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EN | 5/2013

#6

magazine

Gosia Janik

Eliza Stegienka | Lorenzo Mancini Hengki Lee | Wirginia Bryll | Mariusz Mr贸z ipressphoto | Photography - Culture | Free Monthly Magazine | www.ipressmagazine.com


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Contents

News Producers News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Portfolio from the Cover Gosia Janik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Point of View

................. Demony wojny w obiektywie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 First-rate advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 “Runway” project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

© Copyright photo Małgorzata Janik | Model - Olga Diago | Make-up artist - Almudena Marín Rubio Stylist - Gosia Janik & Fernando Ocaña 4

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Interview Aleksander Czyba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

iPress Magazine Editor in Chief & Publisher Maciej Pawela Subeditor Marcelina Bednarska

Presentations Eliza Stegienka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Lorenzo Mancini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Hengki Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Wirginia Bryll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Mariusz Mróz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Editors Magdalena Janczura Marta Regnowska Karolina Wąsowicz Adriana Błażej Proofreading Marcelina Bednarska Translation Zofia Cieślak Cover Photo Gosia Janik

History in the Lens History of Kodak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Ansel Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Utilitarian approach to photography . . . . . . . . .82

Books Book Review - Bryan Peterson “Understanding Photography Field Guide” . . . . 86

iPress Choice Frebourg Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Edyta Dufaj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Editorial Office info@ipressmagazine.com Marketing & Advertising marketing@ipressmagazine.com

Address of the Publisher iPress Magazine ul. Nowowiejska 34 32-660 Gorzów | Poland Free copy of the magazine. Sale of the magazine is treated as acting for the publisher’s disadvantage and it entails liability and civil responsability. The editor is not responsible for the content of advertisements. All photographs and texts published in iPressPhoto Magazine belong to the particular authors and they are subject to the protection of authors’s rights. Photographs and texts cannot be reproduced, edited, copied and distributed without the holder’s written permission. No part of this publication can be reproduced in any form, digital or mechanical, printed, edited or distributed without the publisher’s written permission.

All rights reserved.

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News

Text | Marta Regnowska

Producers News New Canon PowerShot SX280 HS Canon PowerShot SX280 HS is the new compact camera by Canon. It features a 20x optical zoom, resolution of 12.1 megapixels, speed of 60 fps, and Full HD video recording. The camera also has an in-built GPS memorising where a photo was taken and allowing to see your itinerary. Advanced users will certainly enjoy the image stabilisation system, manual mode, Av and Tv.

Sony SLT - A58 Sony SLT - A58 is a camera in the Translucent Mirror Technology ™. It features CMOS APS-C sensor of 20 megapixels and an option to register a series of photos (up to 8 fps). It also has the Steady Shot image stabilisation system and 15 points autofocus. The range of ISO is from 100 to 16.000 but extension is possible up to 25.600.

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Producers News

New EOS Canon EOS 100D Canon EOS 100D - was presented as the smallest and the lightest (407 g) reflex camera on the market. It has an APS-C sensor with a resolution of 18 mexapixels, wide range of ISO (10012.800), 9 point hybrid autofocus system and LCD touchscreen. Beginners can use a guide on the available functions.

Canon Lens Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS - With its universal range of focal lenghts Canon EF-S 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS is designed for amateur users. It features advanced optical solutions to assure image stabilisation. Thanks to the new stepping motor (STM) technology the lens prevents photos from blurring.

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News

Text | Marcelina Bednarska

Eve nts photography

Into the Wild – exhibition by Szymon Szcześniak

© Copyright photo Dedo Gallery

Ded Gallery Kraków, Sławkowska 26a (entrance from the yard) 19.04 – 16.05.2013 The exhibition Into the Wild is composed of a series of photos taken by Szymon Szcześniak during his journey through California in 2011. The

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photographs depict places visited by the artist, as well as people he met during the trip. These outstanding shots were taken in Bombay Beach, Salton Sea, Niland, Death Valley, Ballarat, Slab City and Joshua Tree. During his Californian adventure Szcześniak hired a car and drove through wilderness – an experience

which, according to the author, purifies the mind and sharpens all senses. The photos are full of contradictory emotions accompanying the photographer during the journey – solitude, admiration of the nature’s beauty, and fascination with the people met by chance.


