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2016 GOVERNOR GENERAL’S AWARDS

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE RAIC

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38 Halifax Central Library

NIC LEHOUX

MARC GIBERT

STÉPHANE GROLEAU

ADAM MØRK

2016 GOVERNOR GENERAL’S AWARDS

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09

CANADIAN ARCHITECT

MAY 2016

44 Bridgepoint Active Healthcare

42 Amphithéâtre Cogeco

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15 NEWS

67 BOOKS

27 RAIC JOURNAL

Profiles of the winners of the RAIC’s Architectural Firm Award, Young Architect Award, and Emerging Architectural Practice Award.

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Reviews of publications on iconic buildings in Toronto, museums in Quebec, women in architecture and more.

54 University of Manitoba ARTlab

ED WHITE

EMA PETER PHOTOGRAPHY

ROBERT LEMERMEYER

56 Glacier Skywalk

Winners of 2016 National Urban Design Awards announced; Cornelia Hahn Oberlander named inaugural recipient of Governor General’s Medal in Landscape Architecture.

52 Nathan Phillips Square Revitalization

50 W  ong Dai Sin Temple

EMA PETER PHOTOGRAPHY

46 Regent Park Aquatic Centre

PATKAU ARCHITECTS

STEVEN EVANS

JAMES DOW

SCOTT NORSWORTHY

Desjardins de Lévis

62 Wood Innovation and Design Centre

64 Ronald McDonald House BC & Yukon

Regent Park Aquatic Centre by MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects (MJMA). Photograph by Shai Gil.

COVER

73 CALENDAR

RAIC Festival of Architecture in Nanaimo; Design Exchange auction in Toronto.

V.61 N.05

74 BACKPAGE

Andrew Hotari explores a Canadian-designed retreat in the Caribbean.

THE NATIONAL REVIEW OF DESIGN AND PRACTICE / THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE RAIC

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COURTESY OF ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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LEFT A view of Zaha Hadid’s 2000 competition proposal for the Grande Bibliothèque de Québec in Montreal.

Zaha’s Unbuilt Canadian Projects Zaha Hadid’s unexpected death at the end of March sent shockwaves through the global architectural community. Only 65 and at the head of a thriving global practice, Hadid suffered a heart attack while being treated for bronchitis at a Miami hospital. On two occasions, Canada came close to having a Hadid design—she was on the shortlist for the Grande Bibliothèque du Québec in Montreal (2000) and the Edmonton Art Gallery (2005). For the Montreal Library, Hadid and Quebec City firm Boutin Ramoisy Tremblay proposed a series of sculptural, swooping forms that traced pathways through the interior. Horizontal aluminum slats would have clad the glazed façades, bringing the sense of dynamism from inside to out. The linear, layered drawings strongly recall Hadid’s MAXXI Museum in Rome, designed around the same time. Hadid’s entry received an honourable mention from the jury. They wrote that they were “particularly impressed by Hadid’s work in opening new ways of understanding a library, proposing pathways of knowledge that become an invitation to an adventurous journey and the discovery of new spaces.” They added, “The model reveals a dimensionally rich urban sculpture composed of original forms, with a strong metaphoric character, fluidity and lush interior spaces.” “The ‘Bilbao Effect’ was in the air,” recalls Phyllis Lambert. “Hopes hung on Zaha Hadid and Christian de Portzamparc [another of the four finalists]. However, ambition bowed to pragmatism: the librarian members of the 2000 competition jury, more familiar with North American literalness than with European conceptualization, could not understand the plans, and with a tight money economy, the client was fearful of cost overruns.” For the competition to expand the Edmonton Art Gallery (since renamed the Art Gallery of Alberta), Hadid teamed with Kasian Architecture to produce a proposal that was selected by the architects on the jury. However, in a political twist, their decision was overturned

by local representatives, including the gallery director and board chair, who named Los Angeles-based Randall Stout as the winner. In part, it seems that Hadid had insulted Prairie hospitality by being the only finalist not to show up in Edmonton for the competition presentation. In Hadid’s scheme, the gallery’s existing Brutalist orthogonal volume holds the street corner, and is topped by a controlled series of trapezoidal volumes, which Hadid referred to as “three totemic figures.” These frame a skylit gallery at the upper level. “Zaha Hadid’s design for the Art Gallery of Alberta shows her at the height of her powers, shortly after her Pritzker win,” says architecture critic Trevor Boddy, FRAIC. “The heart of Don Bittorf ’s original gallery was a gracious winding stair that rose up to skylights—her design builds on this spatial logic with new gallery spaces stacked above, but expressed in her own idiom. It is a huge architectural loss to my hometown that they chose not to build this masterpiece of a powerful but respectful addition to a Brutalist gem on the Prairies.” These two near-misses recall the adage that the second place in competitions often goes to the most innovative project, while the first place goes to a more familiar solution. Zaha Hadid’s designs were challenging, and she didn’t feel the need to simplify them for the sake of a non-architect jury. Her renderings were evocative, but could be hard to understand, even for trained architects. She didn’t care to play the glad-handing game to garner favour—the quality of the work itself was what counted. Clearly, at least some of the jurors for both of these competitions saw the spark of genius in Zaha Hadid’s entries. Had they taken a leap of faith with the exuberant renderings and models, would Canada have struck architectural gold? Sadly, we’ll never know. Elsa Lam

­­EDITOR ELSA LAM, MRAIC EDITORIAL ADVISOR IAN CHODIKOFF, OAA, FRAIC ART DIRECTOR ROY GAIOT CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ANNMARIE ADAMS, FRAIC ODILE HÉNAULT DOUGLAS MACLEOD, NCARB, MRAIC REGIONAL CORRESPONDENTS HALIFAX CHRISTINE MACY, OAA REGINA BERNARD FLAMAN, SAA MONTREAL DAVID THEODORE CALGARY GRAHAM LIVESEY, MRAIC WINNIPEG LISA LANDRUM, MAA, AIA, MRAIC VANCOUVER ADELE WEDER PUBLISHER TOM ARKELL 416-510-6806 SALES MANAGER FARIA AHMED 416-510-6808 CUSTOMER SERVICE / PRODUCTION LAURA MOFFATT 416-510-6898 CIRCULATION CIRCULATION@CANADIANARCHITECT.COM PRESIDENT OF IQ BUSINESS MEDIA INC. ALEX PAPANOU HEAD OFFICE 80 VALLEYBROOK DRIVE, TORONTO, ON M3B 2S9 TELEPHONE 416-510-6845 E-MAIL elam@canadianarchitect.com WEBSITE www.canadianarchitect.com Canadian Architect is published monthly by iQ Business Media Inc.. The editors have made every reasonable effort to provide accurate and authoritative information, but they assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. Subscription Rates Canada: $54.95 plus applicable taxes for one year; $87.95 plus applicable taxes for two years (HST – #81538 0985 RT0001). Price per single copy: $6.95. Students (prepaid with student ID, includes taxes): $27.00 for one year. USA: $105.95 US for one year. All other foreign: $125.95 US per year. Single copy US and foreign: $10.00 US. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., Canadian Architect, 80 Valleybrook Drive, Toronto, ON Canada M3B 2S9. Postmaster: please forward forms 29B and 67B to 80 Valleybrook Drive, Toronto, ON Canada M3B 2S9. Printed in Canada. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be re­produced either in part or in full without the consent of the copyright owner. From time to time we make our subscription list available to select companies and organizations whose product or service may interest you. If you do not wish your contact information to be made available, please contact us via one of the following methods: Telephone 1-800-668-2374 E-mail circulation@canadianarchitect.com Mail Circulation, 80 Valleybrook Drive, Toronto, ON Canada M3B 2S9 MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN BUSINESS PRESS MEMBER OF THE ALLIANCE FOR AUDITED MEDIA PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT #43096012 ISSN 1923-3353 (ONLINE) ISSN 0008-2872 (PRINT)

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EMA PETER PHOTOGRAPHY

NEWS

ABOVE Designed by DGBK Architects, the UBC Library Preservation and Archives building’s striped façade refers to the barcodes used to retrieve books within the specialized facility.

PROJECTS Library Preservation and Archives Facility opens at UBC.

The University of British Columbia has opened its Library Preservation and Archives (PARC) facility, designed by DGBK Architects. The facility is a highly specialized library environment based on a model developed at Harvard University that extends the life of printed library collections from 30 years (in a typical library environment) to 300 years. The system stores the library’s collections within high-density shelving units in a temperature and humidity controlled environment, making Library PARC one of North America’s most efficient and cost effective storage facilities. Capable of holding about 1.6 million volumes, the facility includes the first of six possible storage modules. The building also houses a campus-wide records management service, digitization area, contained freezer area for decontamination, staff work area and publicly accessible reading room.  The facility consists of two main parts: a processing and administrative area, and a long rectangular storage module. Wood elements at the entry and the sunshades on the west glazing enliven the expression of the processing area, while the storage module has a barcode-like façade of vertical cedar strips on concrete. DGBK started to develop the façade concept while exploring siting options. “It started with the location of the facility within the Forest District of UBC ,” says Robert Lange,

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MRAIC, partner at DGBK . Barcodes are

used to store and retrieve the books, which are arrayed by size on barcoded trays and shelves. “The conceptual idea of the trees in the forest in tandem with the operational requirements of the facility led to the building’s design language.”

www.dgbk.com

Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning opens at the University of Calgary.

The Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning has opened at the University of Calgary. The project was completed by Diamond Schmitt Architects as design architect with Gibbs Gage as architect of record. The building is designed to inspire new approaches to collaborative learning, enhanced by the creative use of learning technologies, flexible spaces and furnishings. The facility is reconfigurable day-to-day, based on the evolving needs of students, teachers and researchers. “This building offers an extraordinary range of diverse spaces that promote a variety of uses, all centered around an interactive public spine,” says Donald Schmitt, FRAIC. The heart of the building is a highly flexible public forum capable of effortlessly changing configurations using mobile technology and hidden seats to function as a 400-seat theatre, a flat-floor open space, a teaching lab or a community meeting space. The main hall is filled with natural light and establishes a campus axis announced by two cantilever projections that extend over the front entry plaza and into the campus green on the other side of the building. Research conducted at the Taylor Institute

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IWAN BAAN © OMA

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

NEWS

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ABOVE The Pierre Lassonde Pavilion at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, designed by OMA with Provencher_Roy, is scheduled to open this June.

will transform the integration of teaching practices, learning technologies and optimal designs for learning spaces. “Transparency, flexibility, and collaboration are at the core of our programs, and this building perfectly supports these concepts,” says Nancy Chick, academic director for the institute. To achieve 71 percent less energy compared to a conventional building of the same size, sustainable design measures include high-performance windows, LED lighting controlled by daylight sensors, low-flow water fixtures, a well-insulated roof, radiant heating and cooling, and energy sourced from the campus district energy plant. www.dsai.ca

Pierre Lassonde pavilion to open in June.

The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec’s new Pierre Lassonde Pavilion will officially open on June 24, 2016. Designed by OMA (Office for Metropolitan Architecture) in collaboration with Provencher_Roy architectes of Montreal, the 14,900-square-metre building will increase the 83-year-old museum’s exhibition space by 90 percent. The Pierre Lassonde Pavilion faces the main artery of Quebec City’s Grande Allée. Behind the new facility, the three existing pavilions of the museum stand within the historic Parc des Champs-de-Bataille. The Pierre Lassonde Pavilion connects with this complex through an underground passageway while presenting a transparent façade directly on Grande Allée, where it creates a new public plaza. “Our design stacks three gallery volumes in a cascade that continues the topography of the park,” says Shohei Shigematsu, partner at OMA . “Art becomes a catalyst that allows the visitor to experience all three core assets— park, city, and museum—at the same time.” Within the pavilion, column-free galleries, an auditorium, a café and a museum store rise in stepped tiers from the park to the

streetfront. A 12.5-metre-high grand hall faces the boulevard, where the topmost tier’s dramatic 26.5-metre cantilever shelters an urban plaza. Orchestrated views from a monumental spiral stair and an exterior pop-out stair orient visitors to the museum and its place in the city. Mezzanines and overlooks link the temporary and permanent exhibition spaces. On top of each of the volumes, roof terraces provide space for outdoor displays and activities. The new pavilion opens with five exhibitions showcasing the museum’s collections of contemporary Quebecois and Inuit art. The pavilion’s opening coincides with Quebec’s national holiday, and will include three days of free public programs. www.mnbaq.org

Design team selected for Arctic College expansion.

The Government of Nunavut has awarded the design of the Arctic College Expansion and New Community Centre in Iqaluit to Torontobased firm Teeple Architects with Cibinel Architecture of Winnipeg. The school endeavours to be the college of choice for the people of Nunavut by offering culturally relevant programs at the highest national standard. Its graduates help to advance Inuit language and culture, and continue their careers in Nunavut and beyond.  Through an integrated design process, the Teeple-Cibinel team will work with the Government of Nunavut, Arctic College and community members to develop and realize their vision for the new facilities.  “We’re excited for this opportunity to create architecture that responds to Iqaluit and the Arctic in every sense—technically, contextually, culturally and socially,” says design architect Stephen Teeple, FRAIC.  “Through our work on the Inuit Art Centre expansion at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, cur-

rently in design, we had the incredible experience of visiting some of the communities of Nunavut,” says George Cibinel, MRAIC. “We are thrilled to now be able to work with the Arctic community, in their homeland, to develop a facility that responds uniquely to their needs and to the climatic challenges of the Northern environment in the creation of exceptional learning spaces.” The program includes fine arts and multimedia classrooms, fisheries training classrooms, digital labs, kitchen classrooms and other versatile learning spaces. The roughly 2,169-square-metre facility is scheduled to open in August 2019. www.arcticcollege.ca

3XN to design condo tower on Toronto’s waterfront.

Following a design competition, real estate firm Hines and developer Tridel have selected Danish firm 3XN as the design architect of their latest waterfront residential project at Bayside Toronto, working with Torontobased Kirkor as architect of record. 3XN architect Kim Herforth Nielsen describes his firm’s intention to create a vertical neighbourhood, with the family home as its inspiration. “The design puts people first, paying particular attention to the quality of views, space and lifestyle,” he says. “The development will command extraordinary views of the water, neighbouring parks and the city skyline.”  Located along the water’s edge on Queens Quay East in the developing East Bayfront neighbourhood, the new condominium will be defined by an L-shaped design that ensures views out across the water for residents, and also provides ample natural light to the public areas at ground level. Featuring a dynamic and distinctive architectural form, the building steps down from its highest point at its northwestern edge where it faces the city to an amenity space on the 7th floor, before rising back up towards its eastern façade. “While the stepped L-shaped form provides a sculptural quality to the building, the large garden terraces are the hallmark of the design,” explains Nielson. He adds that the terraces will “activate the façade, enlivening it with texture, colour, depth and variety, while imbuing it with a human scale.” 3XN’s building is one of six residential buildings planned for the new Bayside community on Toronto’s waterfront, which will also include two office buildings. The development covers a 5.3 hectare site and will include approximately 190,000 square metres of residential, employment, commercial and cultural space. The development aims to be Toronto’s first LEED-ND Gold Neighbourhood.

www.tridel.com

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AWARDS National Urban Design Awards winners announced.

KUGO KUMA / WESTBANK

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ABOVE A rendering of a proposed 43-storey tower in Vancouver by Kengo Kuma for Westbank. The project will be Kuma’s first residential high-rise in North America.

Kengo Kuma to design Vancouver skyscraper.

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has been selected to design the Alberni high-rise in Vancouver, announced Westbank president and founder Ian Gillespie. This will be the architect’s first residential high-rise in North America. The proposed 43-storey, 188-unit tower will be located on Alberni Street in the West End. The design is distinguished by scalloped “scoops” of negative space, removed from opposite sides of the tower’s profile, protecting view corridors within the city. The exterior is made of glass and aluminum, reflecting neighbouring buildings on the lower levels and sky on the upper levels. Giving the building a warm materiality, it will include wood balconies and bamboo interiors. The mixed-use design will also include restaurants and retail at street level, along with a Japanese moss garden. “In the 20th century skyscrapers were isolated monuments. In the 21st century skyscrapers should part of the urban design,” Kuma explained at a recent event in Vancouver. “I feel we are going back to tradition, but it doesn’t look like the classics.” The building is the first of at least three projects that Kuma is anticipated to design in Vancouver. www.westbankcorp.com

The RAIC, the Canadian Institute of Planners, and the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects have annonced the winners of the 2016 National Urban Design Awards. “The quality of the submissions this year was impressive,” says the jury. “These unique solutions displayed a strong commitment to the overarching objective of urban design to respond to and enhance the immediate surroundings and wider community.” The awards are part of a two-tier program held in cooperation with Canadian municipalities. The national awards program judged winners of the 2015 municipal awards and entries submitted at large. In the category of Civic Design Projects, the award went to the Nathan Phillips Square Revitalization in Toronto, by PLANT Architect and Perkins+Will Canada in joint venture, with Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architecture and Adrian Blackwell Urban Projects. In Urban Architecture, the winning project was Union Street EcoHeritage in Vancouver, by SHAPE Architecture. The Urban Design Plan category recognized Provencher_Roy’s Technopôle Angus—Phase II plan for Montreal. Two projects were awarded under the Urban Fragments category: Entre les Rangs in Montreal, by KANVA; and Impulse in Montreal, by Lateral Office with CS Design. Calgary’s anonymous Bench Project was awarded as a community initiative. Student projects by Michael Zabinski and by the team of Brad Comis, Sebastian Sauve-Hoover, Danielle Soneff (of Threshold Art and Design) and Jesse Sherburne were also awarded. In addition, a sustainable development award was given to St. Patrick’s Island Park in Calgary, by Calgary Municipal Land Corporation; and the Small or Medium Community Urban Design Award went to Kinsmen Park in Saskatoon, by space2place design. Certificates of Merit were awarded to: Lansdowne Park in Ottawa, by PFS Studio; Queen Richmond Centre West in Toronto, by Sweeny &Co Architects; University of Ottawa Campus Master Plan, by the University of Ottawa with Urban Strategies; Quartier des spectacles in Montreal, by Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles; Limoilou Dans la Rue in Quebec City, by Groupe A with Annexe U; and Gore Pedestrianization Initiative—Veterans’ Place in Hamilton, by The MBTW Group. The jury included Carl A. Knipfel, MRAIC, Franc D’Ambrosio, MRAIC and Joanne Moran, CSLA. The awards will be presented during the RAIC ’s Festival of Architecture to be held in Nanaimo from June 8 to 11. www.raic.org

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OAA Design Excellence winners announced.

