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Middlebury College

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


President Ronald D. Liebowitz congratulates valedictorian Martin Rajcan of Slovakia at commencement 2006. Rajcan, who was elected to Phi Beta Kappa as a junior and graduated summa cum laude, was the 2006 recipient of Middlebury's Phi Beta Kappa Prize, Senior Honors Thesis Award in Economics, and George H. Catlin Prize.

My Path to Middlebury My path to Middlebury College started in Slovakia, my home country, and continued in India before finally converging to the beautiful state of Vermont. After seeing the first few sunsets over the Adirondacks and getting acquainted with my classmates and professors, I became confident that I had arrived at the right destination.

pursuing my interest in Eastern Europe’s political transition.With the support of the Rohatyn Center, I was able to meet Slovak government officials and interview them about how nations come to terms with their communist past. Moreover, the results of my recent research project were presented to Václav Havel, an honor second to none.

The academic choices I made were naturally pathdependent. Growing up in Czechoslovakia and later Slovakia, I witnessed the Velvet Revolution headed by Václav Havel and lived through the first decade of the post-communist transition. At Middlebury, my interests eventually gravitated towards the study of transition countries of Eastern Europe as well as China. I was fortunate to spend most of the year 2005 studying Chinese language and working in China as an analyst in the energy sector. I integrated these experiences into a senior thesis in economics that explores the process of innovation and technological change in Chinese enterprises.

Being an intern at the Rohatyn Center for four years was the most rewarding experience I had at Middlebury. Learning from talented and dedicated faculty and staff at the center, I was able to thrive academically and grow as a person.The center epitomizes Middlebury’s commitment to global affairs and international education and has influenced my decision to seek professional experience in the natural resources sector after graduation. In a few years, I would like to pursue graduate studies in industrial organization and environmental economics and eventually contribute to shaping public policy on the interplay between the economy and the environment.

My internship at the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs provided an ideal venue for


Building Bridges

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2005-2006 was a lively one, as we strengthened existing programs and initiated new ones. With respect to the latter, we stepped up our ongoing effort to make RCFIA events more widely accessible.You can watch digital videos of a range of lectures in the archives section of our Web site (www.middlebury.edu/ administration/rcfia/archives/) or you can now tune into them via the University Channel, a portal (http://uc.princeton.edu) through which public lectures, panels, and events at universities worldwide are made available through television and the Web. The Rohatyn Center and Middlebury College, together with the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas are charter members of the University Channel initiative. cademic year

Middlebury’s December 2005 affiliation with the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) has already enriched the center’s programming. Students benefited enormously from Deputy Director of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) Sandy Spector’s lecture on meeting the proliferation threat. The Rohatyn Center assisted in the June 2006 Workshop on Teaching Nonproliferation, which was attended by professors from around the country. Middlebury Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Dean of Curriculum Bob Cluss and CNS Deputy Director and Professor of International Policy Studies Clay Moltz oversaw the intellectual content and general orientation of the workshop. We’d like to thank MIIS Adjunct Professor and Director of International Student Programs Peter Grothe for the beautiful photos of children from around the world that now grace our upstairs conference room, linking Middlebury and Monterey. We were also pleased with our partnership with MIDD8. Working together, the Rohatyn Center, the Middlebury chapter of the Roosevelt Institution, and students from MIDD8, with the support of the administration and many other campus organizations, cosponsored a month of events in April 2006 related to the U.N. Millennium Development Goals. This spring, the Department of Religion simultaneously mounted a world-class series on religion and ethnic conflict.

We are indebted to the creative efforts of Middlebury Professors Larry Yarbrough and Walker Connor for turning vision into reality. With respect to ongoing programs, the Princeton Project on National Security’s Working Group on Global Institutions and Foreign Policy Infrastructure (see www.wws.princeton.edu/ppns/) had a productive meeting at the Center in August 2005. It was a record year for international theses at Middlebury; some 36 seniors were nominated by a faculty member to present research in the International Thesis Forum. We had the largest number of applications to date for RCFIA International Research Travel Grants. Under the able direction of Professor Mark Williams, the Working Paper Series continued to flourish. Our Executive-in-Residence program was particularly noteworthy, and we are grateful to Sam Palmisano, chair of the board, president, and CEO of IBM, and Bob Fisher, chair of the board of Gap Inc., for being so generous with their time and ideas. Of course, none of the events in the pages that follow would have seen the light of day without the exceptional contribution of our staff and faculty, with Director of International Politics and Economics Michael Kraus and Director of International Studies Ian Barrow deserving special mention for their devoted service on the RCFIA Advisory Committee. The center could not function without the ideas and resources of many other individuals and organizations committed to the cause of advancing international understanding, who collectively keep the center a beehive of activity. The College is fortunate indeed that Professor Emeritus Ed Knox has agreed to a second stint as director of RCFIA during academic year 2006-2007, when I will be on sabbatical in Prague. Charlotte Tate will continue her usual outstanding work as assistant director throughout, and Martha Baldwin and Carolann Davis will provide their usual vital support. We look forward to another memorable year, and invite you to be a part of it. Allison Stanger Director, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs Professor of Political Science

RCFIA Mission Rohatyn Center for International Affairs (RCFIA) supports the College’s goal of advancing global understanding that radiates from a core linguistic and cultural competency. RCFIA works with a faculty committee to create cocurricular programming that expands opportunities for students, and supports faculty in their teaching and professional development. Programs include Executivein-Residence, Scholar-in-Residence, the International Studies Colloquium, international symposia and lectures, and outreach activities. RCFIA disseminates current research through a Working Paper Series; we also administer institutional grants in international studies, an undergraduate international research travel grant program, and a sponsored internship program. We work with the Career Services Office and other campus organizations to expand opportunities for internships and other types of direct experience that give students a sense of how the world looks and works from perspectives other than their own.

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he

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006




Getting In Touch Allison Stanger Director, RCFIA Professor of Political Science 802-443-5023 stanger@middlebury.edu Charlotte Tate Assistant Director, RCFIA 802-443-5795 tate@middlebury.edu Martha Baldwin Program Coordinator, RCFIA 802-443-5324 baldwin@middlebury.edu Carolann Davis Program Coordinator, International Politics and Economics, and International Studies 802-443-2319



International Affairs at Middlebury College 2005–2006 Michael Kraus, Director, International Politics and Economics Ian Barrow, Director, International Studies, and Director, Middle East Studies Cynthia Atherton, Director, South Asian Studies Gloria Gonzalez-Zenteno, Director, Latin American Studies David Macey, Director, Russian and East European Studies, and Director, Off-Campus Study Paul Monod, Director, European Studies Carrie Reed, Director, East Asian Studies Jacob Tropp, Director, African Studies Michael Geisler, Dean, Language Schools and Schools Abroad Kathy Foley-Giorgio, Dean, International Student and Scholar Services

RCFIA Web Site www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


Inside 1

Building Bridges

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Getting in Touch

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Symposia and Series

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Lectures and Events

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Executive-in-Residence

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Colloquia

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Language, Mind, and Culture

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International Research Travel Grants

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International Thesis Forum

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International Thesis Awards

Photo left by Dennis Curran

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Student Internships

Featured throughout are images from Middlebury College’s 2005 study abroad photo contest.

