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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY JULY/AUGUST 2018

MANDY MOORE IN CALIFORNIA “WE BROUGHT THIS HOUSE BACK TO LIFE”

HELLO, SUMMER BLISSFUL BEACH RETREATS GLORIOUS GARDENS COLOR EVERYWHERE!


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CONTENTS july/august

80 THE COVERED TERRACE OF A SHELTER ISLAND BEACH HOME.

104 BUNNY AND LULU HENAULT-BASSETT AT THEIR FAMILY’S HOUSE IN MILLBROOK, NEW YORK.

14 Editor’s Letter 18 Object Lesson How Poul Henningsen’s artichoke lamps changed the trajectory of lighting design.

For a Paris-based family, two Catskills cabins make the perfect retreat . . . The revived splendor of Boston’s Emerson Colonial Theatre . . . Charlap Hyman & Herrero unveils its first collection of rugs, wallpapers, and fabric . . . Van Cleef & Arpels presents shimmering new additions in Marrakech . . . Ceramist Christopher Spitzmiller and his elegant dovecote . . . and more!

60 This Is Home Mandy Moore’s Pasadena house is a testament to the star’s confidence, warmth, and passion for design. BY MAYER RUS

70 Harmonic Convergence An A-team of top talents creates a romantic Hamptons escape for one very discerning client. BY DAN SHAW (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)

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AR C H D I G E S T.COM

FROM TOP: CHRISTOPHER STURMAN; WILLIAM WALDRON

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CONTENTS july/august

60 MANDY MOORE’S CALIFORNIA HOME.

70 THE PARTERRE GARDEN AND ARBOR AT A HAMPTONS RETREAT.

80 Squad Goals With the help of Christoff:Finio Architecture, a young family builds their dream house on New York’s Shelter Island. BY SAM COCHRAN

88 Fertile Imagination Lady Tania Compton listens to the land—and looks to history—to create places of informal exuberance. BY CHRISTOPHER STOCKS

94 Outside the Box FOLLOW @ARCHDIGEST

94 Made in America For its latest home collection, Calvin Klein rethinks tried-and-true icons.

104 Days of Heaven Designer Darren Henault crafts a glorious getaway on a former Christmas-tree farm. BY MAYER RUS

112 Resources The designers, architects, and products featured this month.

114 Last Word An overhauled landscape rejuvenates St. Louis’s iconic Gateway Arch.

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SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION GO TO ARCHDIGEST.COM, CALL 800-365-8032, OR EMAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS@ ARCHDIGEST.COM. DIGITAL EDITION DOWNLOAD AT ARCHDIGEST.COM/APP. NEWSLETTER SIGN UP FOR AD’S DAILY NEWSLETTER, AT ARCHDIGEST.COM/ NEWSLETTER. COMMENTS CONTACT US VIA SOCIAL MEDIA OR EMAIL US AT LETTERS@ARCHDIGEST.COM.

ON THE COVER MANDY MOORE, IN A LA DOUBLEJ DRESS, AT HER HOUSE IN PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. “THIS IS HOME,” PAGE 60. PHOTOGRAPHY BY TREVOR TONDRO. STYLED BY LAWREN HOWELL. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

FROM TOP: TREVOR TONDRO; DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; TREVOR TONDRO

Architect Ron Radziner designs his own family home in response to its wooded Los Angeles site. BY MAYER RUS


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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 75 NUMBER 7

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Amy Astley CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Sebbah EDITORIAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Diane Dragan EXECUTIVE EDITOR Shax Riegler EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Keith Pollock INTERIORS & GARDEN DIRECTOR Alison Levasseur STYLE DIRECTOR Jane Keltner de Valle FEATURES DIRECTOR Sam Cochran DECORATIVE ARTS EDITOR Mitchell Owens WEST COAST EDITOR Mayer Rus

FEATURES SENIOR DESIGN WRITER Hannah Martin DEPUTY EDITOR, DIGITAL Kristen Flanagan SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR, DIGITAL

Sydney Wasserman ENTERTAINMENT EDITORS

Carson Griffith (Digital), Maxwell Losgar DESIGN EDITOR, DIGITAL Amanda Sims EDITOR, DIGITAL David Foxley HOME EDITOR, DIGITAL Lindsey Mather DESIGN REPORTER, DIGITAL Hadley Keller ASSOCIATE FEATURES EDITOR, DIGITAL Nick Mafi EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Elizabeth Fazzare, Katherine McGrath (Digital), Carly Olson ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF Annie Ballaine

MARKET MARKET DIRECTOR Parker Bowie Larson ASSOCIATE EDITOR, MARKET Madeline O’Malley PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kevin Roff EDITORIAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Nick Traverse PRODUCTION MANAGER Alexandra Kushel PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE Sarah Rath COPY AND RESEARCH COPY DIRECTOR Joyce Rubin RESEARCH DIRECTOR Andrew Gillings COPY MANAGER Adriana Bürgi RESEARCH MANAGER Leslie Anne Wiggins

CREATIVE DESIGN DIRECTOR Natalie Do VISUALS DIRECTOR Michael Shome VISUALS EDITOR, DIGITAL Melissa Maria ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITOR

Gabrielle Pilotti Langdon JUNIOR DESIGNER Megan Spengler

COMMUNICATIONS + EDITORIAL PROJECTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS

Erin Kaplan DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL PROJECTS

Jeffrey C. Caldwell CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTING EDITOR AT LARGE

Michael Reynolds

VIDEO PRODUCERS

Vince Cross, Matt Duckor, Sara Snyder, Chauncey McDougal Tanton, Rusty Ward ARCHDIGEST.COM SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Rachel Coleman ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Geneva S. Thomas SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Jessica Gatdula BRAND LEAD Amy Liebster ANALYST, DIGITAL INTELLIGENCE Kevin Wu

CONTRIBUTING INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS EDITOR

Carlos Mota CONTRIBUTING STYLE EDITORS

Lawren Howell, Carolina Irving CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Amanda Brooks, Gay Gassmann CONTRIBUTORS Fabiola Beracasa Beckman, Derek Blasberg, Peter Copping, Sarah Harrelson, Pippa Holt, Patricia Lansing, Colby Mugrabi, Carlos Souza EDITOR EMERITA Paige Rense Noland

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY Barri Trott DIRECTORS, MARKETING Dina Biblarz, Christin DeMaria,

Emma Greenberg, Casey McCarthy, Shannon Muldoon DIRECTORS, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY Brittany Bakacs, Holly Sabecky ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING Jackie Albastro, Caitlin DiLena, Tom Heiss, Elena Korn, Caroline Luppescu, Nadine Rivoldi, Lucas Santos, Jessica Sisco, Arisara Srisethnil

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Alexis Aliquo, Alex Bair, Michele Bastin, Joshua McDonald, Justine Parker, Jordan Schaefer ASSOCIATES, BRAND MARKETING Chelsea Horhn, Marybeth Lawrence, Hillary Miller, Lauren Pernal EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCE Benjamin Peryer ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS, EXPERIENCE Jennifer Mills, Joshua Robertson ASSOCIATE, EXPERIENCE Jennifer Lanzarone MANAGERS, BRAND MARKETING

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COMMUNICATIONS, THE LIFESTYLE COLLECTION

Molly Pacala COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, THE LIFESTYLE COLLECTION

Savannah Jackson CREATIVE SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Phuong Nguyen ART DIRECTORS Tanya DeSelm, Marisa Ehrhardt SENIOR DESIGNER Corinne Baptiste DESIGNERS Elena Scott, Stephanie Stanley SENIOR PRODUCER Julie Sullivan DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE CONTENT PRODUCTION Dana Kravis CONTENT DIRECTOR Kate Marsanico BRANCH OFFICES LOS ANGELES SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Melissa Lee 323-965-3455 EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Elizabeth Murphy 323-965-3578 SAN FRANCISCO / PACIFIC NORTHWEST EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Rick Gruber 415-276-5217 MIDWEST VP, REVENUE Pamela Quandt 312-649-3526 EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTORS Ashley Connor 312-649-3512, Jenna Ernster 312-649-3549 DETROIT EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Anne Green 248-765-9126 FLORIDA / SOUTHEAST / CARIBBEAN Peter M. Zuckerman, Z-MEDIA 305-532-5566 FLORIDA Esther Jackson, MDS INC 305-373-3700 SOUTHWEST Lewis Stafford Company 972-960-2889 CANADA Dodd Media Group 905-885-0664 MEXICO John Hillock 212-286-2035 ASIA Marcia Kline +62-813-60896848 UK Juliet Fetherstonhaugh +44-20-7349-7111, Steve Middleton, SMS LTD +44(0)7710-128464 MIDDLE EAST Skyscale Media Services +971-42-42-4579 INDIA Saurabh Wig 647-679-6005 EUROPE, FASHION/LUXURY Rula Al Amad +39-02-6558-4237

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editor’s letter

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It seems fitting that we ring in the Fourth of July and this high-summer double issue of AD with a feature on a resuscitated and refreshed Pasadena house that our Mayer Rus aptly describes as “a declaration of independence.” Cover star Mandy Moore, a onetime teen idol, bought a “starter house” in 2002 at the tender age of 18 and admits that “it never felt wholly mine. . . . I never felt secure enough to bring a lot of people there.” Sixteen years later, Moore has a hit television show (This Is Us), a fiancé, and a spectacular new “old” place to live. A carefully selected team of pros helped her achieve, at last, a home she’s proud to call her own. In addition to Moore’s sunny, can-do spirit, the issue positively brims with American optimism. Three wildly different houses—a beachy modernist getaway for a young family on Shelter Island, a deluxe estate in Southampton that wears its erudite design ever so lightly, and esteemed L.A. architect Ron Radziner’s ultracool creation for his own family—were all built from the ground up. Also quintessentially American: Calvin Klein. The brand’s venerable home collection was once a minimalist nirvana of sleek glassware and oatmeal-hued towels, but under Belgian creative director Raf Simons, its new look is a riot of color and a frank celebration of team USA. Feast your eyes on our exclusive photos of bright wool Pendleton blankets and pillows (made in Oregon and Washington), vivid Fiesta dinnerware (made in West Virginia) emblazoned with Andy Warhol images, and the pièce de résistance, Gaetano Pesce’s Feltri armchairs upholstered with vintage quilts selected by Simons himself. Having made a big splash last month at Design Miami/Basel, the chairs are destined to become design-world trophies and the “new classics” of Calvin Klein.

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AMERICANA! 1. FELTRI ARMCHAIRS BY GAETANO PESCE FOR CASSINA, UPHOLSTERED IN VINTAGE QUILTS SELECTED BY RAF SIMONS FOR THE NEWEST CALVIN KLEIN HOME COLLECTION. 2. PAINTED FLOORS IN AN 1800 HUDSON VALLEY FARMHOUSE. 3. MANDY MOORE’S PASADENA POOL. 4. A YOUNG FAMILY ENJOYS A SHELTER ISLAND SUMMER. 5. AT THE AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE GALA IN NYC.

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AMY ASTLEY Editor in Chief @amytastley

1. ANTHONY COTSIFAS; 2. WILLIAM WALDRON; 3. TREVOR TONDRO; 4. CHRISTOPHER STURMAN; 5. ROY ROCHLIN/GETTY IMAGES

“This house signifies the next chapter of my life—as an adult, a woman, and a performer. I was able to pour all of who I am into making this place.” —Mandy Moore


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object lesson

THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN

Vegging Out How Poul Henningsen’s unusual 1958 artichoke lamps changed the trajectory of lighting design 18

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POUL HENNINGSEN’S COPPER ARTICHOKE LAMP CROWNS A BEDROOM IN THE COPENHAGEN HOME OF ARTIST EVALAJKA.


