Page 1

MAY 2013


THE IRISH FILM INSTITUTE

EXHIBIT PRESERVE EDUCATE

TALK As part of this month’s Neil Jordan Retrospective (see page 16), the director will be joined by his friend and frequent collaborator, novelist Pat McCabe, in a broadranging conversation exploring Jordan’s work in film on Saturday, May 25th (14.10). Reserve your FREE ticket for this Afternoon Talk at the IFI Box Office. 2

The Butcher Boy

Our French Film Club screening in partnership with Alliance Française will be Olivier Assayas’ Something in the Air (see page 14 for notes) on May 29th at 18.40. Film blogger and teacher James Dempsey will introduce the film. IFI and Alliance Française members can avail of a discounted ticket price of €7 for this screening (please request at Box Office).

A Hijacking

DEBATE

The Critical Take, the IFI’s FREE monthly forum on film, will meet on May 29th (18.30) to discuss the re-issue of Jerry Schatzberg’s Scarecrow (1973) starring Gene Hackman, Olivier Assayas’ new film Something in the Air and Tobias Lindholm’s A Hijacking. Panellists will include Head of French and Francophone Studies at UCD, Dr. Douglas Smith and the IFI Irish Film Archive’s Collections Officer Anja Mahler. Book your FREE ticket at the IFI Box Office.

PICK

Our Children

Something in the Air

FRENCH

The Irish Film Institute is Ireland’s national cultural institution for film. It aims to exhibit the finest in independent, Irish and international cinema, preserve Ireland’s moving image heritage at the IFI Irish Film Archive, and encourage engagement with film through its various educational programmes.

Émilie Dequenne (Rosetta) was a deserving winner of Best Actress in the Un Certain Regard strand of last year’s Cannes Film Festival for her outstanding performance in Joachim Lafosse’s Our Children (see page 10), a penetrating study of immigration, social status, and psychological decline. Compelling and claustrophobic, it’s a superb film whose events will stay with audiences long after its conclusion.


DIRECTOR’S NOTE

MAY AT THE IFI Following on from our celebration of new Irish film throughout April, this month allows us to further explore home-grown talent through a focus on the work of one of Ireland’s leading and most important film directors, Neil Jordan. In the lead-up to the release of Jordan’s latest feature Byzantium (from May 31st) starring Saoirse Ronan and Gemma Arterton, we’re delighted to present his 16 other cinematic works. On May 25th we will also present a free public interview with Neil Jordan conducted by his collaborator on The Butcher Boy, Pat McCabe. Please check online (www.ifi.ie) for more details on film introductions by Jordan and special guests throughout the retrospective. This season is presented in partnership with Bord Scannán na hÉireann/Irish Film Board on the occasion of their 20th anniversary.

This year I’ve often written about our IFI International programme of major events across Europe presented by the Irish Film Institute as part of the International Culture Programme to celebrate Ireland’s Presidency of the Council of the European Union. While these events continue throughout May, there are also many events closer to home to celebrate Ireland’s Presidency. IFI National is proud to present a programme of short films exploring impressions of Ireland and Europe in collections at the IFI Irish Film Archive. At a time when our relationship with Europe is at the forefront of local debate, we hope this programme will further spark discussion on our relationship with Europe in the past, present and future.

Neil Jordan at the IFI

Welcome to the IFI’s May programme as we present a major retrospective of one of Ireland’s leading directors, Neil Jordan.

This touring programme will be presented nationwide in arts centres (including The Triskel in Cork, The Model in Sligo, The Visual in Carlow, and Dunamaise Arts Centre in Laois), libraries (including Ardkeen Library in Waterford, 14 Tipperary libraries, and the New Ross Library in Wexford) and other locations including schools and the EU House on Dawson Street, Dublin 2. For full details of the touring programme and a list of locations, please visit www.ifi.ie/nationaleu This programme is supported by the Arts Council Local Partnership Scheme as part of Culture Connects, the EU Presidency Culture Programme. There are also plenty of great new releases this month including Pedro Almodóvar’s fun and frisky I’m So Excited! which comes hot on the heels of a major IFI retrospective of his work throughout April; Joachim Lafosse reunites the male leads from A Prophet (Tahar Rahim and Niels Arestrup) in the immensely powerful Our Children; while the writerdirector of Take Shelter, Jeff Nichols, returns with Mud, cementing him as one of the most exciting new directors working today. With all of this on top of continuing strands including Feast Your Eyes (Bella Martha), the Experimental Film Club (Unrolling Processes), and our annual celebrations with Bealtaine and the Dublin Dance Festival, May promises to be another busy month at the IFI! Ross Keane Director

3


MAY 2013 DATE

SCREENING

TIME

DATE

SCREENING

TIME

1ST WED

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 1 LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES JUMP ANGEL

13.10

10TH FRI

THE EYE OF THE STORM OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED*

13.00, 18.20 13.50, 16.10, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 15.30, 18.10, 20.40

13.40, 16.00, 20.50 13.40, 20.30 14.00, 17.00, 20.00 16.20, 18.30 18.30

LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED 2ND THURS WHITE ELEPHANT

13.40, 16.00, 20.50 13.40, 18.20, 20.40 14.00, 17.00, 20.00 16.20, 18.30

3RD FRI

13.50, 18.20 14.00, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.10, 20.40

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES JUMP LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* SCARECROW WHITE ELEPHANT

4TH SAT

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: DOUBLE BILL THE COMPANY OF WOLVES THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT SCARECROW

5TH SUN

MONA LISA THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT SCARECROW

6TH MON

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 1 SCARECROW THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT HIGH SPIRITS

7TH TUES

SCARECROW THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT LUX PRIZE SCREENING: JUST THE WIND

8TH WED

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 2 SCARECROW THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED* LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT WE’RE NO ANGELS

SCARECROW 9TH THURS THE GATEKEEPERS I’M SO EXCITED*

LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED WHITE ELEPHANT

4

MUD

11TH SAT

THE MIRACLE THE EYE OF THE STORM OUR CHILDREN

12TH SUN

14.10 14.10, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.20, 20.50 18.30 13.10 13.50, 18.30 14.10, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10 16.20, 20.50 18.30 13.50 14.10, 20.40 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.20, 20.50 18.30

13TH MON

13.50, 20.50 14.00, 18.30 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.10, 20.40

MUD ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 2 THE EYE OF THE STORM I’M SO EXCITED*

13.10 13.30, 18.10, 20.40 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10 18.30 20.50 13.00 13.40, 18.20 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10 16.10, 20.50 18.20, 20.50 13.00, 15.30, 20.40 13.10

OUR CHILDREN INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE

14.10, 18.30 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.20, 20.50 18.20

14TH TUES

THE EYE OF THE STORM OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED* MUD MICHAEL COLLINS BROKEN + Q&A

13.00 13.40, 16.00, 20.50 14.20, 16.20, 20.50 15.30, 18.10, 20.50 18.20 18.30

15TH WED

MUD ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 1 OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED*

13.00, 15.30, 20.40 13.10

THE BUTCHER BOY THE EYE OF THE STORM THE EYE OF THE STORM 16TH THURS OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED* MUD

17TH FRI

13.10 13.50 14.10, 20.40 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.20, 20.50 18.30

IRELAND ON SUNDAY: TAX CITY THE EYE OF THE STORM I’M SO EXCITED* THE CRYING GAME OUR CHILDREN MUD

13.10 14.10 14.10, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 16.10, 18.30 16.20, 20.50 18.30

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: DOUBLE BILL MUD I’M SO EXCITED*

OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED* A HIJACKING MUD SIMON KILLER

18TH SAT

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: DOUBLE BILL MUD A HIJACKING SIMON KILLER IN DREAMS OUR CHILDREN I’M SO EXCITED*

14.00, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 18.30 18.30 13.00, 18.20 13.50, 16.10, 20.50 14.30, 16.30, 18.30, 20.30 15.30, 18.10, 20.40 13.50, 18.20 14.00, 18.40 14.10, 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 16.10, 20.40 16.10, 20.40 13.10 13.30, 20.40 14.10, 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 14.10, 18.40 16.10 16.20, 20.50 18.50