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Working Paper Series

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Selected Faculty Books 2005-2006

Photography Cover photo by Stephanie Enemark “Sen Ba Zuro” (A Thousand Cranes)–a traditional symbol of peace–was created in 2005 for the 60th anniversary of Hiroshima and sent to the Hiroshima War Memorial.

Printed on Galerie Art Gloss, paper made with 30 percent recycled fiber and chlorine-free pulp using timber from managed forests.

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006




Symposia and Series

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ymposia and series with an international focus

are an enriching part of life at Middlebury. Each year, the Rohatyn Center collaborates with a wide range of student groups and academic departments to bring scholars and professionals to campus for in-depth and extended discussions.

The Enduring Relevance of Cervantes A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of Don Quixote September 29 “Flaubert’s Reading of Don Quixote” by Soledad Fox, assistant professor of Spanish and comparative literature, Williams College. March 9 “Reality Check: Cervantes, Unamuno, and Questions of Narrative Realism” by Edward Friedman, professor of Spanish and comparative literature,Vanderbilt University. March 30 “Quixotic Frescoes: Cervantes and Italian Renaissance Art” by Frederick de Armas, Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Humanities, University of Chicago.

WOW (We Owe the World) Series (student organized) October 11 “The Darkest Hours and a Present Hope: Conflict and Efforts at Peace in Rwanda and Uganda” by Ketura Brown, The Carter Center.

Fatima Gailani Photo by Dennis Curran

Islamic Society Series (student-organized) November 29 “Is Islamophobia Really about Islam? A Socio-Political Look at Islam” roundtable discussion with Middlebury College faculty members Ghazi Abuhakema, visiting assistant professor of international studies and Arabic; Febe Armanios, assistant professor of history; Justin Stearns, visiting instructor in religion; and David Stoll, associate professor of anthropology. February 28 “Freedom of Speech, Provocation, and Tolerance: The Aftermath of the Caricatures of Muhammad” roundtable discussion with Mahmoud Hayyat, past president, Islamic Society of Vermont; and Middlebury College faculty members Febe Armanios, assistant professor of history; Murray Dry, Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science; Quinn Mecham, assistant professor of political science; and Justin Stearns, visiting instructor in religion.

November 4 “Children’s Rights in Africa Today: AIDS Orphans and Child Soldiers” by Kimmie Weeks, spokesperson and director of planning, International Coalition for Children and the Environment.

Paula Nirschel and Zohra Safi ’09 Photo by Dennis Curran



Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


Charles P. Scott Lecture Series “Religion, Nation, and State” January 20

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was provided by the Department of Religion and the Charles P. Scott Fund. rimary organization and sponsorship

A Celebration of Mozart’s 250th Birthday “History in Mozart—Mozart in History” by Neal Zaslaw, Herbert Gussman Professor of Music, Cornell University, and dubbed “Mr. Mozart” by the New York Times for organizing the 1991-1992 Mozart Bicentennial at Lincoln Center.

March 1 “Religion and Nation: Competitors or Reinforcers?” by Walker Connor, scholar-in-residence, Middlebury College. March 15 “Muslim Is the New Black: Constructing the Ethno-Racial Outsider in Western Europe” by Erik Bleich, associate professor of political science, Middlebury College.

Piano recital by Leopoldo Erice, Stony Brook University, including works by Mozart, Haydn, and Schubert. March 1-4

April 4 “Crime versus Nationalism: What Really Drove War in the Balkans?” by Misha Glenny, independent scholar and former European correspondent for the BBC.

International Students’ Organization Symposium “The Changing Face of Tibet” (student organized) Participants included Tibetan monks from Namgyal monastery in Ithaca, N.Y., who constructed a mandala; Rinchin Dharlo, president, Tibet Fund; Robert Barnett, lecturer in modern Tibetan studies, Columbia University; Jamyang Norbu, Tibetan novelist, political commentator, and leading campaigner for rangzen (independence) in the Tibetan community; Middlebury College faculty members David Rosenberg, professor of political science, who helped establish the Tarshi Palkhiel Tibetan community in Nepal as a Peace Corps volunteer in the early 1960s; William Waldron, associate professor of religion; and Ashley Esarey, instructor of political science; and several Tibetan refugees and Chinese students who attend Middlebury College. April 5-7

Dialogues for Peace Symposium “Remember Afghanistan?!” (student organized) Participants included Ashraf Haidari, first secretary of the Afghanistan Embassy in Washington, D.C.; Fatima Gailani, chair, Afghan Red Crescent Society; Paula Nirschel, founder, Initiative to Educate Afghan Women; John Sifton, Afghanistan researcher, Human Rights Watch; and Middlebury College students from Afghanistan Zohra Safi and Haseeb Humayoon.

April 11 “Global Muslim Identity and the Denmark Cartoon Crisis” by Ijaz Gilani, professor and dean of the faculty of social sciences, International Islamic University, Islamabad. April 19 “The Tsunami and Its Effects on Sri Lankan Politics and Reconstruction Efforts” by Stanley Tambiah, Esther and Sidney Rabb Research Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University. April 20 “How Democratic Could the Arab or Muslim World Be?” by Saad Ibrahim, professor of political sociology, American University, Cairo. April 26 “One Nation under God: Religion, Nation, and the Drive for Statehood in the Post-Soviet World” by Christopher Marsh, associate professor of political science, Baylor University. May 2 “The Moral Economy of Religious Change in Latin America” by David Stoll, associate professor of anthropology, Middlebury College. We welcome you to visit the archives section of the RCFIA Web site (www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia/archives) to view digital videos of all of the Scott lectures.

Symposia and Series

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006




MIDD8 Global Awareness Month in April

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Millennium Development Goals set forth by the United Nations, a group of Middlebury College students organized and cosponsored a series of “MIDD8” events during the month of April. n support of the

The U.N. Millennium Development goals include • Eradication of extreme poverty and hunger • Achievement of universal primary education • Promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women • Reduction of child mortality • Improvement of maternal health • Combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other infectious diseases • Ensuring environmental sustainability • Global partnering for development

In addition to setting up their own events for campus audiences and the local community, MIDD8 organizers recognized that there were many other events taking place on campus during the month of April that were closely related to one or more of the Millennium Development Goals and tied them all together through their collective vision.

“The goals are about improving the everyday lives of individuals and communities worldwide who suffer unnecessarily from the effects of extreme poverty.”

–Toral Patel ’09

Charles MacCormack ’63, president of Save the Children Federation, brainstorms strategies for citizen involvement with student organizers of MIDD8. Photo by Dennis Curran

Symposia and Series 

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


Lectures and Events

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2005-2006 academic year, the Rohatyn Center sponsored and supported a wide array of cocurricular and internationally oriented events that spanned the globe and crossed many disciplines. We welcome you to visit the archives section of our Web site (www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia/archives) to view digital videos of many of our events. uring the

August 12 Meeting of Princeton Project on National Security Working Group on Global Institutions and Foreign Policy Infrastructure. (For the final report of the working group, see www.middlebury.edu/administration/rcfia/conferences/princeton. htm.) September 16 “East to West and Back Again: What Really Happens to Board Games” by Irving Finkel, assistant keeper, Department of the Ancient Near East at the British Museum, and cocurator, Middlebury College Museum of Art exhibition Asian Games: The Art of Contest.