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1. A COPPER EXAMPLE IN A SOMERSET COUNTRY HOUSE BY MARK PANTER. 2. AN ARTICHOKE WITH POWDER-COATED STEEL LEAVES FROM DWR. 3. FURNITURE DEALER AND COLLECTOR NINA YASHAR HAS A STAINLESS-STEEL VERSION IN HER MILAN KITCHEN. 4. COPENHAGEN’S LANGELINIE PAVILION RESTAURANT, WHERE HENNINGSEN HUNG THE FIRST FIVE ARTICHOKES IN 1958.

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1. LINE T KLEIN; 2. DESIGN WITHIN REACH; 3. GIANNI BASSO/VEGAMG; 4. COURTESY OF LANGELINIE PAVILION

hen architects Eva and Nils Koppel asked Danish luminary Poul Henningsen to design the lighting for a buzzy restaurant in Copenhagen’s Langelinie waterfront park in 1958, Henningsen revisited a radical design that he had abandoned more than 30 years prior: a ceiling light that resembled an upside-down artichoke. Just three months later, five finished versions (made by lighting manufacturer Louis Poulsen) were installed in Langelinie Pavilion. The designs—each of which used 72 copper leaves to totally conceal the lightbulb—diffused a warm luminescence that, thanks to the pale-pink paint applied to the underside of the leaves, gave diners below a healthy, rosy glow. “The fact that you couldn’t see the light source was very revolutionary,” says Rasmus Markholdt, product and design director of Louis Poulsen. “At the time, people didn’t see a lamp as a nice object; they simply needed light. Henningsen was one of the first to think of both.” Several original Langelinie fixtures, all but one removed from the pavilion after a remodeling, have recently appeared at auction—Piasa sold an original for just under $10,000 in May, and Bonhams plans to auction another in the near future. But the new models, still made by Louis Poulsen in a variety of sizes and finishes (to mark its 60th anniversary of the design, they’ll debut a version in brass), actually command a higher price, starting around $11,000. AD100 designer Robert Couturier explains why he likes it. “Chandeliers can be quite difficult to use, but this one is very discreet since the light is diffused. I have always used it with great effect over small dining tables. It is a very complimentary light.” dwr.com —HANNAH MARTIN


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DISCOVERIES

THE BEST IN CULTURE, DESIGN, AND STYLE

Grass Roots A pair of Catskills cabins provide the perfect counterpoint to Paris life for Sarah Andelman and her family PH OTOG R A PH Y BY A DRIAN GAU T STYL ED BY MICHAEL BAR GO

SARAH ANDELMAN AND HER SON, WOODY, AT THE FAMILY’S CATSKILLS RETREAT.


DISCOVERIES AD visits

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cabin nestled amid the counterculture enclave that birthed Woodstock is not the first place you would expect to find the très cool Sarah Andelman, cofounder of Paris’s late, lamented concept store Colette. (She now heads up Just an Idea, a consulting company.) Yet, here in the quiet New York hamlet of Chichester, the Parisian is clipping thyme in her garden outside the cottages she shares with her American husband, music-video director Philip Andelman, and their son, Woody. Though their main residence is in France, they retreat here for summers and vacations. In fact, Woody’s name is a testament to this very place. Rewind 12 years, when a then-single Philip decamped from Los Angeles and wound up in the Catskills (where, by his account, “everyone has a recording studio”). In the summer of 2009, he was passing through Paris for a friend’s wedding and

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1. THE COUPLE’S BEDROOM. 2. GUESTS NOW BUNK IN THE ORIGINAL CABIN, WHERE THE KITCHEN AND LIVING ROOM OVERLOOK THE CATSKILLS. 3. SUNSET BUBBLE TIME; THE FRETWORK RAILING IS PAINTED COLETTE BLUE.

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met Sarah. A two-and-a-half-week courtship followed, as Philip strategically booked photo shoots with the Beastie Boys and Jack White to draw out his stay. “Eventually the shoots end and I haven’t even gotten a kiss,” he laments. “So I come back to the mountains all bummed.” But he kept returning to Paris until his frequent-flier miles were depleted—still, no kiss. “So I do one last Hail Mary. I told her, ‘Do you not realize I’m trying to date you?’ Sarah shook her head no—I kissed her, and we’ve been together ever since.” During Sarah’s next trip to New York for fashion shows, she visited Philip’s hideaway. “I loved it immediately,” she says. “Especially discovering it through Philip’s eyes.” They dropped by a neighbor’s house one evening to watch the sunset on the terrace, from which magical views of the mountainous landscape unfolded. “Not a phone line or road in sight,” says Philip. And both thought, Sarah recalls, “It would be fantastic to one day live here.” Now they do, having purchased the five-acre property and renovated its modest 1970s cabin with a neighbor, woodworker Jeremy Bernstein, coating it in white paint and updating the pink fiberglass bathroom to a simple gray slate. The Colette-blue trim around the terrace was Philip’s surprise to Sarah (the shade is echoed in everything from water


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DISCOVERIES buckets to a Smeg refrigerator). The home was christened Chalabin because, explains Philip, “it’s smaller than a chalet and larger than a cabin.” Weeks after the work wrapped up, they wed at a friend’s place nearby. But a dwelling that had been perfectly sized for a couple proved to be too small once Woody came along. So Philip decided to build a guesthouse. “It’s his baby,” notes Sarah, who has creative control over their Paris flat (the Andelmans fondly refer to their properties as “his and hers” homes). Bernstein oversaw the project, collaborating with architect Kurt Evans, who drafted the initial plans. The building is constructed of quarter-sawn white oak, “so there’s no end grain anywhere,” Philip relays

DEBUT

JUNGLE BOOGIE Oscar-winning design deity Catherine Martin (Moulin Rouge!, The Great Gatsby), a.k.a. Mrs. Baz Luhrmann, thrills to what she calls the big, “discordant” mix. Enter Majorelle, her bodacious new range of textiles, wallpapers, and trims for Mokum. Think palm fronds, bunches of ripe bananas, leopard spots, and rampant Orientalism, sparked, in part, by Morocco’s swoony Jardin Majorelle. jamesdunloptextiles.com —MITCHELL OWENS

A SITTING AREA IN THE GUESTHOUSE TURNED FAMILY HOME.

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The Andelmans loved their new guesthouse so much, they moved right in.

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1. MAJORELLE WALLPAPER IN SAPPHIRE. 2. LA PALMA IN CORAL. 3. CATHERINE MARTIN, WEARING A DRESS BY RED VALENTINO, STRIKES A POSE IN FRONT OF MAJORELLE IN EMERALD.

1. & 2. COURTESY OF MOKUM; 3. EMILY ANDREWS

with pride. Expansive picture-frame windows were sourced after Philip spotted the same ones at musician Lenny Kravitz’s Bahamas home—which prompted him to tear up the check he had already written for other, less costly windows. “Originally I was like, It’s going to be a guesthouse; it doesn’t matter,” Philip says. “But once you make one expensive decision, you don’t want to cheap out on the rest.” The result? A guesthouse that the Andelmans loved so much, they moved in. Now when visitors come, they take over the original cabin and join the Andelmans for dips at a secret swimming hole. “The water tastes like sugar,” Sarah exults. “It’s paradise.” —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE

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DISCOVERIES restoration 1

1. CHERUBIM-FILLED CEILING MURALS DECORATE THE OPULENT 1,600-SEAT AUDITORIUM. 2. CUSTOM-MADE CARPET IN A HISTORIC PATTERN COVERS THE PROMENADE LOBBY STAIRCASE.

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SINCE OPENING IN 1900, Boston’s Emerson Colonial Theatre has launched some of America’s most-beloved musicals, from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! to Sondheim’s Follies. And for decades it had an interior to match. Conceived by architect Clarence H. Blackall and designer Henry Barrett Pennell, the theater brought the best of Baroque Europe under one roof, reproducing elements of Versailles and the Louvre. But by the time Ambassador Theatre Group (ATG) won its management in 2017, trend-based renovations had altered Blackall’s intent. “We had to revive that feeling of grandeur,” reflects David Manfredi of Elkus Manfredi Architects, which collaborated with ATG and a team of artisans on a two-year restoration. The results debuted June 27 with the premiere of Moulin Rouge! The Musical. Orchestra seating was replaced, carpet custom-made, gilding refreshed, and hand-stenciled walls returned to their original teal color. Backstage, a new grid system allows for expanded event programming. And theatergoers can now mingle in a glamorous orchestra bar, once the ladies’ lounge. As general manager Erica Lynn Schwartz explains, “Modern conveniences bring us into the next century.” emersoncolonialtheatre.com —ELIZABETH FAZZARE


Martyn Thompson believes in Perennials His pet peeve is a rug that can’t handle pets plus UV rays, stains and mildew Mr. Thompson shown atop his Perennials Splash rug in Mustard colorway I perennialsrugs.com


DISCOVERIES debut 2

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The Next Big Things Design trio Charlap Hyman & Herrero continues down the path to greatness with its first collection of rugs, wallpapers, and fabric

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hen the design studio Charlap Hyman & Herrero approached Patterson Flynn Martin last year, all they had in mind was a single rug for a residential project. But Dara Caponigro—creative director of F. Schumacher & Co., the carpet company’s parent brand—loved the young firm’s energy and asked for more. What was originally meant to be a capsule collection quickly expanded into seven rugs and seven wallpaper patterns, three available as fabrics. “We got to do so many things,” exclaims Adam Charlap Hyman, who

cofounded the interdisciplinary studio with Andre Herrero in 2014. (Adam’s younger brother, Alexander, joined their ranks a year later.) Adds Adam, still in a state of disbelief: “It was crazy.” We’d call it shrewd on Schumacher’s part. Wise beyond their 20-something years, Adam, Andre, and Alexander have quickly found themselves on the fast track to success, eschewing Pinterest design tropes in favor of a deeply scholarly approach. Indeed, embedded among the firm’s playful new fabrics are a range of historical references. Intertwining snakes reinterpret 17th-century drawings by Albertus Seba. Clouds and arrows nod to Gio Ponti ceramics, pinned insect specimens to Carlo Mollino. And pigeons pay homage to the wallpaper that Adam noticed in portraits of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas. The firm’s woven-abaca carpets for Patterson Flynn Martin, meanwhile, take inspiration from Alexander Calder tapestries, albeit incorporating bold figurative imagery—astrological symbols, more snakes and arrows, a crocodile. “This is only a fraction of what we were thinking about,” says Adam, noting that his mother, the artist Pilar Almon, collaborated on the myriad motifs. “Our ideas come from all different places.”

P HOTOGRAP HY BY M ART I EN M U LD ER

S T YLED BY ROBERT S U M R E L L

GROOMING BY MARY GUTHRIE USING V76 BY VAUGHN FOR ARTISTS BY TIMOTHY PRIANO; 2. COURTESY OF PATTERSON FLYNN MARTIN

1. ALEXANDER CHARLAP HYMAN (FAR LEFT), ANDRE HERRERO (CENTER), AND ADAM CHARLAP HYMAN WITH SOME OF THEIR NEW DESIGNS FOR F. SCHUMACHER & CO. AND PATTERSON FLYNN MARTIN. 2. THE PROVERBIO COILED-ABACA RUG.


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DISCOVERIES debut 2

1. MERCURIO WALLPAPER AND A MODEL FOR A HOUSE. 2. ENDIMIONE, ANOTHER PATTERN. 3. THE TEAM’S CAIMAN RUG. 4. A SURREALISTIC CHAIR BY ADAM STANDS ON AN ASTROLOGIA RUG. 5. DIANA WALLPAPER.