The Ontario Association of Architects (OAA) has announced the recipients of this year’s Design Excellence awards. Awards were given to the following projects in Ontario: Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, by Moriyama & Teshima Architects in association with Maki and Associates; Go Home Bay Cabin in Georgian Bay Township, by Ian MacDonald Architect; Harbord Towns in Toronto, by Superkül; Prince Arthur’s Landing, Thunder Bay Waterfront, by Brook McIlroy; Richard Ivey School of Business at Western University in London, by Hariri Pontarini Architects; Skygarden House in Toronto, by Dubbeldam Architecture + Design; and Toronto Public Library Scarborough Civic Centre Branch, by LGA Architectural Partners and Phillip H. Carter Architect in joint venture. Design Excellence awards were also given to two projects outside of Ontario, but completed by OAA-registered architects. These were: Commonwealth Community Recreation Centre in Edmonton, by MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects and HIP Architects in joint venture; and Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, by KPMB Architects and HCMA Architecture + Design in joint venture. Concept awards were given to Dominique Cheng for Planespotting and Paul Raff Studio for Shoreline Commemorative. Landmark designations were awarded to 299 Queen Street West in Toronto (original building by Burke, Horwood and White with renovation by Quadrangle Architects) and St. Mary’s Ukranian Catholic Church in Sudbury (John Stefura and Carl Skerl, Townend Stefura Baleshta and Pfister Architects). Denegri Bessai Studio was named Best Emerging Practice. John C. Cook, FRAIC, was awarded the G. Randy Roberts Service Award, and Honour Roll recognition was given to Douglas Cumming Johnson and Brian Curtner, both of whom passed away in 2015. A Lifetime Design Achievement Award went to George P. Baird, FRAIC, and the Order of da Vinci was awarded to William N. Greer, FRAIC. www.oaa.on.ca

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander wins Governor General’s Medal in Landscape Architecture.

The Canadian Society of Landscape Architects has announced that Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, Hon. MRAIC, has been selected by a jury as the inaugural recipient of the Governor General’s Medal in Landscape Architecture. The highest honour bestowed on a landscape architect in Canada, the medal is intended

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of Canada in 2009. She is a Fellow of the Canadian and the American Societies of Landscape Architects. In 2013, she was awarded the American Society of Landscape Architects Medal and received the Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award in 2011 from the International Federation of Landscape Architects. Most recently, she was honoured with the Margolese National Prize for Living. When asked about her work, Oberlander describes it humbly as: “an evolving experiment... the art of the possible.” Oberlander will receive her award at a ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on September 20, 2016.

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NEWS

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www.csla-aapc.ca

Winners of the MAQ Young Architectural Critic Competition announced. ABOVE Located on an urban infill site, Harbord Towns in Toronto by Superkül received one of nine 2016 OAA Design Excellence awards.

to honour exceptional landscape architects whose lifetime achievements and contributions to the profession have had a unique and lasting impact on Canadian society. Oberlander has led the landscape architecture community both nationally and internationally throughout her career. She is a respected teacher and has published many books and articles. Many ground-breaking

ideas, such as the importance of exposure to nature and the creation of opportunities for social interaction, formed the foundation of her design philosophy decades ago. She has played a seminal role in the evolution of Modernism in the context of architecture, landscape architecture and planning. Oberlander received the Order of Canada in 1990 and was made an Officer of the Order

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The Maison de l’architecture du Québec (MAQ ) has announced the winners of the 4th MAQ Young Architectural Critic Competition, held with the support of the RAIC. Under the theme “A Library for the 21st Century,” some 88 entrants aged 34 and under from across the country analyzed more than 20 Canadian library buildings. First prize (French) was awarded to Une bibliothèque à coeur ouvert, by Marie-Pier BourretLafleur, a 25-year-old French literature graduate student at McGill University. Her text on

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the Marc-Favreau library, designed by Dan Hanganu, FIRAC, is available in the 2016 spring-summer edition of Nouveau Projet magazine. First prize (English) was awarded to Growing Pains, by Kristen Smith, a 22-year-old architecture student at Ryerson University in Toronto. Her text, on Ryerson’s new Student Learning Centre, designed by Snøhetta and Zeidler Partnership Architects, will be published in an upcoming edition of Canadian Architect. The jury also gave honourable mentions to Alexandre Hamlyn, René-Maxime Parent, Alexandre Petitpas, David Rudin and Magdalena Milosz, MRAIC. The two winners each receive a $1,000 award and a two-year subscription to Canadian Architect. www.maisondelarchitecture.ca

WHAT’S NEW Call for speakers for the 2017 World Design Summit and Congress.

Members of the international design community are invited to take part in the World Design Summit and Congress in Montreal, from October 16 to 25, 2017. The Summit’s theme is both an invitation and a challenge: 10 days to change the world. What are the ideas that will allow design to reinvent the future? How does design in all its facets respond to the great issues of our times? Summit organizers are calling for presentations that promote collective, participative conversations on the value of design and its capacity to help bring about a better future. The coming together of the various design disciplines is greatly encouraged. The Summit seeks proposals aligned with the following six transdisciplinary themes: design and participation; design for Earth; design and beauty; design for sale; design and transformation; design and extremes. These themes intend to open discussions on the existing state of design, as well as to lead towards new perspectives, new paradigms and new solutions. The deadline to respond to the call for speakers is July 29, 2016. 

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FGMDA incorporates under new name: EVOQ.

Montreal-based architectural firm Fournier, Gersovitz, Moss, Drolet et associés architectes (FGMDA) has incorporated under a new name, EVOQ Architecture. EVOQ will be guided by the same management team of Alain Fournier, FIRAC, Julia Gersovitz, FRAIC, Rosanne Moss, FRAIC, Georges Drolet, MIRAC, Giovanni Diodati, MIRAC, Dima Cook, MRAIC, and Éric Moutquin. The name EVOQ stems from the word “evocative.” It asserts the firm’s continuing commitment to conserving and creating meaningful architecture that relates to its historic or cultural context. “The richness of any site comes from its unique characteristics and history,” explains Georges Drolet. “When we create, we want to evoke that particularity in the project’s overall design and details.” www.evoqarchitecture.com

Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr, Jr., and Philip Johnson opens at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) has opened an exhibition that puts the spotlight on a crucial aspect of the development of North American modern design. Partners in Design examines the collaboration between Alfred H. Barr, Jr., (1902‐1981), the first director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, and Philip Johnson (1906‐ 2005), MoMA’s first curator of architecture. These two visionaries and friends spread the ideas of the Bauhaus and

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NEWS acquainted North America with modern design and architecture by means of pioneering exhibitions at MoMA, such as Modern Architecture: International Exhibition (1932) and Machine Art (1934). By putting architecture, design, photography and cinema on an equal footing with the fine arts, Barr and Johnson transformed the vocation of museums throughout the continent, which had become home to numerous European artists and architects between the wars. Phyllis Lambert, founding director emeritus of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, recalls the inf luence of Barr and Johnson in the exhibition catalogue: “The decisive years in which an extraordinary relationship forged one of the world’s great institutions, the Museum of Modern Art in New York… [were] a turning point in bringing Modernism and consciousness of design to North America.” The exhibition runs until August 21, 2016. www.mmfa.qc.ca

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dangerous Steps.

The stair in the otherwise beautiful house by Omar Gandhi (April CA) appears to not have a side guard. This seems to be an ongoing issue with images of stairs in architecture magazines, where guards and handrails are removed or photoshopped out because they look better without. This is irresponsible and can be deceptive to clients, who want their buildings to look like the photos. Stairs without guards are dangerous in reality and against building code. Anyone can fall down a stair and seriously hurt themselves—stair safety isn’t just for kids and the elderly. Architects should be upholding all laws and codes in ways that are integrated into their architecture, and they shouldn’t need to hide things like stair guards for the sake of a glossy photo. I’m sure my suggestion won’t be popular, but I would like to see Canadian Architect fight this trend by refusing to showcase photos of stairs that lack guards or rails. -Christine Lolley, Solares Architecture Cohousing Legalities.

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The Cohousing Option (April CA) refers to restrictive legal statutes that impact cohousing development. Actually, the terms “strata title” and “condominium” are different names for the same thing. Both are a form of tenure where a housing unit is individually owned, with its own separate title. The housing form can be an apartment, townhouse or single family home. In addition to the individual ownership, access to common facilities are executed under legal rights associated with the individual ownership. These rights are controlled by the association of owners (commonly referred to as a condominium association, condominium corporation, or strata corporation) that jointly represent ownership of the common areas. All of the cohousing homes in British Columbia have separate titles, and are not co-owned as the article suggests. It’s important to clarify that the legal ownership structure for cohousing is very conventional. One of the factors that contribute to cohousing being difficult to develop and finance is misunderstanding about what cohousing is and is not. The real estate development process is risky and challenging no matter where in Canada you are located. The main reason why there are more cohousing homes in B.C. is because there are more local professional resources who understand how to work within the conventional legal and financial structures to support the cohousing movement’s collaborative process. -Valerie McIntyre, Canadian Cohousing Network

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27 Festival of Architecture Nanaimo, British Columbia, June 8-11, 2016 The RAIC heads to Nanaimo, BC, with a 2016 Festival of Architecture that is designed to engage the public as well as architects from across the country. The four-day Festival celebrates the theme of CONNEXIONS within a landscape that exemplifies the concept. Architects will connect with each other and, through a series of special events open to the public, connect with the Vancouver Island community. festival2016.raic.org

Festival d’architecture Nanaimo, Colombie-Britannique, 8-11 juin, 2016 L’IRAC se rend à Nanaimo pour y présenter un Festival d’architecture 2016 conçu pour mobiliser le public et les architectes de partout au pays. Le Festival de quatre jours se déroule sur le thème CONNEXIONS dans un paysage qui illustre le concept. Les architectes tissent des liens les uns avec les autres et, dans le cadre d’une série d’activités spéciales ouvertes au public, en créent de nouveaux avec les collectivités de l’île de Vancouver. festival2016.raic.org/fr

Annual General Meeting Nanaimo, British Columbia, June 8, 2016 All members are invited to attend RAIC’s AGM from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. A special resolution to amend RAIC by-laws regarding RAIC designations will require members’ approval.

Assemblée générale annuelle Nanaimo, Colombie-Britannique, 8 juin, 2016 Tous les membres sont invités à assister à l’AGA de l’IRAC, de 16 h 30 à 17 h 30. Une résolution spéciale visant à amender les règlements administratifs de l’IRAC concernant les désignations de l’IRAC nécessitera l’approbation des membres.

Membership renewal deadline approaching If you have not yet renewed for 2016, please log in to www.raic.org to renew by credit card, or contact asauve@raic.org.

La date limite du renouvellement des adhésions approche à grands pas Si vous n’avez pas encore renouvelé pour 2016, veuillez ouvrir une séance à www.raic.org pour renouveler et payer à l’aide de votre carte de crédit, ou communiquer avec asauve@raic.org.

The RAIC is the leading voice for excellence in the built environment in Canada, demonstrating how design enhances the quality of life, while addressing important issues of society through responsible architecture. www.raic.org L’IRAC est le principal porte-parole en faveur de l’excellence du cadre bâti au Canada. Il démontre comment la conception améliore la qualité de vie tout en tenant compte d’importants enjeux sociétaux par la voie d’une architecture responsable. www.raic.org/fr

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RAIC Journal Journal de l’IRAC John Crace, FRAIC, is a Halifax-based independent consulting architect focused on sustainability. He has illustrated two books and published dozens of cartoons over the past 40 years.

Comment aimezvous notre nouvelle toiture verte? John Crace, FRAIC, est un architecte indépendant établi à Halifax qui axe sa pratique sur la durabilité. Il a illustré deux livres et publié des dizaines de dessins humoristiques au cours des dernières 40 années.

RAIC announces a new designation L’IRAC annonce une nouvelle désignation The RAIC is moving toward a new designation – RAIC – to be used only by licensed architects starting next year. The board of the RAIC has voted to limit the use of this designation to members licensed by provincial regulators to practice architecture and to sunset the MRAIC designation. There are two exceptions: interns will be allowed to use the designation RAIC (Intern) and retired licensed architects RAIC (Retired). This reflects the importance of the internship process to the future of the profession and acknowledges retiring members’ contribution in the past.

L’IRAC va de l’avant avec une nouvelle désignation – IRAC – à laquelle n’auront droit que les membres dûment inscrits comme architectes auprès d’un ordre d’architectes, à compter de l’an prochain.

Le conseil d’administration de l’IRAC a voté en faveur d’une résolution visant à limiter le port de la désignation aux détenteurs du titre d’architecte et d’éliminer progressivement la désignation MIRAC. Deux exceptions s’appliqueront : les stagiaires auront le droit d’utiliser la désignation IRAC (stagiaire) et les architectes à la retraite, celui d’IRAC (à la retraite). Cela montre l’importance du No changes will be made to the FRAIC des- stage pour l’avenir de la profession tout en ignation given to members of the College of reconnaissant la contribution passée des Fellows. membres à la retraite. The new policy aims to ensure that RAIC carries the same clear distinction as MD for medical doctors and P.Eng for engineers.

Aucun changement ne sera apporté à la désignation FIRAC attribuée aux membres du Collège des fellows.

This needs to be voted on at the annual general meeting on June 8th in Nanaimo, BC. Before then, we invite you to share your views and comments.

Cette nouvelle politique aura pour effet d’établir les mêmes distinctions claires pour les architectes que le font les lettres MD pour les médecins.

Misuse of MRAIC has been an ongoing issue for the regulators in Canada, and a cause of confusion among the public regarding who is licensed as an architect in

Avant d’entrer en vigueur, cette mesure doit être approuvée par les membres qui seront réunis en assemblée générale, le 8 juin prochain à Nanaimo (C.-B.). D’ici là, nous

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Architectural Firm Award Cabinet d’architectes de l’année 1 University of Toronto Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport 2 Commonwealth Community Recreation Centre 3 Brampton Community Soccer Centre 4 Centennial College Ashtonbee Campus Student Centre 5 Branksome Hall Athletics and Wellness Centre 1 Centre Goldring pour les sports de haute performance de l’Université de Toronto

MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects (MJMA) is a Toronto firm that specializes in community recreation and sports buildings. Founded in 1988, the firm today has more than 50 professionals and is led by five partners: Viktors Jaunkalns, FRAIC, David Miller, FRAIC, Andrew Filarski, Robert Allen and Ted Watson. In addition to architects, the team includes designers in landscape architecture, interior design, and environmental graphic design. Over 28 years, the firm has advanced the development of hybrid public buildings that accommodate diverse programming. The more than 70 completed projects include sports and recreation centres, wellness programs, cultural facilities, libraries, and municipal and academic buildings. MJMA specializes in merging overlapping programs and user combinations to achieve new forms of community hubs. Among its projects are the Branksome Hall Athletic and Wellness Centre in Toronto (2014), the University of Toronto

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Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport in Toronto (with Patkau Architects, 2014) and the Commonwealth Community Recreation Centre in Edmonton (2012). At the Regent Park Aquatic Centre in Toronto (2012), the firm developed gender-neutral universal change rooms to address concerns of privacy, culture, and gender identity – marking a first in Canada. The group has forged a recognizable, shared and consistent aesthetic. The conceptual approach is driven by strong public realm spaces at the core of both interiors and exteriors. Use of daylight and rational built forms are key to bringing clarity and to elevating the profile of projects. MJMA’s projects are located across the country and increasingly abroad. Recently, it was awarded the lead design for the new $200-million Metro Sports Facility in Christchurch, New Zealand. This will be the first project in a city-rebuilding program to replace infrastructure destroyed in a 2011 earthquake.