September 22 Roundtable discussion between students in the course Modern India (taught by Professor of History Ian Barrow) and 10 public officials from South Asia participating in a U.S. Department of State International Visitor Program focused on effecting social, political, and economic change. September 29 “Go” demonstration and competition with Feng Yun, former women’s world champion of Go (or Weiqi), the world’s oldest board game of skill, invented in China sometime before the sixth century B.C.E. October 4 “Captain of the Sleepers: The Author and Her Translator” by Mayra Montero, novelist, and Edith Grossman, translator. October 7 “Art and Politics under the Habsburgs 1450-1650” by Archduke Géza von Habsburg, art historian and curator.

September 16 Asian games and rhythms of the tabla, a celebration of the opening of the exhibition Asian Games: The Art of Contest and the Middlebury College Museum of Art Robert F. Reiff Gallery of Asian Art. September 20 “The Meaning of the 21st Century” by James Martin, founder of the James Martin 21st Century School at Oxford University.

October 11 “Hair, Hegemony, and Historiography” by Christina Kraus, professor of classics,Yale University. October 12 “Place Matters, or What Do Soil, Climate, and Culture Have to Do with Cheese and Wine? Views from France and Vermont” by Amy Trubek, University of Vermont.

September 21 “Voices from Israel: The Role of Young Leaders in Challenging Times” panel discussion with Michal Goral, director, academic affairs department, Tel Aviv University Student Union; Oren Magnezy, advisor to the prime minister and liaison to the Knesset; Yael Mevorach, head, international relations division, Ben-Gurion University Student Association; and Shabi Michaeli, chairman and manager, Israeli Youth Forum.

From left to right: Sarah Lauing ’07, Shabi Michaeli,Yael Mevorach, Michal Goral, Nina Robinson ’05, and Middlebury College Rabbi Ira Schiffer. Photo by Carolann Davis

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006




October 18 “Under the Olive Tree: Sacred Music of the Middle East” concert by Yuval Ron Ensemble. October 26 “Iraqi Music in a Time of War” concert by Rahim AlHaj on the oud, a 5,000-year-old Middle Eastern stringed instrument. October 27 “The Infrastructure of American Democracy Promotion” by Thomas Melia, deputy executive director, Freedom House, and adjunct professor, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. November 10 “Equiano, the African: Biography of a Self-Made Man” by Vincent Carretta, professor of English, University of Maryland. November 16 “The U.N. Development Programme’s ‘Better Way,’ from the Marshall Plan to the Indian Ocean Tsunami” by Craig Murphy, historian of the U.N. Development Programme, and M. Margaret Ball Professor of International Relations, Wellesley College. November 28 “Where to Now? Iraq on the Eve of the December 15 Elections” by Gordon Robison, journalist.

Students frequently fill the Robert A. Jones ’59 House conference room during afternoon lectures. Photo by Dennis Curran

December 1 “Islam and Globalization” by Saïd Arjomand, Department of Sociology, Stony Brook University. December 1 “More Than a Cover: The History of Brazilian Popular Music through Record Covers from 1940s-1950s” by Jorge Rodrigues, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. January 10 “Russian Cuisine: From Riches to Rags, and Back” by Regina Kozakova, arts consultant, writer, and translator. January 24 “Reporting the News in China” by Rupert WingfieldHayes, China correspondent, Beijing Bureau, BBC. February 1 “Turkey’s Expectations vis-à-vis Europe” by Burak Akcapar, first counselor, Embassy of the Republic of Turkey in the U.S. March 6 Concert by Vusi Mahlasela, South African songwriter and singer.

Chengcheng Xu ’09 shares a laugh with friends. Photo by Dennis Curran

March 7 “Brazilian-Chinese Relations” by Joao Resende-Santos, assistant professor of behavioral and political science, Bentley College.

Lectures and Events 

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


March 13 “Seven Graces” performance by Anita Ratnam, Indian dancer.

April 25 “China and Russia: Superpowers, Past, Present, and Future” by Marshall Goldman, associate director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University; and Merle Goldman, professor of history emerita, Boston University, and associate, Fairbank Center, Harvard University.

March 15 “Can the Lower Classes Be Wise? (For the Answer, See Your Translation of the Decameron)” by Marilyn Migiel, professor of romance studies, Cornell University. March 28 “Benefits of the Oral Transmission of Cultural Tradition in the Arab World” by Fatima Chebchoub, Moroccan artist. March 28 “Iran, South Asia, and North Korea: Meeting the Proliferation Threat?” by Leonard Spector, deputy director, Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies. April 6 “Women, Politics, and Islam: Rereading Islamic Sources” by Asma Barlas, Department of Politics, Ithaca College. April 7 Recital of traditional French songs by Deja Nous. April 13 “Democracy and Growth Reconsidered: Why Economic Performance of New Democracies Is Not Encouraging” by Vladimir Popov, sector head, Academy of the National Economy, Moscow, and visiting professor, Carleton University, Ottawa.

April 27 “An ‘impossible portrait of America’?–Reading BernardHenri Lévy’s American Vertigo” by Edward Knox, professor of French emeritus, Middlebury College. Immediately preceding the lecture, the Honorable François Gauthier, Consul General of France in Boston, conferred on Knox the rank of Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques for his service to the teaching of French culture. April 27 Screening of Citizen Václav Havel Goes on Vacation and discussion with Jan Novak, author, filmmaker, and producer. May 1 “Inequality and Social Justice” panel discussion with JeanPierre Dupuy, professor of French and political science, Stanford University, and professor of social and political philosophy, École Polytechnique, Paris; and Middlebury College faculty members Ann Mari May, visiting associate professor of economics; Peter Matthews, associate professor of economics; and Thierry Warin, assistant professor of economics.

April 18 “Iran’s Nuclear Program and U.S.-Iranian Relations” by Mansour Farhang, former Iranian ambassador to the United Nations, 1979, and professor of politics and international relations, Bennington College. April 24 “A Genealogy of Genealogy: The Quest for Ancestors in American History” by François Weil, director of the Center for North American Studies and directeur d’études, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. Asma Barlas from the Department of Politics at Ithaca College chats with Sean Lena ’ 06 and Justin Stearns from Middlebury's Department of Religion. Photo by Dennis Curran

Lectures and Events

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006




Executive-in-Residence

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Executive-in-Residence program, distinguished leaders visit the Middlebury College campus to share practical knowledge and insights on current international trends and issues. The Executivein-Residence program provides a unique and invaluable opportunity for visiting professionals to exchange views on critical international concerns with members of the College community. Executives-in-residence participate in the stimulating Middlebury College experience by leading policy seminars, conducting career conversations, and meeting with small groups of faculty and students. Each program is tailored to the strengths and experience of the individual leader. hrough the

Conservancy. He has also been a member of the board of directors of Sun Microsystems, a manufacturer of computer workstations, servers, hardware, and software, since 1995. Bob Fisher is the father of Alexandra Lee Fisher ’08. Shortly before the close of the academic year, Middlebury welcomed Executive-in-Residence Samuel J. Palmisano, chair of the board, president, and chief executive officer of IBM Corporation. Palmisano’s lecture “Innovation that Matters” attracted another full house and was followed by a career conversation cosponsored by the Career Services Office. His prepared remarks can be found in the archives section of the RCFIA Web site www.middlebury.edu/ administration/rcfia/archives.

