s Excavations at Abraham’s Birth Place” by Richard Zettler, professor of archaeology, University of Pennsylvania, and curator of the Middlebury College Museum of Art exhibition “Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur.” October 7 “Preserving Iraq’s Past: Perils and Prospects” by John Russell, professor of art history and archaeology, Massachusetts College of Art. October 11 “Reflections on American Hegemony in Light of the Invasion of Iraq” by Lieutenant General William E. Odom, U.S. Army [ret.], senior fellow, Hudson Institute, and professor of political science,Yale University. October 27 “Archaeology and Burial Rituals from the Royal Tombs of Ur” by Irene Winter, William Dorr Boardman Professor of Fine Arts, Harvard University. November 16 “Bull Lyres, Arched Harps, and Silver Pipes: Music of the Sumerians and their Neighbors, circa 2500 B.C.E.” by Bo Lawergren, professor emeritus of physics, Hunter College of the City University of New York. “The Energy Symposium: Developing Solutions for a Global Issue” (student organized) February 27 – March 3 Keynote addresses: “The New Dream: Updating MLK’s Vision to Meet Today’s Ecological and Social Challenges” by Van Jones, founder of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights.



Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

“Mosaic: Finding Beauty in a Broken World” by Terry Tempest Williams, author of Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place. “Gems for Guns: Resources in Africa” (student organized) April 15-19 Keynote addresses: “The Impact of Resource Wars in Africa” by Michael Klare, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies, Hampshire College, and author of Blood and Oil. “The Exploitation of Liberia’s Rubber” by Emira Woods, codirector of foreign policy studies, Institute of Policy Studies. The Gensler Family Symposium on Women in the Global Arena: “Sex and War” April 25-29 Panels: “Coming of Age in War” with Middlebury College students who grew up in war zones. “Surviving War” with Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf, senior research associate, Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Brown University; Indira Kajosevic, Fielding Graduate Institute; Eileen Meier, instructor, University of Baltimore. “Making War” with Swati Parashar, University of Lancaster; Holly Allen, assistant professor, Middlebury College; Sanjukta Ghosh, associate professor, Castleton State College; Stan Goff, U.S. Army special forces master sergeant [ret.]. “Resisting War” with Deborah Ellis, visiting assistant professor, Middlebury College; Nancy Brown, cofounder, Military Families Speak Out. “Gandhi’s Satyagraha Movement: A Centenary Celebration” (student organized) April 20-30 Keynote addresses: “Turning Apathy into Action: Tools for Social Change” by Michael Shank, government relations officer, Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University. “Resolving the Kashmir Conflict in the Light of Gandhi’s Vision” by Hassan Abbas, research fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Annual Report 2006-2007


Muslims and the State in the Post-9/11 West

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n April 20-21, the Rohatyn Center hosted a major conference on Muslims and the State in the Post9/11 West. Convened by Middlebury College Associate Professor of Political Science Erik Bleich, the conference brought together an international group of leading scholars whose primary focus is on the effects of post-9/11 policies on immigrant integration. A number of papers from this conference will be published as a forthcoming special issue of the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, with Erik Bleich serving as a guest editor. Responding to Threats of Terrorism How are states responding to increased threats of terrorism in the post-9/11 era? What homeland security policies have they developed, and how have these affected Muslim communities? What factors influence the nature of antiterrorist and homeland security policies in different countries? Chair: David Napier, Middlebury College.

Ram Caught in a Thicket, Ur (Iraq), c. 2650–2550 B. C. E., gold, silver, lapis lazuli, copper, shell, red limestone, and bitumen, H. 42.6 cm. University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

Lectures: “Policy Responses to Extremism and Extremist Sympathizers” by Shamit Saggar, University of Sussex. “Framing Anti-terrorism Policies: Debates in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands” by Maurits van der Veen, University of Georgia. Comments: Mark Carroll, Department for Communities and Local Government, U.K. Civic Integration of Muslims How have immigrant integration policies changed in the aftermath of 9/11? Has there been a shift toward enforced integration and away from laissez-faire or state-supported multiculturalism? What specific impact have these policies had on Muslims? Chair: Armelle Crouzieres-Ingenthron, Middlebury College. Lectures: “Limits of Integration Policy: Britain and her Muslims” by Christian Joppke, American University of Paris. “Muslims in the Netherlands: Social and Political Developments after 9/11” by Frank Buijs, University of Amsterdam. “Recognizing Islam in France after 9/11” by John Bowen, Washington University, St. Louis. Comments: Tariq Modood, University of Bristol. Muslim Claims-Making vis-à-vis European States What is the nature of Muslim demands on Western states? Are they of a different nature than the demands of other immigrant or religious minority groups? Are they compatible with standard models of minority claims-making vis-à-vis the state, or do they pose particular challenges in Western Europe? Chair: Febe Armanios, Middlebury College. Lectures: “The Need to Take Religion Seriously for Understanding Multicultural Controversies” by Paul Statham, University of Bristol. “Muslims, Religious Equality, and Secularism” by Tariq Modood, University of Bristol. Comments: Baroness Kishwer Falkner, House of Lords, U.K.

Symposia and Series Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007




Muslims in the United States How has the United States responded to its domestic Muslim community? What are the opportunities and limitations of policy making in the institutionally fragmented United States, as compared to its more centralized European counterparts? How are Muslims responding to homeland security policies in the post-9/11 United States? Chair: Justin Stearns, Middlebury College. Lectures: “The American Mosque in Transition: Assimilation, Acculturation, and Isolation” by Ihsan Bagby, University of Kentucky. “Mecca and Main Street: Muslim Life in America after 9/11” by Geneive Abdo, Gallup organization and journalist. Comments: Erik Bleich, Middlebury College. Transnational Islam To what extent do Muslim identities in Western democracies transcend national boundaries? How are states responding to the transnational element of some domestic Muslim groups? Is it necessary to focus more on international policymaking and coordination when responding to domestic Muslim communities? Chair: Sujata Moorti, Middlebury College. Lectures: “Muslim Transnational Identity and State Responses in the U.K. after 9/11: Political Community, Ideology, and Authority” by Peter Mandaville, George Mason University. “The Policy Implications of Islam as an Imagined International Community” by Riva Kastoryano, CNRS, Paris. Comments: David Low, former National Intelligence Officer for Transnational Threats, the National Intelligence Council, U.S. Overviews, Conclusions, and Challenges for the Future Chair: Fiona Adamson, University College London. Cem Özdemir, Member of European Parliament, Germany. Baroness Kishwer Falkner, House of Lords, U.K. Geneive Abdo, Gallup Organization and journalist. Erik Bleich, Middlebury College.

