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Middlebury College

Rohatyn Center

for International Affairs A NN UA L R EPORT   -  


Joining Kathryn (second from left) in celebrating her graduation are her parents, Grace and Paul Boateng, from Ghana and her host parents, Karen and Don Reedstrom, from Middlebury.

K AT H RY N B O AT E N G : FROM GHANA TO D.C. V I A M I D D L E B U RY IT WAS AN EASY DECISION TO ATTEND MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE, a college thousands of miles away from my homeland, Ghana. It was just what I was looking for: a small, liberal arts college in a peaceful, safe, and lush green setting. And when I finally arrived here, I was lucky enough to have dedicated professors, the most cherished of friends, and the best education money could buy. While studying at Middlebury, I was an admissions intern, tour guide, college fairs

coordinator, and president of UNICEF. By engaging in such activities, I was fortunate enough to become involved with the welfare and academic careers of others.

African states, population economics, and international law. I even chose to write on the development of SubSaharan Africa for my thesis in international politics and economics.

In the fall of my junior year, I studied in Paris. There, I was exposed to a different, fascinating culture and found my newest passion in life, an interest in African affairs and development issues. My academic career in Middlebury was highlighted by courses on the political economy of

I have fulfilled my ardent desire to continue working with Africa by accepting a position at a public policy/political think tank in Washington, D.C. I will research aid, development, public health, and environmental issues facing growing nations today. In a few years time, I plan on

pursuing graduate studies. With my first-rate education and experience in the field, I know I will be able to make a difference in policymaking for developing countries in the years ahead.


Fostering the Free Exchange of Ideas THE 2004–2005 ACADEMIC YEAR was launched with a parade of high-impact events. In the course of a week, the College dedicated a brand new library and celebrated the inauguration of a new president, Ronald D. Liebowitz, with the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs hosting a ground-breaking gathering for the ongoing Princeton Project on National Security as part of the inaugural celebration. The conference on the privatization of American national security brought scholars, policymakers, and journalists to Middlebury for an actionpacked day of panels. Managing editor of Foreign Affairs Gideon Rose perhaps summarized the conference’s accomplishment best when he noted “we are present at the creation of a brand new research agenda,” which he viewed as distinctive for bringing together the world of action and the world of ideas in productive and unusual ways. While sponsoring and hosting a broad spectrum of events, the Rohatyn Center also fostered the free exchange of ideas on two contentious issues: America’s role in a still emerging world order and the complexities of the Arab-Israeli conflict. With respect to the former, in addition to the Princeton Project and other related events on U.S. foreign policy, RCFIA brought Lt. Colonel Mark Odom ’87 back to his alma mater for a discussion of Operation Iraqi Freedom. With respect to the latter and thanks to our continued Title VI funding, Middle East Studies received sustained attention throughout the academic year, as the section of this report dedicated to the topic makes clear. These efforts culminated in the “Idea of Jerusalem” Symposium, a gathering distinctive for its multidisciplinary panels and rich array of perspectives. The hard work and vision of Professors Tamar Mayer (geography) and Suleiman Mourad (religion) made the gathering possible. Academic year 2004–2005 was a banner one for the Rohatyn Center’s undergraduate travel research

program, with a record number of six students from five majors winning grants; the Center now receives many more proposals than could possibly be funded. Last year’s recipients brought outstanding projects to completion. In particular, Amichai Kilchevsky received the Senior Honors Thesis Award in International Politics and Economics for his work on economic integration in the Middle East, and Yohanne Kidolezi was invited to Washington to present his research on child labor in Tanzania. Brian Hoyer, who was a recipient in the inaugural year of the research travel grants program, won the Forum on Education Abroad’s first annual Undergraduate Research Award for his honors thesis on Congolese refugees in Tanzania. All of these accomplishments would simply be impossible without the collective efforts of many faculty members and RCFIA staff. For the latter, this was a year of personal challenges. In particular, Assistant Director of the Rohatyn Center Charlotte Tate deserves special mention for keeping things on track after RCFIA Program Coordinator Martha Baldwin had to take an emergency family and medical leave. As for faculty who made a difference, Director of International Studies Jeff Cason and Director of International Politics and Economics Michael Kraus are at the top of the list. But we’d also like to thank the many faculty in international studies who, through their creativity and commitment, make the Center the beehive of activity and exchange that it is. Under Mark Williams’s direction, the RCFIA Working Paper Series continues to thrive. We are especially indebted to Ambassador Felix Rohatyn for another substantial contribution to the Center’s endowment.

A L L I S O N S TA N G E R DIRECTOR, ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

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RCFIA MISSION

ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (RCFIA) SUP P ORTS THE COLLEGE’S GOAL OF ADVANCING GLOBAL UNDERSTANDING THAT RADIATES FROM A CORE LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL COM P ETENCY. RCFIA WORKS WITH A FACULTY COM M ITTEE TO CREATE COCURRICULAR P ROGRAM M ING THAT EXP ANDS OP P ORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS AND SUP P ORTS FACULTY IN THEIR TEACHING AND P ROFESSIONAL DEVELOP M ENT. PROGRAM S INCLUDE EXECUTIVE -IN-RESIDENCE, SCHOLAR-IN-RESI DENCE, INTERNATIONAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM , INTERNATIONAL SYM P OSIA AND LECTURES, AND OUTREACH ACTIVITIES. RCFIA DISSEM INATES CURRENT RESEARCH THROUGH OUR WORKING PAP ER SERIES, AND ALSO ADM INISTERS INSTITUTIONAL GRANTS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, AN UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH TRAVEL GRANT P ROGRAM , AND A SP ONSORED INTERNSHIP P ROGRAM . WE WORK WITH THE CAREER SERVICES OFfiCE AND OTHER CAM P US ORGANIZATIONS TO EXP AND OP P ORTUNITIES FOR INTERNSHIP S AND OTHER TYP ES OF DIRECT EXP ERIENCE THAT GIVE STUDENTS A SENSE OF HOW THE WORLD LOOKS AND WORKS FROM P ERSP ECTIVES OTHER THAN THEIR OWN. HE


G ETTING I N T OUCH ALLISON STANGER Director, RCFIA Professor of Political Science 802-443-5023 stanger@middlebury.edu Charlotte Tate Assistant Director, RCFIA 802-443-5795 tate@middlebury.edu Martha Baldwin Program Coordinator, RCFIA 802-443-5324 baldwin@middlebury.edu Carolann Davis Program Coordinator, International Politics and Economics, and International Studies 802-443-2319 cadavis@middlebury.edu

I NTERNATIONAL A FFAIRS AT M IDDLEBURY C OLLEGE - Michael Kraus, Director, International Politics and Economics

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Jeffrey Cason, Director, International Studies, and Director, Middle East Studies Miguel Fernandez, Director, Latin American Studies David Macey, Director, Russian and East European Studies, and Director, Off-Campus Study Paul Monod, Director, European Studies Carrie Reed, Director, East Asian Studies Michael Katz, Dean, Language Schools and Schools Abroad through December 31, 2004 Michael Geisler, Dean, Language Schools and Schools Abroad after December 31, 2004

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Conferences and Symposia

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NTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIA ARE AN ENRICHING PART OF

at Middlebury. Each year, the Rohatyn Center collaborates with a wide range of student groups and academic departments to bring scholars and professionals to campus for in-depth and extended discussions. LIFE