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and Alexander remain based in New York.) If Charlap Hyman & Herrero’s bicoastal arrangement and unique creative process— with Andre taking the lead on architecture, Adam interiors, and Alexander business strategy— strike some as unorthodox, for them it makes perfect sense. “We are very different people, but at the root level we agree on a direction, even if we don’t fully know what it is,” says Andre. As Adam explains, “Andre brings his references; I bring mine. We are constantly surprising each other.” ch-herrero.com —SAM COCHRAN

1. & 4. MARTIEN MULDER; 2. & 5. COURTESY OF F. SCHUMACHER & CO.; 3. COURTESY OF PATTERSON FLYNN MARTIN

That the collection should evolve rapidly and by chance is only in keeping with the firm’s origins. Adam and Andre first met at the Rhode Island School of Design, where the two admired each other’s work from a distance. They eventually struck up a friendship when Adam, who studied furniture, commissioned Andre, an architecture student, to photograph his Providence apartment. Coincidentally, after graduating, they ended up collaborating on the same New York townhouse—Adam as interior designer, Andre as project architect for the architecture studio SO-IL. When the duo caught wind that Salon 94 was looking to renovate its Bowery gallery, they decided to go after the project, nabbing the job and opening their own practice. Word has since traveled quickly, particularly through the art world, attracting clients like gallerists Tina Kim, Nina Johnson, and Leila Heller. Today their projects range from opera sets to ground-up houses. “Things for us just somehow snowballed,” notes Andre, who has effectively doubled the firm’s reach since moving to Los Angeles two years ago. (Adam


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DISCOVERIES inspiration ITINERARY

Marrakech SEE

To soak up Moorish inspiration of your own, follow in Van Cleef’s footsteps to the 16th-century El Badi Palace ruins, the tiled courtyard at the 19th-century Bahia Palace, or the muqarnas at the 14th-century Islamic college Ben Youssef Madrasa. For some fashion history, visit the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech and adjacent Majorelle Garden. Then stop and smell the roses over lunch at Beldi Country Club. STAY

Moor Is More Van Cleef & Arpels heads to Marrakech to celebrate the latest additions to its Alhambra collection

SHOP

Before braving the souks, book the design world’s go-to guide Mustapha Chouquir (mustapha chouquir.com). He’ll lead you to Palais Saâdiens for rugs, Au Fil d’Or for custom caftans, Chabi Chic for fresh takes on traditional ceramics, and Palais de la Ménara for Moroccan furnishings. Discover more of Marrakech on a one-of-a kind design tour with AD this October. For details, visit indagare.com/AD.

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1. BEN YOUSSEF MADRASA IN MARRAKECH. 2. A NEW ALHAMBRA NECKLACE BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS.

THE SPA AT THE ROYAL MANSOUR HOTEL.

1. JUERGEN RITTERBACH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; 2. COURTESY OF VAN CLEEF & ARPELS; BOTTOM RIGHT: JESSICA SAMPLE

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Get a taste of local flavor at La Mamounia (mamounia.com), decorated by Jacques Garcia, or El Fenn (el-fenn.com), Vanessa Branson and Howell James’s stylish riad at the edge of the medina. For a riad all to yourself, head to King Mohammed VI’s pride and joy, the Royal Mansour (royal mansour.com), where guests are pampered with the absolute best of Moroccan hospitality and craft in 53 private residences.


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DISCOVERIES

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THE LIBRARY AT PORTUGAL’S PALACE OF MAFRA, ONE OF 55 PLACES THAT APPEAR IN MASSIMO LISTRI’S NEW BOOK (RIGHT).

FOR NEARLY 30 YEARS the Florencebased photographer Massimo Listri has had his nose in a book, traveling throughout Europe—and beyond—to document some of the most extraordinary libraries. In Dublin, he visited the barrel-vaulted Long Room at Trinity College, home to 200,000-plus rare volumes, among them the Book of Kells; in Rome, he documented the sprawling Vatican Apostolic Library, with its epic corridors, lavish frescoes, and ornate floors; and in Bavaria, he snapped the shelves at Metten Abbey, a baroque stunner adorned by wedding-cake carvings. These extraordinary places and many, many more appear in Listri’s new tome The World’s Most Beautiful Libraries (Taschen, $200), a musthave for bibliophiles, architecture lovers, and armchair travelers alike. —SAM COCHRAN

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1.–6. COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES; BOTTOM: MASSIMO LISTRI/TASCHEN (2)

Shelf Life


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Selecting the right paint for your space can be challenging. You want it to be the right hue, accentuate your decor, and bring the room to life, making a strong design statement. Benjamin Moore has a longstanding reputation for creating highquality, premium paints. So it was no surprise when they debuted the innovative Century collection. This proprietary paint portfolio of 75 shades is unlike any on the market today. Five years in the making, it was envisioned by Benjamin Moore’s renowned Color & Design team and is created through a bespoke manufacturing process, and is therefore sold in sought-after small batches. Its soft touch matte finish creates a texture on walls that is akin to a fine leather glove—velvety, supple, and simply luxurious. This textural effect adds a bold richness to the color that is not possible with other paints. In the living room seen here, luxurious Century Cobalt was applied to walls, showing how the unique finish of this new paint can add a depth and vividness to any space—solidifying the Century collection as the newest, unrivaled design accessory on the market.

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BOLD TO THE SIGHT. SOFT TO THE TOUCH. century is the first-ever soft touch matte finish paint, made in small batches by master craftsmen. its unique texture, similar to a soft leather glove, produces 75 never-before-seen colors, each with unprecedented depth and richness. it ’ s a difference you can see, touch and feel. that ’ s proudly particular. go to experiencecentury.com ©2018 Benjamin Moore & Co. Benjamin Moore, Century, Paint like no other, and the triangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks licensed to Benjamin Moore & Co.

red mahogany c 9


DISCOVERIES gardens

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Flock Star At home in the Hudson Valley, Christopher Spitzmiller builds an elegant dovecote for his Indian fantail pigeons 2

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tanding in New Orleans’s Jackson Square and feeding pigeons cracked corn is one of Christopher Spitzmiller’s favorite childhood memories. “They would fly up and perch on your hand,” recalls the acclaimed ceramic artist, designer of must-have custom-made lamps and tableware. “It was better than Disney World.” At Clove Brook Farm, Spitzmiller’s home in New York’s Hudson Valley, that reminiscence has been reconstituted, thanks to the dovecote he recently constructed at the center of a parterre that brims, depending on the season, with tulips, sweet peas, and dahlias. It was modeled after the whimsical octagonal “martini houses” at P. Allen Smith’s Arkansas home— the garden guru is a longtime friend—and punctuates Spitzmiller’s landscape like an ornamental lantern. Recycled elements, such as vintage windows found on the side of a country road and floorboards

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1. CHRISTOPHER SPITZMILLER’S LABRADOR RETRIEVER, LYON, STANDS BESIDE THE CERAMIST’S NEW DOVECOTE. 2. THE MAN OF THE HOUSE, JOINED BY ONE OF HIS LIGHT SUSSEX CHICKENS.

P HOTOGRAP HY BY RI C HARD P OW ERS S T YLED BY ANI TA S A R S I DI


DISCOVERIES salvaged from an old barn on the property, give the dovecote a venerable attitude. “You have to integrate old things, so a building doesn’t look brand-new,” he notes. Crowning the hipped roof is another vintage find: a lead sculpture that depicts a pigeon taking flight. It’s usually joined by the real thing, namely some of Spitzmiller’s 16 Indian fantails, fancy strutters shimmering with purple, bronze, and turquoise-blue feathers. The lowly rock pigeons of Jackson Square days they’re not. Martha Stewart directed Spitzmiller to Duke Riley, the artist behind Brooklyn’s 2016 “Fly by Night” extravaganza, where 2,000 trained pigeons, equipped with LED-lit leg bands, sparkled in the night sky. Riley supplied Spitzmiller with his first birds; others were sourced from a North Carolina breeder. “Indian fantails are the standard poodle of the pigeon world,” Spitzmiller explains, though he adds that those subcontinental exotics adored by maharajas have one attribute shared by all members of the Columbidae family. “Their cooing is heaven,” he exults. “It’s the best soundtrack ever.” christopherspitzmiller.com —MITCHELL OWENS

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FOUNTAIN LAMP (2018).

“Indian fantails are the standard poodle of the pigeon world.” —Spitzmıller

ONE TO WATCH

DOVES PERCH AND PREEN ON A TREE TRUNK THAT RISES INSIDE THE OCTAGONAL FOLLY.

“PROCESS, PROCESS, PROCESS,” repeats artistdesigner Joseph Algieri during a visit to his Brooklyn studio—a Technicolor space of just 120 square feet, where wild material experiments unfold. Mirrors are doodled with resin, tiles frosted with grout and stacked into chunky tables, and bulbous lamps coated in goopy foam. Each piece offers a study in trial and error. “I make several iterations of everything,” he explains. “I might map out my tooling at the dollar store or Home Depot, but if they don’t have what I need, I’ll make it.” He’s not kidding. That thrift-store milkshake mixer on his shelf? Algieri uses it to whip resin and a binding agent into thick paste that he can squeeze out of a pastry bag, squiggling it onto reclaimed mirrors. That lamp on his desk? He created it (his first piece of lighting) by pouring soft SmoothOn foam over a papier-mâché mold of a traffic cone he purchased on Craigslist. Since then, his work has found many admirers in the design community, including Voutsa’s George Venson, for whom Algieri made a cactus-shaped fixture, and Fernando Mastrangelo, who included two towering versions of that lamp in a group show at his East New York studio last September. His latest experiment? Fruity Pebbles–like foam forms assembled into a chair. Says Algieri: “I start with a really simple shape and build upon it—until it loses that simplicity.” josephalgieri.com —HANNAH MARTIN

P ORT RAI T BY AM Y LO M B A R D

LAMP: COURTESY OF JOSEPH ALGIERI

Joseph Algieri


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PRO M OTI O N

DINING byDESIGN In March, DIFFA: Design Industries

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organizations nationwide. The 2018 event brought together more than 40,000 guests to experience an array of themed dining installations by more than 30 designers, architects, manufacturers, and brands. Participants had two days to transform a 30,000-square-foot space into an immersive installation, infusing bold colors, eye-catching materials, and powerful messaging into their individual dining vignettes. 2

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craftsmanship by talented artisans worldwide. Hand-forged iron and wood-crafted choices range from historic reproductions of fine European antiques to highly creative modern designs. Many elegant, in-stock selections are available to satisfy specific design solutions and for expedited shipping. KingsHaven’s extensive options for lighting and furnishings include made-to-measure sizes, bespoke finishes, and fully custom designs. KingsHaven’s enduring perspective is focused upon the thoughtful style blending of old and new, spanning both curated and created offerings of eye-catching beauty and hand-chosen quality. Learn more at KingsHaven.com or call 844-546-4799

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THIS IS HO


ME

Mandy Moore’s Pasadena house is a testament to the actress/ singer’s confidence, warmth, and passion for design

TEXT BY

MAYER RUS PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TREVOR TONDRO STYLED BY

LAWREN HOWELL

IN THE FRONT ROOM, VELVET ARMCHAIRS BY MERCER41 AND A BENCH BY KENIAN SURROUND ROSE GOLD COCKTAIL TABLES BY STATEMENTS BY J. VASE FROM HARBINGER; LANGLEY STREET FLOOR LAMP; BUNGALOW ROSE RUG. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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Today Moore is singing an entirely different song. She recently wrapped shooting on the third season of her smash television show. She’s engaged to Taylor Goldsmith of the indie rock band Dawes. And the dazzling home she created for herself, her future husband, and their dogs, Joni (as in Mitchell) and Jackson, is nothing short of a declaration of independence. “This house signifies the next chapter of my life—as an adult, a woman, and a performer. I was able to pour all of who I am into making this place,” she says proudly. After searching for nearly a year, Moore and Goldsmith found the perfect spot to begin their life together, high atop a Pasadena hill, in a classic 1950s home with sweeping vistas of the San Gabriel mountains and valley. The house was designed by Harold B. Zook, a notable but lesser-known architect who worked with modernist maestro Albert Frey in Palm Springs before hanging his shingle in Pasadena.

HAIR BY ASHLEY STREICHER USING GARNIER FOR TRACEYMATTINGLY.COM; MAKEUP BY JENN STREICHER FOR TRACEYMATTINGLY.COM

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ven in a town as youth-obsessed as Hollywood, a little maturity has its own compensations. Just ask Mandy Moore. The star of the NBC family drama This Is Us rose to fame as a singer in 1999, at the tender age of 15, with her debut single, “Candy.” She played her first starring role on the big screen in A Walk to Remember in 2002. That same year Moore bought a “starter” home, a five-bedroom Mediterranean-style spread in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Los Feliz. “I lived there for 15 years, and even though the house went through several iterations, it never felt wholly mine,” she says. “I bought it when I was 18. I really didn’t know myself, and I never felt secure enough to bring a lot of people there.”