DATE

SCREENING

TIME

DATE

SCREENING

TIME

19TH SUN

MUD OUR CHILDREN WIM VANDEKEYBUS SPECIAL NOT I + THE END OF THE AFFAIR SIMON KILLER A HIJACKING I’M SO EXCITED*

13.30, 20.40 13.50, 18.20 14.00 16.10 16.10, 20.40 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 18.40

26TH SUN

11.00

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 1 I’M SO EXCITED* MUD A HIJACKING

13.10

IFI FAMILY: THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO THE BRAVE ONE LIFE IN MOVEMENT SOMETHING IN THE AIR EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS A HIJACKING MUD

27TH MON

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 2 SOMETHING IN THE AIR A HIJACKING GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN MUD THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO

13.10

28TH TUES

SOMETHING IN THE AIR MUD A HIJACKING EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES IFI & EXPERIMENTAL FILM CLUB THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS

13.20, 15.50, 20.40 13.40 13.50 16.00, 20.30 16.30 18.30 18.30 20.50

29TH WED

WILD STRAWBERRIES & BEALTAINE 2013: THE GREAT GATSBY ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 1 MUD SOMETHING IN THE AIR A HIJACKING EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO THE CRITICAL TAKE THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES

11.00

20TH MON

SIMON KILLER OUR CHILDREN

21ST TUES

I’M SO EXCITED* OUR CHILDREN A HIJACKING MUD SIMON KILLER THE GOOD THIEF

22ND WED

ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: PROGRAMME 2 I’M SO EXCITED* A HIJACKING SIMON KILLER MUD OUR CHILDREN FEAST YOUR EYES: BELLA MARTHA MONTHLY MUST-SEE CINEMA: ANOTHER SHORE

OUR CHILDREN 23RD THURS I’M SO EXCITED* A HIJACKING

MUD SIMON KILLER

24TH FRI

25TH SAT

13.50, 18.30 15.50, 20.30 14.10, 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 14.10, 18.40 16.20, 20.50 13.30, 20.40 13.50, 18.20 14.10, 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 15.30, 20.40 16.10 18.30 13.10 13.50 14.10, 16.20, 20.40 14.10, 20.50 15.50, 20.40 16.20 18.30 18.30 13.50, 18.20 14.00, 18.40 14.10, 16.20, 18.30, 20.40 16.10, 20.40 16.10, 20.40

WILD STRAWBERRIES & BEALTAINE 2013: THE GREAT GATSBY SOMETHING IN THE AIR MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO A HIJACKING MUD EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS

11.00

THE MAKING OF EXCALIBUR: MYTH INTO MOVIE ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME: DOUBLE BILL MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO AFTERNOON TALK: NEIL JORDAN PUBLIC INTERVIEW GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES SOMETHING IN THE AIR BREAKFAST ON PLUTO THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS MUD A HIJACKING EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN

13.00

13.40, 16.10, 20.50 14.00 14.00, 18.40 15.50, 20.30 16.10, 20.50 18.30 18.40

13.10 13.30 14.10 14.10 15.30, 18.10, 20.40 16.10 16.10 18.20 18.40, 20.50 20.50

THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS 30TH THURS SOMETHING IN THE AIR

A HIJACKING GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO ONDINE THE STONE ROSES: MADE OF STONE (PREVIEW + SATELLITE Q&A) MUD EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN

31ST FRI

WILD STRAWBERRIES & BEALTAINE 2013: DANCE ACROSS DUBLIN SOMETHING IN THE AIR BYZANTIUM POPULAIRE EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN

13.00 13.30 14.00 15.50, 18.20, 20.50 16.10, 20.50 16.20 18.20 18.40 20.30 13.20, 15.50, 20.30 14.00, 18.40 14.10 16.10, 20.50 16.10, 20.50 18.20 18.40

13.10 13.40 13.40, 16.10, 18.40 14.00, 18.40 16.10, 20.50 16.30 18.30 20.40 21.10 13.40 14.00, 16.30 14.20, 18.20 16.20 16.30 18.30 19.30 20.20 20.50 11.00 13.00, 18.20 13.20, 15.50, 18.20, 20.50 13.50, 16.10, 18.30, 20.50 15.30, 20.50

* Includes the IFB-funded short, Oxygen (see page 9) Programme events and times may be subject to change on occasion. Please visit www.ifi.ie or see IFI daily ads in The Irish Times for the latest information. Scan the QR code opposite with your phone for the latest programme information.

5


MAY 2013 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES MAY 1ST – 2ND FILM INFO:

140 minutes, U.S.A., 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

After the visceral love story that was Blue Valentine (starring Ryan Gosling) writer-director Derek Cianfrance shows no lack of ambition in this expansive contemporary saga, engrossingly tracing the longterm ripple-effect of questionable moral decisions. The ever-charismatic Gosling returns as a rootless carnival daredevil biker who tries to settle down when he learns he’s the father of waitress Eva Mendes’ child. How he chooses to support his new family however, brings him into

contact with local cop Bradley Cooper, here delivering a handsome yet slippery turn as a beat officer whose designs on ascending the career ladder take priority over ethical imperatives. Shaping events into a fascinating triptych structure, Cianfrance subsequently explores the ultimate ramifications of the two men’s actions, as the film is powered towards a satisfying, poetic conclusion by its stellar, committed performances and cameraman Sean Bobbitt’s intensely radiant images.

Set in Derry on New Year’s Eve, and drawing focus on a cast of predominantly young actors, this Romeo & Juliet-type tale, not unlike the Baz Luhrmann production in terms of energy and visual style, is smart and adeptly constructed. Conveying the carnival feel of the night in question and making atmospheric use of its particular sense of momentum, Jump quickly establishes the relationship between Greta (Nichola Burley) and Pearse (Martin McCann), who meet by

chance on a bridge while the rest of the city is wrapped up in revelry.

JUMP MAY 1ST – 2ND FILM INFO:

82 minutes, U.K.-Ireland, 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Alice Butler

6

The instant attraction between them is thwarted by an unwelcome connection in the form of Greta’s father, one of the city’s most brutal criminals. While the couple attempt to escape this, Greta’s friends –Charlene McKenna and Valene Kane – run into dire straits of their own, altering and uniting all four lives irrevocably.


LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED MAY 1ST – 9TH (DEN SKALDEDE FRISØR) FILM INFO:

116 minutes, Denmark-SwedenItaly-France-Germany, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

After her Oscar-winning moral drama In A Better World, Denmark’s Susanne Bier returns with this charmer, bringing a dash of laughter, a smattering of home truths and plenty of Italian sunshine. Brassy blonde Trine Dyrholm holds centre stage as a hairdresser recovering from cancer surgery, whose errant hubby disgraces himself with the office girl only days before the couple must to fly to Sorrento for their daughter’s wedding. Also attending is Pierce Brosnan, father of the groom,

a gruff, work-obsessed fruit ‘n’ veg importer who lost his wife in tragic circumstances years earlier. No, you probably won’t need three guesses to work out where the story’s going, but the filmmakers refuse to talk down to the material, and Dyrholm is absolutely stellar as the doughty heroine while Brosnan responds to every single layer of emotion in one of the best roles he’s ever had.