Executive-in-Residence 2005-2006

Gap Inc. is an umbrella company that includes Gap (launched by Fisher’s parents in 1969), Banana Republic (1983), Gap Kids (1986), Baby Gap (1990), Old Navy (1994), and Gap Body (1998), with 3,000 stores in North America, Europe, and Japan. In addition to his role at Gap Inc., Fisher is a trustee/vice chair of the Natural Resources Defense Council, director of Conservation International, and board associate for the Golden Gate National Parks

Palmisano was appointed to his current position in January 2003. Previously, he served as president and chief operating officer. He began his career in 1973 in Baltimore, Maryland. Since then, Palmisano has held a series of leadership positions during his IBM career, including senior vice president for the Enterprise Systems and Personal Systems groups. He played a key role in creating and leading IBM’s Global Services, rising to senior vice president, and building the largest and most diversified IT services organization in the industry. He also served as senior managing director of operations for IBM Japan. In recognition of his leadership role as co-chair of the Council of Competitiveness’ National Innovation Initiative, as well as his many business accomplishments, he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in September 2005. He is the father of Alexander Palmisano ’07.

Robert Fisher

Samuel J. Palmisano

In April, Executive-in-Residence Robert Fisher, chair of the board of the Gap Inc., delivered the lecture “Corporate Social Responsibility: Where Value and Values Intersect” to a standing-room-only crowd. A full house of students also had the opportunity to meet with Fisher over lunch and talk about “Life in a Store, A Career in Retail” in a career conversation cosponsored by the Career Services Office.

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Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


Colloquia International Studies Colloquium

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hrough the International

Studies Colloquium, students, faculty, staff, and members of the community at large gather over lunch to learn about international research activities. Our speakers include Middlebury College faculty and alumni, as well as other scholars and professionals in the international arena.

Michael Cohen (right) of the New School University discusses international development with students. Photo by Carolann Davis

September 23 “Gender Issues in Developing Country Family Planning and Other Reproductive Health Programs” by Mihira Karra, senior public health advisor, U.S. Agency for International Development. September 30 “Genocide in Africa: The Methods Behind the Madness” by Bill Berkeley, author of The Graves Are Not Yet Full—Race, Tribe and Power in the Heart of Africa. October 14 “Albania in Transition: Prospects for Democratic Stability” by Bernard Zeneli, Graduate School of European Studies, University of Tirana, Albania. October 28 “How Much Debt is Too Much? European Fiscal Policy after Maastricht” by Thierry Warin, assistant professor of economics, Middebury College. November 11 “The Discovery of an Ancient Maya Kingdom in the Northwest Peten: Excavations, Education, and Sustainable Development at Jaguar Hill, Guatemala” by James Fitzsimmons, visiting assistant professor of anthropology, Middlebury College. November 18 “The International Relations of the South China Sea: From Freedom of the Seas to the Ocean Enclosure Movement” by David Rosenberg, professor of political science, Middlebury College.

December 9 “Poverty, Inequality, and Economic Growth: Challenges for Developing Countries” by Michael Cohen, director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, the New School University. January 20 “State, Land, and Nomad: Concepts of Land Rights in Mongolian History” by Elizabeth Endicott, professor of history, Middlebury College. February 17 “Occupying the Occupiers: Women versus the Wehrmacht in WW II France” by Paula Schwartz, associate professor of French, Middlebury College. February 24 “U.S. Policies and Interests in Southeast Asia” by Joseph Mussomeli, U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Cambodia; followed by a career conversation cosponsored by the Career Services Office. March 3 “The Hinduization of the Hare Krishna Movement in North America” by Burke Rochford, professor of sociology and religion, Middlebury College. March 10 “U.S. Policy in the Middle East: A Congressional Perspective” by R. Nicholas Palarino, senior policy analyst, Government Reform Committee, U.S. House of Representatives.

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006

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March 31 “To Laugh or Not to Laugh: An Outline of the Confucian Conception of Proper Humor” by Wei He Xu, assistant professor of Chinese, Middlebury College. April 7 “Making Poverty History: Slogan or Reality?” with Charles MacCormack ’63, president, chief executive officer, and member of the board, Save the Children Federation. April 14 “Washington’s Latin American Policy under Bush” by Vinay Jawahar ’03, program associate, Inter-American Dialogue. April 21 “Identity in Question: Being Jewish in the New Germany” by Jeffrey Peck, professor, Communication, Culture, and Technology Master of Arts Program, Georgetown University, and senior fellow in residence, American Institute for Contemporary German Studies. April 28 “U.S. versus E.U. Approaches to Democracy Promotion” by Jacques Rupnik, visiting professor of government, Harvard University, and director of research, CERI-Sciences-Po, Paris.

What’s a Liberal Arts Education Got to Do with It? Making a Difference in a Globalized World

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Middlebury graduates who are extremely in their fields return to campus to discuss their professions and how their perspectives have been shaped by their liberal arts education. In collaboration with the Career Services Office, the Rohatyn Center hosts public presentations, followed by informal career conversations, with these exceptional graduates from the classes of the nineties. These programs are not only informative, they allow current students to explore a variety of professional opportunities. oung

accomplished

October 10 “Reading the Fine Print: Practical Advice for Careers in International Affairs” by William J. Dobson ’95, managing editor, Foreign Policy. May 5 “What’s Wrong with This Picture? The Big Sacrifices and Small Salaries of America’s Teachers” by Nínive Clements Calegari ’93, executive director, 826 Valencia, and coauthor of “Teachers Have It Easy”:The Big Sacrifices and Small Salaries of America’s Teachers.

Language, Mind, and Culture

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in the fields of foreign languages, literatures, and cultures come to campus for the Language, Mind, and Culture series, hosted by the foreign language division and the Rohatyn Center. rominent scholars and practitioners

October 6 “As the World Turns: Bilingualism and Globalization,” by Carol Myers-Scotton, distinguished professor emeritus, University of South Carolina, and research pioneer in codeswitching and bilingualism.

April 19 “Language Is a Lava Lamp: What Was the First Language Like, and Why Are Today’s Languages So Different?” by John McWhorter, senior fellow, Manhattan Institute. May 1 “The Fictional ‘I’ in Hitchcock’s Vertigo” by Jean-Pierre Dupuy, professor of French and political science, Stanford University, and professor of social and political philosophy, École Polytechnique, Paris.

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Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006


International Research Travel Grants

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iddlebury students can receive generous

their international research through the Rohatyn Center’s International Research Travel Grant program. Students from any discipline or program whose proposed project is international in its orientation are eligible to apply. Funding is provided by RCFIA, and a faculty committee selects the awardees. All recipients are named undergraduate research associates of the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs during their senior year. For further information on the International Research Travel Grant program, see www.middlebury.edu/administration/ rcfia/students/grants.htm. support for

Five grants were awarded to fund research abroad during the summer of 2006 Aglaya Glebova ’07, history of art and architecture major, whose proposal is titled “Natalia Goncharova’s Art: Evolution of a New National Identity and Influence of Traditional Images,” will research in France and Russia. Mateal Lovaas ’07, international studies major, who will examine how and with what success different postindependence political actors have approached cultural decolonization in Senegal.