FROM FAR LEFT MOORE IN A JONATHAN COHEN DRESS; FASHION STYLING BY CRISTINA EHRLICH. IN THE FAMILY ROOM, A CB2 VASE ACCENTS A CUSTOM TERRAZZO SHELF BY EMILY FARNHAM ARCHITECTURE; VINTAGE BENCH IN A FABRICUT VELVET. A BRASS SUSPENSION LIGHT BY LAMBERT & FILS HANGS OVER THE KITCHEN TABLE; VASES FROM HARBINGER.

“This house signifies the next chapter of my life—as an adult, a woman, and a performer.”


LEFT JASPER MORRISON COUNTER STOOLS FROM DESIGN WITHIN REACH ARE TUCKED UNDER THE KITCHEN’S CALACATTA-MARBLE ISLAND. PENDANTS BY CEDAR & MOSS; MARK CHURCHILL VASES AND BOWL; WOLF GAS RANGE. OPPOSITE ABOVE THE POOL AREA WAS REDESIGNED BY TERREMOTO. OPPOSITE BELOW THE FRONTROOM FIREPLACE RETAINS ITS ORIGINAL COPPER HOOD (NOW RESTORED).


“We fell in love with the views, the pool, the yard, basically the whole energy of the place,” Moore recalls. Although the bones of the structure were fairly intact, additions and interior emendations implemented in the early 1990s obscured the structure’s spruce modern lines and quintessential midcentury vibe. “We wanted to recapture the home’s original spirit without delving into a slavish period restoration. We tried to imagine what Zook would have done if he were designing it today,” Moore explains. To that end, the actress assembled a formidable team including architect Emily Farnham, interior designer Sarah Sherman Samuel, and Terremoto landscape designers, all of whom worked in close collaboration from the outset of the project. “We looked at the house and realized that we could bring it back with some basic subtraction, as opposed to a complete gut renovation,” Farnham says, referring to dated surface treatments, dark oak built-ins, and, most significant, a pair of semicircular volumes attached to the kitchen and master bath. “The rounded forms made no sense with all the taut, rectilinear lines. We had to shave those warts off,” the architect explains. With Zook’s original drawings in hand, Farnham rebuilt the tiered, streamlined cornice that zigs and zags along the roofline—a signature detail that had

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ABOVE MOORE, IN AN ULLA JOHNSON DRESS, AND GOLDSMITH WITH DOGS JONI AND JACKSON IN THE MASTER BEDROOM. ABOVE BED, MACRAMÉ ARTWORK BY SALLY ENGLAND; CUSTOM BUILT-IN BED BY SARAH SHERMAN SAMUEL IN A FABRICUT VELVET; BENCH BY KATY SKELTON; LIGHTING BY CEDAR & MOSS.

been replaced at some point with a decidedly less elegant alternative. She also restored and updated the blond brick walls, floors, and fireplace surround, as well as the brawny copper fireplace hood that separates the living and dining rooms. Newly installed white terrazzo floors provide a subtly luminous foundation for the revitalized interiors. “Terrazzo is a dying art, costly and laborious, but so worth it,” Moore insists. Like most aspects of the renovation, the terrazzo treatments were a group effort: Samuel designed the jaunty pattern of triangulated brass inlays in the floor of a guest bathroom, while Farnham obsessed over the specific stone aggregate for the hefty fireplace ledge in the family room. Samuel’s decor is a toothsome olio of vintage and contemporary, high and low, feminine and masculine. “The interiors don’t feel like they’re lost in time. There are plenty of nods to the ’50s, but there are also lots of pieces that just read as fresh, organic, and modern,” the decorator says. For Moore, the look is simply light, bright, and easy. “I don’t have a great attachment to material things,” she says. “The furniture we chose feels in line with the architecture,

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but there’s nothing so precious that a little wear and tear from kids or dogs would be a calamity.” As for Goldsmith’s contributions to the project, Moore claims her fiancé largely deferred to her and the design team: “Taylor was as involved as he wanted to be. He had opinions about certain things, but his only real demands were for bookshelves— he’s a voracious reader—and room for a baby grand piano and a turntable.” Farnham obliged by converting the ungainly hallway to the master bedroom into a proper library and lounge, with chunky bookshelves that appear to be voids carved out of monolithic volumes rather than wall-mounted surfaces assembled from a kit of parts. The piano and record player have pride of place in the living room. Surveying her domain, Moore confesses to having become slightly addicted to the design process. “It still amazes me. We saw the potential of this house and brought it back to life. It’s hard to convey the excitement of working out every detail, from picking slabs at the stone yard to figuring out how many burners we wanted for the stove,” she explains. “Once you realize that you can actually build your true dream house, it’s hard to go back to anything else.”


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT THE MASTER BATH FEATURES AN AQUATICA FREESTANDING TUB. IN ANOTHER BATH, A CUSTOM BRASS FLOOR INLAY IS SET IN TERRAZZO; VOLAKAS MARBLE-TOPPED VANITY. A PAIR OF ARMCHAIRS

BY ANTHROPOLOGIE FACE A TABLE BY SARAH SHERMAN SAMUEL IN THE FAMILY ROOM. ★ EXCLUSIVE VIDEO MANDY MOORE AT HOME, ARCHDIGEST.COM.


TAZARINE WOOL RUG; $800. ABCHOME.COM SONJA ACCENT CHAIR BY KIM SALMELA; $1,695. ONEKINGSLANE.COM

NEWPORT FABRIC IN PINK; TO THE TRADE. FABRICUT.COM

NOTTINGHAM VELVET IN WHISKEY; TO THE TRADE. STROHEIM.COM CURVE GOLD SIDE TABLE; $399. CB2.COM

The house has a lot of feminine touches, but there are nods to a more masculine aesthetic.” —Sarah Sherman Samuel

INTERIORS: TREVOR TONDRO; PAINT: PAUL ARMBRUSTER; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

ANOTHER VIEW OF THE FRONT ROOM.

COLLINS LEATHER BENCH; $1,298. SERENAANDLILY.COM

MIZZLE NO. 266 PAINT; $110 PER GALLON. FARROW-BALL.COM

BIG BOWLS IN DAYBREAK; $52 FOR A SET OF FOUR. YEARANDDAY.COM

P ROD U C ED BY M AD ELI NE O ’ M A L L E Y


TIMES BED IN PELLE FRAU LEATHER; FROM $5,060. POLTRONA FRAU.COM

GLASS GLOBE PENDANT BY RUDI NIJSSEN AND DOMINIQUE SENTE FOR RH MODERN; FROM $371. RHMODERN.COM

LETO VASE; FROM $900. HEATHER ROSENMAN.COM VESTA VASE IN MIAMI VICE ORACLE; $240. CONCRETECAT.COM

A BED BY ANTHROPOLOGIE IN A GUEST BEDROOM.

LUCA COCKTAIL TABLE; $1,980. STATEMENTSBYJ.COM

MARMOREAL MARBLE BY MAX LAMB FOR DZEK; PRICE UPON REQUEST. DZEK DZEKDZEK.COM

1970s UPHOLSTERED WATERFALL BENCH; SIMILAR AVAILABLE. 1STDIBS.COM

CALACATTA MARBLE FORMS THE COUNTERTOP AND BACKSPLASH IN THE KITCHEN. ROHL SINK FITTINGS. $405.

the faint of heart

—Emily Farnham


harmonic convergence An A-team of top design talents comes together to create a romantic Hamptons escape for one very discerning client

TEXT BY DAN SHAW DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN STYLED BY ANITA SARSIDI

CHUCK CLOSE, COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY; © 2018 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

THE LIVING ROOM INCLUDES ARTWORKS BY HEIMO ZOBERNIG (LEFT) AND PICASSO. (CHUCK CLOSE’S PORTRAIT OF PHILIP GLASS CAN BE SEEN

IN THE FOYER.) JOHN ROSSELLI CHANDELIER; 18TH-CENTURY MIRROR; JONAS SOFAS IN A LE MANACH COTTON. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


M ary Ann Tighe will gladly tell you that she wasn’t to the manner born. “I’m a girl from the Bronx,” says the powerhouse New York commercial real-estate broker, who recently built a country manor dubbed Hollyhock with her husband, Dr. David Hidalgo, on four acres near the ocean in Southampton, New York. Located on the site of a former estate known as Red Maples, the new house has historical antecedents: The stucco exterior and Mission-tile roof allude to the original 1908 villa that was razed in the 1940s; the signature interior features were inspired by the iconic mansions that architect David Adler built in Chicago’s lakefront suburbs in the 1920s and 1930s. Sitting in the 55-foot-long, three-bay, pine-paneled library that was inspired by an Adler design, Tighe pulls out books on the architect and his sister, decorator Frances Elkins. “I forget where I saw it first, but I have always remembered it,” says Tighe, finding the pages with photographs of the library as well as the grand black-and-white marble foyer with an elliptical staircase (an Adler adaptation of a design by John Russell Pope), which she asked architect Michael Dwyer to duplicate. “This is a souped-up version of that library,” says Dwyer, who traveled with Tighe to Lake Forest, Illinois, to tour some of Adler’s houses. “Mary Ann wanted 14-foot ceilings, and we wanted to get the proportions right.”

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ABOVE IN THE PINE-PANELED LIBRARY, A PENNY MORRISON LINEN COVERS THE JONAS ARMCHAIR, OTTOMAN, AND SOFA. ENGLISH MAHOGANY CANED CHAIR WITH CUSHION OF A STRIPED COTTON BY JED JOHNSON HOME. OPPOSITE THE HOUSE’S STUCCO EXTERIOR AND TILE ROOF ALLUDE TO AN EARLIER HOME ON THE PROPERTY.


LEFT THE CURVING STAIRCASE WAS INSPIRED BY A DAVID ADLER ADAPTATION OF A DESIGN BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE. BELOW TIGHE AND HER GRANDSON IN THE GARDEN. OPPOSITE A 19THCENTURY WALLPAPER COVERS THE DINING ROOM. MURANO CHANDELIER; CIRCA-1920 CHAIRS IN A COWTAN & TOUT FABRIC.


As CEO for the New York tristate region of the global realestate firm CBRE, Tighe is a professional matchmaker who brings together commercial landlords and high-profile anchor tenants. (She brokered the deal that brought AD’s parent company, Condé Nast, to its current One World Trade Center address.) When she assembled the team for her home—Dwyer, AD100 decorator Bunny Williams, landscape architect Quincy Hammond, and builder Frank Cafone—she had them collaborate on a new guesthouse first to make sure they worked well together under her direction. Tighe is a virtuoso dealmaker, but she doesn’t consider it an art form. Trained as an art historian, she worked in the White House as an arts adviser for vice president Walter Mondale and his wife, Joan, and then served as deputy chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1978 to 1981. She left Washington, D.C., to join her husband in New York, where he

was beginning his career as a plastic surgeon. She went to work for ABC to launch a cultural cable channel that would eventually become A&E, then became a broker in the mid-1980s. Tighe was drawn to Williams, the grande dame of New York’s decorating establishment, because they are cut from the same cloth. “Bunny’s a businesswoman, and I knew she would operate meticulously and efficiently,” says Tighe. “She’s enormously practical. She’s a problem solver, and comfort is as important to her as beauty and elegance. She asks good questions: ‘Do you have a dog? Grandchildren? Do you have houseguests? Do you eat in the kitchen?’ ” (Yes. Yes. Occasionally. No.) In fact, Tighe and her husband never eat in the kitchen. “They eat in the dining room even if it’s just the two of them,” says Williams, explaining why she designed a relatively small dining table for the grand space with rare 19th-century handpainted Chinese wallpaper panels set into the boiserie.

