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JUNE 2014

CHINESE PUZZLE


THE IRISH FILM INSTITUTE

LIBRARY

IFI OPEN DAY

The IFI Tiernan MacBride Library holds the largest collection of film-related publications in Ireland. Anyone is welcome to visit the Library; our June to September opening hours are 10.30 – 13.00 and 14.00 – 17.30 on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. You are welcome to visit the Library outside of these hours by appointment. For more information on our collections visit www.ifi.ie/learn/research-library or please contact Fiona Rigney, IFI Librarian and Document Archivist, at frigney@irishfilm.ie

Join us for a day of FREE film screenings – including previews, old favourites, Irish and international features – across all three cinemas at the IFI on Saturday, June 14th! Make sure to keep an eye out online at www.ifi.ie, on Facebook (facebook.com/irishfilminstitute) and Twitter (@IFI_Dub) for details of what we’re showing and how to get your FREE tickets.

FREE TALK

Jimmy's Hall

EXHIBIT PRESERVE EDUCATE

The Irish Film Institute is Ireland’s national cultural institution for film. It aims to exhibit the finest in independent, Irish and international cinema, preserve Ireland’s moving image heritage at the IFI Irish Film Archive, and encourage engagement with film through its various educational programmes.

Join us at 16.15 on June 11th for Dr. Donal Ó Drisceoil’s Afternoon Talk on Resistance, Rebellion and Jazz: Ken Loach’s Takes on Irish History. A lecturer in History at University College Cork, Dr. Ó Drisceoil was historical advisor on both The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006) and Jimmy’s Hall (2014; see page 5). Collect your FREE ticket at the IFI Box Office.

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FREE QUIZ Do you hunger to attain the glory of a more chivalrous and heroic age, now long past? If the answer to that question is yes, then bring your sword, your steed, an armour of general knowledge and your wittiest team name as your coat of arms to the IFI Café Bar’s free monthly pub quiz on Wednesday, June 4th at 21.30. No booking required.


IFI’s June programme welcomes back our annual IFI Open Day along with part two of our Loach season, and great new releases and special screenings.

JUNE AT THE IFI Fast becoming a much-anticipated event in cinema-goers’ diaries, the IFI is once again throwing open its doors to audiences old and new for a day of FREE screenings at the IFI Open Day, on Saturday June 14th! As always, the titles on offer demonstrate the breadth of programming available at the IFI throughout the year and will include sneak previews of major new releases alongside classics, a family film, and the winner of an audience poll selecting the IFI audience’s favourite film of the last year. Tickets will only be made available on the day, but they always go quickly, so we’d highly recommend that you get in bright and early. It’s always a great day to avail of IFI membership which offers a host of benefits including a free cinema ticket, discounted prices throughout the venue, and double loyalty points. Check out the separate flyer for IFI Open Day programme details, or visit www.ifi.ie for further information and to vote in our audience poll.

After a wonderful career interview with Ken Loach at the IFI in May, we’re delighted to present the concluding part of a major retrospective of his work. This part of the season features titles including his Palme-d’Or-winning The Wind that Shakes the Barley, Ae Fond Kiss and Looking for Eric, while Jimmy’s Hall, which was selected for competition at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, will still be one of our featured new releases.

Juliette Binoche in Camille Claudel 1915 (see page 10)

DIRECTOR’S NOTE

To coincide with Bloomsday, we’re delighted to present a limited number of screenings of John Huston’s The Dead on a recently restored 35mm print as part of our From the Vaults programming strand, which presents classic films that are preserved in the IFI Irish Film Archive. To mark Dublin Pride celebrations, we’ll be screening Jeffrey Schwarz’s I Am Divine, a film about a true queer legend, as well as Roger Ross Williams’ powerful documentary, God Loves Uganda. Also this month, as the only venue in Ireland with the capability to present films on 70mm, we will offer a rare opportunity to see Kenneth Branagh’s Hamlet, which was specifically shot for this special format. We also have a broad range of great new releases on offer. Two hits from last year’s Carte Noire IFI French Film Festival finally get a release. Bruno Dumont’s Camille Claudel 1915, starring IFI favourite Juliette Binoche, tells the story of the troubled sculptor confined by her family to a remote asylum following the breakdown of a long affair, while Cédric Klapisch’s Chinese Puzzle completes his trilogy (following L’Auberge Espagnole and Russian Dolls) and is a thoroughly entertaining tale. Fans of Dexter will get to see Michael C. Hall in the lead role in Jim Mickle’s Cold in July, a cat-and-mouse tale between a man (Hall) who shoots dead an intruder in his home and whose father (Sam Shepard) then looks for retribution. IFI Classics this month include Frank Borzage’s A Farewell to Arms (1932), and Fei Mu’s Spring in a Small Town (1948), widely regarded as the best Chinese film ever made. Ross Keane Director

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NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS A FAREWELL TO ARMS JIMMY’S HALL OMAR VENUS IN FUR FRUITVALE STATION GRACE OF MONACO PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH AND SUPERMARKETS WHEN I SAW YOU BENNY & JOLENE OF HORSES AND MEN THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET (3D) CAMILLE CLAUDEL 1915 CHINESE PUZZLE MISS VIOLENCE SPRING IN A SMALL TOWN COLD IN JULY THE GOLDEN DREAM UNDER THE RAINBOW

SEASONS & EVENTS CALENDAR FROM JUNE 1ST FROM JUNE 1ST FROM JUNE 1ST FROM JUNE 1ST OPENS JUNE 6TH OPENS JUNE 6TH OPENS JUNE 6TH OPENS JUNE 6TH OPENS JUNE 13TH OPENS JUNE 13TH OPENS JUNE 13TH OPENS JUNE 20TH OPENS JUNE 20TH OPENS JUNE 20TH OPENS JUNE 20TH OPENS JUNE 27TH OPENS JUNE 27TH OPENS JUNE 27TH

TIMES For a breakdown of times and dates of IFI New Releases & IFI Classics, check out our weekly schedule on www.ifi.ie or the IFI ads in The Irish Times on Fridays and Saturdays. You can also sign up to receive our weekly ezine by emailing admin@irishfilm.ie

Scan the QR code to take you straight to the IFI homepage on your smart phone.