WHITE ELEPHANT MAY 1ST – 9TH (ELEFANTE BLANCO) FILM INFO:

110 minutes, Argentina-SpainFrance, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

The challenge of retaining your faith in the face of everyday poverty, suffering and injustice provides a compelling core to this latest from brilliant Argentinian director Pablo Trapero. Lion’s Den and Carancho displayed his skill at fusing social issues with gripping thriller narratives, and here adapts to the daunting environs of a real-life shantytown in Buenos Aires, surrounding the massive empty shell of an unfinished hospital – a monument to failed good intentions. Ricardo

Darín exudes troubled decency as the embattled priest caught between church officialdom and his hardscrabble flock, while the arrival of Jérémie Renier’s big-hearted but impetuous Belgian missionary only escalates the temperature of the neighbourhood drugs war. Examining the gnarly realities of compassion, the film is resolutely fair-minded towards the local residents who took part in its production, and eschews easy answers in pondering the conundrum of making a difference. 7


MAY 2013 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

THE GATEKEEPERS MAY 3RD – 9TH (SHOMEREI HA’SAF) FILM INFO:

96 minutes, Israel-FranceGermany-Belgium, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

The personnel of the Shin Bet, Israel’s internal security service, work in secrecy, with only the identity of the head of the organisation known to the public. In a striking coup, documentarist Dror Moreh here interviews no less than six former incumbents in the post – and it’s what they have to say which makes this a startling and provocative contribution to the Middle East debate. Contextualised by an astute use of news archive, these wily old warriors are firstly humanised by a recognition of

the psychological and emotional toll of knowing you’ve killed innocent people along with terrorist targets. However, while their loyalty to defending their homeland remains rock solid, what astonishes here is their anger at the lack of Israeli political leadership in finding an accommodation with the Palestinians – perhaps even despair at how modern Israel’s hawkish mindset has left the country morally compromised. A genuine eye-opener.

SCARECROW MAY 3RD – 9TH (IFI CLASSIC) EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

112 minutes, U.S.A., 1973, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

8

Gene Hackman’s favourite among his own films, and the Palme D’Or winner at Cannes in 1973, this picaresque character study remains one of the least-known gems from the golden age of early ‘70s American cinema. Frame after beautifully-composed frame conveys a scuffed eloquence as Hackman’s uptight loner and Al Pacino’s seemingly happy-go-lucky ex-sailor hitch their way across middle America, their journey shaped by old acquaintances, outbursts of

violence, stalled hopes, and last-gasp ambition. Underneath it all there’s a deft portrait of flawed masculinity meeting the challenge of connection and commitment, Pacino providing a seemingly outgoing foil to Hackman’s brilliant work as a volatile control-freak beginning to realise the depth of his isolation. But it’s the atmosphere, the places and faces – like some Tom Waits song brought to life – which are timelocked yet timeless, in a film crying out for rediscovery.


I’M SO EXCITED! MAY 3RD – 23RD (LOS AMANTES ASAJEROS) FILM INFO:

90 minutes, Spain, 2013, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston IFI IRISH SHORTS These screenings will include Peter Sheridan’s Irish Film Board short film, Oxygen, about an elderly woman whose joie de vivre keeps her one step ahead of her carer and son. (3 mins, 2004, Colour.)

Hands up who expected this! Almodóvar breaks his run of essentially serious recent melodramas to return to the frisky ribaldry characterising his ‘80s career up to Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. A Spanish airline flight is supposedly heading for Mexico City, but its landing gear is crocked, so the pilots circle over Spain, leaving an enthusiastically camp trio of male cabin attendants to entertain the handful of business-class travellers. That the passengers in economy have

been drugged into slumber is just one indication Almodóvar’s also aiming at a bitter metaphor for his homeland’s recent scandalous financial downturn, but his film’s also outrageous fun as the mescaline-spiked ‘Valencia cocktail’ is served and sexual inhibitions are loosened. Riotously naughty, but far from empty-headed, it’s another Almodóvar must-see, graced by generous cameos from old favourites Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz.

THE EYE OF THE STORM MAY 10TH – 16TH EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

119 minutes, Australia, 2011, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

Director Fred Schepisi (Last Orders) returns to Australian filmmaking for the first time since 1988’s A Cry in the Dark with this ambitious adaptation of a novel by fellow countryman and Nobel laureate Patrick Wilson. On her deathbed in early-1970s’ Sydney, petulant, domineering Elizabeth (Charlotte Rampling) is reluctantly visited by her two children, each of whom is eyeing up an inheritance. Basil (Geoffrey Rush) arrives from London, while sister Dorothy (Judy

Davis), retaining the title of Princess after her divorce from a French nobleman, comes from Paris. Each bears the scars of their childhood, carried over into adulthood. Despite increasing doses of morphine, Elizabeth remains a destructive force in their lives even now, as wounds are re-opened and traumas revealed. As one would expect, the film’s greatest strength is its leading cast, each of whom excels as fragile, damaged individuals. 9


MAY 2013 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

OUR CHILDREN MAY 10TH – 23RD (A PERDRE LA RAISON) FILM INFO:

111 minutes, BelgiumLuxembourg-France-Switzerland, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston ✔Programmer's Pick. See page 2.

The quest for domestic bliss becomes an inescapable nightmare in this immensely powerful Belgian character study based on shocking true-life events. Emilie Dequenne, already an indie icon as the Dardennes’ Rosetta, is arguably even more affecting here as a young mum whose children and Moroccan-immigrant husband Tahar Rahim are stuck under the same roof as his seemingly generous benefactor, respected doctor Niels Arestrup. Effectively reuniting the male leads from

A Prophet, the film intelligently uses them to different ends, since Arestrup’s quietly-spoken presence proves an insidiously oppressive reminder of Rahim’s family’s social and economic subservience. Dequenne yearns for her own life, but enveloping entrapment pushes her closer to the edge, as director Joachim Lafosse’s sensitively reserved visuals guide us towards the unthinkable. A tough subject, but this masterly achievement is without question one of the films of the year.

In this backwoods Arkansas rites-ofpassage story, Matthew McConaughey continues his transformation from fading heart-throb to compelling character actor, as a fugitive ne’erdo-well (his name is indeed ‘Mud’) who promises two local lads his wreck of a boat if they help him contact his estranged girlfriend (Reese Witherspoon). Exposure to the adult world of troubled romance and potentially lethal vengeance proves quite an eye-opener for idealistic Ellis

(Tye Sheridan) and his more circumspect pal Neckbone (Jacob Lofland), whose gradual coming-of-age Take Shelter writer-director Jeff Nichols records with the same respect and affection he affords the unspoiled local lakes and rivers. Affectionately echoing both Huckleberry Finn and Stand by Me, this unhurried slice of Americana offers a junior adventure story told from the wise perspective of an older head as the increasingly tense drama plays out. One to savour.

MUD MAY 10TH – 30TH FILM INFO:

130 minutes, U.S.A., 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

10


SIMON KILLER MAY 17TH – 23RD FILM INFO:

101 minutes, France-U.S.A., 2011, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

Nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance last year, Antonio Campos’ second feature sees lovelorn American Simon (Brady Corbett, Martha Marcy May Marlene) licking his wounds in Paris following the breakup of a longterm relationship. Wandering into a sex club, he meets enigmatic prostitute Victoria (Mati Diop, 35 Shots of Rum). Recognising something in each other, the two eventually move in together, and Simon draws her into a scheme to blackmail her married clients. While

there are previous clues, this is the strongest indication yet that behind Simon’s charming, boyish exterior lurks a true sociopath, willing to lie and manipulate in any situation in order to turn it to his own advantage. Campos does an excellent job of slowly and quietly building an atmosphere of tension and menace while Corbett’s icy portrayal of the morally disengaged Simon is difficult to shake.

A HIJACKING MAY 17TH – 30TH (KAPRINGEN) FILM INFO:

99 minutes, Denmark, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

A nightmare scenario unfolds for a Danish cargo ship in the Indian Ocean when armed Somali pirates take over the vessel. Back in Copenhagen, Søren Malling’s no-nonsense CEO is determined to stonewall the hijackers, understandable from his perspective but leaves Pilou Asbæk’s sympathetic cook and the other western crew members nervously sweating it out onboard. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm, who previously scripted the excellent wrong-man drama The Hunt, calibrates

every move in the anxious negotiations with assured precision, bringing documentary-style veracity to this study of the price of principles and the source of human courage. We share the sweaty claustrophobia of the captives just as much as the awful responsibility carried by the boss who’s possibly in over his head. Utterly gripping, and if Gary Skjoldmose Porter is especially convincing as the jargon-spouting corporate security consultant, that’s actually his job in real life! 11


MAY 2013 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES MAY 24TH – 30TH (HOTARU NO HAKA) (IFI CLASSIC) FILM INFO:

89 minutes, Japan, 1988, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne (IFI recommended age: 12+)

Originally released as part of a double bill with My Neighbour Totoro, Grave of the Fireflies is a more mature film, set in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. It begins with the death of 14-year-old Seita, whose spirit narrates the experiences and tribulations encountered by himself and his younger sister Setsuko after the loss of their mother and home in a bombing raid. At first, they find shelter with a willing aunt but as food becomes scarcer and she begins to resent the burden

of caring for the children, they strike out on their own, initially with some success, but ultimately, as we already know, with tragic results. While the film’s themes are open to interpretation, whether it’s pro-social responsibility or anti-war, what is undeniable is its power to move audiences. See page 24 for our IFI Family screening this month.

MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO MAY 24TH – 30TH (TONARI NO TOTORO) (IFI CLASSIC) FILM INFO:

86 minutes, Japan, 1988, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne (IFI recommended age: PG)

12

Hayao Miyazaki’s second film for Studio Ghibli, My Neighbour Totoro was one of the first to draw international attention to Japanese animation, and is now generally considered one of the best in the genre. Its appeal is not hard to recognise; the visuals are beautifully hand-crafted, and it is, as Roger Ebert wrote, “a children’s film for the world we should live in, rather than the one we occupy”. When sisters Satsuki and Mei move to an old house to be closer to their ailing mother, they discover

a magical world in the nearby forest, populated by benign, playful spirits and trolls. Befriended by these creatures, the girls are comforted in their time of need. Effortlessly adding fantastical elements to a story grounded in reality, Miyazaki tells a tale that is simple, wonderful, and utterly unforgettable. This film will be shown in a dubbed version on May 25th and 26th. All other screenings will be subtitled. See page 24 for our IFI Family screening this month.


THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS MAY 24TH – 30TH (IFI CLASSIC) EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

103 minutes, U.S.A., 1972, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

Director Bob Rafelson and his leading man Jack Nicholson created a sensation together with 1970’s Five Easy Pieces, but their moody and melancholy second collaboration has never quite had the attention it deserves. Both are films about the family and its discontents, but where Nicholson played a restless free spirit in the earlier release, two years later he’s intense and somewhat buttoned-up as a late-night radio host who gets ensnared in his estranged sibling’s dangerously speculative

business dealings. Here Bruce Dern is utterly memorable playing the kind of loose-cannon Nicholson himself usually essayed, though crumbling, out-ofseason Atlantic City is just as much a character in the movie, whose title’s derived from the original American version of Monopoly. Dreams and desolation in a town where the party’s definitely over – made in 1972, but this really is a film for now.

EVERYBODY HAS A PLAN FROM MAY 24TH (TODOS TENEMOS UN PLAN) FILM INFO:

118 minutes, Argentina, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

Viggo Mortensen stars in Ana Piterbarg’s directorial debut as twin brothers Agustín and Pedro. Agustín is a successful doctor, married to the attractive Claudia (Soledad Villamil, The Secret in their Eyes), and ultimately frustrated with his life. Pedro, on the other hand, is a beekeeper with a sideline in kidnapping. When the latter announces his terminal illness, Agustín sees an opportunity to assume his identity and start afresh, which he grasps immediately. Stepping into

his brother’s shoes however, is not without complications, most notably in the form of his young assistant, Rosa (Sofía Gala, Tetro), and shady childhood friend Adrián (Daniel Fanego). At heart a crime thriller, the film gives the everreliable Mortensen an opportunity to shine, creating distinctive and complex characters in the dual role. Neophyte Piterbarg shows an admirable restraint, allowing the plot to unfold at its own pace. 13


MAY 2013 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

SOMETHING IN THE AIR FROM MAY 24TH (APRÈS MAI) FILM INFO:

122 minutes, France, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

FRENCH FILM CLUB There will be a French Film Club screening of this film on May 29th, 18.40. Please see page 2 for details.

The brilliant Olivier Assayas surveyed the ‘70s radical terrorist landscape in his epic Carlos and now he revisits his own back pages in 1971 Paris, reconciling raging hormones, post-‘68 ideological ferment and the nascent stirrings of creativity. It’s a fascinating fresco, with a generous ensemble feel, which never uses hindsight to mock its youthful idealists debating their solidarity with the proletariat. Instead there’s a kind of nostalgia for a culture where ideas were taken so seriously, even if they

pointed towards worryingly violent resolutions, and presented doctrinaire restrictions on the development of a personal aesthetic. Shot with the kind of insouciant grace most filmmakers can barely dream of, this is haunting, immersive and impassioned, its moments of visceral threat and casual sensuality intensified by a truly choice soundtrack, including Nick Drake, The Soft Machine, The Incredible String Band and Kevin Ayers.

BYZANTIUM FROM MAY 31ST FILM INFO:

119 minutes, Ireland-U.K., 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

See page 16 for our Neil Jordan Retrospective which will include a free public interview with Jordan hosted by Pat McCabe.

14

Two hundred years old and never been kissed – growing up is hard to do when you’re one of the undead and your mother keeps moving from town to town lest the family’s dark secret be discovered. Remarkably, Neil Jordan’s latest offering finds a fresh take on blood-drinking mythology, as troubled daughter Saoirse Ronan recounts her tale in a concerted effort to make sense of her life, while Gemma Arterton uses her mercilessly voluptuous wiles to play maternal protector. With the film’s

seedy contemporary seaside setting, its love of the Gothic and time-spanning storytelling, screenwriter Moira Buffini proves right at home in quintessential Neil Jordan territory. Starting with a very Irish slant on vampire legend, this certainly has its narrative foibles, yet ultimately balances bloody mayhem with a palpable, poetic depth of yearning. Good to see Jordan going for the jugular again.


POPULAIRE

FILM INFO:

111 minutes, France, 2012, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Trevor Johnston

The year is 1959, and for an ordinary girl from the provinces, landing a secretarial job in super-chic Paris is the height of ambition. Gamine-yet-clumsy Rose (Déborah François) however, has something other hopefuls don’t – blazing typing skills! Enter dishy businessman Louis (Romain Duris) who realises her particular gifts are less suited to office duties than the national speed typing championships. A severe training régime is in order, but are troublesome emotions going

FILM HIGHLIGHTS IN JUNE Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy revive their on-screen amour in Before Midnight, the third instalment of Richard Linklater’s romantic tale following Jesse and Celine’s relationship that blossomed on a train bound for Vienna in Before Sunrise, was rekindled in Paris in Before Sunset and now has matured into a long-term attachment as we meet the couple holidaying in Greece, both now in their 40s. It’s a stunning sequel replete with exceptional performances from its leads.

to impede their professional tilt at fleet-fingered glory? The just-so costumes and delightfully immersive period detail – where did they get all those vintage typewriters? – are a huge source of pleasure in this very cute Gallic combination of sports movie and romance. There’s a dab of social comment, but essentially it’s a lighthearted charmer, deliciously played by François and Duris relishing the chance to kick back and relax.

Before Midnight

FROM MAY 31ST

Claude Miller’s final feature before he passed away is Thérèse Desqueyroux, starring Audrey Tautou. Adapted from Francois Mauriac’s 1927 novel of the same name, this elegant drama closed the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. Abbas Kiarostami’s Like Someone in Love is a beautifully-shot fable from the master filmmaker that sees a student moonlighting as a call girl who develops an unexpected connection with a widower in Tokyo. 15


Neil Jordan filming Ondine

NEIL JORDAN RETROSPECTIVE

If Neil Jordan didn’t exist, you’d be hard-pressed to invent him. There’s simply no precedent on these shores for a gifted young novelist turning to film, then carving out a decadeslong career at home and in Hollywood, all the while keeping his creative integrity defiantly intact. Back in the ‘70s, the notion that someone from Ireland could pull off that sort of trick would have seemed an absurdity. Nowadays however, Jordan is pre-eminent though not alone among Irish filmmakers of world stature, and continues to thrive in a native context where cinema is now central to the arts culture rather than a luxury product to be imported from elsewhere.

In partnership with

As a prelude to the release of Byzantium, his latest darkly captivating saga, here’s a splendid opportunity to survey a major filmography – to be challenged by Jordan’s consistently bracing insight into the best and worst of ourselves, to savour his bitter humour, admire his visionary craft, and thrill to some magnificent performances. Visit some old friends. Make some new ones. Reassess. And marvel. Introduction and notes on individual films by Trevor Johnston.