OCTOBER 2 CRUSADINGANDAGAINSTWHOM?HOLYVIOLENCEINTHEMIDDLEAGES Participants included: George Dameron, professor of history, Saint Michael’s College; Deborah Gerish, assistant professor of history, Emporia State University; Niall Christie, lecturer and research assistant, Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies,University of British Columbia; Alfred Andrea, professor emeritus of history, University of Vermont; Paul M. Cobb, assistant professor of history, University of Notre Dame; Suleiman A. Mourad, assistant professor of religion, Middlebury College; Sean Field, assistant professor of history, University of Vermont; Laura Lieber, assistant professor of religion and classics, Middlebury College; Jessalynn Bird, visiting scholar of history, Northwestern University; Louisa Burnham, assistant professor of history, Middlebury College. NOVEMBER 13 SILBERMAN SYMPOSIUM IN JEWISH STUDIES:THE JEWS INAMERICA AT 350 YEARS Participants included: Samuel C. Heilman, Harold Proshansky Professor in Jewish Studies and Sociology, City University of New York; Ted Sasson, associate professor of sociology and anthropology, Middlebury College; Robert Cohen, associate professor of English, Middlebury College; Robert S. Schine, Silberman Professor in Jewish Studies, Middlebury College. NOVEMBER 16-20 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM: LOST VOICES: HUMAN TRAFFICKING AROUND THE WORLD (student-organized event) Participants included: Janice Raymond, coexecutive director, Coalition against Trafficking in Women; Suzanne Tomatore, program director, Immigrant Women and Children Project, Association of the Bar of the City of New York Fund, Inc.; Dorotea Mendoza, secretary general, GABRIELA Network; Stephen Kiernan ’82, reporter, Burlington Free Press; Ruchira Gupta, founder, Apne Aap.

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JANUARY 25-27 WHATWORKS? A MELTING POT OF IDEAS FOR A MELTING PLANET Participants included: Eban Goodstein, founder and director, Green House Network, and professor of economics, Lewis & Clark College; Jonathan Isham, assistant professor of economics, Middlebury College; Bill McKibben, scholar in residence in environmental studies, Middlebury College; Ted Nordhaus, cofounder and director, Strategic Values Science Project, and coauthor, The Death of Environmentalism; John Passacantando, exec-utive director, Greenpeace USA; Michael Shellenberger, executive director, Breakthrough Institute, and coauthor, The Death of Environmentalism; Sissel Waage, director, sustainability research group, the Natural Step, U.S. FEBRUARY 22 ALIANZALATINOAMERICANAYCARIBEÑASYMPOSIUM:REBELIÓN:LATINO IDENTITY AND THE ARTS IN AMERICA (student-organized event) Keynote reading: “Nuyorican Charla,” by poet and visual artist Sandra María Esteves, New York, New York. MARCH 5-12 THE MANY FACES OF POVERTY: LOCAL, NATIONAL, AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES (student-organized event) Participants included: Stephen C. Smith, professor of economics, George Washington University; Peter Nelson, assistant professor of geography, Middlebury College; Margaret Nelson, A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies, Middlebury College; Jacob Tropp, Spencer Fellow in African Studies, Middlebury College; Cheri Honkala, director, Kensington Welfare Rights Union, and cochair, National Welfare Rights Union. APRIL 1-12 STRUGGLEFORINDEPENDENCEORWARONTERRORISM?THEEXAMPLE OF RUSSIA AND CHECHNYA (student-organized event) Participants included: Ilya Ponomarev, director, New Policy Research Center, Institute for Globalization Studies (Moscow), and member of steering committee,Youth Leftist Front; Ilyas Akhmadov, Foreign Affairs Minister of the Chechen Republic, fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy; Robert Packer, visiting associate professor of political science, Middlebury College; Chechen and Russian students from Middlebury College.

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005


The Privatization of American National Security The Princeton Project on National Security Conference

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CHOLARS, JOURNALISTS, PRACTITIONERS, AND SENIOR

from across the political spectrum met at the Rohaytn Center, on October 9, for a working conference on national security. As part of the nonpartisan Princeton Project on National Security, cochaired by Anthony Lake and George Shultz, the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University hosted the conference. The Princeton Project aims to move beyond the current debate and standard ways of thinking about national security to develop innovative approaches that address military, economic, political, and social threats and opportunities. POLICY MAKERS

Conference participants (left to right) Alex Knott, Charlotte Tate, Edward Soyster, Richard Cooper, John Hamre, and Felix Rohatyn stand outside the Robert A. Jones ’59 House.

“Privatization issues are an important part of what has changed in the foreign policy landscape, not only the privatization of military services but also of aid and development services provided through NGOs,” said Woodrow Wilson School Dean Anne-Marie Slaughter. During the conference, expert panels examined the forces pushing privatization, considered the legitimacy and effectiveness of privatized security operations, and discussed how the government could better coordinate public and private efforts. Compared to regular military deployments, private military corporations (PMCs) offer the flexibility of “expertise quickly, designed exactly as you want it, with

staying power,” said retired Army general Ed Soyster, special assistant to the Secretary of the Army and former vice president for international operations at Military Professional Resources, Inc. Peter Singer, a national security fellow at the Brookings Institution, noted that “the U.S. could not have done the war in Iraq without PMCs, but some of the most controversial aspects have involved private contractors.” More generally, Singer questioned the legitimacy of “public policy through private means.” “When the tolerance of the American people for casualties is low and administrative will to reshape the general security environment is high, outsourcing is a path of least political resistance,” said Allison Stanger, director of the Rohatyn Center. She added that “having civilian contractors perform what have in the past been noncivilian tasks inevitably blurs the line between legitimate and illegitimate violence, yet standard definitions of terrorism rely on a clear distinction between combatants and noncombatants. Outsourcing renders the very definition of terrorist activity itself ever more problematic, since it appears to challenge the state’s perceived monopoly on the legitimate use of violence.” Lamenting the lack of U.S. planning and capacity to rebuild Iraq, retired Army general William Odom dubbed current operations “colonialism by ventriloquism.” That is, the U.S. is paying the Iraqis to say what it wants them to say. However, Odom felt the deeper question is, “Where does the U.S. want to provide surrogate government? If you are going to succeed at this, you have to choose your cases.” Somewhat ironically, members of the private security industry are lobbying governments to regulate them, because they need formal, legal status and legitimacy to work effectively. “The government does not know best how to mobilize national capacity,” said Christopher Beese, chief administrative officer of ArmorGroup International Ltd. He called for regulation and positive engagement with the industry, in order to build a public-private partnership that will offer cost-effective, flexible solutions. Beese also claimed that the United Nations had done a far better job of

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contracting and monitoring private security companies in the Balkans than the Pentagon had in Iraq.

national security strategy. For more information on the Princeton Project, visit its Web site, www.wws.Princeton. edu/ppns.

Adding his perspective from the nonprofit world, Charles MacCormack ’63, president and CEO of Save the Children Federation, Inc., called “the mechanisms for dialogue and cooperation either nonexistent or dysfunctional.”

CONFERENCE AGENDA: THE PRIVATIZATION OF AMERICAN NATIONAL SECURITY

Nevertheless, the trend toward privatization is growing, and most participants agreed that the government must take steps to improve the efficiency, capacity, and legitimacy of these operations. “You have to have a comprehensive security model in place first. Then you can figure out who’s going to do what,” said John Hamre, president of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Hamre called for “absolute clarity of accountability,” and Singer agreed that “privatization can work for us if we are smart contractors and smart regulators.” In reflecting on the day’s discussions, Gideon Rose, managing editor of Foreign Affairs, praised the conference for embracing “problem-driven” as opposed to “theory-driven” research. He said it is rare for academics to interact so meaningfully with practitioners and policy makers and that such collaborations should be encouraged. With initial funding from the Ford Foundation, the Princeton Project is a nonpartisan effort to strengthen and update the intellectual underpinnings of U.S. (Reprinted with permission from Princeton’s “WWS News,” Volume 28, Issue 1, Autumn 2004.)

Catching a breath during the Princeton Project conference are Middlebury students (left to right) Jameson Henn ’07, Simran McKenna ’07, Joachim Skyaasen ’08, Christina Gomez ’05, Amer Barghouth ’05, and Wellington Lyons ’05.