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DATE

SCREENING

TIME

1ST SUN 2ND MON 4TH WED 7TH SAT

KEN LOACH: LAND AND FREEDOM

16:00

KEN LOACH: CARLA'S SONG

18:15

KEN LOACH: MY NAME IS JOE IFI CAFÉ BAR: PUB QUIZ (FREE EVENT)

18:30 21:30

KEN LOACH: BREAD AND ROSES PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH & SUPERMARKETS... & LIVE SATELLITE Q&A

16:00 17:30

8TH SUN 9TH MON

KEN LOACH: THE NAVIGATORS

16:00

KEN LOACH: SWEET SIXTEEN

18:15

11TH WED

AFTERNOON TALK: RESISTANCE, REBELLION AND JAZZ: KEN LOACH’S TAKE ON IRISH HISTORY (FREE EVENT) KEN LOACH: AE FOND KISS

16:15

14TH SAT 15TH SUN

IFI OPEN DAY (PLEASE SEE SEPARATE FLYER) KEN LOACH: THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY FROM THE VAULTS: THE DEAD

16:00

16TH MON 17TH TUES 18TH WED 21ST SAT

FROM THE VAULTS: THE DEAD

18.30

KEN LOACH: IT’S A FREE WORLD…

18:30

KEN LOACH: LOOKING FOR ERIC

18:15

IFI & DUBLIN PRIDE 2014: GOD LOVES UGANDA + PANEL DISCUSSION KEN LOACH: ROUTE IRISH + 11’09’’01 – UNITED KINGDOM

12:00

22ND SUN 23RD MON 24TH TUES 25TH WED

IRELAND ON SUNDAY: WHERE THE SEA USED TO BE

13:00

FEAST YOUR EYES: THE ANGELS’ SHARE

18.30

KEN LOACH: THE SPIRIT OF ‘45 IFI & DUBLIN PRIDE 2014: I AM DIVINE

18:30 18:30

WILD STRAWBERRIES: LE WEEK-END THE CRITICAL TAKE (FREE EVENT)

11:00 18:30

27TH FRI

WILD STRAWBERRIES: LE WEEK-END

11.00

29TH SUN 30TH MON

IFI FAMILY: THE KING AND THE MOCKINGBIRD

11:00

70MM: HAMLET

18:30

18:30

16.00

16:00


JUNE 2014 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

A FAREWELL TO ARMS FROM JUNE 1ST IFI CLASSIC EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI † FILM INFO: 80 minutes, U.S.A., 1932, Black and White, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

A key filmmaker during the late silent and early sound era in Hollywood, Frank Borzage won the Best Director Oscar at the first Academy Awards for 7th Heaven (1927) and repeated the feat with Bad Girl (1931). This is arguably his greatest achievement, a bold adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s semi-autobiographical novel which celebrates love enduring through wartime. Gary Cooper, brilliant and intense, is Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American soldier driving ambulances

JIMMY’S HALL FROM JUNE 1ST FILM INFO:

108 minutes, U.K.-Ireland-France, 2014, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

Based on the true story of Jimmy Gralton, the only Irishman deported from his own country as an “illegal alien”, Ken Loach focuses on the dance hall Gralton opened in rural Leitrim at a time when Ireland was on the brink of Civil War. A place where young people could come to learn, to argue, and to dream, but above all to dance and have fun, quickly came to the attention of the Church and politicians who forced Jimmy to flee and the hall

for the Italian army during World War I. Jaded by his experiences, he drinks and womanises, fearing each day could be his last. That changes when he meets and falls for Nurse Catherine Barkley (a luminous Helen Hayes), yet their romance frequently seems doomed as the War insists on forcing them apart. Building to a heart-wrenching climax, it stands as one of the greatest romantic melodramas the Hollywood studio system has produced.

SHARE YOUR VIEWS AT THE CRITICAL TAKE! P22

to close. Returning from the U.S. a decade later, Jimmy vows to live the quiet life. However, as he reintegrates into the community and sees the poverty, boredom, and growing cultural oppression, he decides to reopen the abandoned and empty hall, regardless of the opposition and consequences. See pages 14 – 18 for part two of our Ken Loach retrospective.

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JUNE 2014 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

OMAR FROM JUNE 1ST FILM INFO:

97 minutes, Palestinian Territories, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

Omar is a Palestinian baker in a divided territory, accustomed to crossing the separation barrier of the West Bank, dodging surveillance and the occasional bullet, so that he might see Nadia, the woman he loves. He keeps the romance a secret from his close friends Amjad and Tarek, particularly as Tarek is Nadia’s brother. Tarek is increasingly frustrated and angry about the way they are treated by the Israeli authorities, and advocates militancy. After suffering a humiliating incident at the hands of the

security services, Omar agrees to go along with Tarek’s call to arms, and a deadly act of resistance sets him on a path of violence, torture, suspicion, mistrust and betrayal. The latest film from director Hany Abu-Assad (Paradise Now) is a thrilling action movie that contains provocative and pertinent political concerns, and features notably committed performances from a striking young cast.

In a Paris theatre, director Thomas (Mathieu Amalric) has spent a long, frustrating day auditioning actresses for the female lead in his new play, an adaptation of Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher Masoch’s novel about sexual submission. No one has measured up to Thomas’ demanding expectations, and he’s about to leave in exasperation when Vanda (Emmanuelle Seigner) stumbles into the theatre. Buzzing with chaotic energy, she convinces an initially reluctant Thomas to let her

try out for the part, and so begins a provocative battle of the sexes, with Vanda initiating a curious, psychological duel between the pair. Polanski’s witty, vibrant adaptation of David Ives’ stage play is mischievously sexy while delivering a sly critique of sexism and the male ego. As with his previous film Carnage, Polanski keeps the action essentially confined to one space, and Seigner and Amalric are on irresistible form, clearly relishing their roles in this smart two-hander.

VENUS IN FUR FROM JUNE 1ST (LA VÉNUS À LA FOURRURE) EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI † FILM INFO: 96 minutes, France, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

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FRUITVALE STATION OPENS JUNE 6TH FILM INFO:

85 minutes, U.S., 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

December 31, 2008; Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan) is a 22-year-old Bay Area resident spending New Year’s Eve preparing for his mother’s birthday celebrations and a night out with friends. His wayward youth has left him with some making up to do with his mother Wanda (Octavia Spencer), his feisty girlfriend Sophina (Melonie Diaz) and his 4-year-old daughter T (Ariana Neal), but he seems determined to straighten out his life, despite struggling to hold down a job

and doubts creeping in about whether he will be able to provide for his family. With a lot on his mind, Oscar takes in the New Year revelries, though his journey home will prove fateful for him, his family and the wider community. Ryan Coogler’s exceptional debut feature won the major awards at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013, and is a sincere and emotional slice-of-life rooted in real events.