THE MAKING OF EXCALIBUR As part of this season, we’re pleased to screen the first feature ever directed by Neil Jordan, The Making of Excalibur: Myth into Movie , which he filmed on the set of John Boorman’s 1981 epic , and which is now preserved in the IFI Irish Film Archive. May 25th (13.00). Tickets €5.

16

Neil Jordan will be interviewed by his friend and collaborator Pat McCabe in our FREE Afternoon Talk on Saturday, May 25th. See page 2. Byzantium opens May 31st. Please see page 14 for notes.


NEIL JORDAN RETROSPECTIVE

ANGEL

waif outside a border country dance hall. As he would throughout his subsequent career however, Jordan challenges the audience’s easy moral assumptions when Rea’s angel of vengeance leaves his own bloody trail, lost in a miasma of contradictions once he picks up a gun himself.

MAY 1ST (18.30) FILM INFO:

92 minutes, Ireland-U.K., 1982, Colour, 35mm

The first-time writer-director certainly laid down a marker here, casting signature actor Stephen Rea as a showband saxophonist who’s shocked by the senseless terrorist shooting of an innocent

THE COMPANY OF WOLVES MAY 4TH (14.10) FILM INFO:

95 minutes, U.K., 1984, Colour, 35mm

The start of an ongoing partnership with producer Stephen Woolley showcases Jordan’s evident affection for Gothic fantasy. Adapting Angela Carter’s oneiric short stories in collaboration with the author, this

Confrontational, spare, and poetic, Jordan’s courageous foray into the dark psychic chasm at the heart of the Troubles remains an indelible landmark in Irish film. imaginative combination of classic fairy tale and Hammer horror surveys the troubled dreams of an adolescent girl, whose subconscious sexual anxieties refract childhood tales through adult flesh-and-blood desire. Structurally, it only just hangs together, but production designer Anton Furst’s studio-created magic forest is a marvel, the sinewy lupine transformation effects are a nostalgia trip in themselves, and Hollywood legend Angel Lansbury is just perfect as the heroine’s understandably protective grandma.

MONA LISA

kingpin Michael Caine, Bob Hoskins is heart-rending as the humble driver who falls hopelessly for elegant black prostitute Cathy Tyson without realising she’s in the throes of her own romantic obsession.

MAY 5TH (14.10)

Characteristically for Jordan, it’s a classic song which defines the idealistic longing ensnaring the characters, the lustrous croon of Nat King Cole’s title tune contrasting brilliantly with the sleazy realities of ‘80s London’s meanest streets.

FILM INFO:

104 minutes, U.K., 1986, Colour, 35mm

This underworld thriller, co-written with David Leland, brings a new level of emotional intensity to Jordan’s work and introduces a central theme – that love is never ours to control. In the employ of seedy

17


NEIL JORDAN RETROSPECTIVE

HIGH SPIRITS

seat by pretending it’s haunted, only for real spectres to emerge from the woodwork and mingle with his American visitors.

MAY 6TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

96 minutes, U.K.-U.S.A., 1988, Colour, 35mm

This misbegotten tilt at a sort of Celtic Ghostbusters is never quite as awful as its unenviable reputation suggests. The comic set-up’s actually quite promising as a full-on Peter O’Toole hopes to save his ancestral

WE’RE NO ANGELS MAY 8TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

106 minutes, U.S.A., 1989, Colour, 35mm

A big-time Hollywood budget, a David Mamet screenplay, Robert De Niro and Sean Penn – what could go wrong? In retrospect, the critical thumping for this religious-themed frolic seems somewhat unjustified,

THE MIRACLE

97 minutes, U.K.-Ireland, 1991, Colour, 35mm

18

since it works pretty well on its own (admittedly fairly singular) terms. As fugitive convicts Bob and Sean don clerical garb to break for the Canadian border, the unlikely meeting of criminal cunning and Christian charity is about to move hearts and minds in unexpected ways. Mamet scripts the two leads as barely articulate dolts, eschewing formular wise-crackery in favour of a wry, somewhat quizzical irony that’s definitely Jordan’s domain.

Byrne and Lorraine Pilkington are such firm buddies they hardly dare acknowledge the attraction between them, but he’s in for a life lesson when visiting American actress Beverly D’Angelo throws him for a hormonal spin.

MAY 11TH (16.10) FILM INFO:

True, it falls down badly attempting large-scale slapstick high-jinks, but the dialogue fires out a few zingers, and Liam Neeson is, frankly, hilarious as the old place’s lustiest longdead resident. The studio patched together the final cut, which remains shambolic but not unendearing.

Two consecutive box-office clunkers sent Jordan back home to regroup, and this intimate drama unfolding on the Bray seafront is the closest his films have come to the world of his short stories. Teens Niall

Jordan arguably overplays the mystery angle, but otherwise this is a delightful compendium of favourite elements – problematic romance, musical standards, the seaside, fractured parental relationships, and a seasoning of fantasy.


THE CRYING GAME MAY 12TH (16.10) FILM INFO:

112 minutes, U.K.-Japan, 1992, Colour, 35mm

Shot in parlous circumstances as its British producers neared bankruptcy, Jordan’s portrait of an IRA gunman embracing his humanity in unexpected circumstances proved the pivotal moment in his career, after an ingenious U.S. marketing campaign swept the film all the way to Oscar night. Stephen Rea once more embodies seriously conflicted innocence as the protagonist’s promise to ill-fated squaddie

Forest Whitaker prompts a lifechanging encounter with the latter’s alluring lover (a once-in-a-lifetime performance from Jaye Davidson). The anguish of love and the rewards of compassion combine to make this an enduring modern classic, long after its much-touted ‘secret’ is out.

INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE: THE VAMPIRE CHRONICLES MAY 13TH (18.20) FILM INFO:

123 minutes, U.S.A., 1994, Colour, 35mm

Now that he was ‘Academy Award Winner Neil Jordan’, his ascendant stock brought him the long-gestating screen version of the first volume in Anne Rice’s million-selling Vampire Chronicles. If the presence of Messrs. Cruise and Pitt hint at some Hollywood sell-out, the reality is a surprisingly uncompromised vision – a dark and brooding affair, whose vampire theme allows Jordan to ponder the moral borderlines

of our very humanity. Cruise and Pitt excel in their contrasting takes on the awful temptations of immortality, but the standout is 12-year-old Kirsten Dunst, truly chilling as a soulless fiend trapped in a child’s body.

19


NEIL JORDAN RETROSPECTIVE

MICHAEL COLLINS MAY 14TH (18.20) FILM INFO:

132 minutes, U.K.-Ireland-U.S.A., 1996, Colour, 35mm

Jordan’s national creation myth was always going to be controversial, but at heart it plays out on a historic scale the personal conflict seen in Angel – once you pick up a gun, even with good reason, it’s difficult to put it down again. Liam Neeson’s intelligently calibrated performance captures the seductive charisma of Collins and his self-doubt, while Jordan’s direction

brings startling ferocity to the guerrilla warfare. Yes, Julia Roberts is too strong a presence for her subsidiary romantic role, but she brought studio financing to a movie which never settles for the easy answers of many a Hollywood epic.

THE BUTCHER BOY MAY 15TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

110 minutes, U.S.A., 1997, Colour, 35mm

Neil Jordan will be interviewed by his friend and frequent collaborator Pat McCabe in our FREE Afternoon Talk on May 25th (14.10). See page 2.

20

It says a lot about Jordan’s phantasmagorical adaptation of Pat McCabe’s novel that by the time Sinéad O’Connor turns up as the Holy Virgin we hardly bat an eyelid. A fresco of 1950s’ provincial Irish mayhem and madness, it traces the finest of lines between innocence and psychosis as schoolboy anti-hero ‘the incredible Francie Brady’ tackles bourgeois convention, failed parents

and priestly authority in a passionate quest for happiness. . . which ends very badly indeed. Fearlessly imaginative, black as tar yet ultimately profoundly moving, it’s another one for the ages, thanks in no small part to Eamonn Owens’ indelible, force-of-nature central turn.