Events

Photomonth in Kraków

Peter Lindbergh, Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Pattz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schifer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mudler, Stephanie Seymour, US Vogue, Brooklyn, Nowy Jork 1991 © Peter Lindbergh

Here comes the next Photomonth in Kraków – the biggest photographic festival in Poland. As usually it will take place in May and June (16.05- 16.06). The programme includes dozens of exhibitions and events, located in the best museums and galleries in the city. “Get ready!” The topic of the 11th edition of Photomonth in Kraków is fashion interpreted as a part of culture and different ways of its representations. Fashion will be defined very broadly, and all its aspects and contexts will be considered. They may, in fact, ap-

pear to be the key to understand the contemporary culture. The main programme includes 10 exibitions. One of them, Limits of Fashion, is shown at Bunkier Sztuki and it allows viewers to get familiar with the festival’s ideas. The main programme also includes: exhibition of Walter Pfeiffer’s photos; collection of Corinne Day’s private photos presented for the first time (Pauza Gallery); new look on Tadeusz Rolke, a famous Polish fashion photographer, and on Ghislain Dussart, officialy known to launch the image of Brigitte Bardot (both in MOCAK); contemporary documen-

tary about fashion obsession (Milou Abel, ZPAF); or installation about fashion in the context of reciprocal cultural influences in the post colonial areas (Roy Villevoye, Etnographic Museum). It’s also worth to mention the ShowOFF Section, launched especially to present young Polish photographers. It gives them a chance to have an individual exhibition in front of an international audience counted in thousands of visitors. It seems there is nothing more to be said but “Get ready for the Photomonth in Kraków!”

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Portfolio from the Cover

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Gosia Janik

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Gosia Janik

Model - Cecile Gerbier Make-up artist - Kasia Syska Stylist - Kasia Syska Š Copyright photo Gosia Janik 2013 May

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Portfolio from the Cover

Model - Iza Kita © Copyright photo Gosia Janik 12

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Gosia Janik

Małgorzata Janik is a 35-years-old photographer born in Częstochowa. Currently, she lives and works in Madrid. Before that, she used to live in Poland for 10 years. It was in Poland where she gathered precious experience, taking photos at weddings, baptisms, during family photo sessions and even for commercial and promotional purposes. Yet, these photos were not satisfying enough for the young photographer. Gosia wanted to do something greater – find motivation for new challenges and feel the taste of satisfaction. She decided to move to the sunny Spain to develop her photographic skills and gain more experience. This decision turned out to be a good one. She has a great talent and her shots can be watched for hours. Her passion started when she discovered an old camera belonging to her father – actually, it was him who inspired her to follow her path in photography. She decided to take up a photographic adventure and to make it her way of living.

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Portfolio from the Cover

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Gosia Janik

Model - Iza Kita © Copyright photo Gosia Janik 2013 May

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Portfolio from the Cover

Gosia says she uses photography as a way to express herself. She usually is a calm person, so photography is like her second language. She likes to focus on people, and on what they say. Instead of speaking, she prefers to listen and look. Her skill of observation certainly helps in her photograpic work. Maybe that’s the reason why she specialises in fashion, beauty and portrait photography. Her photos show the body in a beautiful way – take a look at her outstanding shots of common people practising yoga. As she admits, she wants to show the mystery of being a human. Using her camera, she wants to touch a person’s soul and create a bond. Such approach is also therapeutic for the author – thanks to photography she realised her feminity and gained self confidence. She wishes the same for everyone else.

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Gosia Janik

Model - Cecile Gerbier © Copyright photo Gosia Janik 2013 May

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Portfolio from the Cover

Model - Leticia Agency - Isabel Navarro Model Management Make-up artist - Michell Caro Stylist - Gosia Janik Š Copyright photo Gosia Janik 18

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Gosia Janik

Model - Leticia Agency - Isabel Navarro Model Management Make-up artist - Michell Caro Stylist - Gosia Janik Š Copyright photo Gosia Janik 2013 May

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Portfolio from the Cover

Model - Isabel Lago Agency - Isabel Navarro Model Management Make-up artist - Kasia Syska Š Copyright photo Gosia Janik 20

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Gosia Janik

Her photos do not require additional lighting nor flash because they are taken in natural light. Predominantly, they are in sepia or black and white which gives them a subtle note. She is mostly inspired by everyday life situations – each moment can give rise to extraordinary ideas. She appreciates Diane Arbus, Julia Margaret Cameron, Jan Saudek, Wojciech Prażmowski and Fernando Ocaña. Although she says she’s not an artist, she certainly can be labelled like that.