Welcome: Allison Stanger, director, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and professor of political science, Middlebury College PANEL 1: PRIVATIZATION IN HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE • What forces are pushing privatization? • What functions have been privatized and why? • Does privatizing security save money? • What is the extent and scope of privatization today? Presenters: Peter Singer, national security fellow, Brookings Institution General Ed Soyster, special assistant to the Secretary of the Army Allison Stanger, director, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and professor of political science, Middlebury College Chair: William J. Dobson ’95, managing editor, Foreign Policy Discussant: Peter Feaver, director, Triangle Institute for Security Studies, Duke University PANEL 2:PRIVATIZATION IN THE CONTEXT OFWARFARE,POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT • How effective are privatized efforts over the short and long term? (as compared to state efforts) • How should public and private efforts be coordinated? • How does the reconstruction of Iraq to date compare with previous nation-building endeavors? • Does privatization undermine military morale? • Can intelligence gathering be successfully out-sourced? Presenters: Christopher Beese, chief administrative officer, ArmorGroup International Ltd. John Hamre, president and CEO, Center for Strategic and International Studies General William Odom, U.S. Army (Ret.), and senior fellow, Hudson Institute Chair: Gideon Rose, managing editor, Foreign Affairs Discussant: Doug Brooks, president, International Peace Operations Association PANEL3:PRIVATIZATIONVERSUSNONPROFITDELIVERY:ISITTIMETOGO

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BACK TO GOVERNMENT?

• In advancing U.S. interests, what is the optimal balance of power between NGOs, the government, and private firms? • Do certain threats and challenges require both a public and private response? • To what degree are states yielding accountability to PMCs and other private entities? • Do PMCs encourage military adventurism? • What are the normative implications of privatizing security?

PANEL 4: BEYOND THE ELECTIONS: AMERICA AND THE WORLD • Is foreign policy by proxy a destabilizing force? • What kind of world order can be forged when privatized security is prevalent? • In what ways do modes of reconstruction reflect and build international order? • What are the costs and benefits of privatizing American national security?

Presenters: Deborah Avant, associate professor of political science and international affairs, Elliot School of International Affairs Kateri Carmola, assistant professor of political science, Middlebury College Alex Knott, political editor, Center for Public Integrity Charles MacCormack ’63, president and CEO, Save the Children Federation, Inc. Chair: Nikolas Gvosdev, executive editor, The National Interest Discussant: Andrew Moravcsik, professor of politics, Princeton University

Presenters: Richard N. Cooper, Maurits C. Boas Professor of International Economics, Harvard University Lee Feinstein, deputy director of studies and senior fellow, Council on Foreign Relations G. John Ikenberry, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University Felix Rohatyn ’49, president, Rohatyn Associates Moderator: Anne-Marie Slaughter, dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

Symposium: The Idea of Jerusalem

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death of Jesus: the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and Via Dolorosa, which commemorates the path that Jesus took on his way to the crucifixion.

AS ANY CITY IN THE WORLD CAPTURED THE

of so many generations in both the East and the West as Jerusalem? Is there any city that has been the object of so much love and longing and at the same time has been the center of so much conflict? Jerusalem,Yerushalyim, Al-Quds is the heavenly city for each of the three monotheistic religions. It is a physical place where people live and a spiritual place that lives in people’s hearts and minds. IMAGINATION

Jerusalem’s religious importance is defined in its landmarks, which have come to symbolize the religions as a whole and have been widely reproduced in art and literature. The Temple Mount (Har Habyit), at the top of the Mount of Moriah, is where Abraham was called to sacrifice his son Isaac; it is where the city of King David is located and the Jewish holy temples stood. The Western Wall of the temple is the most sacred Jewish site still in existence. The central Muslim marker in the city is Temple Mount (in Arabic Haram as-Sharif), with its Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa mosques, from which Muslims believe Muhammad ascended to heaven. Jerusalem’s Christian sacred sites are associated with the life and

When we read the landscape as a historical text and understand the religious attachment to Jerusalem, we see that it belongs to all of us. But throughout the city’s history, factional forces have interfered with the fulfillment of its proper status as a universal possession. It is plagued by violence that appears political in nature but more accurately involves control of the sacred sites. Considering the length and intensity of these struggles, we may conclude they are intractable, and no solution will satisfy all sides. Even as the struggles have continued, the sites that are their focus have remained a source of inspiration for artists, clergy, and lay people alike. Organized by Professor of Geography Tamar Mayer, Assistant Professor of Religion Suleiman Mourad, and RCFIA, the Idea of Jerusalem symposium brought an extraordinary gathering of academic experts from Europe, the Middle East, and the U.S. to Middlebury, April 15–17.

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Professor of Modern History, University of Chicago.

SYMPOSIUM AGENDA: THE IDEA

OF JERUSALEM

OPENING REMARKS: Allison Stanger, director, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and professor of political science, Middlebury College; Tamar Mayer, professor of geography, Middlebury College; and Suleiman A. Mourad, assistant professor of religion, Middlebury College. KEYNOTE ADDRESS: “One City, One God, Three Faiths” by Francis E. Peters, professor of history, religion, and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, New York University. PANEL 1: THE RELIGIOUS SYMBOLISM OF JERUSALEM Papers: “The Temple Mount in Jewish Tradition” by Yaron Z. Eliav, Jean and Samuel Frankel Assistant Professor of Rabbinic Literature, University of Michigan. “Jerusalem in Jewish History, Tradition and Memory” by Lee I. Levine, professor of Jewish history and the Rev. Moses Bernard Lauterman Family Professor of Classical Archeology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. “Jerusalem in Early Christianity” by O. Larry Yarbrough, Pardon Tillinghast Professor of Religion, Middlebury College. “The Transformation of the Holiness of Jerusalem in Islamic Scholarship” by Suleiman A. Mourad, assistant professor of religion, Middlebury College. Chair: K. Parker Diggory, Class of 2004, Middlebury College. Moderator: Robert Schine, Curt C. and Else Silberman Professor in Jewish Studies, Middlebury College. PANEL 2: THE STRUGGLE OVER JERUSALEM Papers: “Jerusalem in the Visual Propaganda of Contemporary Iran” by Christiane J. Gruber, doctoral candidate in art history, University of Pennsylvania. “The Jerusalem Syndrome” by Alexander van der Haven, doctoral candidate in the history of religions, University of Chicago Divinity School. “Jerusalem in and out of Focus: The City as a Mirror of Changes in Jewish Nationalism” by Tamar Mayer, professor of geography, Middlebury College. “Palestinian Jerusalem in the Early Twentieth Century” by Issam Nassar, professor of history, Bradley University. “The Palestinian Leadership of Jerusalem, 1948-2004” by Elie Rekhess, senior research fellow, Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Tel Aviv University. “The Walls of Jerusalem: Past, Present, Future” by Bernard Wasserstein, Harriet and Ulrich E. Meyer

Chair: Maija Cheung, Class of 2005, Middlebury College. Moderator: Febe Armanios, assistant professor of Middle East history, Middlebury College. PANEL 3: THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE Papers: “Can There Be Peace Without Negotiating

“Has any city in the world captured the imagination of so many generations in both the East and the West as Jerusalem?”

–Tamar Mayer

Jerusalem?” by Sari Nusseibeh, president, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem. “Yerushalayim, al-Quds, and the Wizard of Oz: Facing the Problem of Jerusalem after Camp David II and the alAqsa Intifada” by Ian S. Lustick, Bess W. Heyman Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania. Chair: Suleiman A. Mourad, assistant professor of religion, Middlebury College Moderator: Jeffrey Cason, associate professor of political science, and director of international studies and Middle East studies, Middlebury College. PANEL 4: JERUSALEM IN THE ARTS Papers: “Nineteenth-Century Photography of Jerusalem” by Emmie Donadio, associate director and chief curator, Middlebury College Museum of Art. “The Map Has a Message: Reality, Ideology, and Symbolism in the Early Printed Maps of Jerusalem” by Rehav Rubin, professor of geography, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. “Fayruz, Jerusalem, and the Leba-stinian Song” by Christopher Stone, assistant professor of Arabic and international studies, Middlebury College. Chair: Amer Barghouth, Class of 2005, Middlebury College. Moderator: Pieter Broucke, associate professor of history of art and architecture, Middlebury College.