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trademark mix of well-bred antiques, the space is cheerfully chic but not cloying. Williams distilled the colors of the sky and gardens for the adjacent master suite with custom Peter Fasano blue-andgreen-striped fabric for the walls and curtains and romantic floral linen from Lee Jofa for the upholstered bed. Tighe is especially fond of the ethereal lavender walls in her dressing room, where her grandson likes to sit on the chaise longue and chat with her when he isn’t playing in his toy-filled bedroom. The tour of the property continues outside as Tighe strolls over to the two-bedroom guesthouse where she and her husband lived while the new house was being built. She passes the swimming pool to the back of the property where a newly built freestanding four-car garage containing some of her husband’s collection of 1960s sports cars is shaded by century-old trees. As she returns through a parterre garden to the motor court at the entrance to the main house, it’s obvious that one of the best deals she’s ever put together was brokering the harmonious partnership of Dwyer, Williams, Hammond, and Cafone. As Williams says, “Mary Ann was the orchestrator, and we were the players who produced the symphony.”

© 2018 THE WILLEM DE KOONING FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; © 2018 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

(“There’s a top that can be put on the table if she has a large dinner party,” notes Williams.) The dining room is connected to the kitchen by a handsome blue-gray-paneled butler’s pantry, which is stocked with an extensive assortment of china and linens. “I love setting the table because I was deprived of dishes in my childhood,” says Tighe. Williams and her associate Elizabeth Swartz embraced Tighe’s directions for the living room that overlooks an emerald lawn. “Mary Ann had seen Pride & Prejudice on television and saw blue walls that she wanted us to replicate,” says Swartz. “We took screenshots of it, but the color was different from every angle, so it took a long time to get it right.” The rich watery blue is the perfect backdrop for a large canvas by Abstract Expressionist Joan Mitchell that dominates one end of the room. “The painting really pops against the colored wall,” says Williams. The use of color throughout the house is precisely modulated. “You need to know when to stop so the rooms aren’t overdone,” says Williams. “You need to think of balance.” On the second floor, a cream-colored hall leads to the massive upstairs sitting room with bracing sunset-pink walls. Furnished with sofas upholstered in muted floral chintz and Williams’s


“You need to know when to stop so the rooms aren’t overdone,” says designer Bunny Wılliams. “You need to think of balance.” RIGHT A CUSTOM WALL COVERING BY ZINA STUDIOS WRAPS THE GUESTHOUSE POWDER ROOM. ANTIQUE MIRROR; VINTAGE PENDANT. BELOW IN THE MASTER SITTING ROOM, A PICASSO LINOCUT HANGS OVER THE 19TH-CENTURY MANTEL. LOUIS XVI VOYEUSE. OPPOSITE STRIPES MEET FLORALS IN THE MASTER BEDROOM.


design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

A DONALD KAUFMAN COLOR PAINT DEFINES THE PANTRY.

BLUE GARDEN DINNER PLATE; $175. HEREND

JARDIN MIRROR; $1,400. BUNNY WILLIAMSHOME.COM

STAR ANDIRONS (SOLD AS A PAIR) BY JOHN LYLE DESIGN; TO THE TRADE. HOLLYHUNT.COM

LUCY’S ROSES HANDBLOCK LINEN; TO THE TRADE. CLARENCEHOUSE.COM

the architecture

Bunny Williams notes.

CENTRE OF ATTENTION TABLE; $2,500. THEODOREALEXANDER.COM

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ST. LAURENT DESIGN ON EDO TURQUOISE PAINTED SILK; $1,843 PER PANEL. DEGOURNAY.COM

PARLOUR OTTOMAN IN CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY; TO THE TRADE. NATHANANTHONYFURNITURE.COM

P ROD U C ED BY M AD ELI NE O ’ M A L L E Y


SPANISH GRAY-AND-WHITE MARBLE SELECT FLOORING; PRICE UPON REQUEST. PARISCERAMICSUSA.COM

HALLEN RUG IN SILVER, BLACK, AND GRAY; PRICE UPON REQUEST. STARKSTUDIORUGS.COM

CÀ BRAGADIN CHANDELIER BY STRIULLI VETRI D’ARTE; $8,490. ARTEMEST.COM

PHIL III BY CHUCK CLOSE, 1982. HANDMADE BLACK PAPER, PRESS DRIED. BOOK ROOM RED NO. 50 PAINT; $110 PER GALLON. FARROW-BALL.COM

STRIPES, FLORALS, AND PLAID UNITE IN A GUESTHOUSE BEDROOM.

CHAMPLAIN SECRETARY BY DARRYL CARTER FOR MILLING ROAD; TO THE TRADE. BAKER FURNITURE.COM

GOLD SUNBURST MIRROR; $179. ONEKINGS LANE.COM

Wonderful chintz can be hard to find these days,” Williams observes. “It’s ready for a comeback.” AR C H DI G E S T. CO M

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squad goals


With the help of Christoff:Finio Architecture, a young famıly takes a giant leap of faith and builds their dream house on New York’s Shelter Island SAM COCHRAN CHRISTOPHER STURMAN STYLED BY MARTIN BOURNE

TEXT BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TAYLOR ANTRIM LEADS HIS CHILDREN, VIVIAN AND WILLIAM, TO THE POOL AT THE FAMILY’S HOME ON SHELTER ISLAND, NEW YORK. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


“We gravitate toward people who really engage and want to create something authentic to how they live.” —Martin Finio


A THOMAS JACKSON PHOTOGRAPH IS GIVEN PRIDE OF PLACE IN THE OPEN LIVING/ DINING ROOM, WHERE AN EXPOSED CEDAR CEILING COMPLEMENTS A WALL OF RECLAIMED BARNWOOD. PENDANT LIGHT BY JASPER MORRISON FOR FLOS.


i

t’s 8 p.m. on Shelter Island, and for Vivian and William Antrim, ages six and three, that means bedtime. But first, a dance party. “One song,” warns their father, Taylor, cuing the music. Tiny fists start pumping and little hips begin to shake as the kids recognize a favorite tune—Kelly Clarkson’s “Since U Been Gone.” “Thanks to youuu, now I gettt, what I wannnt,” Vivian bellows, sashaying across the broad window seat, her podium for the evening. Taylor and his wife, Liz Twitchell, didn’t have a stage in mind when they decided to build in this mellow community, tucked between Long Island’s North and South Forks. But in many ways their house has been a happy accident. “None of this was planned,” recalls Liz, a Manhattan high school English teacher. “We weren’t even looking until we came here.” Six years ago, the couple fell in love with Shelter Island’s low-key charms while staying at the home of a friend, design writer Sarah Medford, who had built from the ground up. That approach stayed in their heads as they looked at houses for sale, none of which appealed. When they visited a sunny parcel, empty save for an old barn, they instantly felt a connection. A week later it was theirs. “We acted very quickly,” says Liz. “The whole thing felt like a fever dream.” To design a house, the couple enlisted Christoff:Finio Architecture, whose modernist rigor Taylor, now the executive editor of Vogue, had come to admire while working at AD. “We thought they were more architect than we could afford,” he remembers, uncertain at the time that the firm would take on a modest dwelling on a budget. But their first meeting with husband-and-wife duo Martin Finio and Taryn Christoff proved jolly—everyone teasing their respective spouses and bonding over a shared love of the island, where the architects had gotten married. “For us it’s never about the size of a project; it’s about the clients,” says Martin. “We gravitate toward people who really engage and want to create something authentic to how they live.” Liz and Taylor had their hearts set on a modern house, with wood construction and visual links to the landscape. Beyond that, everything was open for discussion. There was the choice of one story or two, which was resolved after Martin built an elevated platform that revealed only a sliver of water views. The question of where to situate the house, meanwhile, was answered one afternoon when he spontaneously drove from Manhattan to Shelter Island, walking the property until inspiration struck. By stretching the house lengthwise on the long plot, with the structure’s back to nearby neighbors, he realized, he could orient it toward the surrounding

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woodlands while maximizing privacy. “Martin figured something out that we would never have been able to do on our own,” says Taylor. The design process lasted several months, as one idea evolved into the next. A compound of discrete volumes gave way to a single massing with dramatic light monitors, which in turn gave way to a peaked roofline. When Taylor and Liz floated the prospect of just a simple box, the architects came back with the winning proposal—three pavilions, all single-story except for an upstairs lounge that pops through the flat roof. Bedrooms connect to living areas via a glassenclosed walkway; living areas in turn open onto a covered deck that leads to the guest pod, with an indoor/outdoor bathroom that doubles as a kind of poolhouse. “We created a gathering area for people to meet, plus private zones for visitors and family,” explains Taryn, adding that since both indoor and outdoor rooms are crowned with one shared roof, “a smallish home presents itself as much bigger.”


LEFT WALLPAPER BY HANNA WERNING FOR BORÅSTAPETER ACCENTS WILLIAM’S BEDROOM. BELOW LINED IN FIRECLAY TILE, THE MASTER BATH HAS A CUSTOM SHOWER. PENDANTS BY BEGA. OPPOSITE A CHAISE LONGUE BY CB2 SITS POOLSIDE.

Construction is never without its freak-outs. After the house had been framed, Liz suddenly panicked that the ceiling, slightly lowered to cut costs, felt claustrophobic. “I thought it was going be too Being John Malkovich in there, all 7½ floor,” she jokes. A frantic email to Taryn and Martin followed. “Martin’s response was so staggeringly perfect,” Taylor remembers. “He said, ‘No problem at all. Ceiling perfect. You’re gonna love it.’ And he was right. They were right about everything.” As, for that matter, was their contractor, Maude Adams of Artisan Construction Assoc., who realized the architects’ plan with precision. Three summers in, family rhythms have molded to the house. The long march that is a summer day with kids begins early, Vivian and William rising with the sun. Hours float by as the family migrates from the kitchen to the living area to the deck to the pool—with excursions to farmers’ markets and beaches or picnics aboard their motorboat,

The Antrim Family Presents: Robot Sparkle. (“We let Vivian name it,” Taylor notes.) In the evenings, the children get to watch a show upstairs while dad barbecues outside and mom steals a quiet moment to read, reclining on the window seat. “I just wanted the house to be great for them,” reflects Taryn, who chose the furnishings, a mix of vintage finds and budget-friendly modern furnishings. “It was truly a labor of love.” By bedtime, the family has enjoyed but somehow never exhausted the whole house, its clever floor plan keeping cabin fever at bay. “There’s no space that doesn’t get used,” says Taylor. “We rotate through the rooms.” For Liz, that momentary panic about ceiling heights has long dissipated into domestic bliss. “When we’re in the house, I really feel like this is how I wanted it to be,” she says. “There’s never a moment when I think, What a weird decision.” At that, she pauses and laughs. “I guess that’s because we made all the decisions.”


“A smallish house presents itself as much bigger.” —Taryn Christoff 86

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HAIR AND MAKEUP BY MARY GUTHRIE USING KÉRASTASE PARIS COUTURE STYLING, M.A.C., AND BECCA COSMETICS FOR ARTISTS BY TIMOTHY PRIANO

ABOVE LIZ AND TAYLOR GATHER WITH THE KIDS IN THE KITCHEN. STOOLS BY MASH STUDIOS; RANGE BY DACOR; HOOD BY BEST. BELOW STRETCHED ALONG ITS NARROW PLOT, THE CEDAR-CLAD HOUSE IS A SEQUENCE OF INDOOR AND OUTDOOR SPACES.


IN THE LIVING AREA, A CUSTOM-MADE CUSHION CREATES A READING NOOK. ARNE JACOBSEN SCONCE; MARBLE PLINTH COCKTAIL TABLE BY RH; NYCHAIR X BY TAKESHI NII.