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Point of View

Text | Adriana Błażej

Demony wojny w obiektywie „Jedziemy na wojnę, aby zrobić reportaż, zebrać ludzkie historie i je stamtąd wywieźć, pozostając przy życiu. To po opowieść jedziemy, a nie przeżywać przygody. Nie chodzi o to, by wziąć udział w konflikcie zbrojnym, puczu. Czasem trzeba zaryzykować, wystawić się, ale nie ma reguły. Trudno mówić o granicach, póki się człowiek nie znajdzie w danej sytuacji. Trzeba liczyć na przypadek i wierzyć, że nic się nie stanie i w swoje szczęście”.

O fotografii wojennej można pisać dużo i dobrze (mało i źle tym bardziej). Analizować jej historię z perspektywy ewolucji techniki wykonywania zdjęć: od kolodionu Rogera Fentona przez negatywy Roberta Capy, po aparaty cyfrowe Horsta Faasa i Krzysztofa Millera. Obowiązkowo powinny pojawić się charakterystyki sylwetek najważniejszych fotoreporterów i opis ich dokonań. W tekście nie powinno też zabraknąć głębokich rozważań nad istotą i sensem poczynań fotografów oraz symboliczną wartością wykonywanych przez nich zdjęć. Jednak nawet najbardziej erudycyjny tekst, perfekcyjny pod względem języka i stylu ociera się o banał, chcąc usilnie dotrzeć do istoty rzeczy, nie powielając jednocześnie tego, co już zostało powiedziane. Sprawiedliwiej będzie więc oddać głos żołnierzom obrazu. Ja, reporter wojenny. „Pisałem o wojnach, które obserwowałem, ale wojny toczą się dalej. Nowe lub stare. Jak trzynaście nieszczęść, przekleństw, katastrof, plag niemających końca. Trzynastka to diabelski tuzin, więc nie ma trzynastego piętra w co lepszych hotelach. Nie ma trzynastych pokoi. Jest dwanaście, a nie trzynaście miesięcy i było dwunastu, a nie trzynastu apostołów. Harmonijnie, podzielnie, parzyście. A trzynastka to wojna. Karta najbardziej mroczna i bijąca wszystko. To as pik wymalowany na

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transporterze przed pałacem prezydenckim w Groznym, na którym rosyjscy wojacy opijali swoje zwycięstwo nad małym narodem. To as pik w talii kart, którą dostawali amerykańscy żołnierze wyjeżdżający do Iraku. Był nim Saddam Husajn. Trzynastka wypadła też bohaterom moich zdjęć. Tym, którzy głodowali, ginęli, uciekali, byli przerażeni. Mogła być może przypaść komu innemu, ale padła na nich. Trzynaście wojen było też dla mnie. Posłańca wiadomości, gdy wraca do domu. To chyba ostatnia moja wojna. Wojna ze sobą. Wojna ze wspomnieniami, które – pisząc – musiałem jeszcze raz ożywić. Jeszcze raz spojrzeć na uchwycone obrazy i przeczytać je we wszystkich kierunkach świata”. Krzysztof Miller, „13 wojen i jedna”, s. 349 Obecność „Wojna to zawsze dramat ludzi. Właściwie nie ma znaczenia, z której strony konfliktu będziesz się jej przyglądać, zawsze dojdzie się do tego samego wniosku. Góry Karabach, Czeczenia, Kurdystan, Irak, Gruzja, to właściwie zawsze krwawy teatr. Moim zadaniem jest dokumentowanie, a nie uczestnictwo w tych wydarzeniach, czy branie udziału w boju. To nie moja wojna. Jak mogę staram się więc nie angażować. Patrzę i fotografuję. Daję świadectwo”.