GRACE OF MONACO OPENS JUNE 6TH FILM INFO:

103 minutes, Belgium-ItalyFrance-Monaco-U.S.A., 2014, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Alice Butler

In 1962, Hitchcock offered Grace Kelly the prized lead role in Marnie. At 33, Kelly, now a princess, had already been retired from acting for seven years and since her marriage to Prince Rainier III of Monaco, all screenings of her films had been banned in the principality. Olivier Dahan’s (La Vie en Rose) film takes this proposition as the starting point in his examination of the actress’ remarkable decision to renounce her own thriving career in order to establish and maintain stability

both personally, for her family and, politically, for Monaco, an immensely wealthy but nevertheless somewhat vulnerable sovereign state, struggling at the time to retain its independence from France. With all the glamour you would expect from a film set in Monaco and starring Nicole Kidman as Princess Grace, Dahan’s film also stands up as an intriguing character study of an extraordinarily talented and complex figure. 7


JUNE 2014 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH AND SUPERMARKETS OPENS JUNE 6TH FILM INFO:

90 minutes, U.K., 2014, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

LIVE SATELLITE Q&A On Saturday, June 7th, the 17.30 screening will be followed by a live satellite interview with Pulp. See www.ifi.ie for more information and to book.

Formed by Jarvis Cocker in Sheffield in 1978, Pulp spent years in the pop wilderness before finding the success that Cocker craved during the Britpop years with era-defining hits such as Common People and Sorted for Es & Wizz. Discovering that fame wasn’t all it had promised to be, the band gradually retreated from the limelight before entering a hiatus in 2002. They returned to performing live in 2011, and Florian Habicht’s film catches them at their last U.K. gig, at Sheffield’s Motorpoint Arena

in 2012. Between stirring renditions of their greatest songs, Cocker and the band give candid observations on love, sex, death and fame. It’s also revealed how much the city of Sheffield shaped Pulp, and contributions from fans around the city illustrate the lingering devotion for the band.

WHEN I SAW YOU OPENS JUNE 6TH (LAMMA SHOFTAK) FILM INFO:

85 minutes, Palestinian territoriesJordan-Greece-United Arab Emirates, 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

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In the political upheavals of 1967, thousands of refugees cross the border into Jordan to escape the conflict in Palestine. Ghaydaa and her young son Tarek are among them, having been separated from Tarek’s father in the chaos. Passing time in primitive camps, waiting on a return to his homeland and a reunion with his father proves frustrating for impatient, intelligent Tarek, and he runs away, only to be taken into an encampment of combatants in training, determined

to fight for their freedom. The second feature from director Annemarie Jacir bristles with political indignation, yet its main focus is the very humane and honest story of a young boy whose understanding of a cruel adult world is beyond him. In his first on-screen role, Mahmoud Asfa, who was just 13 years old when the film was made, gives a wonderful performance at the centre of the film.


BENNY & JOLENE OPENS JUNE 13TH EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

88 minutes, U.K., 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

Caught up in a moment of popularity, indie folk duo Benny & Jolene are conflicted about their success. Jolene listens eagerly to the industry types encouraging her to capitalise on the interest and on her attractiveness; Benny is just increasingly baffled and marginalised by it all, resenting the situation that could be the thing which finally extinguishes the torch he’s been carrying for his friend and collaborator. With appearances on daytime TV and festival slots promised, the tension

SHARE YOUR VIEWS AT THE CRITICAL TAKE! P22

between the pair become increasingly evident. Pitched between the warmth and wit of Woody Allen's early films and a Spinal Tap that’s afraid to rock, Jamie Adams’ debut feature has enough ambition and charm to make a mockery of its small budget. With a notable ensemble cast and an improvised feel, Craig Roberts and Charlotte Ritchie excel as the title characters.

OF HORSES AND MEN OPENS JUNE 13TH (HROSS I OSS) EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

81 minutes, Iceland-Germany, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden IFI IRISH SHORT These screenings will be preceded by the IFB-funded short animation, Learning to Fish, by Teemu Auersalo. (4 mins, Ireland, 2012.)

An incident with a randy stallion, witnessed by many of his neighbours, mortifies stately gentleman Kolbeinn. Vernhardur is so desperate for a drink that he rides his horse into the sea in the direction of a Russian trawler that he suspects will have vodka on board. Grimur objects to the barbed wire blocking thoroughfares and rides around with his wire cutter to hand. Spanish tourist Juan is excited about seeing horses in the countryside, but when he gets lost in the snow, he

has to take desperate measures to survive. Gloriously filmed in a remote, idyllic Icelandic valley, these stories of the relationships people have with their equine companions is the feature debut of former stage director Benedikt Erlingsson. It is a bizarre and brilliant ensemble piece, a saucy, pitch-black comedy packed with memorable images.

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JUNE 2014 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET (3D) OPENS JUNE 13TH EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

105 minutes, France-Canada, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

T.S. Spivet is a clever, precocious and intuitive 10-year-old living on the family’s ranch in Montana, with an imagination and intelligence that give him the notion to escape his meagre circumstances. His parents appear mismatched; dad is a cowboy throwback, while mom is a distracted entomologist. His timid brother and diva of a sister give him further cause for grief. On taking a call from the Smithsonian, who are under the impression he is a grown-up inventor

CAMILLE CLAUDEL 1915 OPENS JUNE 20TH FILM INFO:

95 minutes, France, 2013, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema, 3D Notes by Kevin Coyne

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Previously the subject of a major biopic starring Isabelle Adjani, sculptor Camille Claudel is here portrayed by Juliette Binoche in the first instance of director Bruno Dumont (Hors Satan, 2011) working with an established actor. In all other respects, the film remains unmistakably identifiable as the work of Dumont. Confined by her family to a remote asylum following the breakdown of a long affair with Auguste Rodin, Camille’s days are filled with despondency both at her surroundings

of a perpetual motion machine, he leaves home for Washington, intent on accepting a prize being offered to him. His decision sets him on course for a brilliant adventure. The latest film from the acclaimed director of Amélie and Delicatessen, The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet is a sweet and vivid fable, and a warming, affectionate love letter to America.

SHARE YOUR VIEWS AT THE CRITICAL TAKE! P22

and her sense of abandonment. Rather than a broad exploration of her life, the film focuses on a brief period close to the beginning of what would become decades of incarceration. Austere, rigorous, and challenging, the film also contains moments of poignancy and sympathy for the cruelly mistreated Camille, while Binoche gives a performance that stands out even in her illustrious career.