MJMA is a studio-based practice that emphasizes collective participation in the design of projects and office culture. The firm has participated in Habitat for Humanity Builds in Toronto, Ecuador, Kenya, Guatemala, Dominican Republic and Kyrgyzstan. MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects (MJMA) est un cabinet de Toronto qui se spécialise dans les bâtiments récréatifs et sportifs communautaires. Fondé en 1988, le cabinet compte aujourd’hui plus de 50 professionnels et il est dirigé par ses cinq associés, Viktors Jaunkalns, FRAIC, David Miller, FRAIC, Andrew Filarski, Robert Allen et Ted Watson. Outre des architectes, l’équipe comprend des professionnels en architecture du paysage, en design d’intérieur et en design graphique et de l’environnement. La firme prône depuis 28 ans la réalisation de bâtiments publics hybrides qui conviennent à divers usages. Elle a réalisé plus

3 Centre communautaire de soccer de Brampton 4C  entre étudiant du campus Ashtonbee du Collège Centennial 5C  entre de bienêtre et de sports Branksome Hall

Photos: Doublespace Photography (1), Tom Arban (2-3), Shai Gil (4-5)

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de 70 projets de centres sportifs et récréatifs, de centres de bien-être, d’installations culturelles, de bibliothèques et de bâtiments municipaux et universitaires. Elle se spécialise dans la fusion de programmes qui se chevauchent et de combinaisons d’usages pour créer de nouvelles formes de pôles communautaires. Parmi ses projets, mentionnons le Centre de bien-être et de sports Branksome Hall de Toronto (2014), le Centre Goldring pour les sports de haute performance de l’Université de Toronto (avec Patkau Architects, 2014) et le centre récréatif communautaire Commonwealth, à Edmonton (2012). Dans le centre aquatique de Regent Park (2012), à Toronto, la firme a installé des vestiaires universels mixtes avec des cabines individuelles qui tiennent compte des questions liées à la vie privée, à la culture et au sexe des utilisateurs. C’était une première au Canada. Les projets de la firme se distinguent par leur esthétisme reconnaissable et

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cohérent. Ils créent des espaces publics forts, tant à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur, et ils s’imposent par leurs formes ration­ nelles. La firme utilise abondamment la lumière naturelle, ce qui rend les espaces plus accueillants.

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La firme réalise des projets à la grandeur du pays, et de plus en plus à l’étranger. Elle a récemment été retenue pour la conception du nouveau centre sportif Metro de Christchurch, en Nouvelle-Zélande, un projet de 200 millions $. Ce sera le premier bâtiment du programme de reconstruction de la ville dont les infrastructures ont été détruites lors d’un tremblement de terre en 2011. MJMA axe sa pratique sur l’atelier et insiste

sur la participation collective à la conception des projets et sur la culture d’entreprise. La firme a participé à des projets d’Habitat pour l’humanité à Toronto, en Équateur, au Kenya, au Guatemala, en République dominicaine et au Kyrgyzstan.

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Emerging Architectural Practice Award Prix du cabinet d’architectes de la relève

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Driven by a love for their city and enthusiasm for the intimate relationship between individuals and architecture in their dayto-day lives, the founders have focused on smaller-scale residential design—a niche that has been underserved by architectural firms. The firm’s name alludes to its work, which expresses the eclecticism of Montreal’s alleyways and the old structures typically found behind the city’s homes. They are inspired by the informal qualities of the city’s residential lanes. As recent graduates without clients, Renée, Sébastien and Yannick bought a duplex on De Bullion Street and converted it into a single-family dwelling. It became a laboratory where they could test and

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apply what they had learned. With the visibility generated by this project, they slowly built a portfolio. During the first three years after graduation, they interned in larger firms, spending evenings and weekends on la SHED projects. They worked together part-time in the Plateau Mont-Royal triplex where they all lived, passing files and computers from one floor to the next. When they had licenced, the three left their day jobs to devote themselves full-time to la SHED.

La SHED Architecture, un bureau de neuf personnes, a été créée en 2011 par Renée Mailhot, MIRAC, Sébastien Parent et Yannick Laurin. Ces trois architectes se sont rencontrés à l’Université de Montréal où ils ont obtenu leur diplôme en 2008. La firme réalise principalement des projets résidentiels de plus petite échelle; des projets de réaménagement d’espaces exigus en contextes urbains; des petits bâtiments commerciaux; et des résidences secondaires.

The firm now makes its home in a storefront location on the main floor of a building built in 1890. La SHED continues the vernacular tradition of the area while reflecting the firm’s resolutely contemporary aesthetic. Team members sit and work around a large table.

Amoureux de leur ville et passionnés de la relation intime, émotive et fonctionnelle qu’entretient l’individu à l’architecture dans la vie de tous les jours, les fondateurs ont dès le départ porté leur intérêt sur l’architecture résidentielle de plus petite échelle—un créneau généralement délaissé par les cabinets d’architectes.

They seek to convey a view of architecture where choosing to use an architect does not depend on budget but rather on the desired outcome, and designing a personalized living space is not a luxury but an accessible service.

Le nom de la firme est une allusion à ses interventions qui expriment l’éclectisme des ruelles où l’on trouve les anciens hangars caractéristiques de l’arrière des maisons montréalaises. Ce nom prend essence des anciennes « sheds ».

Photos: Maxime Brouillet

La SHED Architecture, a nine-person office, was founded in 2011 by Renée Mailhot, MIRAC, Sébastien Parent and Yannick Laurin. The trio graduated in 2008 from the University of Montreal, where they met. Their work includes free-standing houses and additions in tight urban contexts as well as small commercial projects and vacation properties.

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1 De Gaspé House

Tout juste diplômés et sans clients, Renée, Sébastien et Yannick ont acheté un duplex sur la rue de Bullion dans l’objectif de le transformer complètement pour en faire une maison unifamiliale. Ce lieu est devenu un laboratoire permettant de tester et de mettre en pratique leurs connaissances. La visibilité apportée par ce projet leur a permis de tranquillement construire un portfolio. Pendant les trois années qui ont suivi la fin de leurs études, les fondateurs ont effectué leurs stages dans de grands bureaux tout en travaillant aux projets de la SHED les soirs et les week-ends. Ils travaillaient ensemble dans un triplex du Plateau Mont-Royal où ils habitaient tous, trimbalant leurs dossiers et leurs ordinateurs d’un étage à l’autre. Dès l’obtention de leur permis d’exercice, les nouveaux architectes avaient déjà con­ clu un nombre suffisant de contrats pour voler de leurs propres ailes. Ils ont donc quitté leurs emplois afin de se consacrer à temps plein à la SHED.

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3 Durocher House 4D  emers House 5 La SHED office 1M  aison de Gaspé 2S  alle d’exposition de l’Aire Visuelle 3 Maison Durocher 4M  aison Demers 5B  ureaux de la SHED

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La firme a choisi de s’installer au rez-dechaussée d’un commerce ayant pignon sur rue datant de 1890. La SHED perpétue la tradition vernaculaire du lieu tout en adoptant une facture résolument contemporaine à l’image de la firme. Au centre de l’espace, tous les membres de l’équipe prennent place autour d’une seule grande table. L’équipe cherche à établir une nouvelle relation à l’architecture, une relation dans laquelle la décision de faire appel à un architecte ne doit pas être prise en fonction du budget, mais plutôt en fonction du résultat espéré. Une relation où concevoir un lieu de vie à son image ne relève pas du luxe, car il s’agit d’un service accessible. 5

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Young Architect Award Prix du jeune architecte

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1 Alpine cabin

Lund Hagem and Mork Ulnes, of Norway, to create an alpine community in the snowbound Sierra Nevada Mountains in California. The three-year project encompasses the master planning and design of housing, a public lodge, warming structures and furniture.

Their projects, located mostly in British Columbia, include cabins at Whistler and Lac le Jeune; houses on Bowen Island and in Tofino, Squamish and North Vancouver; the restaurants Kin Kao, Torafuku, and Bestie in Vancouver; and a barn on Pender Island.

The Scotts believe that an architect should have a direct role in the act of construction, as innovation and refinement come from working (and reworking) directly with materials. Their education at Dalhousie University was formative to this approach, in part through the study of traditional construction as a basis for form.

They’re currently at work on the adaptive reuse of urban buildings; the design of a hunting cabin; and an ongoing line of project-specific furniture, lighting and architectural hardware. They plan to launch a fixture and furniture line in 2016 to make the designs publicly available. In 2015, the Scotts were selected with Claesson Koivisto Rune, of Sweden, and

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After graduation, they returned to British Columbia to build a cabin for David’s parents on Lac le Jeune Cabin. The experience was invaluable for their roles in construction administration for 11 years before forming their studio. Susan worked at James Cheng Architects and Mcfarlane Green Biggar Architecture + Design, while David worked in the office of Peter

Cardew Architects. They launched their practice with Alpine Cabin, an award-winning remote snowboard cabin on Vancouver Island, built with friends using locally felled lumber. David et Susan Scott sont un couple de Vancouver dont les carrières en architecture se sont inextricablement liées il y a 19 ans. Ils travaillent ensemble sous la raison sociale Scott & Scott Architects et leurs bureaux sont établis dans un atelier donnant sur la rue, aménagé dans leur résidence familiale construite en 2012, ce qui leur permet de travailler tout en restant près de leurs deux fillettes. Ils ont également un atelier de design industriel, de prototypage et de recherche sur les matériaux. Leurs projets, presque tous situés en Colombie-Britannique, comprennent notamment des chalets à Whistler et à Lac le Jeune; des résidences sur l’île Bowen, à Tofino, à Squamish et à North Vancouver; les restaurants Kin Kao, Tora-

2L  ac Le Jeune cabin 3 Pender Island Barn 4 Bestie Currywurst 5S  usan and David Scott 1 Chalet de montagne 2 Chalet à Lac le Jeune 3G  range sur l’île Pender 4 Bestie Currywurst 5S  usan et David Scott

Photos: Scott & Scott Architects

The architectural careers of David and Susan Scott have been intertwined for 19 years. The husband and wife behind Scott & Scott Architects built a street-level studio inside their Vancouver house in 2012, allowing them to work while being home with their two young daughters.

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fuku et Bestie à Vancouver; et une grange sur l’île Pender. Ils travaillent actuellement à la réutilisation adaptative de bâtiments urbains. Ils sont aussi en train de concevoir un chalet de chasse et ils offrent des services de design de meubles, d’appareils d’éclairage et de quincaillerie architecturale. Ils prévoient d’ailleurs lancer une gamme de meubles et d’appareils d’éclairage en 2016. En 2015, ils ont été choisis pour faire partie d’une équipe internationale formée de Claesson Koivisto Rune, de la Suède, et de Lund Hagem et Mork Ulnes, de la Norvège, pour créer une collectivité dans une région qui reçoit de fortes précipitations de neige dans les montagnes du Sierra Nevada, en Californie. Le projet triennal porte sur l’élaboration d’un plan directeur et sur la conception de logements, d’une auberge, d’abris et de meubles. David et Susan Scott croient que l’architecte doit jouer un rôle direct dans l’acte de construire, car l’innovation et le

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raffinement ne peuvent venir qu’en travaillant et en retravaillant directement avec les matériaux. Leurs études à l’Université Dalhousie ont d’ailleurs été formatrices à cet égard, notamment parce qu’elles ont porté sur la construction traditionnelle comme base de la forme. À la fin de leurs études, ils sont retournés en Colombie-Britannique pour construire un chalet pour les parents de David sur Lac le Jeune. L’expérience de construire a été précieuse pour leur rôle de surveillants de travaux qu’ils ont assumé pendant 11 ans avant d’ouvrir leur propre atelier. Susan a travaillé chez James Cheng Architects et Mcfarlane Green Biggar Architecture + Design, alors que David a travaillé dans les bureaux de Peter Cardew Architects.Ils ont ouvert leur bureau après avoir remporté un prix pour une cabane de snowboard en région éloignée, sur l’île de Vancouver, qu’ils ont construite avec des amis en utilisant du bois abattu trouvé sur place.

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RAIC Journal

Journal de l’IRAC

Continued from page 27

Canada. Collectively the regulators have handled over 100 instances of people using the designation to imply licensure. “A post-nominal designation implies a credential, and creating ambiguity about who is an architect is not something the RAIC can be seen to be supporting,” says RAIC President Allan Teramura, FRAIC.

architects, corporate affiliates, and allied professionals, with no other member benefits being affected by this proposed change. The goal is to remain as inclusive as possible and to welcome all who have an interest in the built environment. Only the postnominal will be changing to distinguish licensed architects from other members. There may still be changes and further stipulations as this issue is brought to a vote at the AGM.

“It could take only one serious and public complaint about one of our members to make the entire organization look question- Suite de la page 27 able, and undermine all of the credibility we vous invitons à nous transmettre vos points have built up over the years,” he says. de vue et vos commentaires. “I am sure all members would agree that Le mauvais usage de la désignation this is an unacceptable situation, and one that presents risks for the reputation of the MIRAC préoccupe les ordres d’architectes RAIC and its members,” he says. “The new depuis longtemps, car il crée de la confusion dans le public qui ne sait pas si celui designation, RAIC, used only by licensed qui la porte est dûment inscrit comme professionals, will serve as a universally architecte auprès d’un ordre d’architectes recognized designation of professional du Canada. Mis ensemble, les ordres standing from coast to coast.” d’architectes ont traité plus d’une centaine de cas de personnes qui utilisaient la The goal is to raise the profile of architects, désignation pour laisser croire qu’elles to encourage non-licensed individuals to étaient architectes. become licensed, and to strengthen the RAIC’s role and influence as the voice of « L’ajout d’une désignation après le nom architecture in Canada. Once it is ratified, suppose que la personne détient un titre de the RAIC will launch a public awareness compétences et l’IRAC ne veut certainecampaign. ment pas créer de l’ambiguïté à ce sujet », “There are thousands of architects in Can- a déclaré le président de l’IRAC, Allan ada who are not yet members. It’s our hope Teramura, FRAIC. that strengthening the significance of the « Il s’agirait d’une seule plainte sérieuse et national designation will make it more publique sur un de nos membres pour que meaningful,” says Mr. Teramura. toute l’organisation soit mise en doute et pour saper toute la crédibilité que nous The new designation, RAIC, will come into avons bâtie au fil des ans », a-t-il ajouté. effect in 2017. As of 2017, new non-licensed members will not receive a designation. « Je suis certain que tous les membres Existing non-licensed members currently using the MRAIC designation will be allowed conviendront que c’est une situation inacto continue to use it up to and including 2019. ceptable qui pose des risques pour la réputation de l’IRAC et de ses membres. La Licensed members will use the new designouvelle désignation IRAC, en étant exclunation, effective January 1, 2017. sive aux professionnels inscrits auprès d’un ordre, sera reconnue par tous comme It is important to note that membership la désignation d’un statut professionnel, in the RAIC will remain open to students, d’un océan à l’autre. » architectural graduates, foreign-trained

L’objectif est de faire rayonner les architectes, d’encourager les personnes admissibles au titre d’architecte à s’inscrire auprès d’un ordre et de renfor­cer le rôle et l’influence de l’IRAC en tant que porteparole de l’architecture au Canada. Une fois la mesure approuvée, l’IRAC lancera une campagne de sensibilisation auprès du public. « Il y a des milliers d’architectes au Canada qui ne sont pas encore membres de l’IRAC. Nous espérons qu’en accordant une plus grande importance à la désignation nationale, nous lui donnerons une plus grande signification », a conclu M. Teramura. La nouvelle désignation IRAC entrera en vigueur en 2017. À compter de 2017, tous les nouveaux membres qui ne sont pas inscrits comme architectes auprès d’un ordre provincial n’auront pas droit à la désignation. Les membres qui utilisent actuellement la désignation MIRAC pourront continuer à le faire jusqu’à 2019 inclusivement. Les membres ayant le statut d’architecte utiliseront la nouvelle désignation à compter du 1er janvier 2017. Il est important de souligner que les étudiants, les diplômés en architecture du Canada et de l’étranger, les associés et les membres de professions affilées pourront continuer d’être membres de l’IRAC et de profiter de tous les autres avantages de l’adhésion. Le but est de rester le plus inclusif possible et d’accueillir tous ceux qui s’intéressent à l’environnement bâti. Seule la désignation changera pour établir la distinction entre les membres qui ont le titre d’architecte et les autres membres. Cette question étant soumise au vote lors de l’AGA, il est possible que des modifications et des ajouts y soient apportés.

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Banking center strengthened with MAPEI’s CFRP products

Scotiabank’s concourse and ground levels at Scotia Plaza in Toronto are undergoing structural strengthening in order to increase the live load capabilities of the floors to greater than 50 lbs. per square foot. The center’s vertical support columns are being strengthened by MAPEI’s MapeWrap C Uni-Ax 300 and MapeWrap C Uni-Ax 600 uni-directional carbon fiber fabrics in combination with MapeWrap resins. Two pultruded carbon fiber plates – MAPEI’s Carboplate E 200 and Carboplate E 250 – are being used on the floors themselves and on the underside of load-bearing beams on the two levels. The Carboplate products on the floors are being covered with MAPEI’s Planibond EBA bonding agent and Topcem Premix screed to provide a flat, level surface for floor coverings.