Demony wojny w obiektywie

„Czujesz, że jesteś w miejscu, gdzie dzieje się historia, to jest ekscytujące, a twoje ego jest mile łechtane. Jest zapotrzebowanie na to, co robisz. Każdy człowiek pragnie mieć poczucie, że robi coś ważnego. Tyle że rzadko widzisz wydarzenie, z którego raport czy zdjęcie naprawdę coś zmieni. Jakbyś patrzył na świat przez szparę w kurtynie. Czy nasza praca była ważna? Czy coś byłoby inne, gdyby mnie tam wtedy nie było? Światu by to różnicy nie zrobiło”. Greg Marinovich „Żywy jeszcze atlas anatomiczny przede mną i aparatem. Obraz, który śni mi się do dzisiaj, tylko w odrobinę innej formie. Nie mogłem tym ludziom pomóc, choć wtedy byli dla mnie najważniejsi na świecie. Zawsze mogę tylko podać informację o tym, co gdzieś się z ludźmi dzieje. Zbulwersować świat brzydkim obrazkiem. Żeby hamburger wypadł z ręki. A flaki po warszawsku stanęły kołkiem w gardle. Tylko tyle mogę. Jeżeli komuś tym pomogę, to na pewno nie im. Oni szansy nie mają”. Krzysztof Miller, „13 wojen i jedna” s. 138 Nostalgia „Moja piękna Francja wyglądała nędznie, bardziej odpychała niż zapraszała, a niemieckie karabiny maszynowe wypluwające w stronę naszej barki serie pocisków, kompletnie psuły mój powrót. Widząc brnących w wodzie żołnierzy, kluczących pomiędzy stalowymi zaporami przeciwinwazyjnymi i dymy nad plażą, zatrzymałem się na początku rampy, żeby zrobić zdjęcie. Obsługa, która omyłkowo wzięła moje znieruchomienie za przejaw wahania, pomogła mi opuścić barkę solidnym kopniakiem w tyłek. Woda była zimna, plaża jakieś sto jardów przede mną. Pociski cięły wodę wokół mnie podczas, gdy próbowałem dotrzeć do najbliższej zapory. Stał przy niej żołnierz i przez chwilę dzieliliśmy wspólnie naszą skromną osłonę. Po chwili żołnierz

zdjął wodoodporny pokrowiec z karabinu i nie mierząc w nic konkretnego zaczął strzelać w stronę plaży. Odgłosy wystrzałów dodały mu jakby odwagi by ruszyć do przodu. Zostałem sam i zacząłem robić zdjęcia żołnierzom kryjącym się za sąsiednimi zaporami”. Robert Capa „…wciąż trzeba pamiętać o tym okropnym słowie cierpliwość, kiedy czas goni. Moja miła! Co za wstrętna pogoda! Jak długo jeszcze tak będzie? Dwadzieścia sześć dni, i ani jednego, który można by uznać za ładny. Jest zupełnie inaczej, wciąż rozbudzane nadzieje i kolejne rozczarowania [...] te rzadkie i marne próbki, które udało się nam uzyskać dzięki uporowi i wytrwałości, za jaką cenę? To nieprawdopodobne! Czas naświetlania, który zajmuje kilka godzin, a potem jeszcze dwa lub trzy dni, o ile nie więcej, w laboratorium, do tego zanurzanie płytek w roztworze dwa lub trzy razy dziennie, no i do tego koszty informacji o tym, co się dzieje, materiały, które niszczy ludzka ręka, czas i klimat, który nas tutaj nie oszczędza. Tych kilka zdjęć, które udało nam się wyrwać zimą, ileż zniszczonych płytek, jakże wiele straconych bezpowrotnie odczynników chemicznych, nie licząc tych, które straciliśmy na skutek panujących tu mrozów”. Andre Rouille, „Fotografia. Między dokumentem a sztuką współczesną”, s.30 Lokalni świadkowie „Postęp technologiczny przyczynił się do tego, że relacjonowanie wojny to czasem wolna amerykanka. Z Teheranu pisał mieszkający tam blogger, arabska wiosna relacjonowana była na twitterze, a pierwsze zdjęcia martwego Kadafiego w rowie melioracyjnym zrobione były telefonem komórkowym. Taka wojna wymykała się zawodowym dziennikarzom spod kontroli. Nikt nie wyprzedzi tych lokalnych świadków wydarzeń”. Krzysztof Miller

Zródła: Greg Marianovich - http://wiadomosci.gazeta.pl/wiadomosci/1,114873,12619063,Greg_Marinovich__legenda_fotografii_wojennej___Ta.html?as=2 Robert Capa - http://www.spidersweb.pl/2013/03/robert-capa-fotografia-wojenna-2.html Krzysztof Miller - http://menstream.pl/wiadomosci-reportaze-i-wywiady/krzysztof-miller-zrobi-kazde-zdjecie-nawet-najbardziej-drastyczne-nie-wszystkie-mogly-ujrzec-swiatlo-dzienne,0,1278505.html

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Point of View

Text | Adriana Błażej

First-rate advertising

Good advertising is the key to good sales – this rule is clear even to people who don’t know much about marketing. But the notion of “effective advertising” itself is not so easy to define. What some people see as a great advertising idea, others may criticise as dull and secondary. Some viewers respond to problems tackled, for instance, in an advertisement of a washing powder; yet, the rest 26

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may perceive it as brainwashing and change channel or turn off the TV. Actually, ads make use of many different techniques serving to present and promote a variety of products. The techniques are so diverse that they have been subject to a considerable number of studies conducted by sociologists, psychologists etc.