Charles P. Scott Lecture Series on Immigrant Religions in America

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he Scott series on immigrant religions in America was organized around issues of identity and the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and nation. The working and reworking of identity comprises an ongoing project for immigrants as they seek to adjust to American society. Religion clearly has been central to this ongoing project of identity construction. Primary organization and sponsorship was provided by the Department of Religion and the Charles P. Scott Fund. March 1 “Transnational Religions and American Identities” by Raymond Williams, Charles D. and Elizabeth S. Follette Distinguished Professor in the Humanities, emeritus, Wabash College. March 9 “Religion, Immigration, and the Quest for a Self: An Examination of Contemporary Korean American Buddhism” by Sharon Suh, associate professor of theology and religious studies, Seattle University. March 15 “The Pluralism Project of Distortion: What Do Asian Americans Really Believe?” by Fenggang Yang, associate professor of sociology, Purdue University. April 9 “A Place at the Multicultural Table: The Development of an American Hinduism” by Prema Kurien, associate professor of sociology, Syracuse University. April 19 “Islam: A Truly American Religion?” by Jane Smith, professor of Islamic studies and codirector of the Duncan Black Macdonald Center for Christian-Muslim Relations, Hartford Seminary.

Symposia and Series 

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007


Lectures and Events

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uring the 2006-07 academic year, the Rohatyn Center sponsored and supported a wide array of cocurricular and internationally oriented events that spanned the globe and crossed many disciplines. We welcome you to visit the video archives section of our Web site (www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia/archives/) to view recordings of many of our events.

October 12 “The Myth of Globalization and Neoliberalism: Lessons for George W. Bush” by John L. Campbell, Class of 1925 Professor of Sociology, Dartmouth College.

September 26 Debate on “Foreign Affairs” among Vermont candidates for the United States House of Representatives. Panelists: Green Party candidate Bruce Marshall, Independent candidate Dennis Morriseau, Liberty Union candidate Jane Newton, Republican candidate Martha Rainville, Independent candidate Keith Stern, Democratic candidate Peter Welch. Moderator: Chris Graff ’75, former bureau chief,Vermont Associated Press. Cosponsored by the Vermont Council on World Affairs. October 2 “Swimming against the Tide: Resilient Authoritarianism and Globalization in China” by Andrew Nathan, Class of 1919 Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science, Columbia University.

October 19 “Feeding the World’s Most Populous Country: Organic Agriculture in China” by Lila Buckley ’04, Global Environment Institute, Beijing. October 20 “The Weight of the Colonial Past in French Immigration” by Alexis Spire, National Center for Scientific Research, University of Lille II, France. October 23 “Don Juan: Parodia y desmitificación” by Luciano García Lorenzo, literary critic. October 24 “Population Politics: Old Maps and New Terrain” by Betsy Hartmann, director, Population and Development Program, Hampshire College. October 25 “The Transgressiveness of the Hijab and ‘Muslim Culture’ to Liberalism” by Falguni Sheth, professor of philosophy and political theory, Hampshire College.

October 4 “History of the Sri Lankan Ethnic Conflict” by John Rogers, independent scholar. October 10 “Envisioning a New Africa” by Abdourahman Waberi, University of Caen, France.

October 25 “The Aftermath of Genocide: What Comes Next in Sudan?” by Abraham Awolich, New Sudan Education Initiative (NESEI), and Robert Lair, NESEI and St. Michael’s College.

October 10 “Global Women’s Activism and Reproductive Health” by Jane Roberts, cofounder of 34 Million Friends of the United Nations Population Fund and author of 34 Million Friends of the Women of the World.

October 28 Annual meeting of the New England Council of Latin American Studies, convened by Middlebury College Professor of Political Science Mark Williams.

October 11 “Gender(ed) Tricks: Transvestism and Gay Cruising in Beograd” by Kevin Moss, professor of Russian, Middlebury College.

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2006-2007




October 30 “España cambia de piel (1954-1964): Television (Hi)stories and the Mobile Nation” by Tatjana Pavlovic, associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese, Tulane University.

November 16 “Female Minority Leaders at the U.N.” by Annette Richardson, former director of international relations, New York City 2012 Olympic Bid Committee. November 17 “Has Post-Communism Taught Social Science Anything?” by Stephen Kotkin, professor of history, Princeton University. November 28 “The China Challenge: Transboundary Environmental Issues in International Relations” by Judith Shapiro, director, Global Environmental Politics Programs, School for International Service, American University.

Dedé Mirabal Reyes shares a moment with Nadeghda Gonzalez ’09.

November 1 “The End of Freedom? Oil, Islam, Orthodox Church, and the Press in Putin’s Russia” by Evgeni Kiselev, independent political analyst. November 2 Reading from No Shelter by Pura López Colomé, poet. November 6 “Violence against Women and the Example of the Mirabal Sisters” by Minou Tavárez Mirabal, representative to the Dominican Chamber of Deputies, and Dedé Mirabal Reyes, sister of the late Patria, Minerva, and Maria Teresa Mirabal, the three “Butterflies,” who were killed by Dominican dictator Trujillo’s henchmen in 1960 for their involvement in efforts to overthrow his government.

November 29 “After Fidel: Cuba,Venezuela, and the Challenge to U.S. Policy in Latin America” by Peter Kornbluh, senior analyst, National Security Archive. November 30 “Afghanistan, Haven of Peace and Tranquility” by Luke Powell, photographer. December 1 “Global AIDS Awareness” panel discussion with Glen Elder, professor of geography, University of Vermont; Alicia Battle, director of health education, Middlebury College; Terje Anderson, founder,Vermont CARES; and Robert Cluss, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, Middlebury College. December 4 “Disposable Women: Factory Workers on the U.S.-Mexican Border” by Gabriela Baeza Ventura, assistant professor of U.S. Hispanic literature, University of Houston.

November 10 “Yasukuni’s History Problem” by Alexis Dudden, associate professor of history, Connecticut College.

January 18 “Climate Change in the U.S. Court” by Ronald Shems, attorney at law.

November 16 Reading from Absent by Betool Khedairi, novelist.

January 18 “NATO: Carving Its Future or Digging Its Grave?” by Lawrence Chalmer, director, NATO staff officer orientation course, National Defense University.

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Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

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January 19-20 When I Was a Child, an intermedia event involving Middlebury College student performers and directed by Ted Perry, Fletcher Professor of the Arts, Middlebury College.

March 6 “The ‘Other’ Latinas: Brasileiras in the U.S.” featuring the lectures “In the Shadow of Carmen Miranda and Carnival: Brazilian Immigrant Women in Los Angeles” by Bernadete Beserra, Rockefeller Fellow, Latin American and Latino Studies Program, University of Illinois; and “Travelers of the Twentieth Century: Brazilian Women in the Boston Area” by Helo Galvão, director, Brazilian Women’s Group. March 9 “Secret Intelligence in Support of Foreign Policy” by Haviland Smith, former CIA Chief of Station in Prague and Washington, DC. March 13 “Dateline Afghanistan: Reporting the Forgotten War,” by William Gentile, assistant professor and artist in residence, School of Communication, American University.