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Lectures and Events

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2004-2005 ACADEMIC YEAR, the Rohatyn Center sponsored and supported a wide array of cocurricular and international events that spanned the globe and crossed many disciplines. URING THE

SEPTEMBER 21 Roundtable discussion in Spanish between students in the course Latin American Political Development (taught by Associate Professor of Political Science Jeffrey Cason) and 14 public officials from Latin America participating in a U.S. Department of State International Visitor Program focused on civil society and democratic institutions. OCTOBER 4 Roundtable discussion between students in the seminar on African Government: The Political Economy of the Neo-Patrimonial State (taught by Assistant Professor of Political Science Nadia Horning) and nine public officials from Africa participating in a U.S. Department of State International Visitor Program focused on government. OCTOBER 4 “Fernando Pessoa: The Man Who Wasn’t?” by Richard Zenith, who lives in Lisbon and is the editor and translator of The Book of Disquiet and Fernando Pessoa & Co: Selected Poems.

OCTOBER 26 “Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America’s Growing Petroleum Dependency” by Michael T. Klare, director, Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies, Hampshire College. OCTOBER 28 “Overcoming the Totalitarian Past in East Europe: Secret Police Files, Lustration, and Memory” by Pavel Žácˇ ek, senior researcher, Institute of Contemporary History, Academy of Sciences, Prague. OCTOBER 28, ST. MICHAEL’S COLLEGE Vermont Council on World Affairs Vermont Global Symposium lecture “The Global Economy and Vermont” by Robert B. Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and 2003 Václav Havel Prize winner. NOVEMBER 3 “America’s Nature, and Nature in the Americas: Ecology and the Latin America Library of American Nature Writing” by Jorge Marcone, associate professor of Spanish, Rutgers University, and visiting professor, Center for Environmental Studies, Williams College.

OCTOBER 11 “Where Is Russia Headed?” by Clifford G. Gaddy, senior fellow, foreign policy studies program and governance studies program, Brookings Institution, and visiting professor of economics, Johns Hopkins University. OCTOBER 11 “The Ethics and Politics of Race in the Writings of Garcilaso Inca de la Vega” by Margarita Zamora, professor of Spanish, University of Wisconsin-Madison. OCTOBER 22 “Food Talk, Table Talk: The Triumph of French Cuisine” by Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson, professor of sociology, Columbia University. Joshua A.Tucker, assistant professor of politics and international affairs, Princeton University.

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NOVEMBER 4 “Red, Brown, and Economic Voting: Evidence from Russia, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic from 1990-99” by Joshua A. Tucker, assistant professor of politics and international affairs, Princeton University. NOVEMBER 9 “Gender, Ethnicity, and Urban Space: Life and Perils in Colonial Latin America in Comparative Perspective” by William H. Beezley, professor of history and interim director of the Center for Latin American Studies, University of Arizona, and director of the Oaxaca Summer Institute on Modern Mexican History. NOVEMBER 11 “The Road to 9/11 and Where We Are Today,” by Philip Zelikow, director, Miller Center of Public Affairs and White Burkett Miller Professor of History, University of Virginia; former executive director, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (the 9/11 Commission). NOVEMBER 15 “What Lies Between Pancho Villa and a Naked Woman?” by Francine A’Ness, assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese, Dartmouth College. DECEMBER 1 “Race Counts: American Multiracialism and Civil Rights Politics” by Kim Williams, assistant professor of public policy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. JANUARY 19 “Europe and the U.S.: Still a Community of Values?” by Peter Schneider, George M. Roth Distinguished Writer in Residence, German department, Georgetown University.

MARCH 10 Phi Beta Kappa lecture “Fomenting Class Warfare in Transylvania: The Early Installation of Communism” by Katherine Verdery, Eric R. Wolf Collegiate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan. MARCH 12 “Testimony from Rwanda,” a music and dance performance by Jean-Paul Samputu and the Ingeli

“Good people can overcome bad structures. They should not have to.” –The 9/11 Commission Report, 2004 Troupe. MARCH 17 “Putin’s Russia and Russia after Putin” by Igor Malashenko, president, Overseas Media Productions, Inc.; adviser to President Yeltsin on the 1996 campaign. MARCH 28 “Chronicling Faith: Maksim Dmitriev and the Renaissance of Female Orthodox Monasticism in Late Imperial Russia” by William G. Wagner, Brown Professor of History, Williams College. MARCH 29 “Postnationalism Prefigured: Caribbean Borderlands” by Charles V. Carnegie, associate professor of anthropology, Bates College.

JANUARY 20 “Not Your Father’s NATO: Challenges and Transformation in the Transatlantic Relationship” by Lawrence Chalmer, director, NATO Staff Officer Orientation Course (NSOOC), National Defense University. FEBRUARY 23 “Youth Efforts in Assisting Children Affected by War” by Kimmie Weeks, international activist for the rights of children around the world.

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Philip Zelikow, director, Miller Center of Public Affairs and White Burkett Miller Professor of History, University of Virginia.

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“The concept of international criminal justice did not exist prior to Nuremberg.”

APRIL 18 “Central Bank Embeddedness in Post-Socialist Countries” by Juliet Johnson, associate professor of political science, McGill University.

–Judge Richard Goldstone

MARCH 29 “The Destruction of a Family: From Hungary to AuschwitzBirkenau, 1944-45” by author and Holocaust survivor Aranka Siegal. MARCH 30 “Businessman Candidates: Special Interest Politics in Russia” by Konstantin Sonin, New Economic School (Moscow), and Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). APRIL 7 “The View of Italy as Seen from a Corner of New York” by Guido Balandi, Jean Monnet Professor of European Community Labor Law, Università degli Studi di Ferrara. APRIL 11 “Dominican Migration and Diaspora through Visual Art” by Sherezade Garcia, Dominican visual artist, and William Vazquez, Puerto Rican photographer. APRIL 11 “Help Wanted: Human Rights Abuses Against Women Migrant Workers in Southeast Asia” by Nisha Varia, Asia researcher, Women’s Rights Division, Human Rights Watch. APRIL 14 “Medieval Dreams and Elite Culture in China” by Ellen Neskar, Asian studies, Sarah Lawrence College.

APRIL 19 “An Introduction to Brazilian-American Literature” by Antonio Tosta, teaching assistant in romance languages and literatures, Department of Portuguese, Harvard University. APRIL 20 Screening of Final Solution, a film about the antiMuslim riots in Gujarat, India, in 2002-03, and discussion with filmmaker Rakesh Sharma. APRIL 20 “The Long Walk,” a slide show and discussion with Dave Anderson, National Outdoor Leadership School. APRIL 21 “From the Enlargement of the European Union to the Enlargement of the Euro” by Larry D. Neal, professor of economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. APRIL 24 Workshop and performance by the Dmitri Pokrovsky Ensemble. Wearing traditional Russian village costumes and performing on ancient instruments, the Dmitri Pokrovsky Ensemble brings the authentic folklore of Russia back to life. Some of their lively recreations of village songs, dances, and pagan rituals are more than 2000 years old. APRIL 25 “The Future of International Criminal Justice” by Richard J. Goldstone, member, Independent Inquiry Committee into the U.N. Oil-for-Food Program (Volcker Oil-forFood Commission); former chief prosecutor, United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda; former justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa.