LAYERS OF FLOWERING TOBACCO, BEEBLOSSOM, EVENING PRIMROSE, AND CHERRY LAUREL BUSHES AT SPILSBURY, THE ENGLISH COUNTRY ESTATE OF LANDSCAPE DESIGNER TANIA COMPTON.

fer imagi


tile nation Wild child turned plant whisperer, Lady Tania Compton listens to the land—and looks to history—to create places of informal exuberance TEXT BY

CHRISTOPHER STOCKS


A

only be described as gusto, but that’s just the half of it. Her ebullient attitude is backed up by an encyclopedic knowledge and a willingness to defy conventional wisdom, as in the silver garden that leads to the door of Spilsbury, her house in Wiltshire. Filled with the kinds of Mediterranean plants that drew her into the profession in the first place, the garden entrance gets little sun, yet her s we squelch round her sodden six acres of garden, Lady Tania Compton exclaims, lavenders and perovskias still thrive. Then again, Compton is not exactly a “I love being on clay!” Even though, I ask, it’s awash in winter, is backbreaking conventional garden designer. An earl’s daughter, she spent her 20s reporting on to dig, and, come summer, dries to the the Paris party scene for Women’s Wear consistency of concrete? “Totally,” she Daily before relocating to Ibiza in 1985. says. “It’s wonderful!” She’s not joking. It was there that, in her own words, Compton—the most successful British landscape designer few have ever heard she had “the Damascene conversion of my life, from clubbing to cuttings.” of—approaches her work with what can

Inspired by the spicy scent of helichrysum and the “Guerlain eye-shadow blue” of anchusa, she began to study, absorbing Reverend W. Keble Martin’s classic The Concise British Flora in Colour. A friend put her in touch with the renowned plantswoman Penelope Hobhouse, who invited Compton to spend the summer working in her Somerset garden, leading to meetings with grandes dames like Rosemary Verey and Nancy Lancaster. But all the while Compton was developing her own tastes. Her decision, in 1988, to sign up for a one-year course at the English Gardening School in London proved fateful. Lancaster predicted she would fall for James Compton, who had been turning heads as the head gardener at


OPENING SPREAD AND PORTRAIT: OBERTO GILI; OPPOSITE: SUZANNAH WILSON; ABOVE: HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN

OPPOSITE COMPTON’S WALLED GARDEN IN BURGUNDY FOR HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN. ABOVE FRIKART’S ASTER, STONECROP, AND PURPLE CONEFLOWER AT DEANE HOUSE IN

HAMPSHIRE, THE GROUNDS OF WHICH COMPTON HAS TENDED FOR THE PAST DECADE. RIGHT THE DESIGNER AT HOME IN THE ENGLISH COUNTRYSIDE.

the Chelsea Physic Garden, where the school is based. Lancaster was right, and Tania and Jamie wed in 1989, relocating to a village house in Wiltshire with a modest plot that she started tending like mad, simultaneously undertaking her first commissions. With the arrival of her children, Sophie and Fred, Compton’s design career took a back seat. But upon moving to Spilsbury in 1998 she began transforming what were largely paddocks into an English Eden, with flower-filled meadows, flag-fringed ponds, and a long hazelnut walk underplanted with thousands of spring bulbs. (She also spent ten years as a gardens editor at British House & Garden.) Her friend and professional peer Tom Stuart-Smith

describes Spilsbury as “treading, with great flair, that tricky line between simple placemaking and exoticism.” This floriferous paradise now represents two decades of hard work. It’s both test bed and playground. “People sometimes ask me if I ever sit in it, but for me that’s the whole point,” says Compton. “Falling asleep in a hammock under the old oak tree is tons more fun than digging a border.” At 54, Compton is now well into the second, post-child-rearing act of her career. For the past ten years she’s been working at Deane House in Hampshire, home to philanthropist Kara Gnodde, who describes the designer admiringly as “a combination of incredibly bossy and incredibly collaborative.” Under her

direction the flower garden has been expanded, with a separate cutting garden for the house. “You don’t want a cutting garden to look pretty,” Compton says, “or you’ll only snip at things. You want to be able to fill a room with flowers, not just a posy in a pot.” French furniture designer Hervé Van der Straeten, with whom Compton has designed a walled garden in Burgundy, echoes Gnodde’s sentiment, calling his collaborator “charming, bossy, and extremely generous with pragmatic advice. Before meeting her I had no clue there were such plants as Alchemilla mollis or Verbena bonariensis, or that when placing an order, brunnera (small) must not be confused with gunnera (very, very large).”

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At Reddish House, the delectable 18th-century country manse near Salisbury once owned by Cecil Beaton, Compton has been working with current owners David and Sophie Bernstein to return the grounds to their former glory. Asked whether Compton would have got on with the wickedly waspish Beaton, Sophie says, “Tania gets on with everyone, so I have no doubt they would soon be deep in conversation up his ropes of roses on the hillside.” After three years of replanting, Compton discovered from old photographs that much of what she added was in fact there in Beaton’s time. “This may sound potty,” she says, “but I call myself a garden diviner, not a garden designer.” Her flair for informal exuberance in formal settings is also evident in two other historic Wiltshire gardens. At Longford Castle, a remarkable triangular Elizabethan country house, she worked with the Countess of Radnor to revive an enclosed 19th-century parterre, filling it with perennials in shades of blue, purple, rose, and lilac. Since 2006, closer to home, she has been working on the Arts and Crafts terraces surrounding the Fonthill Estate, home of Lord Margadale, removing leylandii hedges and rescuing heirloom plants and trees. They are now the focus of lush new plantings of cornus, figs, roses, and dianthus. Compton may be just hitting her stride. Other current commissions include a large town garden for Chris Burch north of Paris and a Gloucestershire estate for a top-secret client whom she describes, without much exaggeration, as “the coolest woman in Britain.” As for Compton’s place in British horticulture, perhaps the final word should go to Stuart-Smith. “I would say that Tania is one of the central cogs in the world of British gardening, though that seems a very inelegant way of putting it for someone so supremely stylish.”

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COURTESY OF LONGFORD CASTLE

“This may sound potty, but I call myself a garden dıviner, not a garden designer.” —Compton


DEPLOYING VIBRANT PERENNIALS, COMPTON UPDATED THE HISTORIC PARTERRE GARDEN AT WILTSHIRE’S LONGFORD CASTLE (SUBJECT OF AMELIA SMITH’S NEW BOOK, LONGFORD CASTLE: THE TREASURES & THE COLLECTORS).


TEXT BY

MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TREVOR TONDRO STYLED BY

MICHAEL REYNOLDS

Architect Ron Radziner designs his own family home as a composition of long, lean volumes that shift and open in response to its wooded Los Angeles site

OUTSIDE THE BOX


SUNNY DAYS MEAN PLENTY OF POOL TIME FOR THE COTTLE RADZINER FAMILY. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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CLOCKWISE FROM NEAR LEFT ASHER’S BEDROOM FEATURES AN ARTWORK BY ROSE MARCUS; ON LARGE DOSA PILLOW, PHOTO BY CHRISTINA KIM. SUNLIGHT POURS INTO THE GREAT ROOM; TONY LEWIS

O

ne might reasonably expect an architect’s own house to make a statement, and on that account the home that Ron Radziner designed for himself, his wife, graphic-and-jewelry designer Robin Cottle, and their children, Asher and Lexi, does not disappoint. Situated on a wooded parcel in Los Angeles’s Mandeville Canyon, the structure declares its principles sotto voce: simplicity of line, economy of form, clarity of materials, harmony with nature. It’s a message familiar to anyone who has followed the work of Marmol Radziner, the design/ build firm Radziner founded with Leo Marmol in 1989, which is renowned for both stellar restorations of important modernist houses and finely detailed contemporary creations. “The parti for any architectural design is dictated by the site. Yes, Robin and I discussed the rooms we needed, how we want to live, and so on. But the form of the house evolved from the basic considerations of how it sits on the land and how it embraces the trees and views,” Radziner avers. In the case of the family’s new home, the site selected by Radziner and Cottle is distinctly dissimi-

DRAWING; ON CUSTOM CREDENZA, VASE BY ADAM SILVERMAN AND VINTAGE MEXICAN SCULPTURE. CUSTOM STOOLS BELLY UP TO THE KITCHEN ISLAND TOPPED IN STAINED OAK; VINTAGE MURANOGLASS LAMPS.

lar to the relatively urban lots they’ve inhabited in the past. “We lived in Venice [California] for nearly 25 years, and, frankly, we loved it. We could ride our bikes to most places. But the commute to Asher and Lexi’s school was just too long and grueling,” Cottle explains, echoing the familiar lament of many traffic-tortured Angelenos. “Canyon life is definitely a change. It feels like living in a park,” she adds. Sycamore trees scattered across the property set the tone for the bucolic experience. “Inserting the house within the site was like figuring out a puzzle. I designed the house as a series of sliding planes and rectangular volumes that stop and start to accommodate the trees,” Radziner notes. “I also decided to explore the idea of doing a house with only dark materials. I’ve had enough of crisp white walls for the moment.” The palette includes slender, handmade bricks, imported from Denmark, in a dark gray color; their slight imperfections give the material an organic edge that feels appropriate for the site. While the brick walls anchor the house to the earth on the ground level, the upper story—a taut, rectangular composition of zinc panels and glass walls—appears to float. Interior walls are clad variously in fumed rift-sawn oak and a slightly gritty plaster that takes on a velvety cast when it catches the light. “I love the experience of moving from relatively dark spaces to rooms flooded with light. The entry, for example, is a bit cloistered, but then you emerge into the bright openness of the living/dining/kitchen area. Suddenly it’s all trees and light,” Radziner says. Massive glass sliders connect the voluminous ground floor to an outdoor deck and pool in a quintessentially L.A. inside-out gesture. Radziner maintained the gentle slope of the topography and elevated the pool three feet off the land, once again giving the impression of a structure floating above the earth. A freestanding brick wall with an outdoor fireplace defines the edge of the exterior room. “It feels like we spend as much time outside as we do inside. It’s warmer here than it is in Venice, so that helps,” Cottle says, again referring to the beloved seaside community she and Radziner abandoned for the sake of time, traffic, and sanity. Asked whether they plan to return to Venice once Asher and Lexi are off to college, the couple demurs. “We’re definitely thinking about it,” Radziner offers. “But we love it here . . . for now.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT A LE CORBUSIER, PIERRE JEANNERET, AND CHARLOTTE PERRIAND STOOL BY CASSINA SITS IN THE TRAVERTINE-CLAD MASTER BATH. THE MASTER BEDROOM OPENS TO A TERRACE; PAINTING BY FRIEDRICH KUNATH. SAM DURANT’S LIKE, MAN, I’M TIRED (OF WAITING) HANGS IN THE FAMILY ROOM; VINTAGE VLADIMIR KAGAN FLOOR LAMP AND POUL KJÆRHOLM CHAIRS.