Middlebury College students in the winter term production of When I Was a Child, an original performance work that hints at the lives of children during any wartime, but based specifically upon the WWII wartime experiences and memories of the work’s co-creators, Ted Perry, born in the U.S., and Hans Breder, born in Germany. Photo: Bee Ottinger

March 15 “The State of Nutrition in Developing Countries” by Reynaldo Martorell, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of International Nutrition, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

January 21 Concert of music from the Balkans, Ukraine, and Russia by Emerald Stream.

March 15 Screening of Gobi Women’s Song and discussion with Sas Carey, filmmaker and director.

January 22 “Activating the Liberal Arts Education: Social Entrepreneurship at Middlebury College and the Monterey Institute of International Studies” discussion with Wilford Welch, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, and David Hopkins ’07.

March 16 “How Should We Spend $50 Billion to Most Help the Developing World?” by John Hoddinott, senior research fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute.

February 16 Performance of CHALK by Tangente. March 5 “Putting the World Back in World Music” by Marco Werman, British Broadcasting Corporation, part of the Middlebury College Meet the Press series.

March 16 “The Doll at the End of the World: Identity, Otakus and ‘Play’ in Millennial Japan” by Susan Napier, professor, Department of German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature, Tufts University. March 19 “The Current Issue of Multicultural Identity in France” by Hafid Gafaïti, Mellon Distinguished Visiting Professor, Middlebury College.

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March 20 “Women in the Conquest of the Americas” by Juan Maura, associate professor of romance languages, University of Vermont.

April 23 “El indigenismo y sus invenciones: El relato de lo andino en la cultura peruana” by Peter Elmore, professor of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Colorado at Boulder.

March 20 “An Underground Palace in Ancient China: The Tomb of the Marquis Yi of Zeng” by Robert Bagley, professor of art and archaeology, Princeton University.

April 23 “Israel, Iran, and the Future of Terrorism” by Jeffrey Goldberg, Washington correspondent, The New Yorker, and author of Prisoners: A Muslim & A Jew Across the Middle East Divide.

April 3 “Women and Political Participation in Contemporary Iran” by Shahla Haeri, Women’s Studies Program, Boston University.

April 29 Screening of Ahlaam Dreams, directed by Mohamed Al-Daradji. April 30 “The U.S. and the New Middle East” by Gideon Rose, managing editor, Foreign Affairs.

April 4 “Africa’s Sovereign Sorrow: The Politics of Poverty” by Pierre Englebert, associate professor of politics, Pomona College.

May 2 “Reflections on Transatlantic Relations: Foundations, Faith, and Fundamentalism” by Stanley R. Sloan, founder and director, Atlantic Community Initiative, and visiting scholar, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs.

April 5 “The Only Woman in the Room” by Beate Sirota Gordon, Japan Society New York [ret.]. April 5 “Role of Law in China’s Economic Development” by Donald Clarke, professor of law, George Washington University Law School. April 9 “Let’s Rock Again: The Traumatic Saga of Russian Rock Music” by Artemii Troitsky, Moscow State University, and Radio EKHO, Moscow. April 9 Reading and discussion with Dave Eggers, author of What Is the What, and Vendela Vida ’93, author of Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name. April 11 “Islamic Law and International Non-Governmental Organizations” by Naz Modirzadeh, senior associate, Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research, Harvard School of Public Health.

May 3 “From Borat to Political Realities in Kazakhstan: A Kazakh Human Rights Lawyer’s Perspective” by Raushan Nauryzbayeva, executive director, Development of Civil Society, Kazakhstan, and Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow, National Endowment for Democracy. May 8 “Global Warming: Interpreting the Facts” by Bjorn Lomborg, author of The Skeptical Environmentalist, followed by comments and discussion with Bill McKibben, Middlebury College scholar in residence in environmental studies. Moderator: Chris Graff ’75, former bureau chief, Vermont Associated Press.

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Colloquia International Studies Colloquium

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hrough the International Studies Colloquium, students, faculty, staff, and members of the community at large gather over lunch to learn about international research activities. Our speakers include Middlebury College faculty and alumni, as well as other scholars and professionals in the international arena. September 15 “Private Military Contractors and the Challenge of Regulating New Wars” by Kateri Carmola, C.A. Johnson Fellow in Political Philosophy, Middlebury College.

October 30 “Implications of the Summer of 2006: An Israeli Perspective” by Eynat Shlein-Michael, counselor for Middle Eastern affairs, Embassy of Israel, Washington, DC. November 3 “The Russian Response to Modernity: Crystal Palace, Eiffel Tower, and Brooklyn Bridge” by Michael Katz, C.V. Starr Professor of Russian and East European Studies, Middlebury College. November 10 “Middlebury vs. Bangalore: How Does a Small Vermont College Town Deal with Globalization … And Does It Really Have To?” by R. Bruce Hiland, former independent management consultant and founding member of the Middlebury Revitalization Initiative.

September 29 “A Cross-Cultural Approach to Writing” by Bethany Ladimer, professor of French, Middlebury College. October 6 “The Current State of Constitutional Law in Africa: Perspectives of a Former African Justice” by Bereket Habte Selassie, the William E. Leuchtenburg Professor of African Studies and Professor of Law, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; former attorney general and associate justice of the Federal Supreme Court of Ethiopia; and chairman of the Constitutional Commission of Eritrea (1994-1997). October 13 “Environmental Issues and Actions in China Today” alumni panel discussion with Lila Buckley ’04, Global Environment Institute, Beijing; Elisabeth Grinspoon ’90, Resource Planning and Monitoring, U.S. Forest Service Northwest Region; Daniela Salverry ’03, Pacific Environment; Alexandra Wang ’03, China Sustainable Energy Program, The Energy Foundation. October 20 “An American in Paris: Man Ray’s Photographs of African and Oceanic Art” by Wendy Grossman, assistant professor of art history, George Washington University.

November 17 “History and Propaganda in Northeast Asia” by Neil Waters, Kawashima Professor of Japanese Studies, Middlebury College. December 1 “The Greatest Generation: Chinese Fiction Writers 1900 to 1949” by Thomas Moran, associate professor of Chinese, Middlebury College. January 12 “Map of a Vanished Town: Recollecting the Palestinian Past through Biography” by Adina Hoffman, author and film critic. January 19 “Andalus (Over)extended? Applying the Model of Medieval Spain” by Peter Cole, poet and translator. February 16 “Europe at 50: A World-Historical Perspective” by Andrew Moravcsik, professor of politics and director of the European Union Program, Princeton University.

October 27 “The Future of the European Union” by John F. Campbell, former ambassador to the United Nations from Ireland and president of the European Union (2004).