IN DREAMS MAY 18TH (16.10) FILM INFO:

100 minutes, U.S.A., 1999, Colour, 35mm

Ever unpredictable, Jordan followed a creative high with a psychological thriller which found few admirers. The key image of a lost community beneath a Massachusetts reservoir suggests a lingering suppressed

THE END OF THE AFFAIR MAY 19TH (16.10) FILM INFO:

102 minutes, U.K.-U.S.A., 1999, Colour, 35mm

Not I, Jordan’s short film made for the Beckett on Film project and which stars Julianne Moore, will screen before this feature.

Not perhaps the most obvious filmmaker to tackle the tortured Catholicism of Graham Greene’s autobiographical 1951 novel, yet Jordan proves utterly invested in its writer protagonist Bendrix –

THE GOOD THIEF

109 minutes, France-U.K.-IrelandCanada, 2002, Colour, 35mm

Bening’s performance, so committed it’s truly frightening, makes it palpable either way and there’s a memorable suspense set-piece at a school play showing Jordan at his visionary best. a man seething with anger at the very heavens after the break-up of a torrid wartime liaison. A rainswept London under Nazi bombs provides an immersive context to the film’s intricately structured roundelay of flesh and faith, while the astutely restrained contributions of Ralph Fiennes and Julianne Moore move in tune with the film’s mature sophistication. Vintage chanteuse Jo Stafford’s aching rendition of Haunted Heart sets exactly the right mood of melancholy yearning.

It’s hardly a direct copy, since the plot’s reconceived to include Emir Kursturica in fine fettle as a hitech security expert, yet the solid provenance seemingly allows the movie to relax in its own skin and mosey amiably towards the climactic break-in.

MAY 21ST (18.30) FILM INFO:

subconscious, as illustrator Annette Bening is assailed by visions of a child killer. Her dreams have a disturbing way of coming true however, as the story sidesteps credibility to follow its own hallucinatory logic. Is the horror coming from without or within?

An essay in the art of thievery as Nick Nolte’s grizzled American expat plans a daring heist on the Monte Carlo casino, and Jordan remakes Jean-Paul Melville’s 1956 classic of Gallic cool, Bob Le Flambeur.

Admittedly, some stylistic flourishes out-stay their welcome, though cameraman Chris Menges conjures something wonderful from the Riviera’s combination of tourist seediness and azure light. 21


NEIL JORDAN RETROSPECTIVE

BREAKFAST ON PLUTO Jordan turns to Patrick McCabe’s boundless imagination once more and recreates Ireland’s turbulent 1970s as an odyssey of genderbending possibility, courtesy of irrepressible cross-dressing Patrick

‘Kitten’ Braden. Cillian Murphy triumphs in the central role with a blend of determined flounce and bruised fragility, holding together a picaresque narrative which ultimately relinquishes momentum for in-themoment revelation. What moments they are though, including Brendan Gleeson as a psychotic Womble, Liam Neeson’s sympathetically flawed cleric, and an IRA nerve centre as never seen before. And for all the fizzy stylisation, we never lose sight of the heartbreak and horror only just kept at bay.

Working for Lethal Weapon producer Joel Silver as director-for-hire, Jordan turned this revenge thriller to his own uncompromising ends, following NYC radio personality Jodie Foster’s unsettling journey

from battered and bruised crime victim to gun-toting urban vigilante. An obvious companion piece to Angel, it leaves the audience to pass judgment on her increasingly extreme actions, and indeed their relevance for America’s on-going firearms debate. Terrence Howard almost out-shines his brilliant leading lady as the investigating cop trying to keep the faith, but no-one here will emerge morally unscathed. Visceral and disturbing, this could well be Jordan’s most under-rated film.

MAY 25TH (16.10) FILM INFO:

129 minutes, Ireland-U.K., 2005, Colour, 35mm Neil Jordan will be interviewed by his friend and frequent collaborator Pat McCabe in our FREE Afternoon Talk on May 25th (14.10). See page 2.

THE BRAVE ONE MAY 26TH (13.30) FILM INFO:

122 minutes, U.S.A.-Australia, 2007, Colour, 35mm

ONDINE

legends really co-exist with a gnarled modern world of complex domestic arrangements, drink problems and a daughter on dialysis?

MAY 30TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

104 minutes, Ireland-U.S.A, 2009, Colour, 35mm

22

Back in Ireland for some Celtic faerie lore, and the appearance of a ‘selkie’ in the nets of Cork fisherman Colin Farrell. When he takes sea-nymph Alicja Bachleda ashore, fortune begins smiling on him, but can the

Jordan attempts the near-impossible in crafting a story that’s ethereal and tough at the same time, and if it never quite comes together, it’s certainly a distinctive entry in his filmography, shot in hues of rich marine green by Wong Kar-Wai’s cameraman Chris Doyle.


IFI EVENTS

IFI EVENTS

IRELAND ON SUNDAY MONTHLY MUST-SEE CINEMA ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME IFI FAMILY LUX PRIZE SCREENING: JUST THE WIND BROKEN + DANIEL CLAY Q&A IFI & DUBLIN DANCE FESTIVAL FEAST YOUR EYES IFI & EXPERIMENTAL FILM CLUB MADE OF STONE (PREVIEW + SATELLITE Q&A) WILD STRAWBERRIES & BEALTAINE 2013

TAX CITY MAY 12TH (13.00) DIRECTOR: Tom Begley

FILM INFO:

20 minutes, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema

Ireland on Sunday is our monthly showcase for new Irish film. In a departure from our usual form, this month’s Ireland on Sunday screening features a short drama film followed by a long interview with stellar cast and crew.

ANOTHER SHORE MAY 22ND (18.30) DIRECTOR:

Charles Crichton

FILM INFO:

90 minus, U.K., 1948, Black and White

This months’ selection is one of the most delightful comedies in the IFI Irish Film Archive’s collection. Another Shore is a 1948 Ealing Studios tragi-comedy set in Dublin. Gulliver Shields (Robert Beatty) is a bored civil servant who day-dreams of escaping his mundane existence and sailing to Raratonga in the South Seas. Lacking the 200 guineas

Tax City is a muscular new drama directed by U.K.-based Irish-born Tom Begley and written and produced by Andy Nolan. Set in 1990s’ London, Tax City follows the sensational comeback of rock star Johnny Costa (Jon Campling), his tragic fall from grace and his perilous fight for survival on the streets of London. Costa is forced to confront Fintan (played by former-World-Champion-boxerturned-actor Steve Collins) the brutal leader of a real life, Irish-dominated Taxing Squad gang that preys on the homeless community. The film screening will be followed by a Q&A with Begley, and with Steve Collins who will be appearing in advance of an imminent grudge fight with former World Champion, Roy Jones Junior. Tickets €5.

he requires to get there, he concocts a far-fetched money-making scheme which has him sitting at the dangerous junction of Dame Street and College Green every day waiting to save the life of a wealthy person and bag himself a handsome reward. Life gets complicated when fate sends wealthy, generous, and itchy-footed Alistar MacNeill (Stanley Holloway) his way but also beautiful motorist, Jennifer (Moira Lister), who has romantic but stay-at-home designs on him. It is perhaps surprising that this fine comedy, directed by Charles Crichton (A Titfield Thunderbolt, The Lavender Hill Mob) and based on Judge Kenneth Reddin’s popular novel, isn’t more widely known. For local audiences, the extensive street sequences in post-war Dublin are a particular pleasure.

23


Glimpses of Erin

Join us for FREE screenings of films from the IFI Irish Film Archive (see calendar for dates and times). Simply collect your tickets at the IFI Box Office. This month: more nostalgic snapshots of Ireland (some more accurate than others. . .)

PROGRAMME 1: HAPPY TO MEET. . . SORRY TO PART

This travelogue, featuring the music of Horslips and borrowing its name from their first album (released in 1972), is a light-hearted whistle-stop tour around Ireland narrated by a fictional British traveller and his jolly Irish host.

FILM INFO: 28 minutes, 1974, Colour

PROGRAMME 2: GLIMPSES OF ERIN

Though full of Blarney and some distortion (“Galway is a thriving little town in the south of Ireland”), this cinema short is notable for its portraits of noble Irish peasants.