First-rate advertising

© Copyright photo Daniel Chojnacki

Apart from multimedia commercials there are also ads in two-dimensional form – a photo in press, on a leaflet or billboard. Although the essence of advertising is always the same – that is, to persuade receivers to buy a product – the way of presentation is completely different. How to present in a static way something designed to be in motion?

How to use photography to promote, for example, a car? In case of cars the inventiveness of advertising designers is almost infinite. Still, everything depends on the target viewers of a particular ad.

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Point of View

Friend of the family If a car is set to cater for family needs – space, safety, comfort and economy – it’s necessary to stress these qualities. Such cars are frequently displayed in a picturesque landscape, evoking associations with holidays or weekend trips. Ad of a car for city driving, in turn, will point to the model’s flexibility, which allows a smooth moving through the city jungle. When addressing young couples, willing to buy their first car, advertisements have to mention an affordable price. If the target vie-

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wers are parents it is necessary to picture that a car assures space and safety. Such vehicles are often photographed with their trunks stuffed and opened, surrounded by many equipments. Enhancing images of happy kids or a whole family are used to strenghten the advertising message. To warm up the image of an advertised product marketing specialists also use animals, such as dogs, cats or canaries, as family members, happy about the new purchase.


First-rate advertising

Will you tempt it? It is more difficult to advertise sport cars. Their main quality, apart from an outstanding look, is the ability to reach breathless speeds. But how to produce a good shot of a speeding car in the static two dimentions? Magic tricks deceiving the eye will certainly come in hand: blurred background, illusion of turning wheels and light adding to the dynamics of the image – glow, contrast, intense colours. Such an ad has to activate the viewers’ imagination and make them desire the advertised car. Since the desiring ones are usually men, cars are often shown together with beautiful women. She cannot be sitting behind the steering wheel because such an image could bring about an opposite result. But depicting a woman close to the car or in the background may be an effective marke-

ting trick. Such a car must be stylish, classy and powerful. Authors of ads often decide to let viewers take a look under the bonnet and show technical details of a model. Consequently, photographers often try to capture the intensity of metal shine and flash of headlights, impressing every motorizaion lover. In case of sport cars things such as price, space or economy are of secondary rank. They are made for individualists, who don’t care about the price. Way of presentation, thus, depends on the type of a car and the target group it is designed for. Conscious of the customers’ needs advertising designers have to stress particular elements persuading to purchase a car. Judging by car sales statistics, they are quite good in that. 2013 May

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Point of View

“Runway” Project

The runway of the old Rakowice-Czyżyny airport is close to Grzegorz Ziemiański for personal reasons. It’s his neighbourhood, his child’s playground, an area for camily walks. Unfortunately, it is also a proof for Kraków’s incapable politics in management. In fact, city officials have forgotten about the ancient airport and they did nothing to create a recreational area for people living of the Nowa Huta district. As a result of faulty politics, real estate development companies started to buy particular lots. “At the moment, as a person living here, I have to face a decision that had already been taken. My area will double or even triple the number of its inhabitants, leading to overpopulation and possible rise of pathologies in the future. Especially, because the investors’ plans do not include any public institutions.”

© Copyright photo Grzegorz Ziemiański 30

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Text | Adriana Błażej


“Runway” project

History of the airport History of Rakowice-Czyżyny dates back to the beginning of the 20th century, when it was one of the stations of the first regular post line connecting Great Britain and Odessa. In 1918 the airport, with all its equipment, was taken by a group of Polish officers, who formed the, so called, Eskadrylla. Starting in 1924, it had been reconstructed to become one of the biggest airports in Poland. On the 1st of September Rakowice-Czyżyny suffers the heaviest attact of Luftwaffe and later, during the II World War, it is used by Germans to attact the Soviet Union. In 1945 the airport was occupied by the Russians and then given back to Polish forces. Due to the expansion of a metallurgy plant nearby, it was closed in 1963. Currently, the old runway separates two big housing estates in the city’s 16th district, called Czyżyny. One of them is os. 2. Pułku Lotniczego (around 4,300 people), the other – os. Dywizjonu 303 (around 7,300 people). The runaway, located in between, is used for various purposes – recreation, communication, mettings. Nearby, there is also St Albert’s church which organises religious celebrations on the runway. But since several years the land, divided into a number of lots, has attracted interest of developers. One of them even started to unify the land by buying particular lots from private owners, as well as from the municipality of Kraków. Since there was no criteria concerning architecture of that place, the company proposed a project of a housing estate for 10,000 inhabitants. Despite that number, the project doesn’t include any public utilities such as schools or kindergardens. In the project there is 0.6 parking place planned for 1 flat. The runway itself will to be fenced and turned into a recreational area for the new housing estate. The 30th of September 2012. Wine bush Alden on a deserted allotment. “I have lived in Nowa Huta since 54 years. On Dywizjonu 303 since 32. I remember when people where given these pieces of land. Now, when the construction has started, people moved away. They took everything they could, the rest is left. My wife makes a good juice of these grapes; six weeks and there’s even some wine” – says a man living in os. Dywizjonu 303. “At the beginning of October I picked 4-5 kg of fruit from these bushes and I prepared some wine according to that recipie” – one of the locals.