March 2 “Islam, Human Rights, and Constitutionalism” by Nathan Brown, professor of political science and international affairs, George Washington University.

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March 12 “Who is Bombing Bali? The Idea of Al Qaeda in Everyday Life” by A. David Napier, professor of anthropology and art, Middlebury College. March 16 “Fellini Betrayed: The English and Italian Soundtracks of La strada” by Thomas Van Order, assistant professor of Italian, Middlebury College.

Career Conversations

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n collaboration with the Career Services Office, the Rohatyn Center hosts informal career conversations, which allow current students to explore a variety of professional opportunities. Our “career conversationalists” address questions such as: What skills and subject knowledge have been critical to your success? What are the “hot issues” among professionals in your field? What do you see as other jobs, or career options, for individuals like yourself, who want to work in your respective sector of the marketplace? September 22 “Assignment Abroad: Experiencing the World of a New Foreign Service Officer” with Ebru Uras ’01, U.S. Department of State. November 28 “Graduate Schools, Jobs, and Internships in International Environmental Affairs” with Judith Shapiro, director, Global Environmental Politics Programs, School for International Service, American University.

Jack Gill ’77, in Kohat, Northwest Frontier Province, 2003.

April 6 “Pakistan-Afghanistan Relations” by John (Jack) Gill ’77, associate professor, Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, U.S. Department of Defense.

April 6 “A Career in U.S. Diplomacy and Military Strategic Relations” with John (Jack) Gill ’77, associate professor, Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, U.S. Department of Defense.

April 9 “A Reporter’s Notebook: Mideast Update from Washington” by Janine Zacharia ’95, diplomatic correspondent, Bloomberg News. April 25 “American Writing on France—Plus ça change?” by Edward C. Knox, College Professor Emeritus of French, Middlebury College, and director, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs 2006-07. May 4 “French Presidential Elections” roundtable discussion with Middlebury College faculty members Eric Davis, secretary of the college emeritus and professor of political science; Huguette Knox, lecturer emerita of French; and Thierry Warin, associate professor of economics.

From left to right: Thierry Warin, Huguette Knox, Ed Knox, and Eric Davis. Photo: Charlotte Tate

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Language, Mind, and Culture

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rominent scholars and practitioners in the fields of foreign languages, literatures, and cultures come to campus for the Language, Mind, and Culture series, hosted by the foreign language division and the Rohatyn Center.

March 21 “Shakespeare and/or Music,” by Stephen Orgel, Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Humanities, Stanford University. April 11 “The New International Division of Cultural Labor and Global Hollywood” by Toby Miller, professor of English, sociology, and women’s studies, University of California, Riverside.

February 20 “The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding” by Mark Johnson, Knight Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Oregon.

International Research Travel Grants

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iddlebury students preparing to write senior theses can receive generous support for their international research through the Rohatyn Center’s International Research Travel Grant program. Students from any discipline or program whose proposed project is international in its orientation are eligible to apply. Funding is provided by the Rohatyn Center, and the RCFIA Advisory Committee selects the awardees. Three grants were awarded to fund research abroad during the summer of 2007: Sage Bierster, an international studies major with a focus on Latin America, sociology/anthropology, and Portuguese, will investigate the relationship that former “street children” in Rio de Janeiro still have to the street.

Mateal Lovaas ’07 at the U.N. Millennium Development Village in Potou, Senegal, during her RCFIA-funded summer 2006 research.

Amanda Goodwin, a political science major, will conduct research in London to identify voting patterns among ethnic minorities in Britain and determine their motivations. Talia Lincoln, a sociology/anthropology major, will research the cultural, social, and economic impact of American nongovernmental organizations that provide aid to Thailand.

With the support of an RCFIA grant, Courtney Matson ’07 (second from right) conducted research in China on the AIDS epidemic.

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Executive in Residence

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hrough the Executive in Residence Program, distinguished leaders visit the Middlebury College campus to share practical knowledge and insights on current international trends and issues with members of the College community. Executives in residence participate in the stimulating Middlebury College experience by leading policy seminars, conducting career conversations, and meeting with small groups of faculty and students. Each program is tailored to the strengths and experience of the individual leader.

Foster highlighted his public lecture “Entrepreneurial Leadership: What They Don’t Teach You in Graduate School” by revealing “Foster’s Fifteen Focus Areas for Success,” practitioner’s wisdom that the Career Services Office (our event cosponsor) continues to eagerly share with students. Continuing on the leadership theme, Foster had an in-depth discussion on “Entrepreneurship and Business Development” with students in the economics course DigitalBridges2007, taught by David Nicholson ’07, Christopher Cadwell ’07, and Jessica MacArtney ’07.

Executive in Residence 2006-2007

“Collecting Contemporary Art” was the theme of Jim and Audrey Foster’s visit with students in the history of art and architecture course Curatorial Practicum in Contemporary Photography and Film/Video, taught by Emmie Donadio, chief curator at the College’s Museum of Art. Extending his visit into the sciences, Foster discussed the state of the biotech industry with Assistant Professor of Biology Jeremy Ward and students.

In January, we welcomed Executive in Residence James C. Foster, chairman, president, and CEO of Charles River Laboratories, a leading global provider of solutions that advance the drug discovery and development process, where he has held a variety of positions over the past 25 years. One of the highlights under Mr. Foster’s direction at Charles River has been a leveraged buyout of the company in 1999 while a subsidiary of Bausch & Lomb. Six months after taking the company private, he took the company public, where it now trades on the NYSE. In October 2002, Foster was named Entrepreneur of the Year by Forbes. The publication cited him for dramatically increasing profitability by leading the company into new directions through both acquisition and organic growth. He holds the position of chairman of the advisory board for the Entrepreneurial Leadership Program at Tufts University and is a member of the dean’s advisory council at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. Foster also has extensive experience collecting contemporary art, a passion he shares with his wife Audrey Foster, who visited Middlebury as well. He is a member of the board of trustees of the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park and of the visiting committee for contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Jim and Audrey Foster are the parents of Zachary Foster ’07.

James C. Foster.

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International Thesis Forum

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iddlebury seniors showcase their international research before an audience of faculty, staff, and students at the Rohatyn Center’s annual International Thesis Forum. Although the students may be majors in any department or program, their work must be on an international topic. The result is a rich array of internationally oriented honors theses. Many of the students studied abroad, and their research was greatly informed by that experience and their foreign-language competence. Anastasia Aurol, Chinese and political science double major: “Pu Songling’s Ideal Society.” Gruia Badescu, international studies and geography double major, studied abroad in Paris, France, and Mainz, Germany: “Politics, Architecture, and Identity in Rebuilding Germany’s Cities after the Second World War.”

Seniors Amy Heath, Asena Woodward, Ashley Clark, Carolyn Barnwell, and Mateal Lovaas.