MAPEI products used:

• Carboplate™ E 250 (100 mm and 150 mm plates) • Carboplate E 200 (50 mm, 100 mm and 150 mm plates) • MapeWrap™ C Fiocco anchors • MapeWrap C Uni-Ax 300 • MapeWrap C Uni-Ax 600 • MapeWrap Primer 1 • MapeWrap 11 • MapeWrap 31 • Topcem™ Premix • Planibond ® EBA

As part of a total solution for industrial applications, MAPEI has a line of structural strengthening products that have been ICC-approved for commercial buildings.

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NIC LEHOUX

IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST

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The Governor General’s Medals remain at the pinnacle of the many honours and awards that recognize architecture in Canada. Every two years, they showcase exceptional work by Canadian architects, as chosen by a peer jury. Each cycle covers a relatively long time span—buildings up to seven years old can be entered—meaning that projects can shine at their best, after final adjustments have been made and landscaping has grown in. This year’s winning projects are remarkable in many ways, not least among which is the stellar showing made by public projects. For the first time since 1982, when the medals were established, the winners are entirely institutional, government and commercial projects—not a single private residence is among them. Tenaciousness is often requisite for architecture, but this is especially the case in the face of the tight timelines and budgets of public projects. Bridgepoint Active Healthcare—the first P3 project to garner a Governor General’s Medal—and the Cogeco Amphitheatre are particularly noteworthy for achieving design excellence amidst more than the usual pressures of complex contracts and value engineering. Other projects turned the caprices of public regulations and funding to their advantage. The Wong Dai Sin Temple’s signature cantilever was conceived to fulfill a municipal requirement for a large amount of parking on the compact suburban site. On the University of Manitoba’s campus, ARTlab was a project nimbly mustered from a related commission, to take advantage of a stimulus funding opportunity. Several winning projects are notable for the tight partnership they show

between architecture and engineering. Engineers were key members of the team that created Glacier Skywalk, a daring structure that leaps from a cliff in the Canadian Rockies. Technical excellence in working with wood is evident in the Wood Innovation & Design Centre, Ronald McDonald House BC & Yukon, and the BC Passive House Factory. That all three projects are in British Columbia attests to the continued advancement of expertise in working with wood (and particularly with engineered mass timber) in this province. Other projects show a subtle flair for typological innovation. The Regent Park Aquatic Centre, for instance, includes universal change rooms— a first in Canada—that allow an exceptional quantity of daylight to flow through the entire one-storey structure. The Lévis headquarters of Caisse Desjardins layers circulation and collaborative spaces along a glazed façade, a strategy that distinguishes it from typical office buildings. Of course, users are the final arbiters of a building’s success. Nathan Phillips Square and Halifax Central Library perhaps share the crown by this measure. I was part of the tens of thousands who flocked to Nathan Phillips Square during the Pan/ParaPan American Games last summer; the newly renovated plaza handled the crowds with adeptness and grace. And on the east coast, Haligonians are thrilled with their new library. In its first year, it had two million visitors—more than five times the city’s population. In these cases, the Governor General’s Medals merely confirm what the public has long known—that quality architecture makes life richer and more pleasurable for all.

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

HALIFAX CENTRAL LIBRARY Halifax, Nova Scotia Fowler Bauld & Mitchell Ltd. (architect & prime consultant) with Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects (architectural design consultant) PHOTOS Adam Mørk LOCATION

ARCHITECTS

The Halifax Central Library is the most significant public building completed in the Nova Scotia capital in over a generation, and a new cultural hub for the region. The 15,000-square-metre building was designed through a series of participative public consultations and focus study sessions, which established ambitious architectural, social and environmental goals. Consequently, the library accommodates a variety of programs and sustainable features, including a 300-seat performance space, music studios, a First Nations Circle, rainwater collection and a vegetated green roof. Most important, it provides a free public space in the midst of the city. Located on a prominent site in downtown Halifax, the library is advantageously situated to create vibrant plazas within the surrounding urban context. The building is composed of three stacked glass volumes that are topped by a monumental glass cantilever. Each volume is rotated to embrace views of the surrounding ocean and the city’s landmarks. The Halifax Living Room, the building’s most remarkable space, is located in the signature cantilever on the top level. The backdrop of this glass-encapsulated reading lounge includes dramatic views of the Citadel Hill fortress and the mosaic of buildings and nautical activity that make up the city of Halifax. The atrium at the heart of the building is a centre of activity. Here, visitors can socialize at the café, enjoy magazines, or marvel at an eyepopping installation of 5,000 miniature paintings. This open space is

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anchored by a sculptural criss-crossing of stairs and walkways that provide gallery-like circulation from the lobby up to the top cantilever. Daylight cascades from the elongated skylight down to the reading areas that surround the central space. These elements emerge as focal points in the library, as their exuberance contrasts with the restrained material palette and rigourous design resolution that prevail throughout the building. The Halifax Central Library is a sustainable building. Floor-to-ceiling glass panels on the north and south façades admit diffuse daylight into reading spaces and facilitate passive solar heating benefits for the building. Service rooms, washrooms and elevators, located on the east and west perimeters of the building, are clad in highly insulated wall sections to minimize glare in reading areas and to reduce unwanted solar heat gain. The double-glazed windows achieve exceptional thermal resistance and the frit patterns of falling leaves on the glass façade act LEVEL 2 12

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Stairways playfully criss-cross through the skylit atrium of the library. Different types of gathering places are interwoven in the plan, including a large theatre, study areas, storytelling spaces and a lounge-style reading room on the top floor. ABOVE LEFT The library is composed of stacked boxes that recall a pile of books. ABOVE RIGHT Daylight, natural materials, and clear sight lines contribute to the library’s sense of spaciousness.

OPPOSITE

as both a sun shading solution and a poetic reference to the gardens that were once located on the site. The Halifax Central library opened in December 2014 to a public that has truly taken ownership of the space. It boasted two million visitors in its first year—nearly three times what was anticipated. Currently targeting LEED Gold certification, the project was also shortlisted for World Building of the Year in the Civic and Community category. :: Jury :: This outstanding new civic building is a community gathering place that responds to the diversity of its users, accommodating many more activities than the traditional library. This 21st century facility is topped by the Halifax Living Room: an inviting, light and playful public space with views across Halifax as far as the harbour. Other spaces provide for learning, reading, exercising, studying, hanging out and playing. The reception area’s generous atrium with its beauti-

ful stairway is the hub connecting the functions and users. The jury commends the process of early user engagement that led to the design— the public’s embrace of the building is a testament to its value. |

CLIENT HALIFAX REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY/HALIFAX PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARCHITECT TEAM SCHMIDT

HAMMER LASSEN—MORTEN SCHMIDT, CHRIS HARDIE, METTE WIENBERG, STUART HILL, JESSICA MENTZ, LARS VEJEN. FOWLER BAULD & MITCHELL—GEORGE COTARAS, WAYNE DUNCAN, SUSAN FITZGERALD, MARK GAMMON, D’ARCY DENNEHY, STACEY MACINNIS, SHEENA MOORE, GREG FRY, HARVEY FREEMAN, MAUREEN AUBUT, MEGAN BAKER. | STRUCTURAL SNC-LAVALIN WITH OVE ARUP (CONCEPT DESIGN) | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL CBCL LIMITED WITH OVE ARUP (CONCEPT DESIGN) | CIVIL SNCLAVALIN | LANDSCAPE GORDON RATCLIFFE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT | INTERIORS SCHMIDT HAMMER LASSEN ARCHITECTS AND FOWLER BAULD & MITCHELL LTD. | PUBLIC CONSULTATION MYRGAN INC. | SUSTAINABILITY SOLTERRE DESIGN | ACOUSTICS SWALLOW ACOUSTIC CONSULTANTS LTD. | BUILDING CODE RJ BARTLETT ENGINEERING LTD. | CURTAIN WALL BVDA FAÇADE ENGINEERING LTD. | WIND & SNOW ENVIRONMENTAL THEAKSTON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING ENGINEERS | THEATRE DESIGN THEATRE CONSULTING GROUP LTD. | THIRD-PARTY COMMISSIONING FC O’NEILL SCRIVEN & ASSOC. LTD. | PROJECT MANAGER HALIFAX REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER ELLISDON CORPORATION | AREA 14,996 M2 | BUDGET $57.6 M | COMPLETION NOVEMBER 2014

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 1 VESTIBULE   2 LOBBY   3 PAUL O’REGAN HALL   4 WINTER GARDEN   5 TEEN STUDY/READING   6 LARGE PROGRAM ROOM   7 FAMILY READING   8 COLLECTION 9 OPEN STUDY 10 LOCAL HISTORY 11 EXTERIOR PODIUM 12 SKYLIGHT

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

SIÈGE SOCIAL DE LA CAISSE DESJARDINS DE LÉVIS Lévis, Quebec ABCP Architecture and Anne Carrier Architecture (architects in consortium) PHOTOS Stéphane Groleau LOCATION

ARCHITECTS

This flagship project at the entrance to Cité Desjardins and the City of Lévis adds a symbolic and striking dimension to the heart of the birthplace of Caisse Desjardins. The architectural approach reflects the financial institution’s historical values as well as its modern image. While asserting its presence at the intersection of two major arteries, the building—in both location and volume—blends with the site’s variable topography and lush greenery. This also carries through into its architectural detailing. On the east-west axis, the vertical movement of the decidedly urban zinc-clad façade reflects the fast-paced user activity and regional scale. Running along Boulevard Alphonse-Desjardins, the main façade faces Old Lévis and steps down to bring us to the city’s human scale. The circulation areas inside and outside the building are the key elements that frame and reveal the building’s various spaces and functions. The decision to cluster interior circulation against a curtain wall draws natural light into the heart of the structure. Oversized tripleglazed glass was used for the curtain wall, with a minimum of mullions to allow for clear views. The design incorporates innovative office layout and functional organization strategies. The ground f loor features multipurpose

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areas and a large foyer facing the park, above which modular wooden cubes housing member reception and lounge areas are suspended like tree branches. A new concept in the financial sector, the open workspaces offer common areas accessible to both employees and customers. An array of breakout areas along the main corridor are used for collaborative work. Advisors can welcome members at the entrance, walking them through the large foyer, a ref lective gathering place that opens out onto the park and the outdoor square. The foyer serves as a multipurpose collective space; the director often uses this area to address his 200-some employees. Aimed at meeting LEED Silver certification, the project’s sustainable development strategies include tree preservation, geothermal energy and chilled beams, and the use of local materials to create an architectural design that is consistent with the structure’s purpose. However, the comfort and well-being of users were the key drivers of the design and layout choices. In sum, the project features innovative architectural composition and spatial organization for the financial sector. The quality of the architectural concept and its technical construction details ref lect the architects’ intention to contribute to the sustainability of this living and working environment. On both the urban and human scales, the architectural solution transforms the image of the entrance to the City of Lévis and that of the Desjardins movement.

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OPPOSITE A rhythmic façade composed of zinc panels provides filtered light to the office spaces within, while giving the banking headquarters a handsome street presence. Landscaping softens the site’s slope to create a welcoming approach for clients. ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Meeting rooms pop out along the building’s north side, creating a focal zone for collaboration and circulation; wood staircases rise alongside the façade; the ground floor foyer includes meeting areas for clients, and is enlivened by the activites above.

:: Jury :: This exceptional office building, developed within the discipline of commercial structures designed for financial institutions, breaks new ground in its organization and detailing. Most of the space is designed for large open office layouts, but the designers have clustered the circulation and enclosed spaces along the north face of the building to create a zone of energy and contact. Triple glazing provides acoustic privacy for the meeting spaces while creating a lively and special identity for the façade. The jury applauds the clarity and refinement of this unique building, as well as the clients who supported it.

CLIENT DESJARDINS SÉCURITÉ FINANCIÈRE / CAISSE DESJARDINS DE LÉVIS | ARCHITECT TEAM

ANNE CARRIER ARCHITECTURE—ANNE CARRIER, CHARLES FERLAND, PATRICIA PRONOVOST, MATHIEU ST-AMANT, MARTIN L’HÉBREUX, ROBERT BOILY, RAPHAEL HAMELIN. ABCP ARCHITECTURE—VADIM SIEGEL, PHILIPPE LAFRANCE-BOUCHER, DANY BLACKBURN, MARIO CÔTÉ, JACQUES BERNIER, SIMON BÉRUBÉ. | STRUCTURAL CIMA | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL BPR | CIVIL CIMA+ | ERGONOMICS ENTRAC | ACOUSTICS SOFT DB | WINDOW GRAPHICS PAQUEBOT DESIGN | CONTRACTOR CONSTRUCTION DUTRAN INC. | BUDGET $20 M | COMPLETION NOVEMBER 2013

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

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ARCHITECTS

MARC GIBERT

In the early 2000s, the City of Trois-Rivières began work on a major revitilization project for a site on the shores of the St. Lawrence River. Formerly industrial land, the parcel was a prime location adjacent to the harbourfront park, city centre, St. Lawrence River and St. Quentin Island. The municipality envisaged a majestic, harmonious and vibrant amphitheatre, and chose to hold an open architectural competition with the aim of obtaining a world-class building. In 2011, Paul Laurendeau Architect won the competition in a joint venture with Trois-Rivières-based Beauchesne Architecture Design. The Amphithéâtre Cogeco, which opened with a Cirque du Soleil performance

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on July 15, 2015, garnered media acclaim for its spectacular architecture. The qualities highlighted by the competition jury are undeniable. The project boasts an elegant and imposing structure, and provides ample views of the St. Maurice and St. Lawrence rivers. It is a model of sound planning, which includes enhancement of the site and public river areas. Its interiors benefit from natural lighting and the clarity and simplicity of the spatial organization. Conceptual integrity was maintained throughout the project’s development. From an urban perspective, the building is situated at the tip of the site, bordering on the St. Maurice River. Its silhouette is reflected in the water at night, similar to the Sydney Opera House, which was cited as a reference for the city. The waterfront location also frees up the central portion of the development area, providing wonderful views of the river from Avenue des Draveurs, a new urban artery in Trois-Rivières-sur-Saint-Laurent.

ADRIEN WILLIAMS

Trois-Rivières, Québec Paul Laurendeau Architect (design and project architect) in joint venture with Beauchesne Architecture Design LOCATION

MARC GIBERT

AMPHITHÉÂTRE COGECO

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ADRIEN WILLIAMS

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OPPOSITE TOP A tapered red roof and aluminum-clad fly tower give the amphitheatre an iconic presence in Trois-Rivières. OPPOSITE BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT The facility includes 3,500 fixed seats; thousands of additional spectators can enjoy concerts from the grassy slopes that ring the back of the amphitheatre. ABOVE View of the amphitheatre reflected in the St. Lawrence River at night.

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Symmetric and open like a welcome pavilion, the four sides of the structure dialogue with its setting: to the west, the historic downtown core of Old Trois-Rivières; to the north, the new Technoparc and the main access road; to the west, St. Quentin Island and its beach; and to the south, the St. Lawrence Seaway. The massive horizontal roof, which measures 80 by 90 metres, forms a distinctive architectural element—one that stands out from the landscape. Covered in red perforated metal soffits, its underside is supported by eight metallic-painted columns, each 85 centimetres in diameter. Scale-like aluminum panels, in three shades of red, clad the central concrete fly tower. Like a curtain, it transforms the building’s rear façade into a dramatic entrance. The bright colours have a theatrical feel, reinforcing the building’s function. Lighting at the base of the columns creates sparkling contrasts on the underside of the roof, showcasing the form of this new landmark for Trois-Rivières. :: Jury :: The amphitheatre has become an icon in the transformation of the riverfront precinct in Trois-Rivières, providing a new identity for the city. Using the simplest of geometries and the lightest of touches, the architects have created a memorable place for performances. The jury admires the precision of its distinct f loating roof. Night lighting and the use of bright colour make the building a beacon for spectacles and performances at the water’s edge.