With the support of an RCFIA Research Travel Grant, Pauley Tedoff ’06 (center) traveled to Mauritius during summer 2005.

Courtney Matson ’07, international studies major, who will investigate the effects of attitudes and culture on the AIDS epidemic in China. Rachel Rosenfeld ’07, international studies major, who will explore Jewish history and revival along the trans-Siberian railroad, while investigating questions of Jewish identity. Devin Wardell ’07, international studies major, whose proposal is titled “An Exploration of British Designer William Morris’ Life and Politically Charged Moral Philosophy of Craftsmanship,” will conduct research in England.

Rachel Dunlap ’06 (right) with Mama Diarra Badiane during her RCFIA-funded summer 2005 research in Senegal.

Montevideo featured Candombe, an Afro-Uruguayan tradition of drumming and dance, when Danielle Naugle ’06 was there conducting her RCFIA-funded research in 2005.

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006

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International Thesis Forum

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iddlebury seniors showcase their

before an audience of faculty, staff, and students at the center’s annual International Thesis Forum in early May. Although the students may be majors in any department or program, their work must be on an international topic. The result is a rich array of internationally oriented honors theses. Many of the students studied abroad, and their research was greatly influenced by that experience. international research

Brian Aguilar, Japanese major, studied abroad in Tokyo, Japan: “Shin Nikutai Bungaku: Literature after the Bubble Economy.” Grace Armstrong, independent scholar, studied abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “North-South Copyfights: Ideology and Copyright in the United States and Brazil.” Jennifer Bemis, French major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Sorcellerie et identité dans la litterature féministe de la Caraïbe francophone” (“Witchcraft and Identity in the Feminist Literature of the French Caribbean”). Joy Bloser, Chinese and history of art and architecture joint major, studied abroad in Hangzhou, China: “A Defiant Touch of Personal Expression: The Fingertip-and-Ink Paintings of Pan Tianshou (1897-1971).” Ashley Calkins, Japanese major, studied abroad in Kyoto, Japan: “Representations of the Japanese Emperor: An Examination of the Imperial Image.” Celia Cohen, religion major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Judging the Seemingly Unjudgeable: A Normative Framework for Evaluating Transitional Societies’ Responses to Widespread Human Rights Violations.” Kristen Deane, Japanese major, studied abroad in Paris, France, and Tokyo, Japan: “Reimaging Japan in the PostWar Period, 1944-1964.” Kenneth Donahue, international politics and economics major, studied abroad in Cairo, Egypt: “Taxation and Representation in the E.U.-15.” Rachel Dunlap, English and theater joint major, studied abroad in Dakar, Senegal, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Brave, Sexy, and Tired: The Collected Experiences of Senegalese Women.”

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Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Ian Fleishman, French and German double major, studied abroad in Paris, France, and Berlin, Germany: “La Modernité (a)mnésique: Une lecture des Fleurs du mal à la lumière de Walter Benjamin” (“Memory and Forgetting in the Modern Metropolis: Benjamin’s Reading of Baudelaire’s Flowers of Evil”) “Die Fatale Erinnerung der Flânerie” (“Mnemonic Metropolitan Wandering and the Dialectics of Forgetting”). Calvin Garner, political science and Russian double major, studied abroad in Irkutsk and Moscow, Russia: “A Case of Continuity: The Persistence of Geopolitics in Russian Foreign Policy toward Iran.” Erika Gold, psychology major, studied abroad in Tokyo, Japan: “A Cross-Cultural Study of U.S. and Japanese Elementary School Teachers’ Beliefs about Students’ Abilities.” David Murphy Haglund, history and political science double major, studied abroad in Berlin, Germany: “Inventing the Nation in the Modern World: Austrian National Identity, 1918-1985.” Christopher Harnisch, international studies major, studied abroad in Cairo, Egypt: “Jihad of the Vote: The Struggle for an Islamic Democracy in Egypt.” Sarah Hartman, Spanish major, studied abroad in Madrid, Spain: “Goya and the Caprichos: An Artistic Manifestation of an Intellectual Crossroads.” Catherine Hu, international studies major, studied abroad in Beijing, China: “Japan-Taiwan Relations: Colonial Influences and Contemporary Trends.” Philip Kehl, political science major: “Spain and the Great Powers, 1939-1941: Explaining Spanish Neutrality.” Ashley Kerr, international studies major, studied abroad in Valparaíso, Chile: “Abrir fronteras, enriquecer lenguas: Globalización, lenguaje e identidad en Mala onda y Sobredosis por Alberto Fuguet” (“Opening Borders, Enriching Languages: Globalization, Language and Identity in Alberto Fuguet’s Mala onda and Sobredosis”). John Linsky, Spanish major, studied abroad in Logroño, Spain: “Las confesiones de comida y sexo: Una aproximación bajtinana al análisis del Lazarillo de Tormes” (“Confessions of Food and Sex: A Bakhtinian Approach to the Analysis of the Lazarillo de Tormes”).

Annual Report 2005-2006


Kristen Deane

Grace Armstrong

Kenneth Donahue

Calvin Garner

Philip Kehl

Rachel Dunlap

Erika Gold

Ashley Kerr

Danielle Naugle

Nicole Santa Maria

Jennifer Bemis

Catherine Hu

Christian Petrangelo

Jason Siegel

Judy Tran

Victoria Watts

Sarah Hartman

David Murphy Haglund

Moreen O'Brien

Pauley Tedoff

Ian Fleishman

John Linsky

Nora Segar

Joy Bloser

Martin Rajcan

Andrew Smith

Elliot Turley

Tara Vanacore

Photos by Carolann Davis

Brian Aguilar

Elizabeth Zane

International Thesis Forum Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

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Lauren Markham, literary studies major, studied abroad in Kampala, Uganda: “Orphaned and Exiled: The Fate of Child Soldiers in the Novels of Ken Saro-Wiwa, Uzodinma Iweala, Ahmadou Kourouma, and Emmanuel Dongala.” Price Massey, international studies major, studied abroad in Fort Dauphin, Madagascar, and Geneva, Switzerland, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “An Analysis of Leadership in the Fight against HIV/AIDS: The Cases of South Africa, Malawi, and Uganda.” Danielle Naugle, sociology/anthropology and Spanish double major, studied abroad in Montevideo, Uruguay, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “The Afro-Uruguayans of Montevideo: Blackness, Discrimination, and Identity.” Moreen O’Brien, Japanese major, studied abroad in Kyoto, Japan: “Women Playing Women: The Secret Power of Musumeyaku in the All-Female Takarazuka Revue Company.” Christian Petrangelo, history major, studied abroad in Florence, Italy: “Everything to Fight For: Transport Diplomacy in the Former Rhodesia, 1964-1989.” Alexandra Ragan, international studies major, studied abroad in Florence, Italy: “Sardinian Regionalism in the Context of European Integration.” Martin Rajcan, economics major, studied abroad in Hangzhou, China: “Research and Development, Innovation, and Productivity: Modeling the Process of Technological Change in Chinese Firms.” Nicole Santa Maria, international studies major, studied abroad in Kyoto, Japan: “Lessons and Limits: Censorship and Propaganda in Occupied Japan.” Nora Segar, Spanish major, studied abroad in Guadalajara, Mexico: “La enfermedad en su dominio cultural: Representaciones de la salud y la medicina en La casa verde, La muerte de Artemio Cruz, El amor en los tiempos de cólera y Cien años de soledad.” (“Illness in its Cultural Domain: Representations of health and medicine in The Green House, The Death of Artemio Cruz, Love in the Time of Cholera, and One Hundred Years of Solitude”).

