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NOVEMBER 2018 COMMUNITY

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IRVINE CITY ELECTIONS NOVEMBER 6

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VOTE WAGNER, O’MALLEY AND KUO ICN ENDORSES THE ONLY EXPERIENCED AND TESTED TEAM TO LEAD OUR CITY FEATURE

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by Irvine City News Editorial Board

ayor Don Wagner has proven himself a leader on issues that impact Irvine. Anthony Kuo and Carrie O’Malley have served the city well, including on the planning and transportation commissions. The three have earned the chance to lead Irvine forward, and have this publication’s enthusiastic endorsement. Vote this slate of candidates on Nov. 6 Since he was elected in 2016, Mayor Donald Wagner has done everything he promised in his campaign and after the election to maintain the level of excellence Irvine residents enjoy and expect. Wagner has been proactive with the city council and staff in addressing issues such as traffic, housing, economic development in the city, and broader regional issues such as homelessness. He’s taken steps to correct mistakes

Diversity and vision for Irvine’s future A Q&A WITH CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATES CARRIE O’MALLEY AND ANTHONY KUO FEATURE

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by Irvine City News staff

rvine City News has endorsed Anthony Kuo and Carrie O’Malley for Irvine City Council. ICN asked O’Malley and Kuo questions about their candidacies, their priorities if elected, and their visions for Irvine’s future.

XXXXX IRVINE PLANNING COMMISSIONER ANTHONY KUO, IRVINE TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION VICE CHAIR CARRIE O’MALLEY AND IRVINE MAYOR DON WAGNER EARN THE ENDORSEMENT OF IRVINE CITY NEWS.

Anthony Kuo Irvine City Council Candidate

of the city councils of the Agran era that deviated from the Master Plan, leading to traffic congestion in the city. Wagner is pragmatic, fiscally conservative, and no-nonsense when it comes to the future of the city and how to spend taxpayers’ money.

He has been an excellent, engaged and energetic steward of that success, while taking decisive steps with the city council and city staff to ensure it continues. Anthony Kuo has experience in the city, and has concrete answers to problems facing Irvine. It’s Kuo’s enthusiasm and love for

the city, and experience serving it, that earns our endorsement. Kuo understands how to get things done in Irvine. Kuo has an energy and optimism that will be welcome on council. At a time when too many people are complaining and

Why are you running for Irvine City Council? I grew up in Irvine and was lucky enough to live the life every family who has chosen to make Irvine their home would want for their children.

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“TESTED TEAM” FROM PAGE 1

Publisher’s Note

LOOKING FORWARD TO THE FUTURE

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his is the season for anticipation. As I write this, Halloween decorations are up and kids (as well as playful adults) are choosing their costumes with care as visions of tricks and treats dance in their heads. With Thanksgiving and the holiday seasons soon to follow, we’re in for a few months of celebration. It’s a time to be thankful for all that we’ve been given, and for what we’ve accomplished and earned, as individuals and by working together as a community, while planning for an even better future. When I was learning to drive in high school, the instructor used a lot of quotes and metaphors. Later, I realized he was teaching us about more than the rules of the road. One day he asked me why the windshield in the car is bigger than the rearview mirror. I stumbled

for an answer about keeping my eyes on the road. “Close,” he said. “It’s because where we’re going is more important than where we’ve been.” It’s one of those simple sayings that still resonate. It’s fine to remember past days with fondness, but we shouldn’t get lost in nostalgia and forget truths learned through experience. The instructor was also fond of quotes from baseball players. One he used while teaching driving was from Yogi Berra: “You’ve got to be careful if you don’t know where you’re going, because you might not get there.” Another was from Satchel Paige: “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.” We know where we’re going in Irvine. The city has always been successful at planning for an exceptional future. Let’s not forget that, as voices from the past urge us to regress to the mean. This is a good time to stay focused on the windshield rather than the rearview mirror. n

IrvineCityNews Editor and Publisher

Jacob Levy • editor@irvinecitynews.com

5319 University Drive Suite #440 Irvine, CA 92612

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focusing on the city’s problems, it’s refreshing that Kuo leads by discussing our successes: “Irvine is on top in terms of keeping our families safe, ensuring our schools are providing our youth a stellar education, and protecting and supporting a healthy local economy. Staying at the top takes hard work, detailed planning, and dedicated leadership. Having served Irvine in our schools, homeowners’ associations, non-profits, City Hall, and among regional leaders, I have the history, experience, and know-how to protect our city’s quality of life.” He served as chief of staff to Christina Shea from 2002-2006, and has been on the planning commission for nearly eight years. Kuo’s deep connection to the city he serves is apparent when a list of his many endorsements (far too many to list here) is examined: www.anthonykuo.org/support It’s important that the city council reflect the city it serves, including the Asian American community. Kuo is the strongest choice from the field of worthy candidates to add diversity to the city council. Kuo is known for his community involvement, both through his church and as an individual. He volunteers for Working Wardrobes and several other charities, and he serves on the board, helping lead local nonprofits as well. “Anthony has been an important voice on the city’s Planning Commission, advocating for thoughtful, balanced development that meets the city’s workforce housing needs, ”said Orange County Business Council President and CEO Lucy Dunn in the organization’s endorsement of Kuo. Transportation Commission Vice Chair Carrie O’Malley has lived in Irvine for 20 years, and has been active in the community. She’s chair of the Irvine Taxpayers Association, and vice president of her neighborhood

Home Owners Association in Northpark. O’Malley is a fiscal conservative, a useful attribute on the city council at a time when some in the city want to spend tens of millions of dollars on unplanned projects simply because the money is available. “As Irvine Taxpayers Association Chair, I am committed to fiscally responsible proposals that will protect Irvine taxpayers, and to fiscally wise governance of our city,” O’Malley says. “I will work to ensure long-term fiscal soundness and to avoid the need for future tax increases. I will work to maintain and preserve the quality of life that we as Irvine residents and taxpayers have grown accustomed to while protecting us fiscally.” She’s earned numerous endorsements from civic groups and individuals, including California Women’s Leadership Association PAC, Irvine Mayor Don Wagner, Assemblyman Steven Choi, the Orange County Taxpayers Association PAC, and O.C. Firefighters, Local 3631 all support O’Malley’s campaign for Irvine City Council. “Carrie has proven she understands the complexities of transportation and congestion management,” said Orange County Business Council President and CEO Lucy Dunn in the organization’s endorsement of O’Malley.