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CLIENT VILLE DE TROIS-RIVIÈRES | ARCHITECT TEAM ATELIER PAUL LAURENDEAU—PAUL LAUREN-

DEAU, BORIS MORIN-DEFOY, RENÉE-CLAUDE LANGLOIS, ERWAN LE DIRAISON, GABRIEL OSTIGUY, CLAUDE DE PASSILLÉ. BEAUCHESNE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN— FRANÇOIS BEAUCHESNE, ROBERT MAILHOT, ÉTIENNE PARADIS, MAXIME GERVAIS, JOANNIE DESROCHERS, NATHALIE LORD. | STRUCTURAL STANTEC LTD. (FORMERLY DESSAU) AND PLURITEC | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL STANTEC LTD. (FORMERLY DESSAU) | THEATRE CONSULTANT FOR THE PROJECT TRIZART ALLIANCE | ACOUSTICS OCTAVE ACOUSTIQUE | THEATRE CONSULTANT FOR THE ARCHITECT GUY SIMARD | LIGHTING ÉCLAIRAGE PUBLIC | GRAPHICS AND WAYFINDING BUREAU PRINCIPAL | CODE TECHNORM INC. | AREA 14,000 M2 | BUDGET $42 M | COMPLETION JULY 2015

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

GEOFF GRENVILLE

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BRIDGEPOINT ACTIVE HEALTHCARE Toronto, Ontario Stantec Architecture / KPMB Architects—Planning, Design and Compliance Architects HDR Architecture / Diamond Schmitt Architects—Design, Build, Finance and Maintain Architects LOCATION

ARCHITECTS

Bridgepoint Active Healthcare is as much about city building and engagement with the community as it is about creating an architecture of wellness for people with complex chronic diseases. It creates a positive destination for people seeking help and for those providing care. The design evolves from the patient experience and expands to engaging the community, city and natural world. The hospital is the subject of North America’s largest post-occupancy study to assess the impact of design on health and wellbeing. This study has linked Bridgepoint’s design quality to patient and staff satisfaction as well as to inpatient healing: the average length of stay for stroke patients has been reduced by 12 days. The project builds on a 2006 master plan to create a connected campus of new parks, plazas and pathways tied to the Riverdale residential community. The existing site is organized into a nine-square grid with the historic Don Jail occupying the central square. The hospital is located

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on the northwest edge. The entrances of the hospital and the Don Jail were planned to create a continuous interior public realm, connecting north-south and east-west to the landscape, the city and the community. This connectivity is key. The building design optimizes the therapeutic benefits of nature for healing by emphasizing visual and physical access to the outdoors. Magnificent views of the lush Don River Valley and Riverdale Park, the changing downtown skyline, and the vibrant Riverdale neighbourhood are all highlighted to connect patients and staff to the community. The massing and organizational strategy breaks down the large building into neighbourhoods of care. The podium is conceived as a public building and draws on the idea of an “urban porch” inspired by the vernacular of domestic and resort architecture in Canada. The hospital rooms were designed to give every patient—whether sitting or lying down—an unobstructed view, both horizontally and vertically. The vertical bay windows provide ground-to-sky views, visible from bed: a symbol of hope that expresses Bridgepoint’s goal of rehabilitation. The views encourage patients to get out of their rooms and reintegrate themselves into their community. The fenestration pattern of projecting pop-out vertical frames interspersed with horizontal windows communicates this strategy to the city. There are 464 vertical windows—one for each patient.

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TOM ARBAN

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OPPOSITE The hospital includes the renovated Don Jail and links to a series of surrounding park spaces. ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT An upper-floor terrace provides generous outdoor space for patients to socialize and test their mobility; each patient room includes horizontal windows to provide views from bed and from wheelchairs, while vertical windows act as a subtle nudge towards rehabilitation.

Bridgepoint Health is the first hospital in Toronto to be LEED Silvercertified. The building envelope incorporates durable and low-maintenance materials, including local stone, zinc metal panels and ipe wood. Low-iron glazing was used throughout to enhance the perception of the surrounding landscape. Interior materials were selected to support ongoing maintenance and infection control. Finally, a green roof with a dramatically positioned terrace is accessible to patients. Bridgepoint’s aspirations go beyond LEED to create an architecture of wellness that celebrates the sustainability of our healthcare system. :: Jury :: This innovative healthcare project heals the city by revitalizing a historic jail site and linking patient spaces with nature and the city. The project is strong on connections: between present and past, hospital and city, patients and healthcare professionals. Unlike in most health care facilities, the interior and exterior spaces join to promote health, with areas for outdoor meeting, retreating and conversation. Windows, fixtures and spaces are scaled to the humans who occupy the facility. The former jail at the centre of the site opens onto public gathering space, connecting the grounds with the wider world. The jury applauds the many ways this project addresses the often dehumanizing aspects of the typical hospital experience.

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3

SITE PLAN

 1 CENTRAL COURT   2 BRIDGEPOINT HOSPITAL   3 ADMINISTRATION BUILDING   4 LABYRINTH TERRACE

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20M

CLIENT BRIDGEPOINT HEALTH | ARCHITECT TEAM STANTEC ARCHITECTURE—MICHAEL MOXAM,

STUART ELGIE, JANE WIGLE, DEANNA BROWN, SYLVIA KIM, NORMA ANGEL, RICH HLAVA, KO VAN KLAVEREN, TIM LEE. KPMB ARCHITECTS—BRUCE KUWABARA, MITCHELL HALL, JUDY TAYLOR, KEVIN THOMAS, GLENN MACMULLIN, PAULO ROCHA, LILLY LIAUKUS. HDR ARCHITECTURE—CRAIG ELLIS, RODEL MISA, TOD TRIGG, STEWART EARLE, NEIL SUTTON, HYOUNJUNG AHN, ELLEN ROGOJINE, JESUS SANTOS, ANDY WONG. DIAMOND SCHMITT ARCHITECTS—A.J. DIAMOND, GREG COLUCCI, ANTRA ROZE, JEONG CHOE, KIRSTEN DOUGLAS, GILDA GIOVANE, CHRIS HOYT, BRIAN MCCLEAN, GIUSEPPE MANDARINO. | STRUCTURAL/ELECTRICAL STANTEC CONSULTING | MECHANICAL THE MITCHELL PARTNERSHIP | LANDSCAPE PHILLIPS FAREVAAG SMALLENBERG | SUSTAINABILITY/ ENERGY STANTEC CONSULTING | BUILDING CODE/FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY RANDAL BROWN & ASSOCIATES | ELEVATORS SOBERMAN ENGINEERING | VIBRATION/NOISE/ACOUSTICS AERCOUSTICS ENGINEERING LTD. | COMMISSIONING CFMS CONSULTING | MUNICIPAL LEGAL ADVISOR MCCARTHY TETRAULT | URBAN PLANNING URBAN STRATEGIES | HERITAGE E.R.A. ARCHITECTS | SITE SERVICING RV ANDERSON ASSOCIATES | TRAFFIC/TRANSPORTATION BA CONSULTING GROUP | FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING AGNEW PECKHAM | ENVIRONMENTAL GOLDER ASSOCIATES | ARCHEOLOGICAL ARCHEOLOGICAL SERVICES | ARBORIST BRUCE TREE EXPERT | FOOD SERVICES KAIZEN FOODSERVICE PLANNING & DESIGN | STRUCTURAL HALSALL AND ASSOCIATES | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL SMITH & ANDERSON | LANDSCAPE THE MBTW GROUP | CIVIL A.M. CANDARAS ASSOCIATES | SUSTAINABILITY HALSALL ASSOCIATES | HERITAGE THE VENTIN GROUP | DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN CONSORTIUM PLENARY HEALTH BRIDGEPOINT (PLENARY HEALTH, INNISFREE HEALTH) | CONSTRUCTOR PCL CONSTRUCTORS CANADA | BUDGET $315 M | COMPLETION APRIL 2013

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

REGENT PARK AQUATIC CENTRE Toronto, Ontario MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects (MJMA) Shai Gil

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

Located in downtown Toronto and built in the late 1940s, Regent Park is Canada’s oldest and largest social housing project. The neighbourhood was originally envisioned as a transitional community for new immigrants. But, due to inadequate planning, it would become infamous for concentrating a socially marginalized population into a series of increasingly neglected building complexes. 41% of those living in Regent Park are under 18, and over 70% of the population lives below the lowincome cut-off rate. In 2005, the City began the Regent Park Revitalization initiative, a 12-year program to redevelop the 69 acres into a vibrant mixed-use, mixed-income community, and one of North America’s largest urban redevelopments. At the heart of the revitalization—centred on the eastern flank of the new central park development—the Regent Park Aquatic Centre enjoys pride of place as the neighbourhood’s key civic amenity. Regent Park Aquatic Centre is a multi-purpose, year-round indoor swimming pool facility that includes a 25-metre six-lane pool, leisure pool, tot pool, hot tub, slide, tarzan rope, diving board and a large multi-purpose community room. The “pavilion in the park”—as the centre was conceived—is very open at the base and bisected lengthwise by a “dorsal fin” of aquatic hall skylights. The building form was shaped by its solar orientation. A large canopy to the south forms a generous public verandah at the main entrance; and a low continuous window overlooking the park to the west provides views, while minimizing heat gain from the afternoon sun. Replacing an existing outdoor pool, the project captures a feeling of trans-

CA May 16.indd 46

parency and connection to the outdoors. It has sliding glass doors off the main pool hall for access to the park-side terrace, as well as natural ventilation opportunities. Responding to the views from the new highrise towers surrounding the park, the building’s green roof is designed as a fifth elevation that integrates with the building features and with its park setting. The Aquatic Centre is the first facility in Canada that provides universal change rooms exclusively. These common areas—with private cubicles—establish equality by addressing cultural and gender identity issues. They also enhance openness, safety and visibility throughout the entire complex. In the last three decades, Regent Park has become an immigrant settlement community. As such, the Aquatic Centre offers a new level of accommodation, with the addition of a complete system of aquatics hall screening for those cultural groups interested in privacy swims. Interest in the City’s aquatic venues has been greatly increased by the adoption of this progressive feature, along with the universal change rooms, the combination of fitness, leisure, and therapeutic aquatic uses, and the open and inviting design. This project typifies the design legacy commitment of the Regent Park Revitalization program. :: Jury :: While the jury commends the many fine aquatic and recreational centres that it reviewed in other Canadian cities, Regent Park Aquatic Centre stands out. This facility is sensitively connected to its surroundings. Open and transparent, it invites passersby and those using the adjacent park into its grand space that houses a sparkling pool and recreational facilities. It is a pavilion in the best sense, elevating the activities within and making them accessible. The green roof is the building’s fifth façade, completing Regent Park’s green environment.

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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 1 MAIN ENTRANCE   2 MAIN CONCOURSE   3 RECEPTION   4 MEETING ROOM   5 ADMIN STAFF   6 OFFICE   7 AQUATIC STAFF   8 UNIVERSAL CHANGE ROOM   9 CHANGE ROOM CONCOURSE 10 AQUATIC HALL 11 POOL STORAGE 12 OUTDOOR TERRACE

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OPPOSITE Designed as a one-storey pavilion, the aquatic centre greets visitors with a verandah-like canopy and glimpses of the pools inside. ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A wood ceiling and line of skylights top the swimming areas; the centre fully opens out onto the main park in the redeveloped neighbourhood; universal change rooms with individual changing stalls allow for an exceptional degree of transparency and natural light throughout the facility.

CLIENT CITY OF TORONTO | ARCHITECT TEAM DAVID MILLER, VIKTORS JAUNKALNS, TED WATSON, ANDREW FILARSKI, ROBERT ALLEN, TROY WRIGHT, JEANNE NG, SIRI URSIN, KYUNG-SUN HUR, COHEN CHEN, CARLA MUNOZ | STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL LKM CONSULTING ENGINEERS INC. | INTERIORS MACLENNAN JAUNKALNS MILLER ARCHITECTS | CONTRACTOR THE ATLAS CORPORATION | BUDGET $14.8 M | COMPLETION NOVEMBER 2016

SECTION

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T:9.25” S:8”

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B:6.125”

S:5”

T:5.625”

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

WONG DAI SIN TEMPLE Markham, Ontario Shim-Sutcliffe Architects Inc. James Dow

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

The Wong Dai Sin Temple is a modern sacred space that houses a dynamic Taoist community, committed to their inner spiritual development through the ancient physical practice of tai chi. The Fung Loy Kok Institute of Taoism needed a new spiritual home in suburban Toronto that had to reflect not only the heart and soul of their religious beliefs, but also the modern contemporary world of their congregants. This place of worship is located on a major suburban arterial road, surrounded by a shopping mall and cul-de-sacs lined with oversized single-family residential mansions. The new temple building demonstrates asymmetry and counterbalance while maintaining its equilibrium, much like a measured tai chi pose. The building’s south elevation, visible from the busy roadway, reveals a major and minor cantilever supported on slender concrete piers. Stringent on-site parking requirements necessitated elevating the spiritual space and providing surface parking below it. This sacred space is supported on a two-way concrete slab integrated with seven rectangular poured-in-place structural concrete piers, tied to a robust raft foundation. The post-tensioned concrete slab system, with its 10.2metre cantilever on the west, hovers over the parking area. A smaller 5.2-metre cantilever on the east side of the post-tensioned structure accommodates an exterior terrace over the parking, and serves

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as a counterbalance for the longer cantilever to the west. Exposed concrete is also used for two cantilevered staircases, which, along with an elevator, provide access to the second-floor worship space. The building’s north and south façades are clad in shaped weathering steel vertical fins, which control views from the inside looking out. Floor-to-ceiling window openings in the prayer space splay outwards, allowing for natural light at the perimeter and encouraging cross-ventilation. The west and east elevations, facing the neighbours, are clad in large abstract panels of weathering steel, ensuring privacy. Inside the Wong Dai Sin Temple, circular motorized skylights are linked to large red light monitors that modulate the natural light entering the space, and also provide support for oversized rings of incense used for Taoist chanting and prayer ceremonies. These glowing red lanterns of varying diameters create a cosmic ceiling plan and result in ethereal natural light, which co-mingles with burning incense. The result is a spiritual space linking sky and ground, and connecting interior selves with the external world beyond.  Within the prayer hall is the most introverted space in the Wong Dai Sin Temple: the memorial hall. In this small wooden building within the temple, ancestors are honoured. Bamboo memorial plaques line the contemplative space; congregants are invited to leave offerings of gratitude and to light incense in memory of their loved ones. The building is inextricably tied to ancient Wong Dai Sin Temples in other parts of the world through its manipulation and amplification

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The temple’s daring cantilever recalls the measured balance of a tai chi pose; an ethereal atmosphere is created by custom luminaires with suspended incense rings, fitted to the skylights above. ABOVE The open space underneath the building contributes to the required parking area for the facility, doubling as a sheltered outdoor area for community activities. OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT

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of natural light, its instrumental use of colour, and its commitment to a carefully composed and tactile material palette. The daily worship of the ancient religion of Taoism is embedded in the fabric of this modern sacred space. :: Jury :: The jury appreciates this project for its conceptual clarity. It is a pleasure to see such a unique building that celebrates structural form and materials. The relationship between the form and function of the Temple demonstrates a strong and considered composition. The Temple gives the appearance of being both heavy and light; the major volume hovers above the ground, providing a protected space below for collective activities. Similarly, the striking façade modulates natural light while controlling views of the surroundings. This is a beautifully crafted and designed building that raises the bar for architects working in the domain of new spiritual buildings.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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SECOND FLOOR

 1 ENTRY CANOPY   2 MAIN ENTRANCE   3 PRAYER HALL   4 MEMORIAL HALL

  5 ELEVATOR   6 SUPPORT SPACE   7 OUTDOOR TERRACE

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4M

CLIENT FUNG LOY KOK—INSTITUTE OF TAOISM | ARCHITECT TEAM BRIGITTE SHIM, HOWARD

SUTCLIFFE, MONICA LEUNG, ANDREW KIMBER | STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL BK CONSULTING INC. | ELECTRICAL DYNAMIC DESIGNS AND ENGINEERING INC. | SITE SERVICES MASONGSONG ASSOCIATES ENGINEERING LTD. | LANDSCAPE NAK DESIGN GROUP | GEOTECHNICAL CANADA ENGINEERING SERVICES INC. | PLANNING BOUSFIELDS INC. | PLANNING LAWYERS SHERMAN BROWN | CONTRACTOR GILLAM GROUP INC. | AREA 304 M2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | COMPLETION MARCH 2015

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SECTION

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STEVEN EVANS

CHRIS POMMER

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

52

NATHAN PHILLIPS SQUARE REVITALIZATION Toronto, Ontario PLANT Architect Inc. in joint venture with Perkins+Will Canada (formerly Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Inc.) LOCATION

ARCHITECTS

Toronto City Hall is a well-loved Modernist icon. Completed in 1965— after the death of its architect, the Finnish master Vijo Revell—the heritage-designated square was true to the spatial arrangement Revell had envisioned. Over time, however, it had become run-down. In 2007, the City of Toronto launched an international competition to redesign Nathan Phillips Square. The winning design both draws from Revell’s own references to the classical Athenian agora and transforms the square into an exemplary 21st century public space. Through the redesign or relocation of existing elements and the addition of a new series of buildings and gardens framing the open plaza, the revitalization enhances the functionality, versatility, connectedness and appeal of Toronto’s signature civic space.