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Point of View

Stanisław Gawliński is an 80-years-old inhabitant of os. 2. Pułku Lotniczego. He is a photographer and photoreporter. For many years he worked for “Głos” (eng. voice) – a weekly magazine of Nowa Huta. He claims the runway is just perfect for wandering. “My first memory concerning the runway is that I was going to the allotment by bike together with my parents. Some time ago there has been Carrefour built in that place. Firstly we had a 32

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Wigry Lux bike, western part of the runway had still been enclosed – it was used to store building materials for new housing estates.” The runway is also the playground remembered from childhood, place for riding bikes, racing, flying kites and models made in a club nearby. In winter, on these two hills, kids rode on sledges, built bases and played in the ground remaining from the constructions.


History of the airport

© Copyright photo Grzegorz Ziemiański 2013 May

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Point of View

“The runway also witnessed the beating of Guiness record, in which I participated together with my students. The author of the idea was an art teacher from the primary school nr 52. It also hosts the Feast of Corpus Christi, with the last station located on the hill close to os. 2. Pułku Lotniczego” – says Gawliński. Grzegorz Ziemiański gathered stories of people who attribute a sentimental value to the runway. One of them was the story by Paweł Dobrowolski, living in os. Dywizjonu 303. “The runway is a part of the Rakowice-Czyżyny airport, place close to one of my relatives, gen. Bolesław Stachoń, who propagated Polish aircraft in the period between the wars. He has beaten records on engine aeroplanes and gliders (2 records on Blériot SPAD S-61-4 and one on an ancient glider called Czajka II). He was a propagator and initiator of aviation; he spread his passion, also in non-military contexts. He also initiated the creation of aviation circles and construction of gliders.

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History of the airport

The fact that we live close the runway also influenced my choice of cultivating the aviation tradition of my family and becoming a pilot. Now, I dream of going to Krakowski Piknik Lotniczy – land and take off in a place the memories of which are so vivid in my childhood. And a place close to my relative who died in a flight above the Netherlands to save his country.” The construction at the ancient airport in Czyżyny has already started and cannot be stopped. Although the runway will be transformed into a modern housing estate, it will still be of a sentimental value for the local people. The project by Grzegorz Ziemiański will certainly help to preserve and pass that value to younger generations, becoming a documentary of the local community.

© Copyright photo Grzegorz Ziemiański 2013 May

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Interview

Text | Marta Regnowska

Aleksander Czyba

Photography is magical interview by Marta Regnowska

M: You have a degree in theology and philosophy. Do you see any link between these domains and photography? A: There was no passing stage between them, everything is linked. Philosophy and theology allow understanding of the reality through synthesis, which is also important in photography. Philosophy requires the ability of analysis and synthesis, similarly to photography. What we call freeze-frame shot is exactly the analysis and synthesis of the reality. M: Photography is your way of living, commercial or artistic activity? A: It’s strange but I used to help other artists as a photographer, and I asked myself, why shouldn’t I try? I treat photography as a way of expression that allows to show emotions and my perception of the world. In some way it also expresses one’s philosophy of life, it’s personal. But I still streat photography in a very amateur manner, that is, I get excited while taking a