Don Wagner, Carrie O’Malley and Anthony Kuo have the experience and vision to lead Irvine forward. But there is a slate of candidates running for election that have their eyes fixed in the opposite direction: backwards, towards the past when Larry Agran ruled Irvine. “No on B” candidates speak with one voice (literally!), but have little to say about the future of Irvine. There are many sources of information to help voters choose who will guide the city of Irvine

forward. At Irvine City News, we believe the more information, the better. Which is why we were intrigued by a story featuring questions and answers with candidates for Irvine mayor and city council published in Irvine World News in October. There were three questions posed to the candidates, perhaps the most intriguing of which was about the priorities of each, if elected. The different answers and points of view were interesting. But perhaps more revealing were the answers of three candidates running together on a single-issue slate devised to divide Irvine, rather than bring us together. Irvine City News supports the re-election of Mayor Don Wagner. In two years he has done much to lead Irvine forward; he deserves another two years to continue the job. Mayor Wagner’s answer to the Irvine World News question about his two priorities for Irvine was precise and insightful: “1. Maintaining Irvine’s quality of life, emphasizing our unparalleled public safety, world-class schools, and award-winning parks and open space, all accomplished in a fiscally sound manner without raising your taxes. “2. Returning us to the Master Plan that prior city councils ignored so that development is managed responsibly and traffic congestion (which had also been ignored by prior city councils) is reduced through many measures we have begun at my direction as mayor.” Mayoral candidate Ing Tiong’s response was even more succinct: 1) “Ease traffic congestion.” 2) “Sustain city growth.” Katherine Daigle’s answer focused on keeping “residents and families safe and secure….. Protecting our families is the top priority.” She also noted her plan “for affordable housing, reducing traffic and commuters coming into the city.” We imagine if we polled


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MAYOR DON WAGNER GREETED BUSINSS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS AT A RECENT GREATER IRVINE CHAMBER EVENT “TESTED TEAM” FROM PAGE 2

residents of Irvine, the issues listed by Wagner and mentioned by the other candidates would also be top priorities: Quality of life, public safety, schools, smart growth, fiscal responsibility. So what does “No on B” candidate Ed Pope list as his No. 1 priority among all the opportunities and challenges facing the city of Irvine? You guessed it: all Pope is concerned with is the single wedge issue Larry Agran and Ed Pope have been using to divide the city for a year: “I will implement the June 5 voter mandate to immediately begin construction of our longpromised Veterans Memorial and Cemetery at the Great Park.” Nowhere does Pope mention quality of life, safety, schools, jobs, housing, traffic or any other key civic issues as being among his priorities for the city. If Pope has any new, young and fresh ideas for how to maintain and improve quality of life in Irvine while balancing issues of traffic, growth and safety, he hasn’t revealed them. Nowhere does he say what he believes in, or how he views Irvine’s future. Perhaps because his gaze is toward the past, not toward the realities and

possibilities of Irvine of today and tomorrow. Our peers at Irvine World News asked the same “what are your top two priorities” question of the 12 candidates running for city council. The most thoughtful, detailed and broad-based answers came from Anthony Kuo and Carrie O’Malley, the candidates endorsed by this publication. O’Malley: “Protect Irvine’s Master Plan, which includes protecting and preserving our city’s open space, safe neighborhoods, parks, trains, outdoor amenities and the numerous aspects that drew many of us to live in Irvine. Provide practical, creative, and safe transportation solutions for our city, including: signal synchronizations, intersection improvements, left-hand turn pocket elongation where needed, safe active transportation options (for cyclists and pedestrians), and efficient public transportation options by working with OCTA and regional partners.” Kuo: “We have to continue protecting and improving Irvine’s quality of life, and that means continuing that which has made us successful: public safety, parks and open space, supporting our schools.”

It also means working on fixing challenges that everyone is living with: cost-effective fixes to traffic, providing adequate parks and infrastructure to handle over-development approved by previous councils.” Others among the 12 candidates answered the question thoughtfully. Gang Chen said traffic and controlled growth were his priorities. Lauren Johnson-Norris lays out her detailed traffic plan, and promises to “tackle the problems of overcrowded schools and insufficient childcare options for working families.” Mark Newgent’s top two priorities are: “Public safety and listen to residents.” Liqing Lee Sun’s top two priorities are “Public safety and education.” So what are the top two priorities of Larry Agran’s handpicked slate of city council candidates? Jaci Woods: “I will implement the June 5 voter mandate to immediately begin construction of our long promised Veterans Memorial and Cemetery at the Great Park.” Frank McGill: “I will implement the June 5 voter mandate to immediately begin construction

of our long promised Veterans Memorial and Cemetery at the Great Park.” Wait, that sounds familiar. McGill and Woods offered the exact same, word-for-word response to the “priorities” question as mayoral candidate Ed Pope. How about the other questions from the Irvine World News? “How should the city balance paying off debts with meeting residents’ needs?” Ed Pope: “The city of Irvine has won several awards for having the best fiscal management over the last 10 years! The city should continue its cautious path during budget approvals with a healthy “rainy day fund” which proved so beneficial during the financial downturn in 2008-2012.” Frank McGill: “The city of Irvine has won several awards for having the best fiscal management over the last 10 years! The city should continue its cautious path during budget approvals with a healthy “rainy day fund” which proved so beneficial during the financial downturn in 2008-2012.” Jaci Woods: “The city of Irvine has won several awards for having the best fiscal management over the last 10 years! The city should continue its cautious path during budget approvals with a healthy “rainy day fund” which proved so beneficial during the financial downturn in 2008-2012.” The “No on B” slate’s answers are identical. Not only that, but the only input they have on the issue is “keep doing what you’ve been doing.” The third question in the Irvine World News story was about the city’s role in encouraging low-income housing, and if there should be incentives or mandates. Here are the answers offered by the “No on B”/Larry Agran candidates: Ed Pope: “Irvine should continue its long-standing policies of inclusionary zoning which creates scattered sites for elegantly designed and well-managed