CHINESE PUZZLE OPENS JUNE 20TH (CASSE-TÊTE CHINOIS) EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO: 117 minutes, France, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Alice Butler

FRENCH FILM CLUB There will be a French Film Club screening of this film on June 23rd (see www.ifi.ie for time), introduced by Philippe Milloux. Tickets are €7 for IFI and Alliance Française members.

Following the huge box office successes of both L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and its sequel Russian Dolls (2005), writer and director Cédric Klapisch completes his trilogy with this jaunty final chapter on the lives of Romain Duris’ amiable Xavier and his cosmopolitan friends. After the break-up of his marriage to Wendy (Calvary’s Kelly Reilly), Xavier leaves Paris to follow her to New York where she has moved with their two young children to join her new and ultra-laid-back American

boyfriend. Juggling single fatherhood with attempts to write a novel, find a place to live and (fraudulently) secure a visa, Xavier also manages to get reacquainted with old flame Martine (Audrey Tautou) . . . but not without several arduous diversions along the way. Much like its predecessors, Chinese Puzzle is fast-paced and highly entertaining, and succeeds in handling some of its heavier going subject material with a very light touch.

MISS VIOLENCE OPENS JUNE 20TH EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO:

99 minutes, Greece, 2013, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

While the crest of the Greek ‘Weird Wave’ may have passed, director Alexandros Avranas’ Miss Violence is very much of a similar mindset and approach to films such as Athina Rachel Tsangari’s Attenberg (2010) and, especially, Yorgos Lanthimos’ Dogtooth (2009) in its study of a dysfunctional family. In the midst of celebrating her 11th birthday with her family, Angeliki commits suicide by throwing herself from the apartment balcony. As the family relationships

become clearer, and perspectives on the dynamic shift, the reasons for the muted reaction to the child’s death, and the suicide itself, slowly reveal themselves to the viewer until what had previously only been suspected is made shockingly explicit. Executed with impressive precision, the film could also be seen as an allegory of the state of contemporary Greek society, one that may prove equally applicable to the Irish situation. 11


JUNE 2014 NEW RELEASES & IFI CLASSICS

SPRING IN A SMALL TOWN OPENS JUNE 20TH (XIAO CHENG ZHI CHUN) IFI CLASSIC FILM INFO: 93 minutes, China, 1948, Black and White, D-Cinema Notes by BFI

Widely regarded as the best Chinese film ever made and now newly restored, Spring in a Small Town is set in the aftermath of the Sino-Japanese War (1937 – ‘45) and tells the story of the once prosperous Dai family. The patriarch Liyan (Shi Yu) is a shadow of his former self, an invalid who spends his days lost in nostalgia. His marriage to the beautiful Yuwen (Wei Wei) has become little more than a passionless duty of care on her part. Meanwhile Liyan's teenage sister Xiu (Zhang

Hongmei), too young to remember the past, plays cheerfully in the rubble of their home.

When Richard Dane (Michael C. Hall, Dexter) shoots dead an intruder in his Texas home, he is left filled with remorse, and uncomfortable with the almost congratulatory response of his friends and neighbours. Attending the funeral, he is accosted by the dead man’s ex-con father (a magnificently grizzled Sam Shepard), who promises retribution. The scene is set for a game of cat-andmouse between the two men, and indeed, for a time, it would seem that this is how the film will play out, with the

shadow of John Carpenter looming large over proceedings. However, director Jim Mickle has in his past films, Stake Land (2010) and We Are What We Are (2013), shown a desire to subvert genre tropes, and Cold in July similarly evolves over its course, becoming a much different, darker, and more satisfying film than initially suggested.

Across the broken town wall and into their world comes Liyan's childhood friend Zhang (Li Wei), an adventurous doctor from Shanghai and an old flame of Yuwen. In the ensuing love triangle Yuwen finds herself torn between the two men, while Xiu has her own ideas about the future.

COLD IN JULY OPENS JUNE 27TH FILM INFO:

109 minutes, U.S.A.-France, 2014, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

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THE GOLDEN DREAM OPENS JUNE 27TH EXCLUSIVELY AT IFI† FILM INFO: 108 minutes, Mexico, 2013, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Michael Hayden

A group of Guatemalan teenagers attempt to make their way to the U.S.A., dreaming of the better life that the country promises, but they are ill equipped, both physically and emotionally, for the challenges they face getting there. Sara attempts to pass as a boy, thinking that will make her less vulnerable; Juan positions himself as the group's guide and cheerleader, but he proves himself as naïve as the others; Samuel struggles from the start of the

adventure, while Chauk, an indigenous Indian, speaks no Spanish. Diego Quemada-Díez has previously worked with Ken Loach, and there’s evidence of that in the film’s raw realism and its committed social concerns. It’s a brilliant and effecting debut, which has won numerous prizes on the festival circuit, including an award for its young ensemble cast at Cannes 2013.

UNDER THE RAINBOW OPENS JUNE 27TH (AU BOUT DU CONTE) FILM INFO:

112 minutes, France, 2013, Subtitled, Colour, D-Cinema Notes by Kevin Coyne

In previous films such as The Taste of Others (2000) and Look at Me (2004), co-writers Agnès Jaoui and Jean-Pierre Bacri created comedies of bourgeois manners that were witty and intelligent, as well as frequently barbed. While Under the Rainbow treads a similar path, there is an added level of playfulness in its repeated allusions to fairy tales, both subtle and overt. Young and lovelorn Laura dreams about the man she will marry; this turns out to be aspiring

composer Sandro, who she meets at a glamorous ball. However, their blossoming relationship comes under threat with the arrival of impresario Max. Meanwhile, her aunt, Mariane, and his father, Pierre (played by Jaoui and Bacri), meet when Laura’s father is awarded the Legion of Honour, and bond over driving lessons. Beneath the humour is a perceptive exploration of the gap between idealistic expectation and quotidian reality. 13


Ken Loach on the set of Looking For Eric (see page 18)

KEN LOACH

PART TWO Soon after the May programme went to print, Ken Loach announced he had reconsidered his decision to give up fiction filmmaking. The scale of Jimmy’s Hall had been daunting, but he now thinks making more films with frequent collaborator Paul Laverty is a distinct possibility. That’s great news for fans of his work; as the second part of our retrospective illustrates, there are few filmmakers working today who have the courage and intelligence to take on vital issues as frequently, articulately and convincingly as he does. THE ANGELS' SHARE The Angels’ Share will be this month’s Feast Your Eyes screening on June 23rd at 18:30 (where we show a gastronomic film and follow it with a main course in the IFI Café Bar). Tickets €20. See page 21 for full details.