OPEN THE SQUARE

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ACTIVATE THE STOA AS A THRESHOLD

One of Revell’s master strokes was never fully developed: while his elevated walkways framed the square and focused views toward the council chamber, the Athenian idea of the stoa—a porch at the perimeter that clearly defined the interior void—was lost in translation. To return to Revell’s idea and strengthen the square’s coherence, the winning team executed four tactical moves. First, it opened the square by removing clutter at the centre, allowing the space to accommodate large events. Second, it created programmed, porous “green rooms” around the perimeter to frame the square and provide gathering spaces. Third, it created new connections between the raised walkway and the square, and activated these spaces to feed the plaza’s programming. Finally, it strengthened links between zones by using new architecture to bridge between the two levels of the square. Major architectural components include the redesigned skate pavilion and a permanent stage with back-of-house suspended below in the parking garage. All elements are multifunctional. The glass-canopied,

PROGRAM THE PERIMETER WITH GREEN ROOMS

ORGANIZE THE EXISTING ARCHITECTURE TO BRIDGE THE THRESHOLD

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SECTION 10

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SITE PLAN

  1 PERIMETER LANDSCAPING & SEATING   2 LANDSCAPED PODIUM   3 RECESSED FOUNTAINS   4 THEATRE

  5 SKATE RENTAL & SNACK

PAVILION   6 DAYCARE GARDEN   7 THE PEACE GARDEN   8 FUTURE RESTAURANT

  9 PARKING ENTRANCE  10 BRIDGE 11 BACK-OF-HOUSE

0

10M

ABOVE LEFT The revitalized Nathan Phillips Square includes the renewal of infrastructure underneath the plaza, as well as the addition of a new theatre, skate and snack pavilion, relocated Peace Garden, and an extensive green roof on the podium. Landscape and seating areas at the perimeter encourage movement under the surrounding walkways and into the Square. ABOVE CENTRE Designed to complement the Modernist style of Viljo Revell’s City Hall, the theatre accommodates large scale performances as well as encouraging casual use as a perch overlooking the plaza.

terraced form of the theatre, for instance, provides covered public space and casual seating when not in use for performances, and its stairs connect the raised walkway to the square. Small events can take place with performers facing westward toward stairs that act as bleachers; for larger events, the stage faces eastward to overlook the entire square. The original Peace Garden, added in 1983 near the square’s centre, had compromised the sense of openness and ability to accommodate crowds. The design team relocated it to the western edge, freeing up space for larger events. The new Peace Garden features terraced seating that conceals an underground parking garage’s exhaust duct while muff ling its sound. Other elements include a playground redesign, a new Sculpture Garden, a new forecourt along Queen Street, and a future two-storey restaurant. The master plan includes refurbishing the existing elevated walkways with gardens and seating. Prior to the revitalization, City Hall’s podium was a grim, paved void: it is now Toronto’s largest publicly accessible green roof, a popular urban retreat for sitting and strolling. The Podium Roof Garden’s plantings, which change seasonally from bright yellows and oranges in the southwest to deep reds and purples in the northeast, were chosen to thrive in the site’s challenging shade and wind conditions. From the ground up, the new City Hall has achieved a 21st century remake. :: Jury :: Nathan Phillips Square has long been the symbolic centre of the city, but was too often left empty or littered with temporary structures. The courageous renovation and reprogramming of the square now makes

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it one of the most sought-after public spaces in Toronto. Carefully balancing Viljo Revell’s original design with new additions to support active uses in all seasons, it has become a hyper-democratic place. With purposefully designed spaces allowing people to unwind or be active, engage in collective experiences or seek solitude, the square accommodates many different users and uses. What makes this project so great is that it preserves the essentials of this historic square while adapting it for future generations. The jury commends the architects and the City of Toronto for realizing this project, which has created one of the most outstanding public spaces in Canada.

CLIENT CITY OF TORONTO | COMPETITION/PROJECT DESIGN TEAM PLANT ARCHITECT INC., SHORE

TILBE IRWIN & PARTNERS/PERKINS+WILL, INC., HOERR SCHAUDT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, ADRIAN BLACKWELL URBAN PROJECTS ARCHITECT TEAM PLANT—CHRIS POMMER, LISA RAPOPORT, MARY TREMAIN, VANESSA EICKHOFF, LISA DIETRICH, ERIC KLAVER, ELISE SHELLEY, LISA MOFFITT, JANE HUTTON, HEATHER ASQUITH, SUZANNE ERNST, JESSICA CRAIG, JEREMY MCGREGOR, MATT HARTNEY, CLEO BUSTER, RENÉE KUEHNLE, OLIVIA MAPUÉ. SHORE TILBE IRWIN/PERKINS+WILL—D’ARCY ARTHURS, ANDREW FRONTINI, VIS SANKRITHI, JOE DHANJAL, LINDA NEUMAYER, ADRIAN WORTON, STEVEN VAN DER MEER, GAVIN GUTHRIE, LIA MATSON, ELIZABETH TSERONAKIS, PERRY EDWARDS, AARON CHEUNG, AIMEE DRMIC, EMILY MACLENNAN, TALAL RAMEH. HOERR SCHAUDT—PETER LINDSAY SCHAUDT, JOHN RIDENOUR, JON BROOKE, SHAWN WEIDNER, JUSTIN LIBRA. ADRIAN BLACKWELL URBAN PROJECTS— ADRIAN BLACKWELL, MARCIN KEDZIOR, GEOFFREY TURNBULL, ALAN KWAN. | STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL BOWICK ENGINEERING | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL CROSSEY ENGINEERING LTD. | SOILS URBAN TREES + SOIL | HERITAGE BLANCHE LEMKO VAN GINKEL | LIGHTING CROSSEY ENGINEERING LTD. | QUANTITY SURVEYOR VERMEULENS INC. | FOUNTAIN WATERWORX | ECOLOGICAL ENERMODAL ENGINEERING LTD. | INTERIORS PERKINS+WILL, INC. | CONTRACTOR FLYNN CANADA/GARDENS IN THE SKY (PHASE 1A); PCL CONSTRUCTORS CANADA (PHASE 1 & 2); FOUR SEASONS SITE DEVELOPMENT (PHASE 3) | AREA 10 ACRES (LAND); 2,953 M2 (THEATRE) | BUDGET $42 M | COMPLETION 2009-2015

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA ARTLAB Winnipeg, Manitoba Patkau Architects (design architect) with LM Architectural Group (architect of record) PHOTOS Patkau Architects LOCATION

ARCHITECTS

This project began as a renovation to Taché Hall, a 1911 student residence at the University of Manitoba. When an opportunity arose for federal stimulus funding, the decision was made to develop a portion of the program separately, so that the design and construction could be expedited to meet funding deadlines. ARTlab, then, became the first piece in a multi-phase creative arts facility. The 6,300-square-metre program consists principally of large spaces for the School of Art that complement small studio spaces within Taché Hall. Included are a national-standard gallery, a lecture hall, a soundstage, administration, and a variety of new and traditional media studios. The volume of the ARTlab interlocks with that of Taché Hall, reinforcing the fact that the two buildings comprise an integrated arts facility. The extension of the north wing of the ARTlab in front of Taché Hall gives the building an emblematic presence on Duckworth Quadrangle, the principal outdoor space within the university campus. To facilitate a critical urban connection to the Asper School of Business, south of the project, the north wing of the ARTlab is raised one storey above grade. The covered area below forms the entrance, creating

CA May 16.indd 54

ABOVE Extending in front of Taché Hall, the fine arts building has a strong contemporary presence facing the campus’s main quadrangle. OPPOSITE TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The entry is tucked beneath a massive overhang supported on sculpted columns; a feature staircase winds around the triangular atrium. OPPOSITE BOTTOM Painting studios enjoy diffuse north light and views of the campus.

a generous sheltered outdoor space for school and gallery events. Large V-shaped columns animate this space at an urban scale, mediating between the structural grid of the building and underground obstacles. The result is a lively courtyard caught between historic and contemporary campus buildings. Above grade, a pair of bridges links the upper levels of the ART lab to Taché Hall. Below grade, the ARTlab ties into the campus tunnel network, a key pedestrian circulation system during the bitterly cold Winnipeg winter months. Within the ARTlab, a narrow atrium dynamically links all of the levels. Animated by south daylight, this atrium forms the central circulation space and social heart of the building. On the ground and tunnel levels are the two principal public spaces of the building: the School of Art gallery and the lecture hall. Terraced seating at the base of the atrium creates a multi-level lobby that connects these two facilities, tying them to both at-grade and below-grade campus circulation. Studios and administration are on the upper floors to take advantage of natural light. The exterior of the ARTlab juxtaposes modern construction with the historic masonry of Taché Hall. The north elevation is fully glazed, so that the studios enjoy diffuse daylight and, at the same time, provide a visible expression of the life of the School of Art to the public spaces below. The east and south elevations are reticent, landscaped walls. Aluminum grilles situated a metre from the face of the building support Virginia creeper vines, while shrouding sunlight and offering privacy from the nearby School of Business. Planted at the base of the walls, the creeper will eventually form a dense, seasonably variable, vertical xeriscape.

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:: Jury :: The ART lab brings art and music out of Taché Hall and in to the public realm of Duckworth Quadrangle, the University of Manitoba’s main outdoor space. The juxtaposition of new and old adds up to more than the sum of its parts. The architects give the older building a new face on campus. Circulation is a key theme, with a dramatic atrium connecting levels and glass bridges colliding with the historic brick walls. The exterior spaces beneath the new addition provide a protected entry sequence in Winnipeg’s harsh winters, while the interior provides stunning views back on to the campus, making for an inspiring environment to create works of art. There is a dynamic tension in the plan, creating simple yet idiosyncratic spaces inside and out.

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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4 CLIENT UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA | ARCHITECT TEAM PATKAU ARCHITECTS—JOHN PATKAU, PATRI-

CIA PATKAU, GREG BOOTHROYD, STEPHANIE COLERIDGE, MICHAEL CUNNINGHAM, DYLAN GILMORE, MARC HOLLAND, DIMITRI KOUBATIS, MAUREEN KWONG, THOMAS SCHROEDER, LUKE STERN, PETER SUTER, MICHAEL THORPE. LM ARCHITECTURAL GROUP— KEN DUCHNYCZ, DAVID KRESSOCK, LLOYD MYMKO, DARRELL SAWATZKY, GREG TOMASZEWSKI, MARIA VERDUN. | STRUCTURAL CROSIER KILGOUR & PARTNERS | MECHANICAL SMS ENGINEERING | ELECTRICAL MCW/AGE | LANDSCAPE HILDERMAN THOMAS FRANK CRAM | CODE GAGE BABCOCK & ASSOCIATES LTD. | ACOUSTICS DANIEL LYZUN & ASSOCIATES | A/V MC SQUARED SYSTEM DESIGN GROUP | SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS | SIGNAGE GALLOP/VARLEY | COST HANSCOMB | CONTRACTOR PCL CONSTRUCTORS CANADA INC. | AREA 6,300 M2 | BUDGET $24 M | COMPLETION FEBRUARY 2012

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SECOND FLOOR

 1 ATRIUM   2 BRIDGE   3 STUDIO   4 ADMINISTRATION   5 CRIT ROOM   6 TACHÉ HALL

0

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

BREWSTER TRAVEL CANADA

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/16

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GLACIER SKYWALK Jasper National Park, Alberta Sturgess Architecture Robert Lemermeyer, unless otherwise noted

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

The Glacier Skywalk, a man-made extension of the fractal landscape of the Columbia Icefield in Jasper National Park, is a jaw-dropping feat of architecture and engineering. This private development initiative in a public park was undertaken in concert with Parks Canada, which wished to more fully engage tourists in an environmental experience. The project weaves a continuous thread through geometric and material forms. A sinuous journey defines the Skywalk not as a singular destination, but as a catalyst that empowers guests to immerse themselves in their natural surroundings. The narrative of Canada’s National Parks necessitates a sustainable approach to building. Geologically, thrust-fault movements have created a fractal landscape, and this informs the architecture. The theme of rugged architecture is evident throughout the voyage of discovery, providing contrast between the subtle gestures and monumental idea of the Glacier Skywalk. Interpretive stations project from and recess into the rock face in response to the program, view and climactic conditions present at each location. In contrast, the Skywalk Vista projects from the sheer face of the mountainside to allow visitors to be immersed in the grandeur and scale of the glacier below. The broken geometry of the viewing platform is further

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accentuated by the eccentric horizontal suspended cable structure supporting the glass walkway. Stepping onto the glass surface, one is able to physically experience the depth of the surrounding icefield. The exploration begins under a bus stop canopy at the receiving area. Venturing out from under the canopy, visitors are given a first glimpse of the gorge far below and a hint of what lies ahead. The trail initially slopes gently downwards, providing separation from the adjacent highway, and is cut into native bedrock. The efficient material palette for the off-grid structure consists of Corten steel, glass, wood and stone. The rusted hues of the steel relate to the ferric outcroppings of the mountains, while the glazing mimics the calcified deposits of the mountainside. Gabion mats of locally mined stone retain the pathways. Wood-lined areas support human contact. The pathways widen and narrow, and rise and fall, allowing visitors to visit several interpretive stations. At the halfway point along the trail, the path starts to slope upward. As the ascent continues, excitement builds as the outlook becomes increasingly visible. Arriving at the Skywalk Vista, the view of the platform and the nature of the experience that awaits is obscured by Corten walls. Just beyond this outcropping is the cantilevered glass walkway—a transparent arc f loating 280 metres above the valley below. Here, visitors can venture 35 metres beyond the face of the cliff and come face-to-face with nature—and the evidence of climate change in the receding glacier. The journey concludes with an amphitheatre tucked into the out-

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SITE MAP

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1 BUS DROPOFF 2 DISCOVERY WALK 3 SKYWALK VISTA

The Skywalk Vista cantilevers daringly over a glacial gorge. A view of the dropoff pavilion; a series of interpretive stations are incorporated into the approach; glass balustrades add to the drama of the lookout; an amphitheatre provides a space for rest after the outlook; Corten steel is used throughout the project to echo the rugged and weathered natural surroundings. OPPOSITE

ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

cropping, where visitors may sit in the sun and engage with others. The project is an unprecedented example of the design-build process. Consultants, contractors and manufacturers worked in constant collaboration to realize this collective vision. :: Jury :: This extraordinary landscape intervention challenges visitors to experience the scale of the Columbia Icefield on foot, rather than from a car. Tough materials such as Corten steel and the jagged, fractal forms along the pathway emulate the thrust-fault movements that have shaped glaciers. Like many outstanding works of architecture, this project offers users a unique opportunity—a viewing platform to see the world in a whole new way. The skywalk makes you feel safe and frightened at the same time: that’s its magic.

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CLIENT BREWSTER TRAVEL CANADA | ARCHITECT TEAM JEREMY STURGESS, LESLEY BEALE, KEVIN

HARRISON, JAN KROMAN, DAVID TYL, BOB HORVATH | DESIGN-BUILD TEAM LEADER PCL CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT—SCOTT UPDEGRAVE, KEITH BOWERS | PRIME CONSULTANT READ JONES CHRISTOFFERSEN—SIMON BROWN, GEOFF KALLWEIT, MARK RITCHIE | AREA 5,500 FT 2 | BUDGET $16 M | COMPLETION MAY 2014

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

BC PASSIVE HOUSE FACTORY Pemberton, British Columbia Hemsworth Architecture Ema Peter Photography

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

When BC Passive House asked that the design and construction of its new facility reflects its approach to sustainable home construction, the architect took the message to heart. This demonstration project is made with all-wood construction and exemplifies the client’s investment in prefabrication, energy efficiency and sustainable design. Used for the manufacturing of the client’s prefab Passive House panels, the 1,500square-metre facility was conceived as a simple, light-filled wooden box. The main inspiration for the design came from the belief that the industrial, everyday buildings that make up a vast amount of our built environment can be just as important—and well considered—as our public buildings. Three-hundred-and-sixty-degree clerestory windows provide natural daylight and views to the surrounding mountains. Daylighting and exposed wood finishes inside result in a warm, comfortable and inviting space to work. The main structure of the building is Douglas Fir glulam post-andbeam, with solid wood cross-laminated timber panel walls, all manufactured in British Columbia. The roof assembly consists of prefabricated 2x12 panels, which assisted the erection of the glulam structure by offering permanent bracing for the columns and beams during assembly. Using this prefabricated format, the construction team built the superstructure in just eight days. This wood-first approach for the building resulted in a savings of approximately 971 tonnes

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of carbon dioxide compared to a similar concrete building—or 306 tonnes of carbon dioxide compared to steel. The exterior of the building was finished with pre-assembled wood screens, made from fir and larch 2x4s. Left untreated to age with the pass of time, the wood screens provide a natural, no-maintenance siding solution. The screen design incorporated a varied density of slats, particularly over the clerestories, in order to provide greater solar shading on the south and west façades while maintaining the stunning views to the surrounding mountains. The result is a simple, cost effective façade that carefully and subtly responds to, and embraces, its unique and beautiful surroundings. The office and meeting spaces were designed to meet the rigourous Passive House Standard. Constructed using BC Passive House’s airtight, double-walled system and high-performance wood windows, the envelope was optimized to dramatically reduce the energy required for heating and cooling. The envelope’s efficiency enables the solar gain through the windows and the heat from the occupants to provide the majority of heating required for the office and meeting rooms. A highefficiency heat recovery ventilation unit delivers a constant supply of fresh filtered air to the office, making for a healthy, oxygenated work environment. A biomass boiler burns the wood waste from the manufacturing process and distributes that warmth to the shop space through a radiant heat flooring system. The facility is the first of its kind in North America and will assist the company in its promotion of the Passive House Standard and sustainable, energy-efficient, wood-based construction.