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below market housing so that all residents have the opportunity to lie and work in the city…” Frank McGill: “Irvine should continue its long-standing policies of inclusionary zoning which creates scattered sites for elegantly designed and well-managed below market housing so that all residents have the opportunity to lie and work in the city…” Jaci Woods “Irvine should continue its long-standing policies of inclusionary zoning which creates scattered sites for elegantly designed and well-managed below market housing so that all residents have the opportunity to lie and work in the city…” Again, the “No on B” slate’s answers are identical. And again, their input on the issue of affordable housing is “keep doing what you’re doing.” If there’s any doubt that the three “No on B” candidates are serving a single master with their campaigns operated in lock step, check out the campaign websites of each: https://voteforedpope.com/ https://voteforwoods.com/ https://voteformcgill.com/ They are identically templated Wordpress websites, no doubt created by a single individual and focused on a single issue. The bottom line is that the “No on B” slate offers no new ideas. They’re running on a single issue resolved in the primary election last summer. Their vision of Irvine is from the past, some 40 years ago when they bought homes in Irvine. Good for them. We are happy they can enjoy the equity that decades of smart growth in the city have earned them. But let’s not pretend they have new ideas to offer the city, or a vision for its future. Pope, McGill and Woods are running on a single, divisive, wedge issue. They also speak with a single and divisive voice: The voice of Larry Agran. Let's not repeat the mistakes of the past. Vote Wagner, Kuo and O'Malley on Nov. 6. n


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“CANDIDATES” FROM PAGE 1

Using the relationships and partnerships I’ve built as your Irvine commissioner and my experience in serving through our community’s non-profit organizations, I’ll be prepared on Day One to continue my work on your behalf. First and foremost, I want to protect and preserve our parks and open space, aggressively tackle the traffic challenges we’re facing, and work with our Police Department to keep Irvine “America’s Safest City.” What’s the most important issue you believe Irvine faces today? Our biggest issue is definitely protecting our quality of life. That encompasses fixing traffic and gridlock on our streets, protecting open space and enhancing parks, and continuing to partner with our school district to ensure the educational excellence for which we’ve come to be known. What is the first thing you’ll do on the council if elected? As Irvine grows, people are feeling less connected to their representatives at City Hall. I’ll schedule Town Hall meetings and mobile offices throughout our city to ensure residents have every opportunity to share their thoughts and get involved in their community. What will your top three priorities be for the next four years, if elected? I’ll ensure our new Traffic Commission has the support and resources they need to bring about transportation improvements they’ve been working on in the past year. We’ve made tremendous progress in delivering family and communitycentered amenities at the Orange County Great Park, and I’ll continue pushing to make the Park a desirable destination for all Irvine families. I also want to create a communication-centered City Hall where all residents feel they can have a hand in how their

IRVINE CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE ANTHONY KUO

taxpayer dollars are spent and how their government is run.

cause sound disruptions to our neighbors.

How will you deal with the concerns over traffic in the city, if elected? We need to deliver meaningful results to our residents, and fast. That includes a top-to-bottom audit of what has been done to improve traffic, and what else can be done. Whether it’s continuing to coordinate with CalTrans to sync our traffic signals, to partnering with outside agencies like the toll roads agency and the Orange County Transportation Authority to improve mobility, in my mind, I’ll leave no option unexplored. As an example, we need to push for significant improvements on the 55 freeway, because the disaster of traffic there spills on to Jamboree and Culver and our local streets.

Describe how you’d like to see Irvine in 20 years? Well, I’ll still be in Irvine, that’s for sure, likely serving with some community organization that helps serve our families. We’re a can-do community that works together to keep Irvine a clean, safe, and beautiful place to live, work, and learn. In 20 years, our property values will lead Orange County, our students will continue to top the charts in the state and nation, and we’ll be celebrating the 33rd year of being “Safest City in America.”

How will you work to complete the Orange County Great Park and the Cultural Terrace, if elected? I love the Sports Complex and am proud to have had a hand in making sure it was delivered with useful amenities, on-time and on-budget. Having grown up in Irvine, I understand the importance of iconic community assets like Wild Rivers and our outdoor amphitheater. I’ll work with my council colleagues to ensure our favorite water park returns as well as a permanent amphitheater that does not

Carrie O’Malley Irvine City Council Candidate

Why are you running for Irvine City Council? As a 20-year Irvine resident and original homeowner in Northpark, I am running for the Irvine City Council to preserve and protect our Master Plan, protect our open spaces, ensure that Irvine remains the Safest City in the U.S., find practical traffic solutions, and to protect our topnotch quality of life. What’s the most important issue you believe Irvine faces today? Public Safety. As a public safety policy advisor with local and state experience, I can tell

you first-hand that our county is being impacted by poorly crafted legislation in Sacramento that has created an uptick in street drug and property crimes across the state. Irvine needs to find ways to continue to insulate our city from these consequences. What is the first thing you’ll do on the council, if elected? The first thing I will do on the City Council is to review all pending development projects to ensure that they are in line with the Master Plan of our city, and that they do not infringe on our cherished open space. In addition, I will institute traffic reduction strategies, including but not limited to signal synchronizations, intersection improvements, lefthand turn pocket restriping or elongation where needed, and more accessible public transportation options. What will your top three priorities be for the next four years, if elected? My top three priorities are: 1. PUBLIC SAFETY - Keeping Irvine the Safest City in the United States. 2. PROTECTING OPEN SPACE - Protecting and preserving our Master Plan, which is the essence of Irvine. This includes protecting and preserving our open space, parks, trails, and natural reserves. This will help to maintain our high quality of life here in Irvine. 3. FIX IRVINE TRAFFIC Implementing practical transportation solutions that work 4. BALANCED BUDGETS - Protecting and promoting Irvine’s fiscal soundness. Making sure that our funds are spent wisely and not wastefully. How will you deal with the concerns over traffic in the city, if elected? I will first initiate traffic-reduction strategies, including but not limited to signal synchronizations, intersection improvements,

left-hand turn pocket restriping/ elongation where needed, and more accessible public transportation options. Second, I will convene summits between transportation leaders, elected officials, businesses, local residents and other community stakeholders to ensure that regional traffic reduction and mobility are fairly and effectively implemented. How will you work to complete the Orange County Great Park and the Cultural Terrace, if elected? I will first seek the input of Irvine residents. The Great Park should reflect the input of all Irvine residents. There should be something for everyone to enjoy at the Great Park. In addition, I will ensure that there is not overspending and that all funds are spent wisely, and not wastefully when completing the Great Park. I will also make sure that projects at the Great Park are done in an expeditious manner, and that all entities are held accountable. There are many possible options for the Great Park, and I look forward to vetting these options and to adhering to what the majority of Irvine residents would like to see come to fruition at the Great Park. Describe how you’d like to see Irvine in 20 years? I would like to see that we stayed within the Master Plan, which is truly the essence of Irvine. I would like to see our open spaces, trails, parks, and natural reserves still maintained as the beautiful gems and treasures of Irvine that they are. I would like to see that we are still the Safest City in the nation for the 33rd year in a row (since we are currently celebrating 13 years as the Safest City). I would also like to see that since we did not over-develop and stayed within the Master Plan, and since we pursued innovative transportation options and traffic mitigation efforts,that our traffic has subsided. n