For their assistance in mounting this retrospective, the IFI would like to thank the BFI, BBC, Save The Children, Element Pictures, Rebecca O’Brien and all at Sixteen Films. Introduction and film notes by Michael Hayden. For film notes on Jimmy's Hall, see page 5. 14

From the early 1990s, Loach had become fantastically prolific, finding ways and means to get his films made with more frequency than he’d been allowed to previously. This selection of his work, starting with Land and Freedom from 1995, is characterised by his work with screenwriter Laverty; by films made in Scotland, Ireland and beyond, proving himself to be a true internationalist; by his continued social concerns and controversies that he never shies from; and by a telling, sincere sense of humour that belies those who would seek to dismiss him as simply a grim social realist.


KEN LOACH PART TWO

LAND AND FREEDOM JUNE 1ST (16.00) FILM INFO:

109 minutes, U.K.-SpainGermany, 1995, Colour, 35mm

When David Carne (Ian Hart) dies in Liverpool in the 1990s, his granddaughter Kim (Suzanne Maddock) discovers documents that reveal he was a righteous young Communist in the 1930s,

CARLA'S SONG JUNE 2ND (18.15) FILM INFO:

120 minutes (Director's Cut), U.K.-Germany- Spain, 1996, Colour, DVD

George is a Glaswegian bus driver who falls in love with Carla, a troubled refugee from Nicaragua. When George hears of Carla’s experiences, the pair travel back to Nicaragua on a resolute mission to

MY NAME IS JOE JUNE 4TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

108 minutes, U.K.-GermanySpain-Italy-France, 1998, Colour, 35mm

Joe is an unemployed recovering alcoholic in Glasgow who starts to fall for Sarah (Louise Goodall), a middle class health worker. It’s a relationship that appears doomed from the start, given their differing circumstances.

and had travelled to Spain to fight against the Fascists in the country’s Civil War. Letters home illustrate Dave’s story, as he joined a Marxist revolutionary group in Barcelona, only to have his idealism chipped away witnessing the realities of war and the compromises of his comrades. Land and Freedom is a rare and brilliant film about conflict, one which manages to retain a visceral energy while being emotionally engaging and intellectually challenging.

find Carla’s former lover, who has disappeared in the country’s brutal civil war. Carla’s Song features a charismatic performance from Robert Carlyle, and a striking one from Oyanka Cabezas, who was cast as Carla despite not being able to speak English. The film evolved from the first script written by Paul Laverty, a former lawyer who was encouraged by Loach to write after relating his experience of working with human rights organisations in Nicaragua. The pair have formed a potent creative partnership since. Loach’s view of incomprehension across the class divide could come across as pessimistic, yet it’s a beautifully observed character study that is resonant and honest. It’s enlivened by dashes of humour and an engaging, career-defining performance from Peter Mullan which won him an acting award at the Cannes Film Festival and won acclaim from Martin Scorsese, among many others.

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KEN LOACH PART TWO

BREAD AND ROSES JUNE 7TH (16.00) FILM INFO:

106 minutes (Director's Cut), U.K.- Germany-Spain- FranceItaly, 2000, Colour, DVD

Maya (Pilar Padilla) is a Mexican immigrant who, after crossing the border from Tijuana to Los Angeles to join her sister, Rosa (Elpidia Carrillo), is appalled by the exploitation she experiences.

THE NAVIGATORS JUNE 8TH (16.00) FILM INFO:

96 minutes, U.K.-Germany-Spain, 2001, Colour, 35mm

Following a group of rail workers who are affected by the privatisation of the U.K. rail network, The Navigators is in the tradition of Loach films celebrating the nobility, humour and commitment

SWEET SIXTEEN 106 minutes, U.K., 2002, Colour, 35mm

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Taking its title from a James Oppenheim poem commemorating women from the textile industry striking in 1912 and inspired by the Justice for Janitors strike of 1990, Loach’s sole American-set film to date is intriguing, intelligent and lively.

of industrial workers. Like his documentaries on miners and dockworkers, and with echoes of Riff-Raff, there is much camaraderie and banter as the men face uncertain futures and failing safety conditions. The Navigators was given great currency when filming began on it within days of a major train crash at Hatfield, and its script is the poignant legacy of writer Rob Dawber who died while the film was being edited from cancer caused by exposure to asbestos after years working on the tracks. desperation for work opportunities and direction for young people that runs through the film.

JUNE 9TH (18.15) FILM INFO:

With the support and encouragement of a young American lawyer, Sam Shapiro (Adrien Brody), she begins to campaign for better pay and rights for janitors.

While My Name is Joe depicted a middle aged Scottish man trapped in the circumstances of his class, Sweet Sixteen turned its attention to the country’s youth, its ironic title indicative of the indignant

Shot around the council estates of Greenock, an area where shipbuilding had once traditionally provided careers for its community, Martin Compston is electric as Liam, a kid on the brink of his 16th birthday. He’s smart and determined to escape the poverty he’s surrounded by, though crime and dealing drugs present themselves as the only options open to him.


AE FOND KISS JUNE 11TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

104 minutes, U.K.-Germany-ItalySpain-France, 2004, Colour, 35mm

Casim (Atta Yaqub) is a DJ, a second-generation Pakistani Muslim in Scotland who is about to enter an arranged marriage. He meets and falls for Roisin (Eva Birthistle), an Irish-born teacher at

THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY JUNE 15TH (16.00) FILM INFO:

127 minutes, U.K.-IrelandGermany-Italy-Spain-Switzerland, 2006, Colour, 35mm

Loach’s fearless, passionate tale of two Republican brothers fighting for the IRA against the British army in rural Ireland of 1920 proved to be hugely controversial, with a predictable backlash in the

IT'S A FREE WORLD... JUNE 17TH (18.30) FILM INFO:

96 minutes, U.K.-Italy-GermanySpain-Poland, 2007, Colour, 35mm

When Angie (Kierston Wareing) is fired from her job at a recruitment agency, she is enterprising enough to set up a similar business of her own, capitalising on the desperate desire of immigrants looking for work and running it from her kitchen with

a Catholic school. The pair both find themselves in conflict with their communities. The third in a trilogy of Glasgow films, Ae Fond Kiss is a sweet-hearted, warmly observed and frequently funny cross-cultural romance that presents itself as lighter than My Name is Joe and Sweet Sixteen, despite its serious concerns and Laverty’s motivation to write a script in response to the treatment of Muslims in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.