Jason Siegel, French and Spanish double major, studied abroad in Santiago, Chile: “Le bilan de la politique des langues de France: Difficultés d’une nouvelle époque” (“The Languages of France: Policies, Politics, and Challenges of a New Era”). “Discurso y pobreza: Poder e ideología en un contexto santiaguino” (“Discourse and Poverty: Power and Ideology in a Chilean Context”). Andrew Smith, political science major, studied abroad in Edinburgh, Scotland: “Laïcité vs. Traditionalism: A Theoretical Approach to Religion in the Treaty Establishing a Constitution for Europe.” Zachary Snyder, political science major, studied abroad in Cairo, Egypt: “Righteousness and Reality: The Moderating Effects of Participation and Governance on the Islamist Movements of Morocco, Turkey, and Lebanon.” Pauley Tedoff, sociology/anthropology major, studied abroad in Lausanne, Switzerland, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Marriage by Correspondence: A Sociocultural Exploration of Matrimony between Swiss Men and Mauritian Women.” Judy Tran, Japanese major, studied abroad in Kyoto, Japan: “Japanese-Korean Relations as Represented in the Popular Media: The Korean Wave and the Hate Korean Wave as Tools of Nationalism for Korea and Japan.”

“Hall of Mirrors” Prague, Czech Republic Photo by Alison Shapiro ’06

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Elliot Turley, English and history double major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “The Loss of a Colony, the Birth of a Policy: The Development of Belgian Policy and International Influence in the Belgian Congo, 19451965.” Tara Vanacore, Chinese major, studied abroad in Hangzou, China: “The Alienated Female Psyche in Occupied Shanghai: An Analysis of Su Qing’s Short Stories and Essays.” Victoria Watts, international studies major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Socially Dependent Language Variation in Bilingual Children.” Nathalie Wolfram, English major, recipient of 2005 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “‘Scenes Not Inferior to Any in England’: Creating the Stage in Eighteenth-Century Exeter and York.” Elizabeth Zane, biology and Russian double major, studied abroad in Irkutsk, Russia: “The Role of Sign Language in Special Education and Its Impact on Deaf Culture in Russia.”

Taking a break from her 2005 RCFIA-funded research, Nathalie Wolfram ’06 visited Caernarfon Castle in Wales.

International Thesis Awards

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Senior Honors Thesis Award in International Politics and Economics was established by the Geonomics Institute and is awarded for the best senior thesis in international politics and economics. he

2006 Senior Honors Thesis Award in International Politics and Economics Kenneth Donahue, international politics and economics major, studied abroad in Cairo, Egypt: “Taxation and Representation in the E.U.-15.”

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he International

Studies Award is given annually to the best senior honors thesis in international studies, broadly conceived. Candidates for the prize may come from any major at the College, as long as the thesis work is international in orientation. The thesis may be written in English or in a foreign language.

2006 International Studies Award Ian Fleishman, French and German double major: “La Modernité (a)mnésique: Une lecture des Fleurs du mal à la lumière de Walter Benjamin” (“Memory and Forgetting in the Modern Metropolis: Benjamin’s Reading of Baudelaire’s Flowers of Evil”) “Die Fatale Erinnerung der Flânerie” (“Mnemonic Metropolitan Wandering and the Dialectics of Forgetting”). Christopher Harnisch, international studies major: “Jihad of the Vote: The Struggle for an Islamic Democracy in Egypt.”

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Student Internships

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Rohatyn Center employs student interns throughout the year to assist with RCFIA programming and to conduct research for faculty. RCFIA internships strengthen research skills and provide an excellent training ground for future employment. The program is highly competitive. he

While studying abroad, Middlebury students often pursue internships in such diverse fields as diplomacy, international finance, law, environmental policy, economic development, journalism, cinema, and fashion. These internships provide extraordinary opportunities for students to enhance their cultural and language learning. Middlebury students may also engage in internships over winter term or during the summer, before or after a study abroad program. The Digel Family Fund is a source of international internships, using a competitive selection process, for students interested in community service who have a significant financial need. In addition, the Ronald H. Brown Class of 1962 Endowment, Felton Family Fund, and the Louis J. Kutzner ’51 Summer Internship fund provide funding for unpaid international and domestic internships for students, who are selected through a competitive process. These summer internships are noncredit, but students may receive a transcript notation for having completed a summer internship. Sponsored by the Clarence and Anne Dillon Dunwalke Trust, the College offers credit-bearing internships for Middlebury students at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad. In addition, noncredit-bearing internships are offered for Middlebury and non-Middlebury students on our programs abroad.

RCFIA Internships in Middlebury Academic Year 2005-2006

Summer 2006

David Murphy Haglund ’06 Philip Kehl ’06 Martin Rajcan ’06

Ioana Literat ’09 Sara Lowes ’07 Patrick Mott ’07 Alexandra Widas ’08

C ’ T international internships possible. The following

he ollege s extensive overseas network makes

individuals have been instrumental in organizing and overseeing the 2005-2006 internship program. China

Tao Hong, Academic Director Jeremy Friedlein, Resident Director Lu Bin, Program Consultant

France

David Paoli, Director Danielle LaCarriere, Student Life Coordinator Marie-Madeleine Charlier, Academic Coordinator Viviana Lopez, Program Assistant

Germany

Heike Fahrenberg, Director

Italy

Rosa Cuda, Director Patrizia Nesti, Assistant to the Director Laura Sieni, Office Assistant

Latin America

Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director Maria Marta Gabriela Lamoretti, Program Coordinator

Russia

Amy Allington, Director Nana Tsikhelashvili, Assistant Director Donna M. Cardarelli, Resident Coordinator, Irkutsk Simone Bonneville, Resident Coordinator,Yaroslavl Chris Condlin, Resident Coordinator, Moscow

Spain

Kim Griffin, Director Lena Santillana, Assistant to the Director Laura Hernández, Housing Coordinator and Secretary Teresa Córdova Dexter, Coordinator for Student and Faculty Development and Provincial Programs Gabriel Guillen Peña, Coordinator for Student Affairs and Integration

Off-Campus Study, Middlebury

David Murphy Haglund, Martin Rajcan, and Philip Kehl Photo by Carolann Davis

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Martin Rajcan, Philip Kehl, Ioana Literat, Sara Lowes, and Patrick Mott Photo by Carolann Davis

Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Annual Report 2005-2006

David Macey, Director Liz Ross, Associate Director Stacey Woody Thebodo, Assistant Director (non-Middlebury programs) Julie Good, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: China, France, Germany, and Russia) Nicole Chance, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: Italy, Latin America, and Spain) Jamie Northrup, University Relations Coordinator Maggie Edmonds, Program Assistant