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Colloquia INTERNATIONAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM

T

HROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL

STUDIES COLLOQUIUM, students, faculty, staff, and members of the community at large gather over lunch to learn about international research activities. Our speakers include Middlebury College faculty and alumni, as well as other scholars and professionals in the international arena. OCTOBER 1 “Field Experimental Measures of Social Capital in South East Asian Urban Slums” by Jeffrey Carpenter, assistant professor of economics, Middlebury College.

“People generally don’t want to learn from Bangladesh. They want to give to Bangladesh.”

JANUARY 14 “Rethinking Transatlantic Relations for the 21st Century” by Marten van Heuven, retired U.S. Foreign Service Officer and former National Intelligence Officer for Europe. JANUARY 21 “From Collodi to Calvino: Pinocchio and the Art of Storytelling” by Sandra Carletti, associate professor of Italian, Middlebury College. FEBRUARY 11 “Organized Business and the Post-Communist Transition” by William Pyle, assistant professor of economics, Middlebury College. MARCH 7 “U.S. Nonproliferation Policy and the Challenges of Globalization” by James Clay Moltz, deputy director and research professor, Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies.

–Salehuddin Ahmed

OCTOBER 22 “Démocratie: quel visage? Diagnosing the Crisis in the Republic of Congo” by David Eaton, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology, Middlebury College. OCTOBER 29 “Listening to the Poor and Involving Them in Development” by Salehuddin Ahmed, Fulbright Scholar in Residence, School for International Training, and deputy executive director, BRAC University, Bangladesh. NOVEMBER 5 “The Brazil of Lula” by Timothy J. Power, associate professor and graduate director, Department of Political Science, Florida International University, and vice president of Brazilian Studies Association. DECEMBER 3 “Rethinking Histories of ‘Development’ and Environmental ‘Tradition’ in Post-Apartheid South Africa” by Jacob Tropp, assistant professor of history and Spencer Fellow in African Studies, Middlebury College.

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ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

MARCH 11 “Making it Hard to Hate: Responding to Racist Violence in Europe and the U.S.” by Erik Bleich, assistant professor of political science, Middlebury College. APRIL 18 “Monuments, Memorials, and National Identity” by Juliet Johnson, associate professor of political science, McGill University, and by Benjamin Forest, associate professor of geography, Dartmouth College. APRIL 22 “Idealpolitik: Why Great Powers Rethink the World” by Jeffrey W. Legro ’82, associate professor, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia. APRIL 29 “Reform and Confucian Agency in Imperial China: Cases Drawn from Three Ages” by Don Wyatt, professor of history, Middlebury College.

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005


WHAT’S A LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION GOT TO DO WITH IT? MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD

Y

MIDDLEBURY GRADUATES WHO ARE EXTREMELY in their fields return to campus to discuss their professions and how their perspectives have been shaped by their liberal arts education. In collaboration with the Career Services Office, the Rohatyn Center hosts public presentations, followed by informal career conversations, with these exceptional graduates from the classes of the nineties. These programs are not only informative, they allow current students to explore a variety of professional opportunities. OUNG

ACCOMPLISHED

“Dispatches from the Rubble: Encounters with Fixers, Spooks, Embeds, and the Afghani Elvis” by Matthew Power ’96, India-based reporter for National Public Radio, Harper’s, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. FEBRUARY 21 “Tarnished Image: How Diplomacy Can Lead the Way to New Relations between America and the World” by Aditya Mahendra Raval ’98, ABC News State Department producer.

OCTOBER 4

Deputy U.S. Secretary of State Richard Armitage, Ms. Alma Powell, Adi Raval ’98, and U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell.

Sarah Erdman ’96 with village children in Nambonkaha.

“Into the Heart of an African Village: A Reading and Discussion of Contemporary Issues Facing Rural West Africa” by Sarah Erdman ’96, returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Côte d’Ivoire, and author of Nine Hills to Nambonkaha:Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. OCTOBER 25

Janine Zacharia ’95 wraps up an interview in Washington D.C. with U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Colloquia ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005

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A Window on Middle East Culture and Politics

I

N ORDER TO ADDRESS OUR STUDENTS’ INTEREST

in better understanding the culture of the Middle East and the faculty’s eagerness to build curricular strength in this important world region, Middlebury launched a Middle East studies (MES) track within the international studies major. MES is underpinned by the new Arabic language program, introduced during the 2003–2004 academic year, and is enhanced by a rich array of cocurricular offerings. Seed funds have been partially provided by a two-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education Title VI Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program. The grant, now in its second year, is overseen by Allison Stanger, Jeffrey Cason, and Charlotte Tate.

NOVEMBER 12 “Turkey, the U.S., and the European Union: The EuroAtlantic Relationship” by Osman Faruk Logoglu, Turkish Ambassador to the United States.

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES LECTURES 2004–2005 OCTOBER 25 “Colorín Colorado, Cide Hamete Benengeli, and Other Puzzles: Recent Research on the Arabic Contribution to Spanish Language and Literature” by Devin Stewart, associate professor, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, Emory University. NOVEMBER 3 “Following One’s Conscience: The Israeli Youth Refuser Movement” by Noam Bahat, one of a group of young Israelis who refuse to join the Israeli defense force. NOVEMBER 8 “Struggling Towards Peace in Times of Terror” by Avraham Burg, former speaker of the Israeli Knesset and Geneva Accord negotiator.

Avraham Burg, former speaker of the Israeli Knesset and Geneva Accord negotiator.

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The Honorable Osman Faruk Logoglu with his wife Mevhibe Logoglu; Ambassador Logoglu is a former professor of political science at Middlebury College.

NOVEMBER 29 “Israel’s Inevitable and Impossible Separation Barrier” by Yaakov Garb, academic director, Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, Kibbutz Ketura, Israel, and research fellow, Floersheimer Institute for Policy Studies, Jerusalem. DECEMBER 7 “Egypt’s Black-and-White Golden Film Age: ‘Nasser Lost It at the Movies’” by Joel Gordon, associate professor of history, University of Arkansas. FEBRUARY 18 “Operation Iraqi Freedom: A Perspective on the First Forty-Five Days” by Lieutenant Colonel Mark Odom ’87, politico-military planner for the Balkans, Western Europe and Balkans Division, Deputy Directorate for PoliticoMilitary Affairs Europe/NATO/Russia/Africa, Strategic Plans and Policy (J-5).

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005


“The country that draws too great a distinction between its scholars and its soldiers runs the risk of having its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools.” –Mark Odom

MARCH 13 “A Land of Two Peoples: Martin Buber’s Vision of ArabJewish Rapprochement” by Paul Mendes-Flohr, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; University of Chicago Divinity School. MARCH 15 “Muslims and the Religious Question in Europe: The Cases of France, England, and Germany” by Farhad Khosrokhavar, professor of sociology, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Paris. APRIL 7 “The Turks in World History” by Carter V. Findley, professor of history, Ohio State University.

APRIL 8 “The United States and Israel in a Post-Cold War World” by Hillel Newman, Consul of Israel to New England. APRIL 11 “A Roundtable on Recent Events in Lebanon” with Middlebury College faculty members Febe Armanios, assistant professor of history; Tamar Mayer, professor of geography; Suleiman Mourad, assistant professor of religion; Christopher Stone, assistant professor of Arabic and international studies; and Jeffrey Cason, associate professor of political science. APRIL 18 “The Holy Spirit in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam” by Marc Bregman, professor of Rabbinic literature, Hebrew Union College, Jewish Institute of Religion, Jerusalem.

Language, Mind, and Culture

P

ROMINENT SCHOLARS AND PRACTITIONERS IN THE FIELDS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND

come to campus for the Language, Mind, and Culture series, hosted by the foreign language division and the Rohaytn Center. During 2004–2005, the series focused on linguistics, second-language acquisition, and the globalization of aesthetics. CULTURES

DECEMBER 2 “Don’t Leave Your Language Alone: Language Loyalty and Group Identity” by Joshua A. Fishman, Distinguished University Research Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences, Yeshiva University.