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IRVINE’S FINEST INTERACTING WITH IRVINE’S FUTURE. COURTESY IRVINE PD

Safest City, Yet Again! IRVINE HAS THE LEAST CRIME OF ANY CITY ITS SIZE, AND LESS THAN A LOT OF SMALLER TOWNS, TOO. COMMUNITY

by Irvine City News staff

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rvine is once again the Safest City of its size in the country. That’s the 13th year in a row Irvine has been ranked safest of its size based on FBI crime statistics for violent crimes. This year, Irvine also ranked first when property crime statistics per capita are included for similarly sized cities. “The men and women of the Irvine Police Department have again made the hard work of providing unparalleled community safety look easy. It is not; it comes only with a professionalism in everything they do,” Mayor Don Wagner said of the Safest City designation. “The city council and every citizen of Irvine, plus everyone who works or visits here, continue to owe a

debt of gratitude to the IPD. Congratulations to them on this recognition and thank you for your dedication to duty.” The information released for 2017 shows that Irvine has the lowest rate of violent crime per capita of any city in the nation with a population of 250,000 or more. This year, Irvine also had the lowest rate of total Part 1 crime for a city of its size. The FBI’s Annual Uniform Crime Report measures Part 1 crime, which includes murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, auto theft and arson. “The safety of our city is truly a collaborative effort,” said Irvine Police Chief Mike Hamel. “The dedicated men and women of the Irvine Police Department work tirelessly every day to keep our community safe. Our residents and members of the business community partner with IPD to prevent and help solve crime. Our city leaders have always made public safety a top priority, ensuring IPD has the resources

necessary to provide only the highest level of service to the public. It is this comprehensive effort that has allowed Irvine to preserve the safety and quality of life our residents have long enjoyed,” Chief Hamel said. It’s easy to become numb to the annual news that Irvine is one of, if not the safest city in the entire United States. When burglary suspects are arrested or the Irvine Police Department Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team rolls out to aid in the apprehension of a suspected cell phone thief hiding in a Quail Hill apartment, social media erupts with breathless accounts. We can count on NextDoor members to document every suspicious person or poorly parked car in our communities. In many ways, our connectivity and hyperawareness makes us susceptible to fear and anxiety. Still, when was the last time you were afraid for your safety in the city? Other than driving, perhaps. Or reading NextDoor. FBI statistics also played a

large part in a report by SafeWise, an online safety resource that determined the 50 safest cities in California. Irvine is the safest city in Orange County, according to the report, and fourth safest in the state, behind only Danville (population 44,631), Murrieta (pop. 111,674) and San Ramon (pop. 75,639). To compile this report, SafeWise analysts reviewed the most recent 2016 FBI crime statistics and census population data. The evaluation is based on the number of reported violent crimes (aggravated assault, murder, rape and robbery) in each city per 1,000 people. If there was a tie, they also factored in the number of property crimes (burglary, arson, larceny-theft, and car theft). With 266,663 residents, violent crimes in Irvine accounted for only .57 per 1000 people, and property crimes accounted for 14.01 per 1000. The total crimes for that year were 4.07% violent crime, and 95.93% property related crime. Orange County cities that made the top 50 include Aliso Viejo, Yorba Linda, Mission Viejo in the top 10, while Rancho Santa Margarita (13), Laguna Niguel (14), Fountain Valley (21), and San Clemente (25) rounded out the top half of the charts for civic safety. Cypress (32,), Lake Forest (33), Newport Beach (34), Placentia (47), Tustin (49) also made the top 50 safest cities to live in the state In a separate report, SafeWise also named the safest college towns in the country. To be included in the study, cities needed to have more than 15,000 residents and be home to an accredited college that offered four-year degrees. Rankings were based on the incidence of violent crime per capita using the most recent FBI crime report for each city that met the criteria. Irvine was listed as the tenthsafest college town in the country. The nine college towns

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ranked higher than Irvine are mostly sleepy and small, with populations under 60,000, some well under: 1.Brookline, Massachusetts 2. Deerfield, Illinois 3. Rexburg, Idaho 4. Upper Dublin Township, Pennsylvania 5. Wellesley, Massachusetts 6. Princeton, New Jersey 7. Newton, Massachusetts 8. Alpharetta, Georgia 9. Smithfield, Rhode Island 10. Irvine, California The SafeWise report on Irvine notes, “home to over a quarter million people, it’s extraordinary to see Irvine round out our top ten safest college cities. While some lifelong residents worry that more people equals more crime, the numbers still work out in Irvine’s favor. Despite the population, your chance of becoming a victim of violent crime in this growing California city is just 0.57 per 1,000 people.” The online version of the story linked to a 2017 OC Register story that shows crime in Irvine has gone down as the city has grown: “The chances of Irvine residents becoming a crime victim in recent years are lower than ever — at least according to data — and that’s consistent with declining crime rates nationwide since the early 1990s.” “‘I’ve heard people say it’s getting worse and there’s just no evidence of that,” said John Hipp, professor of criminology at UC Irvine. “It’s a very safe city, I’ll say that.’” “His analysis of historical FBI data of reported crimes shows Irvine’s per capita violent and property crime rates have decreased since 1975, when the city had just over 30,000 residents.” The story went on to note that TV news and social media may be to blame for people feeling crime is on the increase. n


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DINING

A TASTE OF TAPS

THE MENU IS MEMORABLE AT THE TUSTIN BREWERY AND BARREL ROOM by ICN Dining Critic

As I was trying the burger at the new TAPS Brewery & Barrel Room for the first time, I had a strong sense of déjà vu. It wasn’t a Proustian memory, exactly. I was not seized with an “all-powerful joy,” as Marcel reported after tasting a teasoaked Madeleine cake in the novel Swann’s Way. But the experience was decidedly pleasurable, and evoking a memory at first just out of reach. The patty was smashed with a nice sear, the bun like a cozy potato pillow. The combined coalition of condiments—mayo, ketchup, mustard, and a chopped up mix of griddled onion, pickle and cheese—included most of my favorites. I added some spicy sauce to augment the heat only hinted at by the sriracha pickle, which is included in the tasty beef-delivery package. Then it hit me: the experience was reminiscent of my first In-N-Out burger, an experience enjoyed years ago, and long before gourmet burgers knocked the Double-Double off of my personal list of favorite hamburgers. But another memory was lingering just out of reach… ah yes, there it is. The burger is called the Royale with Cheese! Surely, someone has already thought to “tap” into the hilarious-for-itsera scene from Pulp Fiction by naming a burger in honor of it. But it was the first I’ve seen on a menu:

THE BANH MI BACON WRAPPED HOT DOG AT THE NEW TAPS BREWERY NEXT DOOR IN TUSTIN

VINCENT: You know what they call a Quarter Pounder with Cheese in Paris? JULES: They don’t call it a Quarter Pounder with Cheese? VINCENT: No, man, they got the metric system there, they wouldn’t know what a Quarter Pounder is. JULES: What’d they call it? VINCENT: They call it Royale with Cheese. I’m not saying every moment at Joe Manzella’s huge new brewery and tasting room will bring to mind classic literature and film experiences. But it’s definitely the most impressive brewery in the Irvine area. See what I did there? The Irvine “area.” That’s because the street address of the 19,000-square-foot facility is technically in Tustin. And I generally restrict myself to writing about restaurants within the Irvine city limits. But every rule should have exceptions. The TAPS brewery is on Red Hill, about a mile from the Irvine border. It’s within the historic sphere of influence of the Irvine Business Complex. It’s across from Orange County Rescue Mission and Irvine

Valley College’s new Advanced Technology and Education Park (ATEP) campus. The TAPS Brewery & Barrel Room is a short drive from the magnificent TAPs Fish House & Brewery, one of Irvine’s best restaurant experiences that opened in the Marketplace in 2015. The new location is the beer production facility for the three TAPs restaurants (the others are in Brea and Corona). Manzella and his brewmasters plan to brew 5,000 barrels this year, with a goal of 25,000 in the future. TAPS beers are critically

THE BREWERY PRETZEL

acclaimed, having scored some 97 competition medals since 2001, including six or so prestigious Great American Beer Festival awards in recent years. Beers on tap rotate, but often include favorites like Irish Red, Flex IPA, Amend This!, Keller Pils, The Velvet Hog, West Coast Pilsner, Hefeweizen, Ponderosa Pale, Hopsteppa, and barrelaged Silent Warrior. The beer is available to take out as well as drink in. Twelve-ounce bottles are available in six-packs and by the case, as are 32-oz “crowlers” and 64-oz stainless steel,

refillable insulated growlers. I don’t love that bartenders tend to ignore you if you’re standing at the bar hoping to order, making the point that they’d rather have you wait in a designated line at one side of the bar. It’s even marked with a sign, which I believe is my right as an American to ignore. If I’m standing at the bar, it means “please bring me a drink,” and I’ll gladly pay for it and tip you in return. The ambience in the large space is inviting, making excellent use of the industrial warehouse space. There are vintage pinball machines and video games, and sports on TV. On the outdoor patio, there are plenty of tables as well as the opportunity to play the oddly popular cornhole game. A few unique aspects of the place: the food is ordered from an electronic kiosk inside and prepared in a food truck parked outside, than brought to your table. The procedure was mildly confusing at first—you choose a tap handle with a number first and enter the number in while ordering the food—but it’s gotten simpler with experience. Beyond the burger, the menu includes an imaginative and diverse take on a variety of bar foods, including a baconwrapped bánh mi hot dog, the electric taco and bulgogi beef masa fries that are particularly popular. And the always-important kids menu is reasonable at $5.99 for the choice of a cheeseburger, hot dog or grilled cheese sandwich. So sure, TAPS Brewery and Barrel Room is technically in Tustin. But we’ll claim it as our own. n n tapsbrewery.com


NOVEMBER 2018

IrvineCityNews

irvinecitynews.com

A+ for IUSD students EDUCATION

by Irvine City News staff

S

tandardized test results are out for California students who participated in the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress tests last spring. For the third year in a row, Irvine Unified School District ranks second highest in the state among public school districts with

25,000 or more students, based on test results where students met or exceeded the standards in English Language Arts/Literacy (ELA) and Mathematics. Scores for the tests are separated into four levels of achievement: standards exceeded, met, nearly met and not met. Among IUSD students taking the tests, 77 percent met or exceeded the state standards in English Language Arts and Literacy, while 74 percent of testtakers met or exceeded standards in Mathematics IUSD state standardized assessment scores have outperformed both California (50% English and 39% math) and Orange County 58% English 49% Math) score averages.

“There are many reasons to be proud of our outstanding IUSD students,” says IUSD Board of Education President Sharon Wallin. “These results highlight our special partnership between our dedicated and talented students, families, teachers and staff.” The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress was administered in the spring to more than 3 million students in grades 3 to 8 and 11. It is a computer-adaptive assessment that bases follow-up questions on students’ answers in real time. This is the fourth year of the computer-based tests, which use California’s challenging academic standards and ask students to write clearly, think critically, and solve complex problems, as

they will need to do in college and 21st-century careers. The tests are designed to provide information on each student’s progress on state standards. IUSD students in grades three through eight and grade 11 participated in the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) tests in ELA and Mathematics last spring. The scores are just one of many measures of student performance, IUSD officials point out. The results help enhance the district’s understanding of each student’s needs and help improve student learning. “IUSD is guided by its Continuous Improvement Efforts, which are designed

IUSD Ranks #2 in the State in ELA and Math for the Third Year

ELA/LITERACY

OC Orange County

Skill Areas 88% 75%

California

77% 58% 50% PERCENT STANDARD MET OR STANDARD EXCEEDED

Reading

Orange County

74% 49% 39% PERCENT STANDARD MET OR STANDARD EXCEEDED

Listening

81%

Research/ Inquiry

Near or Above Standard Orange County

Skill Areas 86%

California

Writing

91% 84%

77%

Near or Above Standard IUSD

MATHEMATICS

OC

92%

89%

89%

87% 71%

66%

Concepts & Procedures

Problem Solving, Modeling/Data Analysis

Near or Above Standard IUSD

75%

Communicating Reasoning Near or Above Standard Orange County

Ranking in comparison to the percent of students who met or exceeded the standards in public school districts with 25,000 students or more.