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photo, but I’m not interested in the final effect, exhibiting nor selling. My photos are important when I take them, later I happen even to forget about them....?. M: Hot do you work? A: Everything is planned! Of course, there is an intuitive approach to photography but it still has to be founded on some basis – we all know works by different artists and they inspire us. Sometimes, we create after reading a book or seeing a painting. It changes as time goes by but we are always anchored in some basis, for example, knowledge, outlook on life, technical details. M: Why did you chose analogue photography? A: My interest in analogue is of purely practical nature. If you want to make a really big zoom you have to use analogue photography. The advantage of digital photography is, of course, the fact that you can control the process of taking a shot and repeat it, whenever you need. But

if you want to make a portrait and expose it, analogue is a much better choice. I also chose analogue because I know how to use it – this kind of photograpy is predictable to me. As I said, it’s purely pratical – even a small analogue camera will allow me a better quality of the final print, when compared to digital. There is no fascination with technology here – technology is to be used in a creative manner, sometimes interfering in the original, for example, using image editing programmes. And that is perfectly justified. M: Do you think that such an interference has its limits? A: In a reportage or documentary the limit is the reality. You cannot interfere with the reality, otherwise you and your story become unreliable. Unfortunately, you can often hear stories about people who yield to such a temptation and aim only at achieving a perfect form.


Aleksander Czyba

M: Do you believe that black and white photography is better than colour? A: Sometimes I just know that my image has to be in black and white, that I have to restrain from colours to underline, for instance, the feeling I want to capture. As to the question of black and white versus colour photography, none of them is better. It is only the content that matters. M: What is more important – the taking of a shot or its post-processing? A: Post-processing is only a part of the process. If someone is able to profit from it, we speak of his or her ability to previsualise. While taking a photo I try to think in advance of further steps to be taken – what about light, printer, paper... M: You said you like to have everything planned. Do you allow any surprises or improvisations? A: Of course, you cannot plan and predict everything. Sometimes you notice something important in the very moment of taking a shot. Frequently, we make small mistakes on purpose and use surprises during photo shootings. At the beginning we often have the frame, we are ready for something. The rest is the realisation of the project, when you need to have your eyes wide open to see something special. M: Does it often happen that you quit plans made before a session? A: Of course, I do. But you always rely on your inner knowledge while taking a shot – nobody is a tabula rasa. Everything you create comes from the inside. It’s not the camera that takes photos but your head, sensitivity and life philosophy. Someone sensitive, even when deprived of photographic

talent, would take a better photo than a person who lacks this quality. A sensitive person always notices something worth to be shown. M: Apart from sensitivity, what are other charateristics necessary for a person to start an adventure with analogue photography? A: Curiosity, perceptiveness, assertive look on the reality; generally speaking – interest in people and in the world. You cannot make a good portrait when you are not able to talk to people, when they don’t arouse your interest. Finally, you need to be a sort of a psychologist, someone more sensitive than the rest of the people. M: And what about your work as a teacher? It is an important element or only an addition to photography? A: It’s not only an addition. Being a teacher is certainly one of the most important things in my life. It gives me enormous satisfaction when, after one year, I see that my students start to see differently – they create really interesting and wise works. It’s absolutely fascinating. M: What mistakes are the most frequently commited by your students and people who start their adventure with photography? A: What strikes me the most is the lack of basic knowledge about art. It’s terrifying that young, talented, sensitive people have no idea about art – they know nothing about film, photography, theatre, visual arts. Teaching in a photographic school means teaching a wide range of matters, most importantly, a way of looking at the world. It means teaching those young people a technique that will serve to express themselves. The majority of them have a very superficial notion

of photography. Yet, photography is a little bit like literature – there are books you read on a train, and then leave in a compartment with no regrets; but there are also books you read several times and where you always find something new. Similar is the case of photography. M: The photographers who influenced you the most are... A: Jem Southam, Sally Mann, Nadav Kander, Daido Moriyama, Song Chao, Andrzej Kramarz, Maier Aichen, Peter Bialobrzeski, Alec Sotha, Ljubisa Danilovic, Sarah Moon, Támas Dezsö, Michael Ackerman. M: Developing photos in a darkroom is more like chemistry or magic? A: I think there’s no magic in it, it’s just a pleasurable way of spending time. People who surround me find it magical but I really don’t know why. Maybe because they don’t understand the process. A thing is magical until you get to know it. My students often ask how it’s possible that I manage to do some things and they don’t – everything seems so simple but, in fact, it’s mainly the matter of experience. What I like the most is to develop my own prints. It’s difficult to develop photos for a person you barely know. It’s a bit similar to translation from one language into another – firstly, you need to know and love the text. The reading of a photo and its editing in the post-processing depends on intentions of both – the image and its author. I don’t find working in a darkroom a magical experience, because I came to know it. Still, it always gives me a lot of pleasure. What’s magical is rather the picture and the photography itself.