Carolyn Barnwell, environmental studies, and sociology and anthropology joint major, studied abroad in Khon Kaen, Thailand: “Organic Solidarity: The Hybrid Discourse and Practice of Alternative Agriculture in Northeast Thailand.” Arnaud Bekenkamp, international politics and economics major: “Civic Life in Catalonia and the Basque Country.” Ljudmila Bilkic, German major: “Dem Überleben seine Kunstder Kunst ihr Überleben: Eine Untersuchung der serbischen und österreichischen Kulturentwicklung in der Kaiserstadt Wien” (“For Every Time Its Art. For Art Its Freedom: An Analysis of Serbian and Austrian Culture in Imperial Vienna”).

Seniors Meredith Conrad, Ljudmila Bilkic, Gruia Badescu, Emily Kilborn, and Tatiana Virviescas.

Ashley Clark, political science major, studied abroad in Berlin, Germany: “A Bitter Pill: Comparison of Transitional Justice Apparatuses in Rwanda and Sierra Leone.” Meredith Conrad, international studies major, studied abroad in Berlin, Germany: “From Kulturkampf to Existenzkampf: Connecting the Anti-Catholic Campaigns of Bismarck and Hitler.” Colleen Fitzharris, history and Russian double major, studied abroad in Irkutsk, Russia: “‘We Saw There Was No Hope’: Soviet Jewish Refugees and American Concern for Human Rights, 1971-1980.”

Seniors Anastasia Aurol, Tae-Hyung Kim, Alfred Yi, Arnaud Bekenkamp,Yuichiro Mitsutomi, and Maureen Murphy. Photos: Carolann Davis

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Aglaya Glebova, history of art and architecture major, studied abroad in Florence, Italy, and Paris, France, recipient of 2006 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Representations of Women in Natalia Goncharova’s Early Work.” Amy Heath, international studies major, studied abroad in Cairo, Egypt: “The Politics of Bilingual North African Print Media.” Emily Kilborn, international studies major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “The Politics of Language in Europe.” Tae-Hyung Kim, international studies major, studied abroad in Harbin and Beijing, China: “In Defense of Protectionism: China’s Cartoon Industry.”

Seniors Michael Young, Iulia Sprinceana, Rachel Rosenfeld, Colleen Fitzharris, and Aglaya Glebova.

Laura Kuhl, sociology and anthropology, and environmental studies double major, studied abroad in Quito, Ecuador: “Losing a Stigmatized Commons: Identity and Community Solidarity for Ecuadorian Concheros.” Mateal Lovaas, international studies major, studied abroad in Grenoble, France,Yaoundé, Cameroon, and Cochabamba, Bolivia, recipient of 2006 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Africa on Stage: Understanding the West’s Collective Representation of Sub-Saharan Africa through a Comparative Analysis of Children’s Literature and International Development.” Sara Lowes, economics and political science double major, studied abroad in Getafe, Spain: “The Use of Propensity Score Matching to Evaluate the Effects of the Red de Protección Social in Wiwilí, Nicaragua.”

Seniors Felipe Pruneda-Senties, Sara Lowes, Zsofia Young, and Laura Kuhl.

Courtney Matson, international studies major, studied abroad in Beijing and Hangzhou, China, recipient of 2006 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “The Politics of Epidemic: How Government and Civil Society Address HIV/AIDS Crisis in the People’s Republic of China.” Yuichiro Mitsutomi, history and Chinese joint major, studied abroad in Beijing and Hangzhou, China: “A Trifurcated Nation: Contemporary Chinese Nationalism and Sino-Japanese Relations.”

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Seniors Aysegul Savas and Pavel Svaton. Photos: Carolann Davis

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Maureen Murphy, Japanese and English literature double major, studied abroad in Tokyo, Japan: “Landscapes of Loss: Depictions of World War II in Mid to Late-Twentieth Century Japanese.”

Tatiana Virviescas, independent scholar, studied abroad in Paris, France: “The Colombian Diaspora in Paris: A Study of Immigration through the Emergence of a Hybrid Colombo-Parisian Social Dance.”

Felipe Pruneda-Senties, film and media culture major: “The Invisible Skull: Death and Modernity in Mexican Postrevolutionary Cinema.”

Devin Wardell, international studies major, studied abroad in Paris, France, recipient of 2006 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Beautiful Craft, Beautiful Life: The Manufacturing Philosophy of William Morris.”

Rachel Rosenfeld, international studies major, studied abroad in Irkutsk and Moscow, Russia, recipient of 2006 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Jewberia: The Struggle to Define Russian Jewish Identity in the Postmodern Period.”

Asena Woodward, political science major: “Two Roads Diverged: Development Discrepancies between Botswana and Zimbabwe.” Alfred Yi, Chinese major, studied abroad in Hangzhou, China: “Representation of Chinese Masculinity in the 1980s: A Detailed Investigation of the Male Characters in Liu Heng’s Fuxi Fuxi, Winter’s Gate, and Black Snow.” Michael Young, international studies major, studied abroad in Moscow, Russia, and Berlin, Germany: “Composing Russianness: Folk Music and Identity in the 20th Century.” Zsofia Young, international studies major, studied abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina: “Broken Promises: Post-Hurricane Stan Reconstruction in Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala.”

Investigating Jewish identity along the Trans-Siberia railroad with RCFIA support, Rachel Rosenfeld ’07 visited Lake Baikal, Russia.

Aysegul Savas, sociology and anthropology major, studied abroad in Yaroslavl, Russia, and Paris, France: “‘No Difference, Really’: Migration Narratives of Kurdish Women from Eastern Turkey to Istanbul.” Iulia Sprinceana, Spanish and economics double major, studied abroad in Getafe, Spain: “El teatro de Valle-Inclán entre lo esperpéntico y la (ir)representabilidad” (“The Theater of ValleInclán between the Esperpento and the (Ir)representability”). Pavel Svaton, German and economics double major, studied abroad in Mainz, Germany: “Westernization of Government Expenditures: Fiscal Convergence in Eastern Europe.” Seniors Devin Wardell and Courtney Matson. Photo: Carolann Davis

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International Thesis Awards

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he Senior Honors Thesis Award in International Politics and Economics was originally established by the Geonomics Institute and is awarded for the best senior thesis in international politics and economics.

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he International Studies Award is given annually to the best senior honors thesis in international studies, broadly conceived. Candidates for the prize may come from any major at the College, provided the thesis work is international in orientation. The thesis may be written in English or in a foreign language.

2007 Senior Honors Thesis Award in International Politics and Economics

2007 International Studies Award

David Restrepo, international politics and economics major: “W(h)ither Coca? Drug Policies, Insurgencies, and Their Effects on the Andean Drug Trade.”