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GL

OPPOSITE Prefabricated panels allowed the industrial facility’s superstructure to be quickly erected. ABOVE LEFT A wood slat screen provides differing degrees of solar shading on the various façades. ABOVE RIGHT The glulam post-and-beam wood structure is exposed on the interior, as are the CLT wall panels.

:: Jury :: The factory is both a demonstration of the possibilities of wood for ordinary industrial structures, and a home for an innovative industry producing panels for building. The architect has considered every detail— from the wood structure and panelized roof, to the sloped larch and fir screens, to the beautifully finished interiors. The jury was impressed by the speed in which the building’s superstructure was constructed: a mere eight days. BC Passive House Factory proves that modest structures can be extraordinary examples of architecture.

CLIENT BC PASSIVE HOUSE | ARCHITECT TEAM JOHN HEMSWORTH | STRUCTURAL EQUILIBRIUM

CONSULTING | MECHANICAL YONEDA & ASSOCIATES | ELECTRICAL BLC ENGINEERING | BUDGET $1.5M | COMPLETION AUGUST 2014

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GLULAM BEAM BEYOND

CONT. AIR/VAPOUR BARRIER

105 CLT WALL PANEL

GLULAM COLUMN BEYOND

DOUBLE-GLAZED SEALED UNITS IN THERMALLY BROKEN ALUMINUM FRAME (LARA GF 60) MECHANICALLY FASTENED TO CLT SOLID WOOD VERTICAL MULLION SUPPORTS MECHANICALLY FASTENED TO CLT

CONT. 19X89 CEDAR BLOCKING IN FRONT OF CLERESTORY

SECTION

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WALL SECTION

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

WOOD INNOVATION AND DESIGN CENTRE Prince George, British Columbia MGA—Michael Green Architecture Ema Peter Photography

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

The Wood Innovation Design Centre ( WIDC) serves as a gathering place for researchers, academics, design professionals and others interested in generating ideas for innovative uses of wood. It shows that tall timber buildings can be economical, safe and environmentally superior options for future urban building. The eight-storey building stands 29.5 metres tall, making it one of the world’s tallest modern all-timber structures. With this project, the architect sought to demonstrate economical, repeatable technologies for building high-rise structures with timber, in hopes of inspiring institutions, private sector developers and other architects and engineers to embrace this way of building. The province enacted a site-specific regulation to allow WIDC to be built for academic and office use. With no precedent, the project team had to prove that all life safety requirements could be met with the mass

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timber design. It performed extensive mock-ups, testing and detailed studies to satisfy the team, the owner and the building officials that its approach was sound—and applicable to future projects. The architect chose to use no concrete above the ground floor slab, with end-of-life demountability in mind. The mass timber structural elements are exposed, as is the ceiling finish in most spaces, allowing occupants to see and understand the structure around them. Realized in just 15 months from beginning of design to occupancy, WIDC is a milestone building that features a state-of-the-art distance learning auditorium, classrooms, shops, demonstration areas and offices. The University of Northern British Columbia occupies the lower three floors of the building, providing a Master of Engineering in Integrated Wood Design. Emily Carr University of Art and Design occupies the middle floors; and the upper floors provide office space for government and wood industry-related organizations. The building exterior is inspired by bark peeling away from the trunk of a tree: bark on the north side is thick to protect from the cold and elements, thinning away towards the south sunlight. The architect chose

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CONSTRUCTION ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

SOUTH

EAST

OPPOSITE The exterior cladding for the project combines natural and charred cedar panels. The density of the panels varies between façades and is optimized for solar orientation. ABOVE An all-wood approach to construction was used above the ground floor slab, including the panelized ceiling system, and an elevator core and exit stairs made from CLT.

to clad the building exterior in a mix of natural cedar (left to naturally weather to grey) and charred cedar. Drawing from traditional Japanese and Nordic practices, the layer of char provides insect- and rot-resistance, as well as increased fire resistance. It requires minimal maintenance and creates a beautiful dark patina that changes with the light. For the glazing systems, the firm used a custom-engineered wood curtain wall system. This project has set many precedents internationally, through the extensive engineering research and testing used to prove the safety and validity of mass timber construction techniques. The completed work and proven innovations have removed hurdles and opened up the market for more tall timber projects to come. :: Jury :: This project celebrates wood as a handsome and sustainable material, and demonstrates its viability for tall buildings. More than just a technological experiment, it combines intelligence, beauty and innovation in its approach to features such as the engineered wood curtain wall system, interior finishes and modulation of sunlight. The jury applauds the research contribution of this exceptional structure.

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NORTH

WEST

ELEVATIONS BY SOLAR ORIENTATION

CLIENT PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—MINISTRY OF JOBS, TOURISM, AND SKILLS TRAINING

|

ARCHITECT TEAM MICHAEL GREEN, MINGYUK CHEN, CARLA SMITH, SENG TSOI, KRISTALEE BERGER,

ALFONSO BONILLA, JORDAN VAN DIJK, GUADALUPE FONT, ADRIENNE GIBBS, JACQUELINE GREEN, ASHER DEGROOT, SOO HAN, KRISTEN JAMIESON, VUK KRCMAR-GRKAVAC, ALEXANDER KOBALD, SINDHU MAHADEVAN, MARIA MORA | STRUCTURAL EQUILIBRIUM CONSULTING INC. | MECHANICAL/ ELECTRICAL MMM GROUP LTD. | CONTRACTOR PCL CONSTRUCTORS WESTCOAST INC. | LEED MMM GROUP LTD. | CIVIL OPUS DAYTONKNIGHT CONSULTANTS LTD. | GEOTECHNICAL GEOPACIFIC CONSULTANTS LTD. | LANDSCAPE JAY LAZZARIN LANDSCAPE | CODE B.R. THORSON CONSULTING LTD. | ACOUSTIC AERCOUSTICS ENGINEERING LTD. | OWNER REPRESENTATIVE DAVID HUBNER, PARTNERSHIPS BC | FIRE CHM FIRE CONSULTANTS LTD. | AREA 4,820 M2 | BUDGET $25.1 M | COMPLETION OCTOBER 2014

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ED WHITE

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

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RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE BC & YUKON Vancouver, British Columbia MGA—Michael Green Architecture (project commenced by mcfarlane | green | biggar architecture + design) LOCATION

ARCHITECT

Ronald McDonald House BC (RMHBC) provides a home for families whose children are receiving treatment at BC Children’s Hospital. From the outset, the design team sought to create a solution that would feel like a home and not a hotel. The architect’s ambition was to preserve the nurturing, closely bonded social connections found in the former RMHBC 12-family house with the design of this new 73-family facility. The design focused on inclusiveness and community-oriented spatial strategies. The site, located on the edge of the hospital’s grounds, borders a suburban-scale neighbourhood. The architecture bridges between the quiet residential fabric and the institutional architecture of the hospital. The building forms are accessible and driven by modesty, endurance and a warm aesthetic. Iron-spot brick is used to durably protect a highly innovative structure of mass timber walls and light wood floor

ONE BIG MASS

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DIVIDE

FOUR SMALL MASSES

ADD GABLES

construction. A carbon-neutral embodied footprint enhances the performance of the building, which exceeds LEED Gold standards. The design layers various spaces to help families find solace and community as they endure significantly challenging moments with their severely sick children. The design breaks down into four “houses” stitched together with common areas—dining rooms, living rooms and courtyards. Each house provides its own identity, with interior colour and wayfinding devices suitable to the diverse ages and backgrounds of kids, from toddlers to teens. An internal ground level “house loop” connects all communal areas, from inside to outside to inside again. Space is arranged to enhance shared-parenting opportunities, with courtyards wrapped by living and dining rooms to contain toddlers, and increasingly independent play spaces for older children located further from the heart of the building. Conceptually, the architecture forms concentric rings. The rings begin with the sick child and family, growing spatially: from the individual suites, to the six families sharing each floor of a house, to the 18 families

SLICE AND SHIFT

LINK WITH AMENITY SPACES

PARK WITHIN A BUILDING

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EMA PETER PHOTOGRAPHY

EMA PETER PHOTOGRAPHY

:: Jury :: This Ronald McDonald House plays an important role in the daily lives of families with children receiving cancer treatment. Although the building accommodates 73 families, it feels more like a large home than a hospital hotel. The architecture has warmth, using familiar domestic materials and a human scale. The structure is broken into four modules, each with connections to create common areas where people can socialize as well as private spaces for families to be alone. It is a comforting environment for families who are away from their homes for extensive periods, and a model for other such facilities.

 1 ENTRY   2 COURTYARD   3 KITCHEN   4 DINING   5 LIVING ROOM   6 GAMES ROOM 7 ARTS AND CRAFTS   8 FITNESS   9 MULTI-PURPOSE

N RI

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sharing the kitchen and living room of each house, to the 36 families that bring together two houses in a shared dining room, and finally to the ring of all 73 families, brought together in the central living room and courtyards. Places to retreat and find quiet time are complemented by everlarger gathering areas that help build community and shared support. The architect introduced significant innovations in mass timber architecture by developing a hybrid CLT wall and TJI floor structure. This is the first example globally of a tilt-up CLT and light-wood-frame construction, and its century-plus durability will keep costs down for the charity. The wood innovations in the project are important milestones for institutional construction, while remaining a subtext to the profoundly important nature of the service Ronald McDonald House provides to the region.

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20M

CLIENT RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE BC & YUKON | ARCHITECT TEAM MICHAEL GREEN, JUSTIN BEN-

NETT, NATALIE TELEWIAK, MINGYUK CHEN, KRISTEN JAMIESON, ASHER DEGROOT, JORDAN VANDIJK, NICK FOSTER, ADAM JENNINGS, SENG TSOI, JING XU, SUSAN SCOTT | STRUCTURAL EQUILIBRIUM CONSULTING INC. | MECHANICAL AME CONSULTING GROUP LTD. | ELECTRICAL APPLIED ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS LTD. | CONTRACTOR ITC CONSTRUCTION GROUP | CIVIL APLIN & MARTIN CONSULTANTS LTD. | GEOTECHNICAL EXP SERVICES INC. | LANDSCAPE PWL PARTNERSHIP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS INC. | INTERIORS MGA—MICHAEL GREEN ARCHITECTURE | CODE GHL CONSULTANTS LTD. | BUILDING ENVELOPE RDH BUILDING ENGINEERING LTD. | ACOUSTIC BKL CONSULTANTS LTD. | FF&E MGA—MICHAEL GREEN ARCHITECTURE | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT ITC CONSTRUCTION GROUP | SUSTAINABILITY KANE CONSULTING PARTNERSHIP | WAYFINDING MGA—MICHAEL GREEN ARCHITECTURE | OWNER REPRESENTATIVE ANDREW WADE | AREA 8,361 M2 | BUDGET $24 M | COMPLETION JULY 2014

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ABOVE LEFT Apartments are grouped in four house-like forms, each of which enjoys shared indoor and outdoor living rooms. ABOVE CENTRE Natural materials and soft colours contribute to a soothing environment in the dining rooms. ABOVE RIGHT A string of communal areas knit together the four houses on the ground floor. Iron spot brick provides a durable façade, protecting the prefabricated CLT panels that form the building’s primary structural system.

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Where Are the Women Architects? By Despina Stratigakos. Princeton University Press, 2016.

Women have been struggling to make their presence felt in architecture for a long time. In the late 19th century, women were seen as only being able to contribute to domestic interiors, with public buildings better left to men. That argument recurs through to the 1970s, even though in the interim, women had designed prominent commissions, from public theatres to entire urban neighbourhoods. Despite robust enrollments of women in architecture schools in recent decades, there has not been a corresponding rise in female architects in practice. Historian Despina Stratigakos traces the reasons back to architecture schools, where there are relatively few women role models among tenured design faculty, included in architectural history curriculums, or invited as guest lecturers. Looking to surveys on obstacles for women, Stratigakos argues that parenthood is an issue— but not the only one. A persistent salary gap, the dominance of male mentors who may unconsciously favour male interns, and underlying sexual discrimination in workplaces—from women being given more secretarial work to being told that pregnancy will result in a salary cut—are all to blame. Such impediments can lead to a self-perpetuating cycle in which women accept the blame for their lower status in the hierarchy. “They lack the ambition to go after big jobs, it is said, or are unwilling to put in the long hours required to pay their dues,” writes

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Stratigakos, recounting common stereotypes. “The underlying presumption here, deeply engrained in the professional culture, is that architecture is a meritocracy that rewards talent and hard work in a straightforward way. Women who share that belief and who commit themselves to architectural practice without seeing professional returns are apt to lose confidence in their own abilities.” On the same subject, Denise Scott Brown wrote: “On seeing their male colleagues draw out in front of them, women who lack a feminist awareness are likely to feel that their failure to achieve is their own fault.” The insiduous and hidden nature of this internalized bias is perhaps the most compelling reason why all architects—especially those that don’t think that gender equity affects them— ought to examine this issue in greater depth to see if they may unwittingly be taking part. Third-wave feminists are tackling equity in new and original ways. Architect Barbie, a toy championed by the author, is a symbol of how a younger generation is seeking empowerment by playing up their femininity. A movement to write women architects into Wikipedia is another important initiative. Many architects strive to create socially-minded physical places that encourage access for all. It’s imperative to ensure that the same kind of equity is being built into the profession itself. Elsa Lam is editor of Canadian Architect.

Architecture Iconique : Les leçons de Toronto. By Guillaume Ethier. Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2015.

In this book, the term “iconic architecture” (“architecture iconique”) denotes the specific mode of contemporary architectural production that relies on the creation of spectacular buildings for cultural institutions to stimulate economic development and urban transformation. Typically adopting a strategy of rupture from their surrounding urban context, these buildings are analyzed as participating in larger attempts to transform a city’s identity in the eyes of local and global publics. Taking Toronto as a revealing case, Guillaume Ethier focuses on four major cultural institutions that commissioned signature buildings during the first decade of the 21st century, namely: the Ontario College of Art and Design University; the Royal Ontario Museum; the Art Gallery of Ontario; and the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. Written by a sociologist who studies urban

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form, the book is insightful and free of designspeak jargon. Substantial attention is given to considerations of terminology, sociocultural context and method, laying the groundwork for the ensuing case studies. A discussion of Toronto’s cultural Renaissance and the city’s various identities provides further context. Since the turn of the 20th century, Toronto seems increasingly inclined to define itself as a place in transformation, which owes in part to its new iconic interventions. A valuable study in contemporary architectural developments in Toronto, this book sheds light on issues that are relevant to other Canadian cities, as well as to urban centres globally. Aliki Economides is Scholar-in-Residence at McGill University’s Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Montréal (CIRM) and teaches at the Université de Montréal’s École d’Architecture.

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BOOKS Architectures d’exposition au Québec Edited by Jacques Plante and Nicholas Roquet. Les Publications du Québec, 2016

The final volume in a trilogy of books on Quebec cultural buildings, Architectures d’exposition presents a detailed analysis of 36 exceptional museums, interpretation and exhibition centres in Quebec since the early 1980s. These are complemented by 11 essays by architects, historians and museum directors. The richly illustrated book is similar in format to architect and Université de Laval professor Jacques Plante’s previous publications on Québec theatres (2011) and libraries (2013). In this case, Plante collaborates with heritage architect and Université de Montréal professor Nicholas Roquet. Roquet’s expertise is felt in the book’s deep understanding of the issues surrounding architecture that interfaces with historical settings. Architectural conservation practices and conceptual approaches to the evaluation, interpretation and development of heritage sites were especially important in the building of interpretive centres at Fort Chambly (1982) and the Monastère des Augustines de l’HôtelDieu-Lieu de mémoire habité (2015). The authors are remiss in leaving out the

Canadian Centre for Architecture, an international research centre and museum of broad renown. They should be applauded, though, for their inclusion of three First Nations projects: Aanischaaukamikw Cree Cultural Institute in Oujé-Bougoumou (2011), Musée des Abénakis in Odanak (2005) and Shaputuan Innu Museum and Cultural and Heritage Centre in Uashat (1998). These projects are not often addressed; here they grace the book’s cover. A preface by former Québec City mayor Jean-Pierre L’Allier is particularly moving. The visionary L’Allier—who passed away earlier this year—argues passionately for continued funding of culture and investment in quality architecture. Much like libraries, museums are rapidly going beyond their traditional mandates and becoming “third places” between work and home. They are being actively reinvented, by museum directors and architects alike, as crucial sites for civic engagement, democracy and establishing feelings of a sense of place. Ewa Bieniecka, FIRAC, is a Montreal-based architect.

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Projective Ecologies Edited by Chris Reed and Nina-Marie Lister. Actar and Harvard Graduate School of Design, 2014.

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A Natural History of English Gardening: 1650 to 1800 By Mark Laird. The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015.