“I wanted to explore the idea of doing a house with only dark materials,” says Radziner. “I’ve had enough of crısp white walls.” 98

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MADE IN


AMERICA For its latest home collection, Calvin Klein breathes new life into Fiesta dinnerware, Pendleton blankets, vintage quilts, and other tried-and-true design icons

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

ANTHONY COTSIFAS STYLED BY

MICHAEL REYNOLDS LIMITED-EDITION FELTRI ARMCHAIRS BY GAETANO PESCE FOR CASSINA, UPHOLSTERED WITH VINTAGE QUILTS SELECTED BY RAF SIMONS FOR CALVIN KLEIN. CALVINKLEIN.US

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OPPOSITE LEFT, CALVIN KLEIN ANDY WARHOL SANDRA BRANT PENDLETON WOOL PILLOW; $350. RIGHT, CALVIN KLEIN X PENDLETON PETER WOOL PILLOWS; $280 EACH. CALVINKLEIN.US

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FIESTA DINNERWARE AND SANDRA BRANT PILLOW: IMAGES COPYRIGHT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION; DENNIS HOPPER IMAGE TRADEMARKED BY HOPPER

ABOVE CALVIN KLEIN ANDY WARHOL DENNIS HOPPER FIESTA DINNERWARE AND CALVIN KLEIN ANDY WARHOL SANDRA BRANT FIESTA DINNERWARE; BOTH $200 PER SET. CALVINKLEIN.US


LULU AND BUNNY AT THEIR FAMILY’S HOUSE IN MILLBROOK, NEW YORK. OPPOSITE PEPPER THE POODLE KEEPS WATCH. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE BY JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


DAYS OF HEAVEN

Designer Darren Henault crafts a glorious getaway for his family on the sprawling grounds of a former Christmas-tree farm TEXT BY

MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

WILLIAM WALDRON

STYLED BY

MARTIN BOURNE

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ARTWORKS BY MICHELLE CHARLES LINE THE DININGROOM MANTEL. ANTIQUE TABLE AND CHAIRS. OPPOSITE IN THE GARDEN ROOM, AN 18TH-CENTURY CHAISE LONGUE WEARS A BENNISON PRINT. CUSTOM SOFA, CLUB CHAIR, AND OTTOMAN BY FARRELL MITTMAN IN ROGERS & GOFFIGON FABRICS.


i

n the abstract, the idea of a 53-acre Christmas-tree farm with a reasonably intact 1800 farmhouse in the Hudson Valley sounds utterly charming. The reality of transforming such a picturesque spread into a gracious family compound geared for 21st-century life is another matter altogether. For the past 12 years, interior designer Darren Henault and his husband, attorney Michael Bassett, have moved, well, if not heaven, then mountains of earth to create their sanctuary in the Arcadian hamlet of Millbrook, New York. The process involved a dramatic overhaul of the sprawling landscape, architectural additions and upgrades, and plenty of good, old-fashioned decorating. But first, there were the conifers. “We had to relocate about 3,000 trees,” Henault recalls, laughing at the scope of the undertaking. “The idea was to return the back fields to something closer to their natural state. So we donated lots of trees to the town of Millbrook one Christmas, and we gave away as many as we could to our friends and anyone else who wanted to dig one up. We also

kept about 500 trees and replanted them to form hedges, although we found out over time that certain evergreens don’t make brilliant hedges. It was exhausting,” he adds wryly. Henault and Bassett collaborated with Janice Parker Landscape Architects of Greenwich, Connecticut, to reimagine the property as an eminently hospitable refuge for themselves, their two daughters—ten-year-old fraternal twins Bunny and Lulu—and the family’s frequent houseguests. “All of that open space was slightly overwhelming, so we broke it down into a series of variously defined outdoor rooms,” Henault explains, pointing to the apple orchard, flower garden, alfresco entertaining areas, and pool, all of which have been added since the couple acquired the land in 2006. Says Parker, “Our goal was to introduce the new elements in a way that weaves the existing and new landscapes together into a cohesive experience.” Two years ago, with the help of New York City–based architect Michael Goldman, Henault orchestrated a major renovation of the house that was specifically designed not to look major. Along with a new entry/mudroom and a covered porch off the kitchen, the primary addition they devised encompasses a bedroom for the girls, perched above a light-filled family room with a distinctly different character than the rest of the home. “[My husband], Michael, had kept a picture for

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LEFT PENDANTS FROM BALSAMO ANTIQUES LIGHT THE KITCHEN’S DANBY MARBLE–TOPPED ISLAND. BENCH FROM VICTORIA & SON; PAINTED FLOOR BY MATT AUSTIN STUDIO; RANGE BY WOLF; HOOD BY FOCAL METALS.


LEFT A FAMILY RAMBLE. BELOW IN THE DAUGHTERS’ BEDROOM, CUSTOM BUNK BEDS WEAR MATOUK LINENS. CURTAINS OF A COWTAN & TOUT FABRIC; LANTERN BY CHARLES EDWARDS.

“I wanted to create a home that looked as if it had grown organically over the decades and centuries.” —Darren Henault

LEFT BALLEYCLAIRE, A CONNEMARA– SPORT HORSE CROSS, TROTS BESIDE A PERSIAN-LILAC HEDGE. RIGHT PEPPER ON THE BACK PORCH. WICKER SEATING BY WALTERS.

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ABOVE A CHELSEA TEXTILES GINGHAM GRIDS THE MASTER BEDROOM. FOUR-POSTER BY THE FEDERALIST; ANTIQUE FRENCH DAYBED; CURTAINS OF A COWTAN & TOUT FABRIC. OPPOSITE A GUEST BATH FEATURES A TUB BY FERGUSON WITH ROHL FITTINGS. KRAVET COUTURE LINEN ON WALLS.

years of a David Hicks house that had enormous windows that went all the way to the floor. It’s something he always wanted, so we created a kind of garden room with walls of windows where we can hang out with the girls. I made the sofa extra deep so we can all pile on together,” the designer says. Goldman and Henault took advantage of a dip in the grade of the land to give the new family retreat a higher ceiling than the home’s original rooms, without disrupting the existing roofline. “We wanted to restore the house’s early-19th-century DNA while growing it in a way that feels both deferential and appropriate for today. The work we did was extensive but discreet—the initial structure remains the primary visual object in the landscape,” Goldman offers. Within the home’s original rooms, Henault’s decorating scheme nods to authentic period flavor without pretense of sober historical verisimilitude. “I wanted to create a home that looked as if it had grown organically over the decades and centuries. That idea gives you wide latitude in the kinds of things that can feel comfortable here,” Henault says, illustrating his point with the roster of furnishings and materials assembled in the living room—19th-century tables and chairs of American, English, and French descent; original pine floors

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and a zebra rug; vintage and contemporary photography; antique needlepoint and contemporary cut velvets. The designer’s fondness for pattern-on-pattern playfulness— and his antipathy for monochrome minimalism—also finds eloquent expression in the master bedroom, where yellow gingham-upholstered walls mingle amicably with toile bed hangings and floral curtains. Henault and Bassett are both accomplished equestrians, and much of their time in the country is spent among Millbrook’s horsey set. At home, however, the kitchen is the center of the couple’s social universe. “Michael is a true gourmet chef. I like setting a table, and he likes filling it with good food,” Henault says, explaining not only the division of labor but also the designer’s obsession with tabletop finery. Casual meals are served at the kitchen table, a custom piece that replicates a Portuguese antique the designer lost at auction. More formal(ish) affairs unfold in the serene, Scandinavian-inflected dining room. “We made our house bigger so it could be filled with people. We have guests over constantly. It’s like inviting friends into your psyche,” Henault observes. “And what’s the point of having great stuff if you don’t share it?” What’s the point, indeed.


resources Items pictured but not listed here are not sourceable. Items similar to vintage and antique pieces shown are often available from the dealers listed. (T) means the item is available only to the trade. THIS IS HOME

Interiors by Sarah Sherman Samuel; sarahshermansamuel.com. Architecture by Emily Farnham Architecture; emilyfarnham .com. Landscape design by Terremoto; terremoto.la. COVER: On built-in sofa by Sarah Sherman Samuel; sarahshermansamuel.com; Nottingham cotton-blend velvet, in whiskey, by Stroheim (T); stroheim.com. On side table, vase by Mark Churchill; shop-midland.com. PAGES 60–61: Velvet armchairs by Mercer21 (similar), New Classics Malibu leather bench by Kenian, cocktail tables, in rose gold, by Statements by J, Valeria arched floor lamp, in brushed gold, by Langley Street, and rug by Bungalow Rose, all from AllModern; allmodern.com. Curtains of Newport linen-blend, in pink, by Fabricut (T); fabricut.com. On side table, vase from Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGES 62–63: In family room, Capri white vase by CB2; cb2.com. Fireplace surround of White Mountains tile by Fireclay Tile; fireclaytile.com. Custom Palladiana Terrazzo shelf by Emily Farnham Architecture; emilyfarnham.com. On vintage bench from Palm Beach Regency; palmbeachregency.com; Lush polyester-cotton velvet, in 29, by Fabricut (T); fabricut.com. In kitchen dining area, Atomium suspension light by Lambert & Fils; lambertetfils.com. On table, vases from Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGE 64: Alfi LowBack counter stools by Jasper Morrison for Emeco from Design Within Reach; dwr.com. Alto pendants by Cedar & Moss; cedarandmoss .com. On island, white bowl and vase by Mark Churchill from Midland; shop-midland.com. Range by Wolf; subzero-wolf.com. Calacatta Venato marble from Stoneland; stonelandusa .com. On shelves, dishware by Year & Day; yearandday.com. On cabinets, Mizzle paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Sink fittings by Rohl; rohlhome.com. Next to sink, tall vase by Mark Churchill from Midland. PAGE 65: In pool area, pool and custom bench by Terremoto; terremoto.la. Next to house, Outdoor Sierra chairs by Croft House; crofthouse.com; in Slubby acrylic, in flint, by Perennials (T); perennials fabrics.com. On Granada round coffee table by Croft House, teal vase from Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGE 66: Macramé wall hanging by Sally England; sallyengland.com. On custom bed by Sarah Sherman Samuel; sarahsherman samuel.com; Rivoli cotton velvet, in 49, by Stroheim (T); stroheim.com. Knot throw from Shoppe by Amber Interiors; shoppe.amber interiordesign.com. Faux-sheepskin pillows by Pottery Barn; potterybarn.com. Safari bench by Katy Skelton; katyskelton.com. Fjord Compass ceiling light and Aurora pendant by Cedar & Moss; cedarandmoss.com. PAGE 67: In master bath, Sensuality Freestanding Soaking tub by Aquatica from Wayfair; wayfair.com. Floor-mounted West Slope tub filler, in aged brass, by Rejuvenation; rejuvenation.com. Zanadoo 12-Light Semi Flush Mount chandelier, in antique brass, by Arteriors from Wayfair. In other bath, vanity of Volakas marble from Stoneland; stonelandusa.com. Custom floor brass inlay design by Sarah Sherman Samuel; sarahshermansamuel.com. Mini Orb sconces by Allied Maker; alliedmaker.com. Gedy by Nameeks Horfield vanity mirrors from Wayfair. Purist wall-mounted sink fittings by Kohler; kohler.com. Tile by Fireclay Tile; fireclaytile.com. In living room, Rhys armchairs by Anthropologie; anthropologie.com. Cocktail table by Sarah Sherman Samuel. On Bronson sofa by Croft House; crofthouse.com; strié velvet, in light khaki, by Greenhouse Fabrics; greenhousefabrics.com. PAGE 71: In guest bedroom, on table, vase from Midland; shop-midland.com. COVER, PAGES 60–69:

HARMONIC CONVERGENCE PAGES 70–79: Interiors by Bunny Williams Interior Design; bunnywilliams.com. Architecture by Michael Middleton Dwyer, Architect; mmd-arch.com. Landscape design by Quincy Hammond Landscape Architecture; quincyhammond.com. Construction by Frank Cafone Construction; cafoneinc.com. Custom millwork throughout by Craz Woodworking; crazwoodworking.com. PAGES 70–71: On Spencer sofas by Jonas (T); jonasworkroom.com; Mortefontaine cotton, in gray, by Le Manach (T); pierrefrey.com; with trim by Clarence House (T); clarencehouse.com. On custom ottoman, all grain leather from Edelman Leather (T); edelmanleather.com. Antique circular side table from Colefax and Fowler (T); cowtan.com. On vintage armchair, Manuel Canovas viscose-blend, in pivoine, by Cowtan & Tout (T). Custom mantel by Michael Middleton Dwyer, Architect; mmd-arch.com. Parquet white oak flooring by Frank Cafone Construction; cafoneinc.com. PAGES 72–73: In library, on armchair, ottoman, and sofa by Jonas (T); jonasworkroom.com; Arabella linen, in taupe, by Penny Morrison from Claremont (T); claremontfurnishing.com. On English Mahogany caned chair cushion, Gustavian Stripe cotton, in champignon, by Jed Johnson Home from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli.com. Wool dhurrie rug, in custom color, by Todd Alexander Romano; todd alexanderromano.com. Library design by Michael Middleton Dwyer, Architect; mmd-arch.com; built by Craz Woodworking; crazwoodworking.com. PAGE 74: In foyer, on staircase by Michael Middleton Dwyer, Architect; mmd-arch.com; custom wool runner by Beauvais Carpets (T); beauvais carpets.com. On wall, custom mirror by Lowy; lowy1907.com. Sconces by Jonathan Browning Studios (T); jonathanbrowninginc.com. On antique bench, linen by Romo (T); romo.com. Marble flooring from Precision Stone; precisionstone.net. PAGE 75: Murano chandelier from Newel; newel.com. On vintage armchairs, Manuel Canovas viscose-blend, in pivoine, by Cowtan & Tout (T); cowtan.com. Custom table base by Larrea Studio; larreastudio.com; with reclaimed parquet wood top from Jacqueline Adams Antiques; jacquelineadamsantiques.com. Sconces from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli.com. Custom silk rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. PAGE 76: On walls, and curtains of, custom Wadsworth Stripe cotton-linen, in lapis, by Peter Fasano (T); peterfasano.com. On bed and sofa, both by Jonas (T); jonasworkroom .com; chintz handblock cotton by Lee Jofa (T); kravet.com. Impero embroidered bed linens by Pratesi; pratesi.com. On armchair, Kabba Kabba linen, in tan, by Martyn Lawrence Bullard (T); deringhall.com. On ottoman by Jonas (T), Bunny viscose-blend, in purple, by Christopher Hyland (T); christopherhyland.com. In fireplace, star andirons by Carole Gratale; carolegratale.com. On slipper chair, Rajmata linen by Peter Dunham Textiles from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli.com. PAGE 77: In guesthouse powder room, on walls, custom burlap wall covering by Zina Studios; zinastudio.com. Antiqued bronze sconces by Pell Artifex Co.; 212-563-9656. Sink fittings by Waterworks; waterworks.com. Washstand with glass legs by Urban Archaeology; urbanarchaeology.com. On cabinetry, custom paint by Donald Kaufman Color; donaldkaufmancolor.com. In master sitting room, on walls, paint by Donald Kaufman Color. Amiens wall lights, in brass, by Vaughan (T); vaughandesigns.com. On sofas by Jonas (T); jonasworkroom.com, Lucy’s Roses linen, in tan, by Jean Monro for Clarence House (T); clarence house.com. On antique ottoman, Makeba silk, in carob, by George Spencer from Claremont (T); claremontfurnishing.com. Custom rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com.

SQUAD GOALS PAGES 80–87: Architecture and interiors by Christoff:Finio Architecture; christofffinio.com. Landscape design by James C. Grimes Land

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 75, NO. 7. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST (ISSN 0003-8520) is published

11 times a year by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to

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Design; nativeplants.net; and Christoff:Finio Architecture. Construction by Artisan Construction Assoc.; 631-808-3323. Windows throughout by Kawneer; kawneer.com. Sliding glass doors throughout by Arcadia; arcadiainc .com. PAGES 80–81: On house exterior, STK western red cedar from Riverhead Building Supply; rbscorp.com. PAGES 82–83: In dining area, Smithfield C pendant by Jasper Morrison for Flos; usa.flos.com. In kitchen, island in plastic laminate from Abet Laminati (T); us.abetlaminati.com; with countertop by Caesarstone; caesarstoneus.com. Milking stools by Mash Studios; laxseries.com. In living-room area, behind sofa, Cobra console from White on White; whiteonwhite.com. PAGE 84: Chaise longue by CB2; cb2.com. Towel by the Company Store; thecompanystore.com. Pool designed by Christoff:Finio Architecture; christofffinio.com. PAGE 85: In William’s bedroom, on wall, Hoppmosse wallpaper by Hanna Werning for Boråstapeter (T); borastapeter.se. Cobble sconce by Lampa (T); lampa.com. Bunk bed and bookcase by IKEA; ikea.com. Gingham bed linens by PB Teen; pbteen.com. Floral pillow sham of Celotocaulis linen, in green, by Josef Frank for Svenskt Tenn; svenskttenn.se. On wall, hooks rack from YLiving; yliving.com. In master bath, on walls, tile by Fireclay Tile; fireclaytile.com. Custom shower by Christoff:Finio Architecture; christofffinio.com. Pendants by Bega; bega-us.com. Sinks and fittings from AF Supply; afsupply.com. Countertop by Caesarstone; caesarstoneus.com. Tray by the Container Store; containerstore.com. On floor, encaustic tile by Mosaic House; mosaichse.com. PAGE 86: In kitchen, island in plastic laminate from Abet Laminati (T); us.abetlaminati.com; with countertop by Caesarstone; caesarstoneus.com. Milking stools by Mash Studios; laxseries.com. Range by Dacor; dacor.com. Hood by Best; bestrangehoods.com. Custom cabinetry by Christoff:Finio Architecture; christofffinio.com. Backsplash tile by Mosaic House; mosaichse .com. PAGE 87: In living area, custom cushion by Interiors by Robert; 718-847-2860. Arne Jacobsen AJ wall sconce from Design Within Reach; dwr.com. Marble Plinth cocktail table, sofa, and leather tray, all by RH; rh.com. Nychair X by Takeshi Nii; nychairx.jp. Vase by Crate and Barrel; crateandbarrel.com. Sofa upholstered in Slubby acrylic, in flannel, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics.com. OUTSIDE THE BOX PAGES 94–99: Architecture, construction, interiors, and landscape design by Marmol Radziner; marmol-radziner.com. Kolumba bricks throughout by Petersen Tegl; petersentegl.dk. PAGES 94–95: Pool designed by Marmol Radziner; marmol-radziner.com. Extrasoft outdoor sofa by Living Divani; livingdivani.it; upholstered in Slubby acrylic, in flannel, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics.com. Custom steel fire pit by Marmol Radziner. Walter Lamb outdoor dining table from Design Within Reach; dwr.com; customized by Marmol Radziner. Walter Lamb outdoor dining chairs from Design Within Reach. Ipe decking by TerraMai; terramai.com. Walter Lamb lounge chairs (at right) from Design Within Reach. Custom outdoor cocktail table by Marmol Radziner. Pablo beach towels (on ottoman and deck) by Missoni Home; missonihome.com. PAGES 96–97: In kitchen, on Mandeville Canyon counter stools, in dark bronze, by Marmol Radziner Furniture; marmolradzinerfurniture .com; leather by Spinneybeck (T); spinneybeck .com. In Asher’s bedroom, on NeoWall bed by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani; livingdivani.it; Sullivan 315 leather by Alphenberg; alphenberg .ru. Bed linens by RH; rh.com. Large Joshua Tree pillow by Christina Kim for Dosa; dosainc .com. Throw by Hermès; hermes.com. In great room, custom ceiling fixture (left), in bronze with patina, by Marmol Radziner; marmolradziner.com. Mandeville Canyon dining table, in solid Bastogne walnut, by Marmol Radziner

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Furniture. On Glencoe dining chairs, in solid walnut, by Marmol Radziner Furniture, leather by Spinneybeck (T). Extrasoft sofa by Living Divani. Bronze side tables by Marmol Radziner Furniture. Custom fumed rift-sawn oak casework by Marmol Radziner. PAGE 98: Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, and Charlotte Perriand LC8 swivel stool by Cassina; cassina .com. Garment-washed Turkish terry towels, in neutral, by RH; rh.com. Tub filler and hand shower by Vola; vola.com. PAGE 99: In master bedroom, on Extra Wall bed by Living Divani; livingdivani.it; Sebastian 315 leather by Alphenberg; alphenberg.ru. Jason bed linens by Ivano Redaelli from Mass Beverly; massbeverly .com. Custom cashmere throw by Cassina; cassina.com. Mandeville Canyon side table by Marmol Radziner Furniture; marmolradziner furniture.com. Custom-stained oak flooring by MIR Hardwood Design; mirhardwood.com. On terrace, Extrasoft outdoor sofa by Living Divani, upholstered in Aqua Velvet II acrylic, in rock garden, by Holly Hunt (T); hollyhunt .com. Handmade felted-wool blanket by Taiana Giefer; taianadesign.com. In family room, vintage Poul Kjærholm PK9 chairs from Vance Trimble Design; 1stdibs.com. On walls, plaster, in gray tweed, by Sto Corp.; stocorp.com. Custom built-in bookshelves, in fumed rift-sawn oak, by Marmol Radziner; marmol-radziner.com. Mandeville Canyon pool table, in fumed oak, and Mandeville Canyon round table, in smoked oak, both by Marmol Radziner Furniture. DAYS OF HEAVEN PAGES 104–11: Interiors by Darren Henault Interiors; darrenhenault.com. Architecture by Michael Goldman Architect; michael goldmanarchitect.com. Landscape architecture by Janice Parker Landscape Architects; janiceparker.com. PAGE 106: Antique chairs from Florian Papp; florianpapp.com. Custom chandelier by Darren Henault Interiors; darrenhenault.com; fabricated by Arrowsmith Forge; arrowsmithforge.com. Hand-stenciled wall design by Matt Austin Studio; matt austinstudio.com. Curtains of Napoleon Bees linen-cotton, in blue, by Chelsea Textiles (T); chelseatextiles.com; with trim by Samuel & Sons (T); samuelandsons.com. Custom sideboard by Darren Henault Interiors fabricated by Daniel Scuderi Antiques; danielscuderi.com. PAGE 107: On chaise longue, Palampore linen-cotton, in charcoal blue on oyster, by Bennison (T); bennisonfabrics.com. Custom sofa, club chair, and ottoman by Ferrell Mittman (T); ef-lm.com. On sofa, Horizon striped linen-blend, in sunrise, by Rogers & Goffigon (T); rogersandgoffigon.com. On ottoman, Serge de Nimes linen, in daydream, by Rogers & Goffigon (T). Antique chairs from the Chinese Porcelain Co.; cpco.co. Custom ceiling fixtures by Matt Austin Studio; matt austinstudio.com. PAGE 108: In kitchen, pendants from Balsamo Antiques; balsamoantiques.com. Bench from Victoria & Son; victoriaandson .com. Painted floor by Matt Austin Studio; mattaustinstudio.com. Range by Wolf; subzerowolf.com. Hood by Focal Metals; focalmetals .com. Tall stools from Sawkille Co.; sawkille .com. PAGE 109: In daughters’ bedroom, bedding by Matouk; matouk.com. Curtains of La Pagode Chine cotton, in teal/coral, by Cowtan & Tout (T); cowtan.com. Lantern by Charles Edwards; charlesedwards.com. On back porch, chairs and sofa (similar) from Walters (T); walters wicker.com; in fabrics from Les Indiennes; lesindiennes.com. Cocktail table from RT Facts; rtfacts.com. PAGE 110: On walls, Medium Check linen-cotton, in gold, by Chelsea Textiles (T); chelseatextiles.com. Bed by the Federalist; thefederalistonline.com. On antique daybed, Outline linen-cotton by Chelsea Textiles (T). PAGE 111: Tub by Ferguson; fergusonshowrooms .com; with bath fittings by Rohl; rohlhome.com. On walls, In Bloom linen, in blush, by Kravet Couture (T); kravet.com.

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EDWARD DUFNER (1872–1957), MARGARET BY THE WINDOW, 1915

Edward Dufner (1872–1957), Margaret by the Window, 1915, oil on board, 16" x 12", signed lower right: EDW. DUFNER; on verso: Margaret by the Window, Edw Dufner/Jan–1915.

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COURTESY OF GATEWAY ARCH PARK FOUNDATION

The keys to a successful public space are feelings of “welcome and clarity,” says landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh. Both were lacking at Eero Saarinen’s 1965 Gateway Arch, long cut off from downtown St. Louis by an interstate highway. Tapped to close that gap, Van Valkenburgh has now extended the arch’s historic Dan Kiley–designed grounds, adding a land bridge to the city. Nestled into the berm beneath the soaring icon, meanwhile, is the entrance plaza to the newly expanded history museum, a discreet crescent of glass conceived by James Carpenter Design Associates and Cooper Robertson in collaboration with Trivers Associates. Says Carpenter, “The project has completely changed the relationship of the park to the city.” gatewayarch.com —ELIZABETH FAZZARE


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