British press characterised by The Daily Telegraph's Simon Heffer’s declaration that "And no, I haven't seen it, any more than I need to read Mein Kampf to know what a louse Hitler was.” Winning the Palme d’Or at Cannes was not only an affront to such right-wing commentators, but also cemented Loach’s reputation as an international filmmaker, someone more respected and celebrated outside of his own country than in it.

the help of her friend and flatmate Rose (Juliet Ellis). Skirting legal bureaucracy and faced with more brutal forces, Angie has difficulty recognising she might be out of her depth. Loach’s comment on a system that encourages a freer movement of labour across borders remains timely, while Wareing’s debut performance is terrific, as she portrays a morally compromised character who stays sympathetic and human.

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KEN LOACH PART TWO

LOOKING FOR ERIC JUNE 18TH (18:15) FILM INFO:

116 minutes, U.K.-France Italy-Belgium-Spain, 2009, Colour, 35mm

Eric Cantona was a notable aesthete and cinéaste in the relatively uncultured world of 1990s Premier League football, and it was Cantona who initially approached Ken Loach with the idea of making a

ROUTE IRISH

Fergus (Mark Womack) is a private security contractor who becomes suspicious about his friend's death, and sets out to uncover the truth.

JUNE 21ST (16:00) FILM INFO:

109 minutes, U.K.-FranceItaly-Belgium-Spain, 2010, Colour, 35mm

Loach’s response to the conflict in Iraq is a breathless thriller that carries echoes of Hidden Agenda, a characteristically indignant work which focuses on war profiteering and the lies that sent the U.K. to war.

SPIRIT OF '45 JUNE 24TH (18:30) FILM INFO:

94 minutes, U.K.-2013, Black and White and Colour, D-Cinema

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film about his relationship with Manchester United’s fans. Building from this premise, Laverty and Loach fashioned this warm and witty story about a depressive postman called Eric, brilliantly realised by Steve Evets, who manages to summon up his hero Cantona in his time of need. A winning comedy, Looking for Eric has enough steel and social concerns to sit easily within Loach’s filmography.

The Labour government of Britain in 1945 had won a massive mandate to take leading industries into public ownership. The fact that the National Health Service remains the last of those services not to be farmed out to private enterprise is a bitter fact

Showing with 11'09''01 – United Kingdom (11 minutes, U.K., 2002, Colour, DVD), Loach’s contribution to the portmanteau film made on the first anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Centre, which comments on the collapse of the Chilean government in the early 1970s.

of history. With archive footage and contemporary interviews with people who contributed to the creation of The Welfare State, Loach celebrates the progressive thinking and community spirit of the time. Spirit of '45 is a pointed put down for modern detractors of the NHS, and a celebration of people determined to build a better society.


IFI EVENTS

IFI EVENTS

IRELAND ON SUNDAY WILD STRAWBERRIES ARCHIVE AT LUNCHTIME IFI FAMILY FROM THE VAULTS FEAST YOUR EYES 70MM SCREENING IFI & DUBLIN PRIDE 2014 THE CRITICAL TAKE

WHERE THE SEA USED TO BE

JUNE 22ND (13:00) DIRECTOR: Paul Farren

FILM INFO:

76 minutes, Ireland, 2012, Digi-beta

Ireland on Sunday is our monthly showcase for new Irish film. Paul Farren’s feature debut is a quietly deadpan comedy following two brothers as they reunite in Dublin for Christmas. Obligatory pints are

WILD STRAWBERRIES LE WEEK-END JUNE 25TH & 27TH (11.00) DIRECTOR: Roger Michell

FILM INFO:

93 minutes, U.K.-France

Wild Strawberries is our bimonthly film club for over 55s. Filmmaker Roger Michell is no stranger to stories of older love and romance. In this bittersweet tale, Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan play

consumed. Nobody gets too drunk. They don't discuss the big issues. No great wounds are healed nor sins forgiven. But gradually we learn everything important there is to know about these two men as they bicker mildly towards home where memories wait in ambush. They do meet Santy. Briefly. And their Auntie Betty cooks them a fry. Director, writer and actor Paul Farren and co-writer and actor Stephen Walsh will participate in a post-screening Q&A.

a long-married couple who return to Paris in an attempt to rekindle their love. However, passion and glamour are far from present as their old hotel turns out to be a dump and the warmth between them is tempered by resentment. It’s clear that they now want different things, and yet we will these convincing and appealing characters to find a way together in the City of Light. €3.85 including regular tea/coffee before the screening. Wild Strawberries is our film club for over 55s. If you are lucky enough to look younger, please don’t take offence if we ask your age. 19


Monagesque Montage

Join us for free lunchtime screenings of films from the IFI Irish Film Archive. This month we mark Princess Grace’s visits to Ireland (see page 7 for Grace of Monaco, which opens on June 6th) and we also celebrate Bloomsday. Check www.ifi.ie for times and further information.

MONAGESQUE MONTAGE

Newsreel, amateur and actuality footage of the visits of Prince Rainier and Princess Grace of Monaco to Ireland in 1961 and 1963 (8 minutes, 1961 & 1963, Black and White/Colour)

MARION AGUS AN BANPHRIONSA

Melanie Clark Pullen’s charming story about a little girl who is determined to meet Princess Grace of Monaco, as she makes her first official visit to Ireland in 1961. (9 minutes, 2006, Black and White/Colour)

A SECOND OF JUNE

Frank Stapleton’s Ulyssean, richly textured day in the life of two young people wandering through the streets of Dublin set against a backdrop of street traders, amusement arcades and protests during the visit of President Ronald Reagan to Ireland in 1984. (40 minutes, 1984, Colour)

Please see page 21 for this month’s From the Vaults screening celebrating Bloomsday, John Huston's The Dead.

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THE KING AND THE MOCKINGBIRD JUNE 29TH (11.00) This French adaptation of a Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale is said to be a favourite of Studio Ghibli director Hiyao Miyazaki. It’s the story of a wicked King who rules over the kingdom of Takicardia, where the only creature in the kingdom who will stand up to him is the brave Mr. Bird. The King’s huge palace is filled with beautiful paintings which come to life at night time and the characters, including a shepherdess and a chimney sweep, all try to escape. They free Mr. Bird who has been trapped, and together they lead the police on a wild chase across the city. This beautiful, dreamlike animation took over 60 years to be completed and was a huge hit when re-released in France in 2013. Tickets: €4.80 per person, €14.40 family ticket (2 adults + 2 children/1 adult + 3 children) DIRECTOR: Paul Grimault FILM INFO: 83 minutes, France, 1980, English language version


THE DEAD JUNE 15TH (16.00) & JUNE 16TH (18.30) DIRECTOR: John Huston

FILM INFO:

82 minutes, 1987, Colour, 35mm

Screening 100 years to the day after James Joyce’s Dubliners was published on June 15th, 1914 (and again on Bloomsday), the IFI Irish Film Archive presents John Huston’s pitchperfect adaptation of The Dead.

community service, devise an ingenious plan to pilfer a small share of highly prized whisky to sell it on for a sizeable sum.