FILM INFO: 8 minutes, 1934, Black and White

IRELAND: A NEW LOOK AT THE EMERALD ISLE

This educational film for American schoolchildren is both facile and inaccurate. The voice-over asserts: “The port city of Galway lies on the northeast coast” and “Ireland cannot import fuel because of its farm economy”. Prepare to be bemused.

FILM INFO: 18 minutes, 1967, Colour

24

THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD

MAY 26TH (11.00) Take a swashbuckling, handsome hero, a beautiful maid and a dastardly villain terrorising the people. . . It can only be The Adventures of Robin Hood, the classic adventure from Warner Bros., which is showing for IFI Family to mark the 90th anniversary of the famed Hollywood Studio. Despite several knowing re-makes, this early version of the great legend remains one of the most popular. Starring Errol Flynn as the robbing-the-rich outlaw, and Olivia de Havilland as Maid Marian, it’s a terrific adventure that is a great reminder of the glory days of the studios. Not only did Warner Bros. bring audiences the first sound picture with The Jazz Singer, but this film made stunning use of Technicolor; the action scenes never lose energy, while the sets and costumes just add to the atmosphere of Saxon England where men were dashing and villains were set up to be gloriously foiled by the hero himself or any of his Merrie Men. Tickets: €4.80 per person, €14.40 family ticket (2 adults + 2 children/1 adult + 3 children)

DIRECTORS:

Michael Curtiz and William Keighley

FILM INFO:

102 minutes, U.S.A., 1938, Action/Adventure/Romance

Turn to page 12 for other family-friendly films at the IFI in May: My Neighbour Totoro and Grave of the Fireflies.


JUST THE WIND MAY 7TH (18.30) (CSAK A SZÉL) DIRECTOR: Bence Fliegauf

FILM INFO:

91 minutes, France/German/ Hungary, 2012, Drama, English Subtitles

The Lux Prize is the annual European Parliament Film Prize aimed at raising awareness of films that have the European public debate as their central theme. The selected films all offer an opportunity for citizens to reflect on the main social and political issues facing the E.U. today.

To mark Europe Week 2013, we are screening one of the three Lux Prize 2012 finalists. Set in Hungary, Just the Wind is the story of four members of a gypsy family who live on an isolated farm. The two children, Anna and Rio, and their mother Mari must defend themselves against the possibility of attack by a racist ‘hunter’ gang who have been attacking and murdering gypsy families they call ‘the crows’. A harrowing and affecting tale that is based on a true story, the film deservedly won a Silver Bear at Berlinale. This event is FREE but advanced booking is essential as places are limited. Please email your ticket request only to epdublin@ep.europa.eu

BROKEN + DANIEL CLAY Q&A

Adapted for the screen by Mark O’Rowe, the film has discovered a real talent in Eloise Laurence, who plays 11-year-old Skunk, daughter of divorced lawyer Archie (Tim Roth).

MAY 14TH (18.30)

When a neighbour’s daughter accuses Skunk’s friend Rick, a young man with learning difficulties, of rape, a chain of events is set in motion that sees the young girl dealing with the repercussions of violence, first love, strained familial relationships, and personal danger. Her warmth and intelligence keeps the viewer engaged throughout.

FILM INFO:

91 minutes, U.K., 2012, Colour, D-Cinema

In collaboration with the British Council on the occasion of ‘Words On The Street: Literature Night’ (May 15th), the IFI is delighted to welcome author Daniel Clay to introduce a screening of Rufus Norris’ acclaimed adaptation of his novel, Broken, and take part in a post-screening Q&A session on his work.

Corsica and the slummiest depths of Brussels, and Silver, inspired by the nursery rhyme “One for sorrow, two for joy.”

WIM VANDEKEYBUS SPECIAL MAY 19TH (14.00) LIFE IN MOVEMENT MAY 26TH (14.00) FILM INFO:

Wim Vandekeybus Special: 90 minutes (approx.) Life in Movement: 90 minutes (approx.),New Zealand, 2011

Wim Vandekeybus, Artistic Director of Flemish dance company Ultima Vez, is renowned for his choreographic and filmmaking work. This programme (May 19th) will include dance-for-camera, documentaries and shorts, and will feature films including Blush, a dazzling voyage of contrasts between the landscapes of

In 2007 Sydney Dance Company appointed 29-year-old Tanja Liedtke as their new artistic director. Shortly afterwards she was killed in a road accident. Eighteen months after her death her collaborators embark on a world tour of her work and together try to make sense of their loss. Life in Movement (May 26th) is a powerfully rendered take on art and artists, creativity and our own mortality. The screening of Life in Movement is proudly supported by the Tanja Liedtke Foundation.

25


BELLA MARTHA MAY 22ND (18.30) (MOSTLY MARTHA) DIRECTOR:

Sandra Nettelbeck

FILM INFO:

109 minutes, Germany, 2001, Subtitled, Colour, DVD Notes by Alice Butler

The inspiration for Scott Hick’s paltry No Reservations (2007) – with Catherine ZetaJones failing to cause a stir in the central role – Bella Martha (Mostly Martha) is the much less cheesy version of German writer-director Sandra Nettelbeck’s original story about a perfectionist chef forced to review her unyielding work ethic when a tragic family

MAY 28TH (18.30) Lemon: 7 minutes, U.S.A., 1969, Colour, DVD; The Room Called Heaven: 11 minutes, Spain-U.S.A., 2012, Colour, 16mm; Ten Skies: 99 minutes, U.S.A., 2004, Colour, 16mm

The central work of this month's programme, curated by Esperanza Collado, is The Room Called Heaven, the most recent film from Los Angeles-based Spanish filmmaker, Laida Lertxundi. Lertxundi’s filmmaking expresses situations of process: perceptual processes, film production processes, and the process in which a

THE STONE ROSES: MADE OF STONE (PREVIEW + SATELLITE Q&A) MAY 30TH (19.30) One of the most iconic bands of the last three decades, the Stone Roses’ reputation rests almost entirely on their timeless debut album and a swaggering cool to which none of their many imitators even came close. But, after flaring so brightly, the group acrimoniously fell apart in the mid-‘90s. Each went their own way before reforming

26

This screening will be followed by a meal in the IFI Café Bar. Tickets €20 (free list suspended). Online booking is available at www.ifi.ie or call the IFI Box Office on 01 679 3477.

film runs from one reel to the other. The notion of process connects The Room Called Heaven with the structural reflections of Hollis Frampton's Lemon – an exploration of luminous modulation unrolling in time, translated to the volumetric illusion of space – and the positioning of the cinematographic medium between a mobile condition and a static one, as suggested in James Benning's Ten Skies.

UNROLLING PROCESSES FILM INFO:

accident leaves a young niece in her charge. The restaurant where most of the action takes place – a sparse, sophisticated affair – is run almost entirely by women, that is until the arrival of vivacious Mario, hired to fill in for Lea, Martha’s heavily pregnant sous-chef. Although Martha fiercely opposes Mario’s cheery presence in her kitchen, she notices the positive effect he has on her dejected niece who, struck down by grief, has been refusing to eat. With mouth-watering dishes featuring in almost every scene, this is an engaging study on the intricate connection between appetite and well-being.

These three masterpieces make up a powerful programme of plastic beauty and insightful reflection that should not to be missed.

and touring in 2012, to the delight of a generation. Shane Meadows’ new documentary follows the history of the band, using rare and previously unseen archive footage from their own private collections, building an intimate, warts-and-all picture of the group, culminating in their triumphant homecoming gigs at Manchester’s Heaton Park. This screening will be followed by a satellite Q&A with the film’s director Shane Meadows, producer Mark Herbert, and a rare public appearance from the band itself.


May brings the annual Bealtaine Festival, a month-long celebration of renewal, creativity and growth in ageing. Coordinated by Age & Opportunity, Bealtaine 2013 is a packed programme of activities that includes film, theatre, dance, art, and music. May 2013 is also all about Gatsby, with the release of Baz Luhrmann’s much-anticipated adaptation of the classic

Moore Street Masala

WILD STRAWBERRIES & BEALTAINE 2013

American novel. For Bealtaine, we are showing the 1974 version, starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow and, in response to the Festival theme “What kind of old do you want to be?”, we’d like to you to unleash your creative side for our Gatsby celebration by dressing in costume, or join the audience for the dance theatre performance of CoisCéim Broadreach.