It’s easy to think of the design professions as never changing in their scope and in their responsibilities, but two recent books put that timelessness in question.   The first is an anthology based on a research initiative from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and its Department of Landscape Architecture. Projective Ecologies examines the impact ecological studies are having on the design professions. It includes contributions from many prominent practitioners and academics such as Chris Reed, Ryerson associate professor Nina-Marie Lister, James Corner, Sanford Kwinter and Charles Waldheim.  Much of their research reveals how we define terms such as ecology, cultural landscape and landscape architect. There is a general unease about how these terms are used in the evolving field of landscape architecture—a profession that itself questions both the terms “landscape” and “architect.” Exploring these shifts in meaning, Kwinter comments that even “ecology,” deriving from Alexander von Humboldt’s writing in the early 19th century, has never been concretely defined. While the essays tend to be written in a densely academic style, they are thought-provoking. Using the lens of theory, Projective Ecologies looks at the possible futures and the present directions for our design professions. The book includes excellent analyses of cities, notably University of Toronto associate professor Jane Wolff ’s exploration of scale in post-flood New Orleans and David Fletcher’s overview of the Los Angeles river watershed. Each section contains a series of curated drawings illustrating the themes of dynamics, succession, emergence, resilience and adaptability.

The second book looks at the profession of landscape architecture through its prehistory, and is equally revealing. Mark Laird’s A Natural History of English Gardening considers the world of horticulture at its turning point, before the professionalism of the practice had fully set in. Laird examines in fascinating detail the broadly creative environment of the amateur gardener in the 18th century—a time when the now-disparate fields of botany, ornithology, geography, and meteorology were all components of horticultural study. The work of the amateur could, at that point, be in turn either an art, or a science, or both. Many of the period’s major authorities were women, and they dealt with gardens with a depth that cannot be captured simply as a flatly viewed landscape or an architectural design. For Laird, the history of these women has never received the attention it deserves, as it has been glossed over by the men of landscape architecture—the Walpoles, Browns and Reptons. This gender definition is an important part of Laird’s study. He continually underlines the larger, less segregated world-view held by amateurs—a view free of the constraints of the male-dominated profession, which focused on architectural design as the main method for modelling our surroundings. In very different ways, each of the two books raises questions about how the design professions respond to our environment. In particular, they reposition the profession of landscape architecture, showing both its strengths and its weaknesses. This energy for reinvention could be salutary—and necessary—for landscape architecture and that “other” architecture alike. Michael McClelland is founding principal of ERA Architects.

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Wind Snow Exhaust Odour Particulate MOECC Approvals (519) 787-2910

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spollock@theakston.com

www.theakston.com

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE Total Acoustics™ Ceilings: Buzz Managed

The CISC is Canada’s voice for the steel construction industry, a vibrant $5.0 billion industry that employs over 40,000 Canadians. The CISC’s vision is to provide leadership in design and construction efficiency, quality and innovation.

Total Acoustics™ panels combine sound absorption (NRC) and sound blocking (CAC) in one product. So you can create buzz-free spaces for concentration, collaboration, and confidentiality. Visit armstrongceilings.com/totalacoustics to learn more about total noise control and design flexibility.

www.cisc-icca.ca

MAPEI’s FRP composite systems The Belden Brick Company offers more options than any other brick manufacturer in the world. Belden Brick is the industry leader in delivering the largest selection of more than 500 colors, 20 sizes, 13 textures and unlimited shapes. Belden will meet all your product needs with time-honored quality and experience.

MAPEI’s MapeWrap™, Carboplate™ and Maperod™ strengthening systems for concrete and masonry structures are available as laminates or carbon fiber plates preimpregnated in epoxy resin; unidirectional and multi-directional fabrics (bi-axial and quadri-axial) easily adaptable to the shape of the structure; and carbon fiber bars preimpregnated with epoxy resin.

www.beldenbrick.com

For more information on MAPEI’s FRP products, please visit: www.mapei.com

800.869.9685 www.modernfold.com

Introducing Bilco’s Thermally Broken Roof Hatch; the new standard in energy efficiency. The Thermally Broken Roof Hatch features an added insulation frame and cover design minimizing heat transfer between interior and exterior surfaces. The result? A product that resists condensation and provides energy efficiency. The Thermally Broken design is available in all standard BILCO single leaf sizes and special sizes upon request. For more information visit, www.bilco-colt.com

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Canam-Buildings: Better Building Solutions Canam-Buildings is an industryleading fabricator of steel joists, girders, steel deck, and also designs, manufactures and installs the Reveal Series decking system, Murox prefabricated building system, and Hambro composite floor systems. © Photos : Stéphane Groleau

Modernfold’s Acousti-Seal ® Encore® operable partitions provide an industry-leading acoustical performance level of 56 STC. Acousti-Seal® Encore® panels are completely trimless, allowing for seamless transitions into any space and also feature the new SureSet™ top and bottom seal mechanism which eliminates the possibility of set-up errors and provides a superior sound seal for unmatched acoustical control.

The BuildMaster approach, Canam’s advance planning, design and improved steel delivery features, can be combined to any of our construction solutions. 1-866-466-8769 | canam-construction.com

Fiberboard panels manufactured in Canada by MSL meet the most stringent environmental criteria, made entirely from non-toxic natural materials. They are stable, lightweight and easy to install, and have been placed at the top of the ranks for soundproofing, insulation and roofing panels. Innovation in sustainable development continues to be top of mind at MSL, with its newest product being recognized as one of Canada’s top green products of the year by the Canada Green Building Council.. www.MSLfibre.com

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Marmoleum Striato takes on a new dimension with 8 beautiful, embossed Textura designs. The organic Flow and Driftwood patterns of Textura add tactility and movement to the floor, creating vibrant spaces that play with light and direction, subtly changing appearances over the course of the day or with the direction of view. www.forbo.com

Introducing New Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for Precast Concrete Products

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE

The North American precast concrete industry recently released EPD s in three key precast concrete product categories. The EPD s will allow architects, engineers and building owners to better understand the environmental impacts of precast and prestressed concrete products. Download the EPDs at www.sustainableprecast.ca

Clean Air & Save Energy Nedlaw Living Wall Biofilters can replace fresh air intake to significantly reduce the energy costs associated with heating and cooling of air being brought into a building. Because they improve air quality, Nedlaw biofilters add more LEED® points than any other green wall. Nedlaw can custom design any living wall, making it an easy addition for new construction or retrofit projects.

Icynene is the all-in-one exterior commercial wall construction solution

nedlawlivingwalls.com

www.icynene.ca/whyproseal

Icynene closed-cell spray foam offers a cost-effective and superior performance solution for exterior commercial wall construction. Ideal for modern building designs, Icynene closed-cell spray foam is an all-in-one product: insulation, air barrier and vapour retarder. From cost, performance to design capabilities, it’s the superior choice.

519-648-9779

Diagonal Punched Aluminum Plank

SunGuard® SNX 51/23

Manufactured from a 6000 series aluminum alloy, our diagonal punched plank is available with various punch patterns/spacings. A slip resistant surface can be applied to enhance the safety of this product. Applications include pedestrian bridges/walkways, stair treads, or platforms which all conform to ADA standards.

Bring Your Vision.

Visit www.ohiogratings.com for details.

Architectural Graphic Standards, the written authority for architects, designers, and building contractors, has been revised with up-to-date codes and standards. Now available through online and mobile, users can search content and download graphic details, texts, charts. Each new book comes with this digital subscription tool. Visit www.graphicstandards.com for more details.

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Aesthetics and performance unite. SNX 51/23 glass offers high transparency, ultra-low solar heat gain and a neutral blue appearance.

www.Guardian.com/commercial

Speed Project Communication 60% with Bluebeam® Revu® Revu enables digital workflows for architects spanning the full project lifecycle from site surveys and field reports to design review and punch. Create 2D and 3D PDFs directly from Revit, AutoCAD, Sketchup Pro or convert any IFC file with Revu. Track, markup and collaborate on shared document sets in Revu’s integrated cloud-based collaboration solution, Bluebeam Studio™. Download a trial at: www.bluebeam.com/shared

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE Tarkett’s Minerality™ Rubber Tile and Plank. Inspired by the rich, organic look of natural wood and stone, it is available in both tile and plank format, and combines an understated, classy sophistication with the performance luxuries of a rubber flooring solution – and has received Cradle to Cradle® Bronze level. www.johnsonite.com/Flooring-Products/Rubber-Flooring/Minerality

THE ELEGANCE OF NATURAL WOOD At Prodema we specialize in creating natural wood products of the highest quality for the world of architecture and design. Following years of research and development we are proud to offer a unique, innovative and high-tech product with no need for the regular maintenance usually required by other wood exteriors.

Mitsubishi Electric – your Canadian HVAC partner It will change the way you look at aluminum The perfect solution for achieving the beauty of wood without the maintenance. Longboard is aluminum soffit and siding available in a wide range of wood grain finishes with superior resistance to weathering in the critical areas of colour and gloss retention. www.longboardproducts.com

Being the world’s only 2-pipe simultaneous heating & cooling VRF system, City Multi helps maximizing your building’s revenue-generating space, offers better comfort control and improves energy efficiency. Its flexible design makes it easier to design and install than traditional HVAC and other VRF systems. Developed specifically for Canada, City Multi air-source & watersource VRF systems are available in all voltages options, including 575 volts. www.ExploreVRF.ca

Style your budget will love Philips Ledalite FloatPlane LED suspended luminaries offer great performance in a sporty, low-profile design. FloatPlane offers sleek minimalism (1.2”h x 8”w), distribution options (70% up, 75% down and 100%), and astounding performance (up to 129 LPW ) at a price comparable to fluorescents. www.bit.ly/FloatPlaneCanada

BOBRICK SureFlo® DISPENSERS FEATURE TOP FILL. Counter-mounted liquid and foam models dispense economical universal soap saving 80% versus proprietary cartridges, top-fill design ends under counter servicing, electronic dispense zone eliminates hand waving, chrome finish integrates with other accessories and fixtures. bobrick.com for info.

VELUX Canada Inc.

ROXUL Inc.

VELUX is the market leader in the manufacturing of residential and commercial skylights. Celebrating 75 years of innovation VELUX continues the lead the industry with solar technology and the best warranty on the market.  Only the VELUX No Leak Skylight includes 3 layers of water protection to give your clients a worryfree installation.  Trust the name you know and discover endless daylighting solutions for your next project. For more information visit:

ROXUL Inc. is part of ROCKWOOL® International, the largest producer of stone wool insulation for residential, commercial and industrial applications. ROXUL has served the North American market for 25 years. Its stone wool products offer advantages, including sound absorbency, dimensional stability, and resistance to fire, water, mold, mildew, and rot. www.roxul.com

www.velux.ca

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OAA annual conference May 11-13, 2016

This year’s conference, held in Toronto, explores how the value of architects and of architecture can be more effectively communicated to clients and to the public. www.oaa.on.ca

Ontario Heritage Conference

Your Future Home: Creating the New Vancouver

Let’s Talk about… Neighbourhoods

To May 15, 2016

May 18, 2016

Presented by the Urbanarium Society and the Museum of Vancouver, this exhibition explores timely issues including housing affordability, urban density, mobility and public space. www.museumofvancouver.ca

Taking place at the Glenbow Museum, this panel discussion examines the design of Calgary’s suburbs, seeking to identify positive features as well as aspects that could be improved by design. www.dtalks.org

May 12-14, 2016

This event in Stratford and St. Marys is aimed towards professionals and advocates, and focuses on new approaches to building communities while preserving heritage and cultural values. www.ontarioheritageconference.ca

Banff Session 2016 May 12-14, 2016

The biennial conference hosted by the Alberta Association of Architects marks its 60th anniversary with the theme of Convergence. Keynote speakers include Brigitte Shim and Howard Sutcliffe, FRAIC, and Angela Ferguson of Australian firm futurespace. www.banffsession.ca

Grey to Green conference June 1-4, 2016

Over 50 technical presentations will cover subjects ranging from best practices in life-cycle cost and benefit analysis, to the latest research on green infrastructure.

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CALENDAR

www.greytogreenconference.org

Festival of Architecture June 8-11, 2016

Design Matters: A Pre-Post Occupancy Evaluation of Bridgepoint Active Health To May 15, 2016

This exhibition at Ryerson University studies the sociological and health impacts of design on the same patient and staff cohort as they moved from the old Bridgepoimt building to the new one.

Lo-Fab: MASS Design Group To June 1, 2016

Showcasing a cholera treatment center in Haiti and a primary school in the Congo, this exhibition in Toronto explores how architecture can address social challenges, effect systemic change, and mobilize communities.

Design Exchange Auction CanBIM Regional Session

May 16-18, 2016

This year’s Architectural Institute of British Columbia conference in Vancouver focuses on building resilient cities and communities. Ac2016.aibc.ca

Change the way you look through glass...and more!

festival2016.raic.org

www.daniels.utoronto.ca

www.arch.ryerson.ca

AIBC annual conference

The RAIC heads to Nanaimo, British Columbia, with a 2016 conference designed to engage the public as well as architects from across the country. The Festival includes keynote presentations, con-ed sessions, tours and a design charrette.

June 1-2, 2016

Taking place in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, this conference features industry leaders discussing the key issues surrounding BIM for various stakeholders. www.canbim.com

June 14, 2016

This second annual event in support of the Design Exchange features contemporary and vintage objects, housewares and furnishings curated from the private collections of Canadian stylemakers. www.dx.org

Exclusively from PCL Graphics Ltd.

Established over three decades ago, PCL Graphics has been at the forefront of the grand format printing industry. Realizing that there was a gap in identifying transparent and translucent colours, Lumitone® was launched. The Lumitone® line offers you the potential to customize density, opacity and overall look of your designs in regards to covering clear surfaces, such as acrylics and glass.

Follow Us On Social Media For The Latest News from PCL Graphics & Lumitone®

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BACKPAGE

WILD WEST INDIES TEXT

Andrew Hotari Joe McNally

PHOTO

CREATED BY A CANADIAN DESIGN COLLABORATIVE, A UNIQUE HOTEL IN ST. LUCIA DRAWS ON MATERIALS UNDERFOOT AS ITS INSPIRATION.

While many resorts in the Caribbean are often half-empty, travellers seeking one-of-a kind experiences continue to fully occupy a remote volcanic mountain escape on a tropical island. And for good reason: after all, who doesn’t like a good mystery? Saint Lucia is definitely a mysterious place. Quaint and colourful villages, small coves that hide sheltered beaches, temperamental weather, shocking tropical vistas and immense beauty abound at every twist and turn of the torturous mountain terrain. Perhaps the success of Jade Mountain lies in the fact that it is equally as enigmatic as the landscape in which it resides. The resort came to be through many years of intense collaboration between hotel owner Nick Troubetzkoy, who trained as an architect in British Columbia (and for whom I work) and a Toronto design team, led by principal designer Peter Bull. Conceptually, the building is a tour de force: a seven-storey hotel where each room has an integrated infinity pool and no exterior wall. The pools cascade down the side of the mountainous site, facing the ocean. Each pool is startlingly different in colour, size and shape. This lack of duplication is a central theme:

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each of the 30 rooms also has a different geometry and sense of space. Adding to the aura of uniqueness, the rooms—dubbed “sanctuaries” by the hotel—are each accessed by their own individual bridge. A typical strategy for designing on a steep slope is to cut terraces into the earth and embed a building into the hillside. Instead, Jade Mountain springs out from the slope into the sky. This allows each sanctuary to be completely private with no view of other units or roofs below. Numerous bridges angle back to the hillside, creating a fantastical sculpture of concrete, wood, greenery, colour, light and shadow. Troubetzkoy approached the site with the aim to “build with what you are standing upon.” The building’s stone cladding and many other materials were obtained from the site itself. Because the building is pulled away from the hill, it requires no air conditioning and is cooled by free-flowing mountain breezes. The natural hill becomes the grounds and gardens for visitors—it is lush with tropical vegetation, Escher-like stairs and twisting streams alive with tropical fish. The opposite slope is used to naturally purify greywater, using

ABOVE Taken by helicopter, this photo reveals the layered composition of the resort. The stacked terraces ensure absolute privacy in each of the guest rooms, or “sanctuaries.”

gravity and a sequence of reed beds that step down the terrain. Carefully conceived sustainable strategies abound throughout. There are many lessons here that work. Although the influences of Canadian West Coast Modernism are palpable, the result has more to do with an incremental approach to design over the project’s six-year construction period. Mistakes were corrected on the spot, strategies evolved from one floor to the next. “It takes a perfect storm: a symbiosis of client, design team, the site, and the overall ambition,” says Bull. The real impact of projects in remote locations is in their possibility of sustaining local culture and employment. The hotel was handbuilt with local craftsmen, and its reputation and success are largely dependent on local employees who are responsible for its daily operation. When Saint Lucians build hotels, they know that they are building a future for themselves and their children. And it shows: just ask any Saint Lucian if they know where Jade Mountain is. With pride they’ll tell you. Andrew Hotari is an intern architect working with Troubetzkoy Architects.

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Light LightCherry Cherry

Table Walnut Table Walnut

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LightFirFir Light

DarkNational National Dark Walnut Walnut

LightNational National Light Walnut Walnut

Storm Storm

C. Charcoal Charcoal C.

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Canadian Architect May 2016  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...