Laura Kuhl, sociology and anthropology, and environmental studies double major: “Losing a Stigmatized Commons: Identity and Community Solidarity for Ecuadorian Concheros.”

David Restrepo (right) catches up with his thesis adviser, Professor of Political Science Mark Williams. In addition to winning the 2007 IPE thesis award, David was selected as outstanding senior in Latin American Studies by the New England Council of Latin American Studies. Photo: Nadia Horning

Laura Kuhl, third from right, with RCFIA Director Ed Knox; her thesis adviser, Associate Professor of Anthropology David Stoll; thesis readers, Assistant Professor of Political Science Nadia Horning and Assistant Professor of Anthropology Michael Sheridan; IPE Director Thierry Warin; and IS Director Ian Barrow. Laura graduated magna cum laude, with high honors in environmental studies and highest honors in sociology/anthropology. Photo: Carolann Davis

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Student Internships

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hile studying abroad, Middlebury students often pursue internships in such diverse fields as diplomacy, international finance, law, environmental policy, economic development, journalism, cinema, and fashion. These internships provide extraordinary opportunities for students to enhance their cultural and language learning. Middlebury students may also engage in internships over winter term or during the summer, before or after a study abroad program. The Digel Family Fund is a source of funding for international internships; students who have significant financial need and want to pursue community service internships outside their home country are selected for support through a competitive process. In addition, the Ronald H. Brown Class of 1962 Endowment, the Felton Family Fund, and the Louis J. Kutzner ’51 Summer Internship Fund provide funding for unpaid international and domestic internships for students, who are selected through a competitive process. These summer internships are noncredit, but students may receive a transcript notation for having completed a summer internship. Sponsored by the Clarence and Anne Dillon Dunwalke Trust, the College offers credit-bearing internships for Middlebury students at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad. In addition, noncredit-bearing internships are offered for Middlebury and non-Middlebury students on our programs abroad.

RCFIA Internships in Middlebury Academic Year 2006-2007 Brian Fung ’10 Eric Harvey ’09 Ioana Literat ’09 Colette van der Ven ’09

Summer 2007 Fernando Aragon ’09 Ioana Literat ’09 Alexandra Widas ’08

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he College’s extensive overseas network makes international internships possible. The following individuals have been instrumental in organizing and overseeing the 2006-2007 internship program. China Tao Hong, Academic Director Jeremy Friedlein, Resident Director Lu Bin, Program Consultant France David Paoli, Associate Professor and Director Danielle LaCarriere, Student Life Coordinator Marie-Madeleine Charlier, Academic Coordinator Viviana Lopez, Program Assistant

Germany Heike Fahrenberg, Associate Professor and Director Italy Rosa Cuda, Associate Professor and Director Patrizia Nesti, Assistant to the Director Laura Sieni, Office Assistant Latin America Claudio González Chiaramonte, Associate Professor and Director (Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Uruguay) Maria Marta Gabriela Lamoretti, Program Coordinator (Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Uruguay) Anna Karlsson, Academic Representative (Chile) Maria Elena Guarda Poblete, Assistant (Chile) Russia Nana Tsikhelashvili, Associate Professor and Director Simone Bonneville, Assistant Director Donna M. Cardarelli, Resident Coordinator, Irkutsk Megan Corrigan, Resident Coordinator, Yaroslavl Karen Anderson, Resident Coordinator, Moscow Spain Kim Griffin, Associate Professor and Director Lena Santillana, Assistant to the Director Laura Hernández, Housing Coordinator and Secretary Teresa Córdova Dexter, Coordinator for Student and Faculty Development and Provincial Programs Gabriel Guillen Peña, Coordinator for Student Affairs and Integration

RCFIA interns Eric Harvey, Brian Fung, Colette van der Ven, and Ioana Literat. Photo: Carolann Davis

Off-Campus Study, Middlebury Jeffrey Cason, Dean of International Programs Liz Ross, Associate Director Stacey Woody Thebodo, Assistant Director (non-Middlebury programs) Julie Good, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: China, France, Germany, Italy, Russia) Nicole Chance, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: Egypt, Latin America, Spain) Terry Crouch, University Relations Coordinator Christie Jones, Program Assistant

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Overseas Internships 2006-2007 Buenos Aires, Argentina Diana Barger: Fundación Huésped Allison Bard: Ecoclubes Amy Beck: IRAM Sara Cowie: Proyectarte Kolbe Franklin: Dirección de la Mujer-GCBA Guillermo García: Amartya Haris Ghertsos: Fundación Rozenblum Rachel Greenspan: Centro Conviven Frances Kammeraad: Idealistas Courtney LaBarge: Maternidad Sarda Dina Magaril: CEPPAS Cristiana Martenson: Consejo del Menor Amy McCowan: Fundación Leer Elaine McGlaughlin: Dirección de la Mujer-GCBA Nick Monier: Ecoclubes Rowan Morris: Centro para la Estabilidad Financiera Benjamin Parsons: Responde Derek Polsinello: Hogar San José Obrero Charlotte Riggs: Ecoclubes Joachim Skyaasen: Consejo de Derechos del Niño-GCBA Patrick Swan: María de las Cárceles Ashley Valle: Idealistas Michael Walsh: Ecoclubes Christopher Wearn: LIFE Argentina Ward Wolff: Responde

Amichai Kilchevsky ’05, recipient of a RCFIA International Research Travel Grant while at Middlebury, has published “Peace and Economic Interdependence in the Middle East” in The World Economy (2007). The article grew out of his senior thesis in international politics and economics and was coauthored with Kirsten Wandschneider, Middlebury assistant professor of economics and international politics and economics, and Jeffrey Cason, Middlebury associate professor of political science and dean of international programs.

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Children of a Dusty Town. San Antonio de los Cobres, Argentina, 2005-2006 Photo: Chris Heinrich ’07

Tucumán, Argentina Noelle Bullion: Programa PUEDES Moriah Helmes: Ingenio La Florida Dylan Wajda-Levie: Ingenio La Florida Niterói, Brazil Emily Hendrick: Baia de Guanabara Jessica Polebaum: Centro de Estudos Jovens e Pesquisa La Serena, Chile William Bloomer: Liceo Gabriela Mistral Evan Williams: Grupo de Astrofísica, Universidad de la Serena Santiago, Chile Gina Delvac: SERPAJ-Servicio de Paz y Justicia-Santiago Karla Hargrave: Fundación Victor Jara Abigail Krumhoz: Colegio Jorge Williams Megan Schneider: YMCA-Santiago