THE GREAT GATSBY

scandals, the music, the fashion, all play a part in this rich, if understated adaptation.

MAY 24TH & 29TH (11.00) DIRECTOR: Jack Clayton

FILM INFO:

144 minutes, USA, 1974, Drama/ Romance

Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel, the story of Nick Carraway and his fascination with the lavish lifestyle of his Long Island neighbour J. Gatsby gets the full period treatment in this version by British director, Jack Clayton. The big parties, the

DANCE ACROSS DUBLIN & SHORT FILM SCREENINGS MAY 31ST (11.00) During Bealtaine each year we are delighted to collaborate with CoisCéim Broadreach and Dublin City Council, and host a dance theatre performance in the IFI Foyer. This year’s performance, Dance Across Dublin, draws inspiration from different

On May 29th, we’d like to bring some of Gatsby’s party spirit into the IFI by inviting you to dress in 1920s garb for the occasion. Call upon your inner flapper, dig out your old tux, or put a feather in your hair – anything goes! There’ll be prizes for best costume, and cocktails (non-alcoholic) will be served alongside dancing and music in the foyer. Let’s recreate the spirit of the Jazz Age at IFI Wild Strawberries during Bealtaine 2013. €3.85 including regular tea/coffee before the screening.

Dublin communities and the way in which people identify with their own area. This lively dance theatre piece presented by the ensemble is set to some of the best dance music around from great classics to the latest popular hits. Prior to the performance, we will screen a number of short films in which dance and music are used to tell a particular story. The film selection will include Moore Street Masala and Dental Breakdown. €3.85 including regular tea/coffee. As places in the foyer are limited, early booking is advised.

27


THE IRISH FILM INSTITUTE

IFI LOYALTY CARD Fancy building points each time you make a purchase at the IFI? Want to convert those points into free tickets? Now you can with the IFI Loyalty Card! With points for everyone who spends at the IFI, and with double points for members, you’ll be able to reap the rewards of all your visits to the IFI! 4c back in points at the IFI for every €1 spent.

28

— Spend at IFI Cinemas, IFI Film Shop or IFI Café Bar and collect 4c back in points to redeem against free cinema tickets for every €1 you spend — With our regular double points events and extra points offers, you’ll have enough points to treat yourself in no time — Plus IFI members will automatically get double points on all their purchases – and that even includes double points on all our bonus point offers! Sign up for an IFI Loyalty Card and you’ll be going to the cinema for free in no time...


MEMBERSHIP SCHEME Free tickets, discounts on tickets, free screenings and a host of other benefits... It can only be the IFI Membership!

BEST MEMBERS (€99)

MEMBERS (€25, €15 CONCESSIONS)

— Special invitation to the Annual Members’ Evening with an exclusive free screening, private programme review by the IFI Director and drinks reception — Invitation for you and a guest to one Festival Opening Night per annum, which includes cinema tickets plus access to the drinks reception — Free membership of the Tiernan MacBride Library at the IFI (worth €20) — Annual tours of the Irish Film Archive at the IFI — Listing on the IFI website as a Best Member — Listing in one monthly programme per annum as a Best Member

— One free preview screening every month* — Free cinema ticket — Double loyalty points which can be redeemed against more free tickets — Discount on tickets (approx. 15% cheaper evening tickets) — Monthly programme posted to your home (free of charge) — 10% discount in the IFI Film Shop — 10% discount on food at the IFI Café Bar (over €10)** — Discounts on tickets for up to 3 accompanying friends — Concession prices on selected film courses and special events — Priority notification of special events — Dedicated Members’ Pages on the IFI website with latest news and updates — Weekly ezine sent direct to your inbox with all the latest releases and news from the IFI * Places are limited. Members are notified by email to apply for tickets and winners are then chosen randomly. ** Maximum two diners per membership can avail of discount.

All of the Member benefits plus:

CORPORATE MEMBERS Contact the membership office on 01 679 5744 for more details on customised corporate packages which include: — Discounted membership rates for your employees — Discounted tickets for your employees — Private screenings or special events for your clients or staff — Presentations/meetings in a unique environment — Unique opportunities for corporate entertainment and staff socials — Recognition for your organisation as a supporter of the arts through IFI publications, website etc. The IFI Corporate Membership packages can fit perfectly within any company’s CSR policy, internal marketing plans or sports and social calendar! 29


YOUR VISIT TO THE IFI PUBLIC & CLUB SCREENINGS

BOX OFFICE & PRICES

Around half of our films are classified by the Irish Film Classification Office, are open to the general public and do not require membership. Unclassified films require membership. You have two options: annual membership (€25 or €15 concessions) or daily membership (€1 per person each time you visit the cinema). For further details on membership, please go to www.ifi.ie or call our Box Office.

ADMISSION FEES These apply to regular IFI screenings and do not necessarily apply to special events or festivals. Reduced admission fees for annual members and their guests are detailed in brackets.

†Correct at time of going to print

LOYALTY & MEMBERSHIP

REET

FY ST

REET

IS ST

JERV

LIF LWR

The IFI Loyalty Card is free and allows you to earn points that you can later exchange for free cinema tickets. Membership gives youT a free preview screening every single EA T GR when you spend at the IFI. Go to month and discounts TREE ALK ND S www.ifi.ie STRA or call our Box Office for details. Please remember: ’S W OR HEL C no card, no points! A B

PARKING

UAY ND Q RMO ER O LOW

NY

PEN

F HAL

GE

BID

BEDFORD ROW

On presentation of your IFI cinema ticket, the Fleet Street E Car Park will offer IFI a special rate of €5.00 for RIDG Bpatrons IUM ENNSimply 3 hours’ parking. present the cinema ticket along MILL with the parking ticket when Y you pay at the cash desk, QUA GTONcar. prior to collecting INyour WELL

E STREET SYCAMOR

ANGLESEA STREET

ALLEY

CECILIA ST

FLEET STREET

CROWN

DAME STREET

TEMPLE LANE SOUTH

IRISH FILM INSTITUTE

EET

EUSTACE STR

EAST

ST

ST EA

UPR FOWNES ST

ESSEX

TEMPLE BAR

COPE STREET

MONDAY – FRIDAY 12.30pm to 6pm €7.50 (€6.70) Conc. €5.80 (€5.20) 6pm to 10pm €8.90 (€7.70) Conc. €7.50 (€6.70) SATURDAY – SUNDAY* 12.30pm to 4pm €7.50 (€6.70) Conc. €5.80 (€5.20) 4pm to 10pm €8.90 (€7.70) Conc. €7.50 (€6.70) *and Bank Holidays Credit card bookings can be taken between 12.30pm and 9.00pm on (01) 679 3477 or 24-hours at www.ifibooking.ie. Online and telephone bookings are subject to a booking fee of 50c per ticket to a maximum of €1 per transaction. There are no booking fees on any ticket purchase made in person at the IFI Box Office. All cinema screens at the IFI are wheelchair accessible.

LATECOMERS POLICY Films start at the times stated in this programme. Latecomers may be refused admission after the start of the feature.

CONTACT Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2 Box Office: (01) 679 3477, Web: www.ifi.ie @IFI_Dub @IFI_Filmshop

DAME STREET

TR

Facebook.com/irishfilminstitute Facebook.com/IFICafe

TY

I IN

IFI BOARD DAME LANE DAME LANE Patron: Michael D. Higgins, President of Ireland Board Members: Lenny Abrahamson, Michael Collins, Eve-Anne Cullinan (Chairperson), Sheila de Courcy, Garry Hynes, Neil Jordan, Margaret Kelleher, Trish Long, Kevin Moriarty, Patsy Murphy, Dr. Harvey O’Brien, Dearbhla Walsh. NE

LA

31


DUBLIN WRITERS FESTIVAL 2013 MAY 20–26 www.dublinwritersfestival.com

IFI May Programme  

IFI May Programme

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you