NOVEMBER 16 “Some Notes On Secular Ritual: The Hearth and the Mountaintop” by Adam Gopnik, New Yorker staff writer. APRIL 11 “Isolating or Integrating Grammar in Foreign Language Instruction” by Patsy Lightbown, professor emerita, Concordia University. APRIL 27 “Death and Translation: Xu Zhimo, Baudelaire, Dante, and ‘Strange Music’” by Haun Saussy, professor of comparative literature and East Asian studies,Yale University.

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International Research Travel Grants

M

IDDLEBURY STUDENTS CAN RECEIVE GENEROUS

for their international research through the Rohatyn Center’s International Research Travel Grant program. Students from any discipline or program whose proposed project is international in its orientation are eligible to apply. Funding is provided by RCFIA, and a faculty committee selects the awardees. All recipients are named undergraduate research associates of the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs during their senior year. For further information on the International Research Travel Grant program, see http://web.middlebury. edu/offices/rcfia/student_research_grants.htm. SUPPORT

SIXGRANTSWEREAWARDEDTOFUNDRESEARCHABROAD DURING THE SUMMER OF



Grace Armstrong ’06, independent scholar, who will investigate, in Brazil, the impact of regional integration and globalization on intellectual property issues in Mercosur. Rachel Dunlap ’06, English and theater joint major, who will conduct research to create a volume of nonfiction, fiction, interviews, and poetry detailing the experiences of French-speaking, Muslim, African women located in Senegal and Paris. Helen Price Massey ’06, international studies major, who will travel to South Africa to investigate potential methods to improve South Africa’s national HIV/AIDS treatment plan. Danielle Naugle ’06, Spanish and sociology/anthropology double major, who will investigate phenotypical blackness in present-day Uruguay, addressing issues of race, identity, and discrimination.

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ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Yohanne Kidolezi ’05, in Washington, D.C., at the Council on Undergraduate Research Posters on the Hill Session, where he presented his RCFIA-funded summer 2004 research in Mwanza, Tanzania.

Pauley Tedoff ’06, sociology/anthropology major, who will travel to Mauritius and Switzerland to conduct a cross-cultural exploration of the institution of arranged marriage between Swiss Romand farmers and Mauritian women. Nathalie Wolfram ’06, English major, who will travel to England to examine the relationship between 17thand 18th-century print culture and the resurgence of provincial theater in Restoration England.

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005


International Thesis Forum

M

IDDLEBURY SENIORS SHOWCASE THEIR INTER-

before an audience of faculty, staff, and students at the Center’s annual Senior Thesis Forum, which took place this year May 2–6. Although the students may be majors in any department or program, their work must be on an international topic. The result is a rich array of internationally oriented honors theses. Many of the students studied abroad, and their research was greatly influenced by that experience. NATIONAL RESEARCH

Renee Balog, Chinese and political science double major, studied abroad in Harbin, China: “Resonances of Religion: An Analysis of the Influence of Christianity on Bing Xin’s Works.” Kathryn Boateng, French, and international politics and economics double major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Development Begins at Home: A Rural Integration Approach to Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.” “L’École des blancs en Afrique noire francophone: L’ imposition d’un modèle culturel unique en Afrique noire francophone durant la période coloniale: processus et impact sur les identités africaines.” (Imposing a White Cultural, Educational Model on Colonial Sub-Saharan Francophone Africa: Strategies and Repercussions on African Identities).

Harrison Kahn, Chinese major, studied abroad in Harbin, China: “Sitting in the Clouds: Reclusion as a Means to Liberation from Transience in the Poetry of Ruan Ji, Tao Yuanming, and Hanshan.” Uzair Kayani, political science major: “Ethical Government and the War on Terrorism: The Case of Detentions.” Amichai Kilchevsky, international politics and economics major, recipient of a 2004 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Peace and Economic Interdependence in the Middle East.” Yohanne Kidolezi, economics major, recipient of a 2004 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Household Surveys and Street Child Labor: Evidence for Selection and Reporting Bias.” Leslie Lartey, political science major, recipient of a 2004 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Examining the Link Between Democracy and Decentralization in West Africa: A Case Study of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire.” Eric Simanek, international studies major, studied abroad in Yaroslavl, Russia: “The Business of Business: Defining Corporate Social Responsibility in Today’s Russia.”

Karin Colyer, environmental studies and sociology/ anthropology joint major, pursued Tibetan studies at sites in South Asia: “Patriarchy Lives: A Demographic and Cultural Analysis of the Great Leap Famine.” Naomi Cookson, history major, studied abroad in Harbin, China, recipient of a 2004 RCFIA International Research Travel Grant: “Greening a Red China: The Development of Environmental Civil Society in the People’s Republic of China.” Michael Crowley, international politics and economics major, studied abroad in Berlin, Germany: “WTO Dispute Settlement: Institutional Effectiveness.” Seniors Karin Colyer and Kathryn Boateng.

Mark Davis, history and Japanese double major, studied abroad in Tokyo, Japan: “The 1960 Security Treaty Crisis and Japanese Democracy.”

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Jeff Stauch, political science major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Popular Monopolies: A Study of Separatist Violence and Restraint in Western Europe Since 1945.” Lauren Teitel, international studies major, studied abroad in Paris, France: “Jaunes, yes! Beurs, no!: A Comparative Study of Vietnamese and Algerian Integration in France.” Melissa Thacker, international studies major, studied abroad in Harbin, China: “Ending Bitterness: China’s Persistent Effort to Care for Its Orphans and Foundlings.” Alyssa Thurston, international studies major, studied abroad in Beijing, China: “Perpetual Bachelors and Living Widows: The Impact of American Legislation on the Immigration of Chinese Women to the United States, 1875-1943.”

Seniors Jeff Stauch, Lauren Teitel, Kathryn Boateng, and Uzair Kayani.

Allison Williams, history major, studied abroad in South Africa: “More than Black, Less than White: Contradictions in Coloured Political Identity in South Africa.” Marina Zaloznaya, sociology/anthropology major, studied abroad in Florence, Italy: “Charting Ethnic Boundaries: The Crimean Tatar Language Reform of 1997.”

Seniors Renee Balog, Naomi Cookson, and Alyssa Thurston.

Seniors Michael Crowley, Allison Williams, Melissa Thacker, and Eric Simanek.

Seniors Mark Davis, Marina Zaloznaya, Harrison Kahn, and Leslie Lartey.

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International Thesis Awards

T

T

SENIOR HONORS THESIS AWARD IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS aND ECONOMICS was established by the Geonomics Institute and is awarded for the best senior thesis in international politics and economics.

HE INTERNATIONAL

STUDIES AWARD is given annually to the best senior honors thesis in international studies, broadly conceived. Candidates for the prize may come from any major at the College, as long as the thesis work is international in orientation. The thesis may be written in English or in a foreign language.

HE

SENIORHONORSTHESISAWARDININTERNATIONAL  INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AWARD POLITICS AND ECONOMICS Amichai Kilchevsky, international politics and economics major: “Peace and Economic Interdependence in the Middle East.”

Jeff Stauch, political science major: “Popular Monopolies: A Study of Separatist Violence and Restraint in Western Europe Since 1945.”

Assistant Professor of Political Science Erik Bleich, Jeff Stauch ’05, RCFIA Director and Professor of Political Science Allison Stanger, and Secretary of the College and Professor of Political Science Eric Davis. Amichai Kilchevsky ’05 beside the Sea of Galilee while conducting research funded by an RCFIA International Research Travel Grant.