THE ANGELS' SHARE JUNE 23RD (18.30) DIRECTOR: Ken Loach

FILM INFO:

106 minutes, ScotlandFrance-Belgium-Italy, 2012, Colour, D-Cinema Tickets €20. Free list suspended.

Our monthly gastronomic feature followed by a meal in the IFI Café Bar. THE FILM: In this deceptively light comedy from Ken Loach, a group of plucky young Glaswegians, all doing

JUNE 30TH (18.30) Kenneth Branagh

FILM INFO:

242 minutes (plus intermission), U.K.-U.S.A., 1996, Colour, 70mm Notes by Kevin Coyne Tickets €12. Free list suspended.

THE FOOD: After the feature, choose from our menu inspired by The Angels’ Share: Roast Chicken Fillet with White Pudding Mash and a Whisky Scallion Butter; Seared Salmon, Nettle and Baby Potato with a Scotch and Mustard Cream; or Grilled Vegetable and Feta Stack with a Basil Puree. This screening includes the short film Irish Breakfast by Aoife McElwain and Mark Duggan of www.forkful.tv Kenneth Branagh’s Hamlet, one of just a handful of features in the last three decades to be shot specifically for the 70mm format. It is also the first unabridged film version of the play to be made, with an all-star cast featuring some of the finest performers of the Bard’s work.

HAMLET

DIRECTOR:

In Dublin 1904, friends congregate, as they have done for years, at a New Year’s party in the household of the Misses Morkan. The mood is coloured by anguish as Gretta (Anjelica Huston) remembers a long-lost love, much to the incomprehension of her husband Gabriel (Donal McCann). For Huston, the film served as an elegant and melancholic farewell to Ireland and to life itself.

Over the last 12 months, with the support of Expert Air Limited, the IFI, the only venue in the country capable of so doing, has been showcasing films on 70mm. To end this series, we’re delighted to present this extremely rare opportunity to see

In partnership with:

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2014 GOD LOVES UGANDA + PANEL DISCUSSION GOD LOVES UGANDA DIRECTOR:

Roger Ross Williams

FILM INFO: 83 minutes, U.S., 2013, Colour

I AM DIVINE DIRECTOR:

Jeffrey Schwarz

FILM INFO:

86 minutes, U.S.A., 2013, Colour

Academy-Award-winning filmmaker Roger Ross Williams explores the role of the American Evangelical movement in fuelling Uganda’s terrifying turn towards biblical law and the proposed death penalty for homosexuals. Using interviews and hidden camera footage, the film allows American religious leaders and their young missionaries to explain their positions in their own words. The showing will be followed by a panel discussion featuring individuals with direct experience of the Ugandan situation.

THE CRITICAL TAKE

JUNE 25TH (18.30)

Camille Claudel 1915

This film is presented in association with National LGBT Federation and Dublin Pride 2014.

The Critical Take is a free event that takes place at the end of every month when a panel of three invited speakers initiate an open discussion about three films from the IFI programme.

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I AM DIVINE Director Jeffrey Schwarz presents a film about a true queer legend, the riotous, extravagant, incredible Divine! While growing up as an overweight gay teenager on the tough streets of Baltimore, Divine found solace in food, hairdressing and all things outrageous. Sharing his taste for the weird and wonderful was friend and neighbour John Waters, and their lifelong professional partnership produced some of cult cinema’s most celebrated films. Combining archival footage with hilarious interviews, this is a thoroughly rounded account of one incredible man’s life and work. This film is presented in association with GAZE International LGBT Film Festival Dublin and Dublin Pride 2014.

Join in the debate on Wednesday, June 25th to give your reckoning on Jimmy’s Hall (see page 5), the new film from outstanding director Ken Loach; Welsh newcomer Jamie Adams’ hilarious road movie, Benny & Jolene (see page 9); and French director Bruno Dumont’s astonishing Camille Claudel 1915 (see page 10). The panellists will be announced on www.ifi.ie This event is open to all to attend and take part. Simply collect your FREE ticket at the IFI Box Office.


SATURDAY JUNE 14TH

FREE FILMS!

A DAY OF FREE FILM SCREENINGS FOR ALL! Mark your calendars and set a reminder on your phone as Saturday, June 14th will be an entire day devoted to FREE films at the IFI! Help us to celebrate all that the IFI has to offer to customers old and new, with FREE sneak previews of major new releases, old favourites, a family screening, Irish and international films, and the IFI audiences’ favourite film of the last year! Keep an eye on www.ifi.ie in early June for the full schedule, to vote in our audience poll and for full details of how to get your FREE tickets! 23


IFI PETE WALSH CRITICAL WRITING AWARD

LOVELACE

Lovelace

Darragh O’Donoghue has been named winner of the IFI Pete Walsh Critical Writing Award for his review of Rob Epstein’s 2013 film Lovelace.

As a documentary filmmaker, Rob Epstein has rewritten U.S. historiography by placing sex and sexual identity at its centre, rather than wars, expansionism, race or economic development. Most crucially, he reclaimed homosexual achievement, whether that of publicly visible, heroic males like Harvey Milk and Allen Ginsberg, or the unseen gay personnel in, and viewers of, classic Hollywood, who inserted subversive content in their films, or read reactionary narratives ‘against the grain’.

a true Epstein hero(ine) is that she fights back. She names and shames her abusers, and by implication the snickering mainstream ‘intelligentsia’ that for a few moments got off on Deep Throat. And she did this by writing a book, by becoming – like Milk the orator and Ginsberg the poet – an artist. Her fight back is like that of the contributors to The Celluloid Closet: each responds to a bogus, noxious, widely accepted media construct of sexual identity with a resounding NO.