7

to develop critical thinking, creativity, communication, collaboration and other learning outcomes also found in state standards,” says IUSD Superintendent Terry Walker. “Building these essential capacities in our students has been an integral focus of IUSD’s educational mission and vision since its inception. The district will continue to leverage limited resources to maximize collaboration and connections with our students, parents, staff and community partners, as we strive to develop well rounded students, who are college and career ready in an ever changing and competitive world.” The test scores will make up a key ingredient of the California School Dashboard, a new system for evaluating school performance. The California Department of Education will use the test results in conjunction with graduation rates, suspension and absenteeism figures, college and career readiness data, and other measures to determine if school districts and individual schools are meeting progress outlooks. IUSD will use the scores to better understand each student’s learning and help the district to continue to improve upon the high-quality instruction we provide. The scores will not be used to determine student advancement to the next grade level or as the sole piece of information when making academic decisions about students, according to the district. IUSD officials suggest that assessment scores should be recognized as only one measure when evaluating student learning; they provide some but not all information about a student’s knowledge and skills. Results from tests should be reviewed in combination with other measures, such as in-class assignments, classroom tests, and teacher input. n


NOVEMBER 2018 8

IrvineCityNews

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Opinion

by ICN Editorial Board

I

t’s time to stand up for the future of the city where we live, and that most of us love. The best way to do that is to vote on November 6. Don’t just think about it; don’t just post opinions on social media or talk about issues with friends. But actually vote. Fill out your ballot at home or at the polls. And when you do, we urge you to think about the Irvine of today and tomorrow, rather than the one of yesterday. We strongly support the three candidates we’ve endorsed for the Irvine city elections. We urge you to vote for Don Wagner for mayor, and Carrie O’Malley and Anthony Kuo for city council. Please refer to our page one story for more details. This is a remarkable election in many ways. The number of candidates alone sets this year apart in the history of Irvine. It is also a crucial election for the future of our fair city. Today, Irvine earns so many local, regional and national accolades that it’s hard to keep up with them. It has stable and thoughtful leadership that has kept our city government fiscally fit while managing economic growth and vitality and addressing real issues of traffic congestion. Compare that to the direction the city was in a decade ago, as $200 million was frittered away at the Orange County Great Park at a time when Larry Agran ruled the city. It took Irvine a decade to recover from the debacle at the Orange County Great Park. Today, the former Marine

Vote as if the future depends upon it Corps Air Base El Toro has evolved into an amazing place. There are schools, parks and playgrounds. There’s a remarkable Sports Park that is already a favorite of families and the envy of other cities. There’s a new ice complex coming soon. And the planning for the Cultural Terrace is well underway. But there is a “the sky is falling” faction in Irvine that has successfully manufactured an “us vs. them” wedge in the city. The Larry Agran-led “No on B” slate is designed to divide us rather than inspire us. Why do politicians create wedge issues? Because unfortunately they often work. Wedge issues thrive on our emotional reactions, rather than our ability to critically analyze them. As a New York Times article put it: “the temptation to elevate non-core issues in specific elections in the hopes it will win over a few more voters is too great for most candidates to ignore.” A year ago, the editorial board of the OC Register weighed in with an opinion piece about the Southern California Veterans Memorial Park and what would become the misleading “No on B” campaign: “This is all about politics and trying to win next year’s city election. Sadly, this is par for the course in Irvine where creating a political wedge issue and riding it to the election seems torn right out of the pages of former Irvine Mayor and Councilman Larry Agran’s playbook. It should come as no surprise that the pro-Agran Irvine Community News and Views publication supports the referendum. Agran even wrote a

column in its pages supporting it.” Now, here we are a few days from the Nov. 6 election, and it’s clear the whole “No on B” effort has indeed been “all about politics and trying to win the city election.” One more note from that story. One of Larry Agran’s main liberal mouthpieces, Dan Chmielewski, posted a comment: “Of the candidates declared or rumored running for city council, no candidate represents the Pope or Agran factions. For the Register’s editorial board to claim this shows remarkable ignorance of facts.” This was a year ago. Today, Chmielewski and his LiberalOC blog are all in for Pope and the Agran attempt to take over the city of Irvine once more. Intriguingly, Dan also suggests that Republicans vote for Daigle for mayor, over the proven incumbent Mayor Don Wagner. That speaks volumes about Daigle’s role in the election: as a spoiler, an old Agran trick that voters no doubt remember well from past elections. We know the direction of the city will change fundamentally for the worse if the city leadership reverts to the control of Larry Agran and his slate. A vote for Wagner, O’Malley and Kuo is a vote for the future, and not the past. We urge everyone to vote in this election. Take into consideration all that you’ve read and heard, here and elsewhere. Then vote your conscience, vote your pocketbook, and vote for your children’s future and for the future of your community, not its past. But please, vote. n


NOVEMBER 2018

IrvineCityNews

irvinecitynews.com

Green Scene CITY AND UCI EARN ACCOLADES COMMUNITY

were related to driving: excess fuel consumption (No. 74) and commute time by car (No. 81). Each city’s weighted average across all metrics to calculate its overall score and used the resulting scores to rank-order the cities. The poorest performing cities were Baton Rouge, Corpus Christi, and St. Louis.

overall,” Shea said. “If this goes into place, we could kind of see it snowball into a lot of other local control issues.”

Cool school

While the city of Irvine is the 4th ranking green city in the nation, UC Irvine retains its first place position as the greenest university in the U.S., while also being recognized as a world leader for sustainability. For the third consecutive year, UCI earned the No. 1 spot in Sierra magazine’s “Cool Schools” ranking. UCI the only campus to score in the top 10 for nine consecutive years, placing first in 2014 and 2015 and tying for No. 1 this year with Vermont’s Green Mountain College on the strength of its curriculum, research, campus operations and public engagement. The official publication of the Sierra Club, the magazine initiated the college sustainability rankings in 2007 because – as the

biggest purchasers and employers in many communities – campuses can create demand for green services and products and lead by example. This year, Sierra rated 269 institutions in 19 categories, ranging from teaching and research to public engagement and campus operations. UCI also received recognition from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s (AASHE) prestigious STARS program, receiving the esteemed STARS Platinum rating, one of only four campuses to do so. The others are Stanford University, Colorado State University and University of New Hampshire. STARS is an acronym for the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System. UCI claimed first place overall for doctoral-granting universities, accruing the highest merit score among all North American schools. UCI also ranked No. 1 in green buildings and in research (the latter a

by Irvine City News staff

Organics first finale?