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Student Internships RCFIA INTERNSHIPS

IN

MIDDLEBURY

ACADEMIC YEAR – David Murphy Haglund ’06 Philip J. Kehl ’06 Marja-Liisa Overbeck ’04

summer internships are noncredit, but students may receive a transcript notation for having completed a summer internship. Sponsored by the Clarence and Anne Dillon Dunwalke Trust, the College offers credit-bearing internships for Middlebury students at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad. In addition, noncredit-bearing internships are offered for Middlebury and non-Middlebury students attending our programs abroad.

SUMMER 2005 David Murphy Haglund ’06 Philip J. Kehl ’06

OVERSEAS INTERNSHIPS –

W

HILE STUDYING ABROAD, MIDDLEBURY STUDENTS

in such diverse fields as diplomacy, international finance, law, environmental policy, economic development, journalism, cinema, and fashion. These internships provide extraordinary opportunities for students to enhance their cultural and language learning. Middlebury students may also engage in internships over winter term or during the summer, before or after a study abroad program. The Humana Foundation is a source of international internships, using a competitive selection process, for students interested in medical or public health issues. The foundation offers two funded experiences in Romania each summer. In addition, the Ronald H. Brown Class of 1962 Endowment, Felton Family Fund, and the Louis J. Kutzner ’51 Summer Internship fund provide funding for unpaid international and domestic internships, for students selected through a competitive process. These OFTEN PURSUE INTERNSHIPS

THE COLLEGE’S EXTENSIVE OVERSEAS NETWORK makes international internships possible. The following individuals have been instrumental in organizing and overseeing the 2004-2005 internship program. CHINA Tao Hong, Academic Director Jeremy Friedlein, Resident Director Lu Bin, Program Consultant

FRANCE David Paoli, Director Danielle LaCarriere, Student Life Coordinator Marie-Madeleine Charlier, Academic Coordinator Viviana Lopez, Program Assistant

GERMANY Heike Fahrenberg, Director

I TA LY Rosa Cuda, Director Patrizia Nesti, Assistant to the Director Laura Sieni, Office Assistant

L AT I N A M E R I C A Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director Maria Marta Gabriela Lamoretti, Program Coordinator

RUSSIA Amy Allington, Director Nana Tsikhelashvili, Assistant Director Kirstin Bebell, Resident Coordinator, Irkutsk Simone Bonneville, Resident Coordinator,Yaroslavl Chris Condlin, Resident Coordinator, Moscow

S PA I N Kim Griffin, Director Lena Santillana, Assistant to the Director Laura Hernández, Housing Coordinator and Secretary Teresa Córdova Dexter and Gabriel Guillén, Coordinators for Student and Faculty Development and Provincial Programs Michelle Harrell, Administrative Assistant

O F F - C A M P U S S T U DY , M I D D L E B U RY David Macey, Director Liz Ross, Associate Director Stacey Woody Thebodo, Assistant Director (non-Middlebury programs) Julie Good, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: China, France, Germany, and Russia) Nicole Chance, Coordinator (Middlebury Schools Abroad: Italy, Latin America, and Spain) Jamie Northrup, University Relations Coordinator Maggie Edmonds, Program Assistant

Philip J. Kehl ’06, Marja-Liisa Overbeck ’04, and David Murphy Haglund ’06.

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BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA Grace Armstrong: National Congress–Senate, Commission on Communications Zoey Burrows: Fundacion Habitat Alexander Demas: National Congress–Senate, Representative of the Province of Entre Ríos Rachel Durfee: National Congress–Senate, Commission on Culture Alyssa Jumars: Fundacion Habitat Christopher King: Programa Proniño Austin Krissoff: U.S. Embassy, Economic Section John Kruchoski: Hospital Durand Julia McKinnon: Asociación Conciencia Sasha Mital: Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas Matthew Osterman: Estudio Mariani & Speyer Benjamin Padilla: Petrotank Patrick Philips: Corporación del Sur John Rayburn: Buenos Aires Herald Emilia Sibley: Poder Ciudadano Rachel Sommer: Asociación Conciencia Justine Thurman: Fundacion Arte Viva Daniel Vogel: Centro para la Estabilidad Financiera Zsofia Young: Asociación de Prevencion de la Violencia Familiar N I T E RO I , B R A Z I L Marcela Delgado: Secretaria Municipal de Cultura Kimberly Nelson: Secretaria Municipal de Cultura HANGZHOU, CHINA Daniel Amaranto: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) Ruby Lan: Sofitel Westlake Hotel PARIS, FRANCE Priscilla Batista: Robert Schuman Foundation Priscilla Batista: Epitech Alexandra Battestin: Global Business Coalition on HIV Jennifer Bemis: French-American Association for Cinema and Theater (FACT) Sarah Boss: Diapason Megan Cargan: Lycée Paul Valéry Penny Chen: Mogador Theater–The Paris Orchestra Melissa Crabb: Epitech Kristen Deane: Ecole Alsacienne Kristen Deane: Epitech Shannon Dobson: Ecole Alsacienne Katherine Doorley: Agence de presse KUNA Rayya El-Zein: Epitech

Ian Fleishman: Epitech Claire Grace: Georges Pompidou Center Claire Grace: Epitech Leah Grzyb: Epitech Hilary Hendricks: Marie-Claire Hilary Hendricks: Ecole Alsacienne Whitney Hill: Epitech Edward Hollo: Ecole Alsacienne Vivian Hu: U.S. Embassy Vivian Hu: Epitech Tomoko Iimura: Presses Universitaires de France Alice Istanbul: Ecole Alsacienne Becky Jeffers: UNESCO Archives Department Becky Jeffers: Epitech Meghan Lefor: Epitech Kirsten Lundgren: French Heritage Society Natalie Mantoan: Boston University’s Paris Study Abroad Program Laurie McPherson: Association Echanges et Partenariats Laurie McPherson: Epitech Mary Medvedkov: Epitech Noelle Milliard: Haut Conseil à la Francophonie Noelle Milliard: Epitech Kristin Nwokedi: Epitech Carrie O’Connor: Epitech Sarah Reynolds: Ecole Alsacienne Daniel Russell: U.S. Embassy Noah Sabich: Epitech Erin Scheidemantel: La Chaîne de l’Espoir Erin Scheidemantel: Epitech Elizabeth Schmidt: Ecole Alsacienne Jeremy Shaw: Lycée Paul Claudel Darah Smoot: Epitech Anniel Stamell: Fairchild Publication Catharine Thomson: Epitech David Tswamuno: Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Devin Wardell: Fairchild Publication Jennifer Watson: Area Revue Jennifer Watson: Epitech Ena Yasuhara: Fairchild Publication MAINZ, GERMANY Gabriel Fabian: Johannes Gutenberg Museum F L O R E N C E , I TA LY Elizabeth DiCioccio: Studio Cavallini & Cantisani Elizabeth DiCioccio: U.S. Consulate David Fulco: Vista Magazine

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Adam Gagliardo: Vista Magazine Moria Greenspun: Fratelli Alinari Alba Lupia: U.S. Consulate Eric Roseman: Fratellanza Militare Ricco Rosini: Fratellanza Militare Eleanor Vanden-Heuvel: Fratelli Alinari Shannon Wallace: Vista Magazine Jennifer Watson: Fratelli Alinari

Elizabeth Sowden: Publishing House September 1st L O G RO Ñ O , S PA I N John Sharpe: Bodegas Alicia Rojas

G UA DA L A J A R A , M E X I C O Christopher Cadwell: El Publico Mary Mendoza: City Secretary for International Affairs Kelsey Rinehart: El Publico; El Informador Nora Segar: Medicine, Women, and Society IRKUTSK, RUSSIA Deborah Jones: Irkutianka Colleen Lucey: “Aistenok” Puppet Theater Y A RO S L AV L , R U S S I A Robert Rose:Yaroslavl International Investment Center Leila Yerxa:Yaroslavl Secondary School Number 4 M O S C OW , R U S S I A Michelle Bienia: U.S. Education Advising Center Joshua Carson: New York Times Bureau Calvin Garner: Glasnost Defense Foundation Joyce Man: New York Times Bureau Trista McGetrick: N.K. Roerich Museum Ashley Ortiz: New York Times Bureau