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Valdivia, Chile Jeffery Boyd: Escuela Angachilla Eleanor Buechner: Escuela Francia Dylan Graetz: Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile Anders Meyer: Proyecto de Administración Ambiental Corporativo, Universidad Austral de Chile Jill Morrison: Centro de Estudios Agrarios y Ambientales Hannah Panci: Centro de Estudios Agrarios y Ambientales Valparaíso, Chile Sandhya Daemgen: Facultad de Teatro, Universidad de Playa Ancha Elizabeth Marks: TAC-Taller de Acción Comunitaria Matthew Plitch: Congreso Nacional Joshua Rogol: Escuela República del Paraguay Ana Victoria Sisson: SAPU-Centro de Urgencias Sarah Wilson: Colegio Sagrados Corazones

Gray Glacier. Patagonia, Chile, 2005-2006 Photo: Meira Lifson ’07

Hangzhou, China Michael Brown: Jiahe Outdoor Matthew Orio: Fotoyard Megan Rogers: Meidiya Zhubao

Penmanship. China, 2005-2006 Photo: Laurie Griffin ’07

Himba Woman Puts on Necklace. Okonjombo, Namibia, 2005-2006 Photo: Anna Viel ’07

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Paris, France

Mainz, Germany

Loralie Adams: Ecole alsacienne Douglas Allen: EPITECH Heather Bessette: Le Musée en Herbe Templeton Biddle: Infusio Frances Bohar: Fairchild Publications Hilary Brueck: Alternacom Robert Burton: Bedouk Editions Robert Burton: Lycée Jean Lurçat David Carlson: EPITECH Christina Cerrato: Salvation Army Nate Clancy: EPITECH Kelley Cordova: EPITECH Patrick Cunningham: EPITECH Carolyn Davis: Lycée Jean Lurçat Jennifer Epting: ICB Europe Shannon Gilson: EPITECH Alexxa Gotthardt: Fairchild Publications Jessica Jackson: Lycée Jean Lurçat Akta Jantrania: Parliament Relations Minister Jessica Jorge: Lycée Jean Lurçat Melissa Klein: EPITECH Melissa Klein: Fairchild Publications Kristen Koch: French Heritage Society Krystin Kopen: Sotheby’s Krystin Kopen: EPITECH Miwa Kosuga: Fairchild Publications Daniel Lopotro: Department of International Relations at the National Institute of Sport and Physical Education Daniel Lopotro: Ecole alsacienne Ashley Michalek: EPITECH Blythe Milbury-Steen: EPITECH Jeffrey Murphy: EPITECH Emily Peterson: Pavillon Bleu Marin Sarve-Tarr: Fondation Cartier Marin Sarve-Tarr: EPITECH Kay Teng: United Nations World Food Program Gokce Uzumcu: Fairchild Publications Ana Valdez: EPITECH Ana Valdez: Télélangue Kristin Ward: Ecole Elémentaire Las Case Kinear Young: French Socialist Party

Stephanie Kane: State Parliament of Rhineland-Palatinate Florence, Italy Katelyn Brack: Studio Cavallini & Cantisani Sarah Bray: Vista Magazine Jacob Cohen: Vista Magazine Neil D’Astolfo: Vista Magazine Allison Donahue: Alinari Dana Isaac: Studio Cavallini & Cantisani Olivia Kerr: Vista Magazine Laura Landesman: American Consulate in Florence Emily Muller: Scuola Elementare “Bagno a Ripoli” Amber Stevens: Scuola Elementare “Conservatorio di S.Maria degli Angeli” Julianne True: Vista Magazine Guadalajara, Mexico Victoria Chia: MAMA Limar Clarke: CAMPO Steven Head: U.S. Chamber of Commerce Yolanda Herrera: MAMA Desmond Jennings: First City Mexico Briahnna Skinner: U.S. Chamber of Commerce Kathryn Zioto: MexFam

Moana. French Polynesia. 2005-2006 Photo: Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak ’07

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Xalapa, Mexico Douglas McRae: Museo de Antropología de Xalapa Molli Freeman-Lynde: Comisión para la Defensa de los DDHH Irkutsk, Russia Clare Hipschman: Baikal Wave Berney Richert: Vesti Irkutsk

Study in White. Russia, 2005-2006 Photo: Matthew Van Meter ’07

Moscow, Russia Evan Alterman: Drevo Art Gallery Megan Gentzler: Begin it Now Daria Kosovsky: TPAA(Transatlantic Partnership Against AIDS) Kirsten Neff: Greenpeace Alexandra Widas: Carnegie Moscow Center

Getafe, Spain Andreea Coca: Fundación Mujeres Nondumiso Qwabe: MITA Haley Revak: FUNDESO Margarita Reznikova: U.S. Embassy Abigail Willman: Club Ivy Madrid, Spain Cristina Cerrato: Animatic Producciones Alexander Clark: University of the Middle East Alexandra Coleman: Hombre y Tierra Lana Coryell: Colegio Reinado Corazón de Jesús Jeffrey Cruz: Library of Instituto Internacional Scott Kessler: Instituto Internacional de Derecho y Medio Ambiente Benjamin Kleinman: Proyecto Solidario Molly Knoll: ASHOKA Samantha Krasne: Colegio Público El Trigal Harry Leshner: American Express Christopher Ramos: Colegio Público San Cristobal Sarah Sandoski: Richmond Publishing Alyssa Tomasi: Biblioketa Ryan Wickenberg: Aquarium of Madrid’s Zoo Six students, enrolled in the graduate course on language acquisition, volunteered as native informants and assistants in English language classes in elementary and secondary schools. Montevideo, Uruguay Ximena Bengoechea: Cinemateca Uruguaya Maria Openshaw: Casa de la Mujer de La Unión Caitlin Vincek: Gurises Unidos Jessica Weiss: Red MERCOSUR

Yaroslavl, Russia Adam Irish: Yaroslavl Film Lovers Club Dane Johnson: Yaroslavl Electoral Commission

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Working Paper Series

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he RCFIA Working Paper Series publishes analytical papers on international matters, broadly defined. By publishing the works of scholars and practitioners from a range of institutions, the series aims to invigorate research and intellectual life at the College and beyond. All prospective papers are reviewed, double-blind, by an outside reader. Each publication in the series is available electronically through the Web site listed below, or as a bound volume upon request from RCFIA. Allison Stanger is the executive editor of the series; Mark Williams is the editor. For further information on the RCFIA Working Paper Series and procedures for submission of potential papers, see www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia/ papers.

William Pyle (Middlebury College), “Collective Action and Post-Communist Enterprise: The Economic Logic of Russia’s Business Associations” (2006). Kenneth D. Wald and Bryan D. Williams (University of Florida), “The Diaspora Consciousness of Arab Americans: The Intersection of Social Identity and Global Politics” (2005). Richard Goldstone (Harvard Law School), “The Development of International Criminal Justice” (2005).