rvine is the 4th greenest city in the United States, according to a report released in October by WalletHub. Irvine ranked after only San Diego, San Francisco, and Washington, DC. To determine the cities promoting an environmentally friendly lifestyle, WalletHub compared the 100 largest cities across four key categories: 1) Environment, 2) Transportation, 3) Energy Sources and 4) Lifestyle & Policy. Irvine ranked No. 1 in the nation in the Energy Sources category, which looks at a city’s share of electricity from renewable sources, solar installations per capita and number of smart-energy policies and initiatives. Irvine’s lowest ranking was No. 27 for Transportation, which includes factors such as commute time, share of commuters who drive alone, walk and bike score, miles of bike lanes, intersection density alternative fuel stations per capita, and annual fuel consumption. The study used an additional 26 key “green” indicators, graded on a 100 point score with 100 being the greenest practices and policies. Irvine’s highest rankings among the 26 indicators include No. 1 in the country for several criteria: water quality, alternative fuel stations per capita, share of electricity from renewable sources, and share of green hotels. The city was ranked No. 2 for green space (26.35%), and No. 6 for bike score. The city’s poorest rankings

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION IS PART OF THE GREEN SCENE AT UCI. COURTESY UCI

I

One of Irvine’s green initiatives was the elimination of the use of synthetic pesticides and herbicides on city parks, landscaping and open space in favor of organic alternatives. A report in the OC Register indicates that a provision in a federal farm bill may put that “organics first” policy at risk, blocking cities and other local governments from making their own rules restricting pesticides. Councilwoman Christina Shea was quoted in the story, noting “how important this [pesticide ban] was for our community

9

tie with UC San Diego). The rankings were released recently in the Sustainable Campus Index, which recognizes top-performing colleges and universities in 17 sustainability impact areas related to academics, engagement, operations and administration. “UCI has a long history of environmental and sustainability leadership dating back to the Nobel prize-winning research of F. Sherwood Rowland into the depletion of the ozone layer almost five decades ago. His work led to the development and growth of our campus culture of sustainable practices, groundbreaking research and extraordinary accomplishments that has placed us at the very forefront of American higher education,” said Chancellor Howard Gillman. “These two latest honors serve to confirm the great success of all our efforts in the classroom, in the laboratory, and in the community.” n


NOVEMBER 2018 10

IrvineCityNews

REACH OUT AND JOIN THE CONVERSATION ON FACEBOOK AT @IRVINECITYNEWS THE FIRST NAIA CHAMPIONSHIP TO BE HELD IN IRVINE THIS MONTH.

Soccer Stars at the Great Park Sports Park SPORTS

by Irvine City News staff

S irvinecitynews.com

ome of the best male athletes from small colleges and universities around the country will be in Irvine for the 2018 NAIA Men’s Soccer National Championship. Sixteen teams will compete at the FivePoint Championship Soccer Stadium at the Orange County Great Park Sports Park beginning Nov. 26. The soccer tournament is the first NAIA Championship to be held in Irvine. California has hosted the men’s soccer championship four previous times: in Pasadena in 1976 and in Fresno in 1984, 2008 and 2009. The tournament will come to Irvine in 2019. It’s the 60th anniversary of the NAIA Championship Soccer Tournament. It was held in Palm Beach County, Florida, the past

four years. “This is a true community effort; the support of the city of Irvine, its new Orange County Great Park Sports Complex and our hotel partners made it possible for our Destination Irvine sales team to secure the 2018 and 2019 NAIA Men’s Soccer National Championships for Irvine,” said Bryan Starr, president/CEO, Greater Irvine Chamber of Commerce, Irvine Economic Development and Destination Irvine. “The new Sports Complex gives Irvine a new level of competitiveness that we can leverage to attract sporting events of this caliber.” The NAIA Men’s Soccer National Championship brings a large economic impact to the host community, according to Destination Irvine, the travel and tourism marketing arm of Greater Irvine Chamber of Commerce. The potential economic impact the championships could have in Irvine is estimated at more than $192,000 per year, totaling more than $384,000 for both years. Each year more than 65,000 NAIA student-athletes play college sports, earn over $600 million in scholarships, and compete for a chance to participate in 26 national championships.

irvinecitynews.com

“We are excited to start a new chapter with men’s soccer in Irvine, California,” said Jim Carr, NAIA president and CEO. “Our team is eager to work alongside the Golden State Athletic Conference to make this championship event memorable for our student-athletes.” The tournament is co-hosted by the Golden State Athletic Conference, which includes schools from California and Arizona, including O.C.’s Vanguard University in Costa Mesa and Hope International University in Fullerton. “On behalf of the nine universities of the Golden State Athletic Conference, we are thrilled to bring this NAIA Men’s Soccer National Championship to Orange County,” said Mike Daniels, commissioner of the Golden State Athletic Conference. “The partnership with Destination Irvine, the city of Irvine and the Orange County Great Park will ensure the 16 teams traveling to Irvine will have a memorable experience as they compete for the national title.” In addition to the tournament matches, events planned during championship week including Opening Night Banquet, presented by Hoag (Sunday, Nov. 25), Soccer Club Night (Monday, Nov. 26), IUSD Night (Tuesday, Nov. 27), AYSO Night (Wednesday, Nov. 28) and Special Olympics Day (Thursday, Nov. 29). The NAIA and GSAC will also honor two of its former national champions on Saturday, Dec. 1 as the 1972 Westmont College National Champions and 2007 Azusa Pacific National Champions will be honored prior to the start of the game. Ticket prices start at $15 for adults for the first three days and $20 for the semifinals and championship days. High school students and younger will be able to get $10 tickets throughout the tournament. n n Tickets: www.gsacsports.org/ NAIA_MSOC_18


NOVEMBER 2018

irvinecitynews.com

IrvineCityNews

11

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Our airport is better than theirs

John Wayne Airport ranks as the No. 1 airport in America in terms of customer satisfaction, according to the latest J.D. Power Satisfaction Survey. JWA earned 815 points on J.D. Power’s 1,000-point scale, taking the No. 1 spot in the large airport category, and also had the highest point total overall. John Wayne just beat out Buffalo/ Niagara International Airport, which had the second-highest overall score (814) of all airports in the survey and was first in the medium airport rankings. Las Vegas McCarran International and Orlando International tied for the highest scoring mega airport with 781 points apiece. Mega airports were defined as those handling more than 32.5 million annual passengers. The large category includes airports with 10 million to 32.4 million passengers, while the medium category includes airports with between 3 million and 9.9 million passengers. The study takes into consideration six factors — in order of importance — 1) terminal facilities, 2) airport accessibility, 3) security check, 4) baggage claim, 5) check-in/baggage check, and 6) food, beverage, and retail. Overall traveler satisfaction climbed to a score of 761 on J.D. Power’s 1,000-point scale. That marked an all-time high for the survey, up 12 points from the previous record set just last year and up 30 points from 2016. The J.D. Power survey calculated responses from more than 40,000 travelers who had used at least one airport from September 2017 to September 2018.