M A D R I D , S PA I N John-Paul Aldi: Escuela Oficial e Idiomas Alcorcón David Barker: Sociedad Geográfica Marisa Díaz: Fundación JARA John Doyle: Aldea Tour Rachel Gaubinger: La Mar de Letras Bradley Hartman: OM Sports & Marketing Kathryn Horton: ARI Perú Justin Hulog: Fundación Triángulo Justin Hulog: Embassy of the Philippines Kim Hults: Ciencia Divertida Georgia Jolink: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Mary Keiser: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Janie Kiser: APRAMP (Association for the Prevention, Reintegration, and Attention of Prostituted Women) Emily Kleinman: Fundación Yehudi Menuhin Clarisse Lehman: Richmond Publishing Patrick Mahoney: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Thomas McCann: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Laura McMahon: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Vicky Miyamoto: Solidarios para el Desarrollo Ellen Moody: Fundación Yehudi Menuhin Maureen Noble: Madrid Puerta Abierta James Petsoulakis: American Express Bryan Prior: Asociación Cuatro Ocas Kristin Rock: Coordinadora de ONG’s para el Desarrollo Alexander Salvador: MITA Centro de Desarrollo de Iniciativas Empresariales Shadiah Sigala: APRAMP (Association for the Prevention, Reintegration, and Attention of Prostituted Women) Caroline Stauffer: Cinemanía Elizabeth Tadlock: Escuela Oficial de Idiomas de Alcorcón Stacey Umans: APUNE (Association of American University Programs in Spain) Stacey Umans: APUNE (Association of American University Programs in Spain) Christina Whiteus: Cruz Roja Española Eighteen students, enrolled in the course Acquisition of Spanish as a Second Language–Practicum, volunteered as native informants and assistants in English language classes in elementary and secondary schools. Many spent all day on Fridays working in schools in rural areas outside Madrid. M O N T E V I D E O , U RU G UAY Danielle Naugle: Mundo Afro

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Working Paper Series

T

RCFIA WORKING PAPER SERIES PUBLISHES ANALYTICAL PAPERS on international matters, broadly defined. By publishing the works of scholars and practitioners from a range of institutions, the series aims to invigorate research and intellectual life at the College and beyond. All prospective papers are reviewed, doubleblind, by an outside reader. Each publication in the series is available electronically through the series Web site or as a bound volume upon request from RCFIA. Allison Stanger is the executive editor of the series; Mark Williams is the editor. For further information on the RCFIA Working Paper Series and procedures for submission of potential papers, see http://web.middlebury.edu/offices/rcfia/papers. HE

James E. Lindsey (Colorado State University), “Ibn ’Asakir (1105-1176): Muslim Historian and Advocate of Jihad Against Christian Crusaders and Shi’ite Muslims” (2003). Yvonne Galligan (Queens University, Belfast), “Women in Politics in Ireland, North and South” (2003). Ethan Scheiner (Stanford University), “The Underlying Roots of Opposition Failure in Japan” (2003).

RCFIA WORKING PAPERS Taylor Fravel ’93 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), “China’s New Diplomacy and the Future of the U.S.-China Relations” (2005). Michael Ignatieff (Harvard University), “The Lesser Evils” (2004). Charles MacCormack ’63 (Save the Children Federation, Inc.), “The Politics of Humanitarian Relief after 9/11” (2004). David Stoll (Middlebury College), “Moral Authority, Permission, and Deference in Latin American Studies” (2004).

Neil DeVotta (Michigan State University), “Uncivil Groups, Unsocial Capital: Whither Civil Society and Liberal Democracy in Sri Lanka?” (2003). Erik Bleich (Middlebury College), “The Legacies of History? From Colonization to Integration in Britain and France” (2002). Felix G. Rohatyn ’49 (Rohatyn Associates), “Freedom, Fairness, and Wealth” (2002). Jean-Philippe Mathy (University of Illinois), “The System of Francophobia” (2002).

Andrew Heyward (CBS News),“Why Television News Is the Way It Is, and Is Not the Way You’d Like It to Be (And Why You Should Care)” (2004). Ellen Oxfeld (Middlebury College), “The Man Who Sold the Collective’s Land: Understanding New Economic Regimes in Guangdong” (2004). Jonathan Isham (Middlebury College), Michael Woolcock (World Bank and Harvard University), Lant Pritchett (Harvard University), and Gwen Busby (Cornell University), “The Varieties of Resource Experience: How Natural Resource Export Structures Affect the Political Economy of Economic Growth” (2004).

Russell J. Leng and Adil Husain ’02 (Middlebury College), “South Asian War Games” (2002). Carolyn A. Durham (The College of Wooster),“The FrancoAmerican Novel of Literary Globalism: The Case of Diane Johnson” (2002). Jeffrey Carpenter (Middlebury College) and Juan Camilo Cardenas (Javeriana University, Colombia), “Using CrossCultural Experiments to Understand the Dynamics of a Global Commons” (2002). Stanley Hoffmann (Harvard University), “The European Union and the New America Foreign Policy” (2001).

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Selected Faculty Books - Julia Alvarez. Finding Miracles. New York: Knopf. John Bertolini. Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion and Three Other Plays. New York: Barnes & Noble. Introduction and Notes. Michael Geisler. National Symbols, Fractured Identities: Contesting the National Narrative. Lebanon, New Hampshire: University Press of New England. Middlebury Bicentennial International Studies Series. Editor. Gloria González Zenteno. El dinosaurio sigue allí: arte y política en Monterroso. México, D.F.: Taurus, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. David Macey and William Pyle. Building Market Institutions in Post-Communist Agriculture: Land, Credit and Assistance. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books. Coeditors. Nancy O’Connor. De sa propre main: Recueils de choses morales de Dauphine de Sartre, marquise de Robiac (1634–1685). Birmingham, Alabama: Summa Publications. Introduction and critical edition. Ted Perry. Buky Schwartz: the Seeing I. Chicago, Illinois: Academy Chicago Publishers. Editor.

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ROHATYN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

ANNUAL REPORT 2004-2005


Kido (front right) and friends in the campus group Mchakamchaka, which brought to Middlebury an African tradition of running and singing.

Y O H A N N E (K I D O ) K I D O L E Z I : G I V I N G V O I C E TO C H I L D R E N I N T A N Z A N I A THE RICH AND DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM at Middlebury College and its strong commitment to foreign affairs and international education were a great influence on my interest in global concerns. To me, the College has no borders, not only to international education but also to international experience. A critical piece of my Middlebury education was the overseas field research I was able to conduct with help, advice, and financial support from the Rohatyn Center and the International Research Travel Grant program. With more than 200 million children in the labor force worldwide, child labor is one of today’s major global challenges. In the summer of 2004, I traveled to Mwanza in the northern part of my homeland, Tanzania, where

I spent two and a half months among working street children, analyzing the complex social and cultural dimensions of child labor. My senior thesis was based on the findings from my research in Mwanza. I have been able to share these findings with many institutions beyond Middlebury College, such as Mwanza’s Kuleana Center for Children’s Rights and Tanzania’s National Bureau of Statistics. Before going on to graduate studies in public policy or international studies, I plan to get some professional experience. And, of course, to continue the African tradition of running and singing.


Middlebury College

RO H A T Y N C E N T E R F O R I N T E R N A T I O N A L A F F A I R S Robert A. Jones ’ House Middlebury College Middlebury, VT  U.S.A.

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

PA I D Middlebury College


RCFIA Annual Report 2004-2005