Overseas Internships Buenos Aires, Argentina Sharyn Korey: Ecoclubes Stephanie Nugent: Asociación Conciencia Tomie Peaslee: Fundación Arte Viva Elizabeth Williams: Asociación Conciencia Kathryn Fish: FEIM Nicholas Grader: Hogar San José Obrero Simran McKenna: Maria de las Cárceles Bernardo Puron: La Usina Ana Thomas: Habitat for Humanity Margaret Watts: Ecoclubes Mary Ting: Interrupción Claire Typaldos: Museo del Grabado Charles Morin: Centro para la Estabilidad Financiera Sandra Sokoloski: Interrupción Rebecca Reingold: Fundación Huésped Emily Nelson: Fundación Compromiso Britt Neuhaus: Senado de la Nación Sigrun Vidarsdottir: Ecoclubes Olivia Kenna: Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo Miosotis Perez: ADEUEM Douglass Sisson: Senado de la Nación Claire Schultz: Ecoclubes Christopher Bohórquez: Compañía Financiera Prefinex Christopher Heinrich:Visage Aurelia Higginson: Museo del Grabado Jeffrey Olson: Interrupción Julia Kaminsky: Consejo del Niño Vander Shanholt: Asociación Conciencia Lindsey Jones: Interrupción Laura Kwoh: Maternidad Sarda Jessica Levin: Radio Jai

Tucumán, Argentina Kimberley Ward: Ingenio La Florida Alison Brown: Facultad de Ciencias Exactas

Niteroi, Brazil Milana Flament: Kuarup Sage Bierster: Centro Integrado de Estudos e Programas de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Thomas Gardner: Hostel Copacabana William Hunt: Subsecretaria de Cultura de Niteroi

“Tango in the Streets” Buenos Aires, Argentina Photo by Ashley Kerr ’06

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“China’s Diverging Paths” Hangzhou, China Photo by Clark Smith ’06

Hangzou, China Amanda McCreight: Blood Center of Zhejiang Province

Paris, France Aaron Ackerman: Epitech Maya Albanese: U.S. Embassy, Business Department Michelle Archambault: Lancry Elementary School Lara Batterink: Epitech Joy Becvarik: Epitech Julia Bredrup: Bureau de press des Joailliers Créateurs Andrew Brenner: Environmental Development and Action in the Third World Andrew Brenner: Epitech Sienna Chambers: Epitech May Chan: Epitech Kunda Chinku: Association for the Development of Education in Africa Sara Dewey: Epitech Leah Drew: ARISTEIA Leah Drew: Epitech Sheerin Florio: Bedouk Editions Sheerin Florio: Epitech Kristin Fraser: Dream Publications

Aglaya Glebova: Galerie Maeght Emily Gustavson: Epitech Tracy Hansen: Epitech Dawnielle Johnson: Epitech Olivia Katz: Epitech Amanda Kern: Sotheby’s Melissa Klein: Epitech Charlene Lok Man Lam: Epitech Charlene Lok Man Lam: Plan Margaret Mahon: Epitech Sara Margolis: Secours Populaire Tsetgs Narangerel: Epitech Jonathan Newton: Epitech Erin Oliver: Epitech Maria Palmero: Académie Internationale des Arts du Spectacle Maria Palmero: Epitech Kendra Paupst: Sciences-Po, American Center Kendra Paupst: Epitech Samantha Ritt: Epitech Jacqueline Ross: French-American Association for Cinema and Theater Dana Rye: Epitech Sanya Shah: Institut de l’Islam et des Sociétés du Monde Musulman Lora Shirey: Epitech Lora Shirey: Institut National du Sport et de l’Education Physique Rebecca Solomon: Epitech Benjamin Sprayregen: Epitech Rita Tarnate: Institut National du Sport et de l’Education Physique Kylie Taylor: Activa/Appia Emily Theriault: Epitech Jill Thomas: Unité de Réflecion et d’Action des Communautés Africaines Johanna Troubough: Epitech Lori Varsames: Epitech Seth Weiss: Epitech

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Ferrara, Italy Brooke Adams: Istituto di Storia Contemporanea Margaret Luppino: CNR Padova Allegra Morosani: Comune di Ferrara-Ufficio Relazioni Internazionali Madhavi Rao: Istituto di Storia Contemporanea Emilie McDonald: Istituto di Storia Contemporanea

Florence, Italy Joseph Barsalona: Law Firm Tiffany Bistocchi: Scuola Elementare “Bagno a Ripoli” Nicolas Emery: U.S. Consulate Aglaya Glebova: Brancolini Grimaldi Art Gallery Elizabeth Leete:Vista Magazine Megan Malta: Alinari Marriell Marquette: U.S. Consulate Rachel Mascetta: Slow Food Aleksandra Mihailovic: Fratellanza Militare Siobhan Quinlan:Vista Magazine Rita Tarnate: Brancolini Grimaldi Art Gallery

Guadalajara, Mexico Tamara Bogojevic: CAMPO Kristin Van Fossen: MAMA

“The Saxaphone Man” Segovia, Spain Photo by Jonathan Mosser ’06

Logroño, Spain Cristina Connolly: Asociación Protectora de Animales de La Rioja Elizabeth Shanbacker: Asociación Protectora de Animales de La Rioja

Madrid, Spain Danielle Barbeau: Centro de Investigaciones para la Paz David Bubb: Liga para la Educación y la Cultura Popular Cristina Connolly: Asociación Pro Infancia Riojana Stephanie Enemark: Embassy of Guatemala Melissa Flores: Colegio Público El Trigal Haley Gilbert: Elipse Iniciativas Kelly Hayes: Colegio La Salle Stephanie Kane: Embassy of Guatemala Shannon Locks: Colegio La Salle Andrew McConnico: Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Meghan McGeehan: Futurastudio Judd Melon: Escuela Oficial de Idiomas de Alcorcón Seth Miran: Colegio Público El Trigal David Santoro: Instituto Universitario de Seguridad Interior Lindsey Seldin: Instituto de Enseñanza Secundaria Isabel La Católica Iulia Sprinceana: Ashoka Jonathan Truppman: Galería Metta Margaret Ullman: Asociación de Educación Ambiental y del Consumidor

“Marseille, Early Afternoon” Marseille, France Photo by Cassity Miller ’06

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Irkutsk, Russia Sarah Jones:V.P. Sukachov Art Museum Matthew Van Meter: N.P. Okhlopkov Drama Theater

Moscow, Russia Stuart Douglas: The PBN Company Rachel Rosenfeld: Greenpeace Maria Voziyan: Agency for Social Information

Yaroslavl, Russia Rayan Cohen: International Investment Center

Montevideo, Uruguay Danielle Barbeau: Red Mercosur Bethany Holmes: Cinemateca-escuela de cine Anna Spencer: Gurises Unidos

“Sasha’s Garden” Irkutsk, Russia Photo by J. Lee Ware ’06

“Angles' Avenue” Ferrara, Italy Photo by Peter Rosenau Viola ’06

“Morning in the Village,” Sam, Njaay Village, Senegal Photo by Rachel Dunlap ’06

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Working Paper Series

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RCFIA Working Paper Series publishes analytical papers on international matters, broadly defined. By publishing the works of scholars and practitioners from a range of institutions, the series aims to invigorate research and intellectual life at the College and beyond. All prospective papers are reviewed, double-blind, by an outside reader. Each publication in the series is available electronically through the Web site listed below, or as a bound volume upon request from RCFIA. Allison Stanger is the executive editor of the series; Mark Williams is the editor. For further information on the RCFIA Working Paper Series and procedures for submission of potential papers, see www.middlebury. edu/administration/rcfia/papers.