RCFIA Working Papers K. Cheasty Miller (University of Texas at Austin), “In the Name of the People? A Closer Look at Politicized Documentary Filmmaking: The Case of El Salvador” (2007). John A. Maluccio (Middlebury College), “Coping with the Coffee Crisis in Central America: The Role of the Nicaraguan Red de Proteccion Social” (2007). João Resende-Santos (Bentley College), “Brazil’s China Card: Trends and Prospects in Brazil-China Relations” (2007). William Odom (Yale University and the Hudson Institute), “American Hegemony: How to Use It, How to Lose It” (2006).

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Untitled. Ghana, 2005-2006 Photo: Erin Elizabeth Schreiner ’07

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Deborah Gerish (Emporia State University), “Men, Women, and Beasts at Clermont, 1095” (2005). Thomas Oatley (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “A Political Logic of Foreign Debt Accumulation” (2005).

Neil DeVotta (Michigan State University), “Uncivil Groups, Unsocial Capital: Whither Civil Society and Liberal Democracy in Sri Lanka?” (2003). Erik Bleich (Middlebury College), “The Legacies of History? From Colonization to Integration in Britain and France” (2002).

Taylor Fravel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), “China’s New Diplomacy and the Future of U.S.—China Relations” (2005).

Felix G. Rohatyn (Rohatyn Associates), “Freedom, Fairness, and Wealth” (2002).

Michael Ignatieff (Harvard University), “The Lesser Evils.” (2005).

Jean-Philippe Mathy (University of Illinois), “The System of Francophobia” (2002).

Charles MacCormack (Save the Children), “The Politics of Humanitarian Relief after 9/11” (2004).

Russell J. Leng and Adil Husain ’02 (Middlebury College), “South Asian War Games” (2002).

David Stoll (Middlebury College), “Moral Authority, Permission, and Deference in Latin American Studies” (2004).

Carolyn Durham (The College of Wooster), “The FrancoAmerican Novel of Literary Globalism: The Case of Diane Johnson” (2002).

Andrew Heyward (CBS News), “Why Television News Is the Way It Is, and Is Not the Way You’d Like It to Be (And Why You Should Care)” (2004).

Jeffrey Carpenter (Middlebury College) and Juan Camilo Cardenas (Javeriana University, Colombia), “Using CrossCultural Experiments to Understand the Dynamics of a Global Commons” (2002).

Ellen Oxfeld (Middlebury College), “The Man Who Sold the Collective’s Land: Understanding New Economic Regimes in Guangdong” (2004).

Stanley Hoffmann (Harvard University), “The European Union and the New American Foreign Policy” (2001).

Jonathan Isham (Middlebury College), Michael Woolcock (World Bank and Harvard University), Lant Pritchett (Harvard University), and Gwen Busby (Cornell University), “The Varieties of Resource Experience: How Natural Resource Export Structures Affect the Political Economy of Economic Growth” (2004). James E. Lindsay (Colorado State University), “Ibn’Asakir (1105-1176): Muslim Historian and Advocate of Jihad against Christian Crusaders and Shi’ite Muslims” (2003). Yvonne Galligan (Queens University, Belfast), “Women in Politics in Ireland, North and South” (2003). Ethan Scheiner (Stanford University), “The Underlying Roots of Opposition Failure in Japan” (2003).

The Road to Baghdad. Syria, 2005-2006 Photo: Nura Suleiman ’07

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Selected Faculty Books 2006-2007 Alvarez, Julia. Saving the World. Chapel Hill: Algonquin Books. Beyer, Thomas. 501 English Verbs. With CD-ROM. New York: Barron’s. Chavez Castaneda, Ricardo. El libro del silencio. México: Alfaguara. Davis, Darién. Beyond Slavery:The Multilayered Legacy of Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield. (Editor) Du, Hang. The Acquisition of the Chinese Ba-construction. Munich: Lincom. Elder, John. Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa: From Vermont to Tuscany in the Footsteps of George Perkins Marsh. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. Endicott, Elizabeth. Pages from the Past:The 1910 Moscow Trade Expedition to Mongolia. Norwalk, Connecticut: EastBridge.

Ganiban, Randall. Statius and Vergil: The Thebaid and the Reinterpretation of the Aeneid. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Herb, Guntram H. Perthes World Atlas. Gotha: Klett Perthes & McGraw-Hill. (Editor in chief) Matthias, Bettina. The Hotel as Setting in Early 20th-Century German and Austrian Literature: Checking in to Tell a Story. Rochester: Camden House Publishers. Moran, Thomas. Chinese Fiction Writers 1900-1949. Dictionary of Literary Biography,Volume 328. Detroit: Thomson-Gale. (Editor) Smorodinskaya, Tatiana. Encyclopedia of Contemporary Russian Culture. London: Routledge. (Coeditor) Tropp, Jacob. Natures of Colonial Change: Environmental Relations in the Making of the Transkei. Athens: Ohio University Press. Warin, Thierry. Crédibilité et discipline monétaire: Naissance d’une école de pensée. Paris: Editions Le Manuscrit.

Machu Pichu en Fuego. Peru 2005-2006 Photo: Jamie Staples ’07

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Father of a Rabbit Farmer. China, 2005-2006 Photo: Megan Young ’07

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Bringing theory and practice together, Laura Kuhl ’07 conducted an in-depth study of identity and community solidarity in the traditional clam-collecting village of San Felipe, Ecuador, which resulted in her award-winning senior thesis. Laura plans to pursue further work on fisheries and go on to get a degree in marine coastal management.

Honing Tools for Change Middlebury far exceeded my expectations about what it means to pursue environmental studies. From studying Vermont forest ecology my first semester to analyzing global warming issues in my last, my classes, professors, and extracurricular activities expanded my outlook and my desire to effect global change. Adding a sociology/anthropology major to my environmental studies concentration in conservation biology taught me to integrate social and natural sciences. I have become convinced of the power of such an integrated approach for addressing complex problems. I experienced the value of this kind of integration while studying in Ecuador my junior fall. I conducted fieldwork in a community of clam collectors, and thanks to a grant from Middlebury’s Alliance for Civic Engagement, I returned the following summer to expand my research for my senior thesis. This community, whose people have long been clam

collectors, is being fundamentally changed by the rise of shrimp farms and resulting deforestation. In my thesis I examined how identity, community, and social stigma relate to resource use, using so much of what I had learned at Middlebury. My thesis truly was the capstone experience it is meant to be. In another project, I worked with chemistry and biology professors analyzing heavy metal contamination in clams I brought back from Ecuador. Although neither I nor my professors had prior experience with this kind of work, they jumped right into the project with me. Their enthusiasm and personal investment in their students was typical of my Middlebury experience; it is what allowed me to grow intellectually and personally, and gives me great confidence as I move out into the world. I hope to work on fisheries and marine coastal management and plan on getting a graduate degree in marine policy within the next several years. I am passionate about the coast of Maine, but I am sure that my future will lead me abroad again.


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RCFIA Annual Report 2006-2007