But if males, even homosexual males in a homophobic society, can be active makers of history, Epstein’s first solo female heroine seems passive – discovered, renamed, abused, pimped, raped, gang-raped, and financially exploited by men. Even at the moment of Linda Lovelace’s greatest cultural triumph – skin flick Deep Throat entering mainstream culture, making her a media sensation – her achievement is a joke, her body, her skills, her name the subjects of sniggering jokes by aging males on TV, such as Johnny Carson and Bob Hope.

The Ginsberg film Howl was the transitional film between Epstein’s documentary work and Lovelace, his first fully blown feature. Howl was a documentary in that it reproduced audio, visual and textual records; it was fictional in that Epstein (and co-director Jeffrey Friedman) reconstructed those records in live action monologues, dramatic sequences and by the use of animation. James Franco acting as Allen Ginsberg as he recites ‘Howl’ or gives a press interview may be fiction, but is only quantitatively different from, say, Franco reading an old letter on a Ken Burns documentary.

Had Linda’s story ended with Deep Throat, or the final escape from her vicious husband (an escape ultimately facilitated by yet more scary middle-aged men), hers would have been a sad, sympathetic, not particularly inspiring narrative. What makes Linda 24

Howl’s multi-stranded approach is replaced in Lovelace by a more cohesive fictional illusion. Even archival footage of Linda’s appearance on the Donahue talk show digitally replaces the historical


Linda with the actress playing her, Amanda Seyfried. The only other factual intrusion occurs at the end of the film when the usual ‘what happened next’ titles are followed, movingly, by a photograph of the real life Linda. The film begins with an audio-visual overture – images of camera, film screens and audiences warning us to be aware of the mediated nature of what we are about to see; fragmented images of Linda taking a bath are overlaid with a montage of voices, asking for the ‘real’ Linda Lovelace. The impression is of a woman without her own voice, defined by her body, the subject of others’ discourse, her ‘self’ created by cinema and the media.

The two most distressing scenes are not, however, those of Chuck’s physical abuse, but dramatised encounters with people who should be supportive but fail to help. The first is an astonishing sequence where Linda seeks refuge from Chuck with her parents. Her mother, the exemplary Catholic who offloaded Linda’s baby, refuses to take her in, telling her she must go back to her husband, and fulfil her vow to forever obey him. She can never divorce, despite Linda telling her mother that Chuck abuses her. Sharon Stone’s icy righteousness disguised as maternal wisdom is the high point in a major performance. (Whether or not the conception of her character is sexist – by contrast with the empathetic and emotionally sustaining father – is another matter.)

Her story is then told in two parts. The first is the traditional zero-to-hero narrative. Linda Boreman is brought up in such a strict Catholic family that her only sexual experience to date resulted in a baby that was tricked away from her, the family moving from New York to Florida to escape the perceived shame. This is alluded to as she jokes hesitantly about fellatio with her best friend Patsy – sex is immediately both the subject of embarrassed humour and a literally scarring trauma; later in the film, one will serve to hide the other. Always led by the seemingly more adventurous Patsy, Linda is discovered go-go dancing at a local ice rink by bar owner/small-time criminal Chuck Traynor, whose opening gambit is to ask the ‘girls’ whether they have ever considered dancing professionally. Wooing her with charm and pot, while trying to hit on Patsy at the same time, he marries Linda and, pressed by debt, asks Linda to star in a porno. Deep Throat, with its iconic fellatio sequences and apparent sense of humour, becomes a huge hit; Linda wears gorgeous frocks to meet Sammy Davis Jr. and Hugh Hefner at glitzy parties, and everybody is having innocent fun with the unexpected mainstream success of an essentially innocent blue movie.

The second scene also stages an abortive flight, as Linda trips in a long dress running away from Chuck outside their home. A police car drives up. The policemen are dubious when Chuck claims to be the bloodied Linda’s husband, but when one of them recognises her as a porn star, all concern for her evaporates, as if someone who works in that line deserves everything she gets.

‘Six years later’ flashes on the screen, a harrowed Linda seems to be tied to a chair; she is taking a polygraph test. She is about to write an exposé of her experiences, and her publishers want to make sure she is telling the truth. The first story is told again, but this time the gaps created by what had seemed to be conventional elisions between scenes are filled in.

For some the spectacle of female victimhood in a film written and directed by men will be problematic. Others might cite Linda’s Catholic background and read her ‘Ordeal’ as a ‘Passion’, a spiritual journey through sin and suffering leading to redemption. Even more, taking their cue from The Celluloid Closet, might place the story of a beautiful, resourceful woman betrayed by a handsome heel in the tradition of the 1940s women’s picture, and praise Lovelace as a Mildred Pierce of the spurious ‘sexual liberation’ era.

Linda’s honeymoon sex is a violent rape; before suggesting Deep Throat, Chuck pimps Linda to out-of-town salesmen; she is forced to film Deep Throat at gun point; he brandishes the gun again when Linda refuses to pleasure a room full of Hollywood executives.

It would be misleading to imply that the first half of the film is the breezy Official Story of Linda Lovelace as presented to the world in the early 1970s, and the second a revision of that history rewritten by its victim. The first half does acknowledge Chuck’s violence – his outburst on being released from jail, or the bruises Linda displays to her co-star Dolly. Nevertheless, the second half seems to unquestioningly vindicate Linda’s account – despite the polyphony of the overture, her account is privileged as the true one, the corrective; there is no Rashomon-style counterpoint of witness statements from Chuck or the other protagonists. It appears to be enough that the polygraph machine attests to her truthfulness.

The IFI Pete Walsh Critical Writing Award is inspired by the late, esteemed IFI programmer Pete Walsh. Reflecting his passion for good writing about film, the award recognises an outstanding piece of critical writing on any one film theatrically screened in Ireland during the previous calendar year.

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MEMBERSHIP SCHEME Free tickets, discounts on tickets, free screenings and a host of other benefits... It can only be the annual IFI Membership!

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YOUR VISIT TO THE IFI

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Around half of our films are classified by the Irish Film Classification Office, are open to the general public and do not require membership. Unclassified films require membership. You have two options: annual membership (€25 or €15 concessions) or daily membership (€1 per person each time you visit the cinema). For further details on membership, please go to www.ifi.ie or call our Box Office.

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The IFI Loyalty Card is free and allows you to earn points that you can later exchange for free cinema tickets. Membership gives you the chance to attend a free preview T screening every Tsingle GREA month and discounts when you REE spendTRatANthe D STIFI. Go to www.ifi.ie or call our Box Office for WALK S ’S LOR details. Please remember: no card, no points! CHE

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UAY ND Q RMO ER Oof your IFI cinema presentation LOW

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At Selected Cinemas from

June 13


IFI June Programme