Cat hotel comes to Irvine

Local residents and travelers to Irvine have a growing selection of hotels to stay at while in town—but what about their feline friends? Not to worry, entrepreneur Shana Martin is opening Club Cat later this year, a luxury boutique “hotel” just for cats. Located just two miles from John Wayne Airport, Club Cat will provide peace-ofmind to cat owners who travel for business or pleasure. Said to be a high-end alternative to traditional cat boarding, Club Cat promises a five-star customer service experience for both cat and cat owner. While in Club Cat’s care, cat patrons receive the type of authentic care and attention they’re used to at home – and much more. The cat suites are eight-feet tall and at least three and a half feet wide with enclosed balconies. Other features and amenities include live webcasts for cat owners who want to check in on their kitty cats 24/7, “Nightly paw-down service,” calming therapy, “pawi-cures” and “derrière trims.” Try to order that from room service at your human hotel!

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Tech for toddlers

UCI researchers have confirmed what many tech-savvy parents already know: many educational apps designed for preschoolers aren’t very educational at all. As part of a doctoral dissertation in UCI’s School of Education – Melissa Callaghan and Stephanie Reich, co-author and UCI associate professor of education, selected the top 10 paid and free children’s math and literacy apps from the Apple, Amazon and Google Play stores. Each app was evaluated for such design elements as feedback, increasing complexity, guided play, developmental appropriateness and instructive value. Preschoolers process information differently from older learners (i.e., shorter attention spans), so app designs should be guided by developmental science. The researchers found that while most of the apps provided clear goals, moderate instructions and positive feedback, few supplied in-play guidance on how to complete tasks, rephrased instructions if the initial ones were not understood or offered rewards that advanced learning. “Without well-structured feedback or leveling of difficulty, children may end up relying on trial and error or playing simple games that drill the same skills with no progression,” says Professor Reich. A few tips from the research for parents evaluating apps for preschoolers: Features facilitating physical interaction, including large icon sizes and simplified touch-screen motions, can help preschoolers successfully play the game, boosting learning. Instead of just earning badges or stickers for completing tasks, unlocking skills or advanced levels of the game can make learning more intrinsically motivating. That makes learning the fun part, rather than the sticker. Or how about this novel idea: parents can read to their kids from actual books, the original app! n

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WHAT REALLY MATTERS


NOVEMBER 2018 12

IrvineCityNews

Top Through 11.11 Nature in Forms at the Great Park

Works in ceramics and sculpture by artists and academics will be on display at the Great Park Gallery. The work looks at ways nature and technology have influenced contemporary sculpture. cityofirvine.org/orange-countygreat-park/palm-court-artscomplex

Through 11.18 Fall Food Drive

Support hunger relief efforts by donating canned goods or nonperishable food items to benefit local food banks. Donations will be accepted at the Orange County Great Park Visitors Center. cityofirvine.org/news-media/ news-article/scare-away-hungerfall-food-drive

irvinecitynews.com

Things To Do in November Through 1.5.19 First Glimpse: The Buck Collection at UCI

When art collector Gerald Buck bequeathed his collection of California art to UCI, it set off shockwaves in the art world. See works that will, along with the Irvine Museum Collection, be the center of the future UCI Institute and Museum for California Art. arts.uci.edu/event/first-glimpseintroducing-buck-collection

9.2-9.3 Holiday Faire

Get an early start on seasonal shopping as some 100 local artists offer handmade gifts for sale at the Irvine Fine Arts Center. Entrance is $2 per person, free for ages 12 and younger. cityofirvine.org/irvine-fine-artscenter/holiday-faire

FIRST GLIMPSE: THE BUCK COLLECTION AT UCI

11.5-12.14 Holiday Toy Drive

Celebrate the reason for the holiday season by giving to 2/11 Marine Battalion families “adopted” by the city of Irvine. Donate a new, unwrapped gift suitable for infants or children up to age 12 at Irvine Civic Center, Irvine Police Department and Orange County Great Park Visitors Center. cityofirvine.org/news-media/ news-article/donate-holiday-toydrive

11.10-11.18 “Legally Blonde” at the Barclay

UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts presents a musical of the film “Legally Blonde” that follows the adventures of Elle Woods at Harvard Law School. thebarclay.org

11.11 Veterans Day at Bill Barber Park

Irvine hosts a special ceremony to pay tribute to our nation’s troops. Free and open to the public, the event will be 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the formal garden at Colonel Bill Barber Marine Corps Memorial Park.

11.26-12.1 College Soccer Championships at the Great Park

The 60th annual NAIA Men’s Soccer Championship for collegiate athletes will be held at the Orange County Great Park Soccer Stadium. The 16-team, single-elimination tournament will draw top soccer teams from smaller colleges and universities from across the country, as well as their fans and families, to Irvine.

11.30-12.1 “MenAlive: Merry and Bright” at the Barclay

Enjoy a festive annual holiday extravaganza featuring a funfilled concert of traditional classics and favorite new carols by O.C.’s gay men’s chorus. thebarclay.org

12.2 Winter Wonderland

Greet the season at the civic center with carols and songs, a tree-lighting ceremony, games, crafts, food and fun— plus, a visit from Santa Claus. Consider bringing a gift for kids up to age 12 as part of the Holiday Toy Drive. cityofirvine.org/news-media/ calendar-of-events/event/winterwonderland-2018

GREET THE SEASON AT THE CIVIC CENTER WITH CAROLS AND SONGS, A TREE-LIGHTING CEREMONY, GAMES, CRAFTS, FOOD AND FUN.

Irvine City News 11.2018  

The community newspaper of the city of Irvine

Irvine City News 11.2018  

The community newspaper of the city of Irvine