Thomas Oatley (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “A Political Logic of Foreign Debt Accumulation” (2005).

RCFIA Working Papers

Andrew Heyward (CBS News), “Why Television News Is the Way It Is, and Is Not the Way You’d Like It to Be (And Why You Should Care)” (2004).

he

William Pyle (Middlebury College), “Collective Action and PostCommunist Enterprise: The Economic Logic of Russia’s Business Associations” (2006). Kenneth D. Wald and Bryan D. Williams (University of Florida), “The Diaspora Consciousness of Arab Americans: The Intersection of Social Identity and Global Politics” (2005). Richard Goldstone (Harvard Law School), “The Development of International Criminal Justice” (2005). Deborah Gerish (Emporia State University), “Men, Women, and Beasts at Clermont, 1095” (2005).

Taylor Fravel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), “China’s New Diplomacy and the Future of U.S.–China Relations” (2005). Michael Ignatieff (Harvard University), “The Lesser Evils” (2005). Charles MacCormack (Save the Children Federation), “The Politics of Humanitarian Relief after 9/11” (2004). David Stoll (Middlebury College), “Moral Authority, Permission, and Deference in Latin American Studies” (2004).

Ellen Oxfeld (Middlebury College), “The Man Who Sold the Collective’s Land: Understanding New Economic Regimes in Guangdong” (2004). Jonathan Isham (Middlebury College), Michael Woolcock (World Bank and Harvard University), Lant Pritchett (Harvard University), and Gwen Busby (Cornell University), “The Varieties of Resource Experience: How Natural Resource Export Structures Affect the Political Economy of Economic Growth” (2004). James E. Lindsay (Colorado State University), “Ibn’Asakir (1105-1176): Muslim Historian and Advocate of Jihad against Christian Crusaders and Shi’ite Muslims” (2003).

Yvonne Galligan (Queens University, Belfast), “Women in Politics in Ireland, North and South” (2003). Ethan Scheiner (Stanford University), “The Underlying Roots of Opposition Failure in Japan” (2003). Neil DeVotta (Michigan State University), “Uncivil Groups, Unsocial Capital: Whither Civil Society and Liberal Democracy in Sri Lanka?” (2003). Erik Bleich (Middlebury College), “The Legacies of History? From Colonization to Integration in Britain and France” (2002). Felix G. Rohatyn (Rohatyn Associates), “Freedom, Fairness, and Wealth” (2002). Jean-Philippe Mathy (University of Illinois), “The System of Francophobia” (2002). Russell J. Leng and Adil Husain ’02 (Middlebury College), “South Asian War Games” (2002). Carolyn Durham (The College of Wooster), “The Franco-American Novel of Literary Globalism: The Case of Diane Johnson” (2002). Jeffrey Carpenter (Middlebury College) and Juan Camilo Cardenas (Javeriana University, Colombia), “Using Cross-Cultural Experiments to Understand the Dynamics of a Global Commons” (2002). Stanley Hoffmann (Harvard University), “The European Union and the New American Foreign Policy” (2001).

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Selected Faculty Books 2005-2006 Julia Alvarez. A Gift of Gracias: the Legend of Altagracia. New York: Knopf Book for Young Readers. Spanish edition, Un regalo: la leyenda de la Altagracia. New York: Dell Dragonfly Book. Jeffrey Carpenter. Field Experiments in Economics. Research in Experimental Economics,Volume 10. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press. Coeditor.

Michael Katz and Vladimir Jabotinsky. The Five: a Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Translation and notes. Bettina Matthias. Geschichten ohne Ende: Ein Arbeitsbuch für Deutschlernende im zweiten und dritten Lehrjahr. AATG Unterrichtsmaterialien.

Armelle Crouzières. Femmes et écriture de la transgression. Paris: L’Harmattan. Coeditor.

Patricia Saldarriaga. Los espacios del Primero Sueño de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: arquitectura y cuerpo femenino. Madrid/Frankfurt:Vervuert/Iberoamericana.

Jeffrey Flynn. Hauke Brunkhorst, Solidarity: From Civic Friendship to a Global Legal Community. Cambridge: MIT Press. Translator.

Mark Southern. Contagious Couplings:Yiddish shm-and the Contact-driven Transmission of Expressives. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Heinemann (Praeger Press).

Juana Gamero de Coca. Nacín y género en la invención de Extremadura. Pontevebra: Mirabél.

Thierry Warin. L’Exception économique française ou les 35 heurts? Paris: Editions de l’Officine.

Marc Garcelon. Revolutionary Passage: From Soviet to PostSoviet Russia, 1985-2000. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

“Slow Day in Coroico” Coroico, Bolivia Photo by Jay Boren ’06

“Radio” Bamako, Mali Photo by Jillian Weiser ’06

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At Middlebury, assistance from the Rohatyn Center enabled Divya Khosla ’06 to organize students to work together toward a more just and sustainable world. Now working for a law firm in Washington, D.C., Khosla plans to go on to law school.

Inspiring a Generaton The notion of “Knowledge without Boundaries” best exemplifies Middlebury’s academic ethos and my college experience. My departure for two years to Columbia University and the London School of Economics, while integral parts of my undergraduate journey, only reinforced my admiration for Middlebury’s faculty, students, and environment. Freshman year was very much defined by an exciting blend of extracurricular involvement and academia. When I wasn’t in the classroom, I was working as a senator for one of the Commons, advising the Addison County courthouse on matters of juvenile justice, teaching migrant Mexican families English, or formulating arguments on the debate team. Middlebury was undeniably a place where I could emerge as a leader and cultivate my passion for politics, international diplomacy, human rights, and the law. Much of my final year revolved around MIDD8, a month-long global awareness series that I cofounded and directed to focus on the United Nations Millennium Goals.With the collaborative efforts and participation of students and faculty alike, we created a new grassroots movement to mobilize students to work toward a more globally conscious future. In creating a nexus between politics and pop-

culture, in the current times of war, disease, extreme poverty, human rights violations, and environmental degradation, we hoped to inspire our generation to assume its tremendous global responsibility. As a campus, we became increasingly in tune with current local, national, and global issues. More important, with interest from nonprofit organizations, the United Nations, politicians, the music industry, and leading activists, MIDD8 has become a potential template for universities across the nation to organize and train leaders who will shape the future of U.S. foreign and domestic policies. From a small town in the middle of Vermont, this institution has been able to effect global change and lead in the world’s quest for sustainability, peace, and the improvement of the human condition. Middlebury is a place that has greatly shaped my character and outlook, while allowing me to leave my own mark. As I work in collaboration with the United Nations to pitch the project, I will head to Washington to work in a human and civil rights law firm that has close ties to the White House. In the next few years, I hope to attend law school.


Middlebury College Rohatyn Center for International Affairs Robert A. Jones ’59 House Middlebury College Middlebury,VT 05753 U.S.A.

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RCFIA Annual Report 2005-2006