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Presentations

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Eliza Stegienka 38

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Eliza Stegienka

Eliza Stegienka was born in 1990 in Warsaw. She has a degree in culture studies at the Warsaw University. At first, she wasn’t interested in photography at all. She discovered it by chance when she started to take pictures during her holidays. And that was the moment. Among her first models were her sisters and friends. She took photos of everything around her. The next step was the cooperation with models agencies and the creation of fashion projects. Today, she is mostly focused on fashion and portrait photography. She loves to photograph women. The changing of images, clothes and hair can create an entirely different person. It also allows to avoid routine during photo sessions, especially that the creative potential of photography is almost infinite.

Model - Krysia / New Age Models Make-up artist - Ilona Gmochowska Stylist - Paula Łukasiewicz © Copyright photo Eliza Stegienka 2013 May

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Presentations

Model - Krysia / New Age Models Make-up artist - Ilona Gmochowska Stylist - Paula ナ「kasiewicz ツゥ Copyright photo Eliza Stegienka 40

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Eliza Stegienka Model - Ania O/ New Age Models Make-up artist - Ilona Gmochowska Stylist - Paula ナ「kasiewicz ツゥ Copyright photo Eliza Stegienka

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Presentations

Model - Joanna S/ Mango Models Make-up artist - Corinne Jankowska Stylist - Paula ナ「kasiewicz ツゥ Copyright fot. Eliza Stegienka 42

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Eliza Stegienka Model - Maciej S/ Panda Models Make-up artist - Ilona Gmochowska Stylist - Paula ナ「kasiewicz ツゥ Copyright photo Eliza Stegienka

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Presentations

She is a perfectionnist. Each of her sessions is prepared very accurately. She likes to have everything under control, because organisation and planning is her biggest challenge. She believes that for a session to be satisfying it needs to be prepared in advance. Would you believe that such a young person is so well organised? According to Eliza her biggest success was the catalogue for a well-known Polish clothing brand. Yet, this young photographer has already accomplished much more. She has had two individual exhibitions, her photos were published in the printed version of Vanity Teen, and illustrated the cover of the Polish magazine HIRO, as well as the American Chicago Hush Magazine. She believes that fashion is not just temporary trends you can forget when the season is over. First and foremost, it’s a real art that allows people to express themselves. She finds inspiration just about in everything – music, films, her environment. But she is mostly inspired by the works of Annie Leibovitz, Patrick Demarchelier and Helmut Newton. She also admires the photographs and style of Terry Richardson.

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Eliza Stegienka

Model - Karolina S/ United4Models Make-up artist - Ewa Świtlak Stylist - Julia Zaremba © Copyright photo Eliza Stegienka 2013 May

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Presentations

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Lorenzo Mancini

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Lorenzo Mancini

Singapore - Marina Place Š Copyright photo Lorenzo Mancini 2013 May

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Lorenzo Mancini

Lorenzo Mancini is a young photographer, currently living in Tournai, a little town in Belgium. Despite his young age he photographs since a couple of years. He loves high contrast and he uses it a lot, which is characteristic for his works. His photos are very mysterious and delicate. often combining dark tones with high contrast. This characteristic makes Mancini’s shots easy to recognise among others. What is important, the photographer tries to work only with in natural light. He doesn’t use technological novelties, instead, he tries to capture the right moment and take the perfect shot. When taking photos, he aims at showing a person or place in a new, original way. His motto is the quote by a French writer and philosopher Roland Barthes – “What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once.”

© Copyright fot. Lorenzo Mancini

Belgium - Courtrai © Copyright photo Lorenzo Mancini 2013 May

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Presentations

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Lorenzo Mancini

Costa Rica © Copyright photo Lorenzo Mancini 2013 May

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Presentations

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Lorenzo Mancini

Singapore - Marina Place Š Copyright photo Lorenzo Mancini 2013 May

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Presentations

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Hengki Lee

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Hengki Lee

© Copyright photo Hengki Lee 2013 May

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Hengki Lee

Hengki Lee is a photograper of unique origins and numerous passions. He was born in Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia. He is a versatile artist, he loves music and plays a few instruments. He also loves reading and writing poems. In addition, he has a bachelor degree in economy and business. The beginnings of his photographic adventure were totally usual. One day, watching family photo albums, he just realised he wanted to become a photographer. Firstly, he joined the local photographic circle. In 2009 he bought his first camera. At the begining it wasn’t easy but thanks to his ambition and enthousiasm Hengki was becoming better and better. His outstanding skills have been noticed many times – his works were published in prestigious, international publications, and awarded in photographic contests (1st prize in FIAP competition, category: Collection and 3rd prize in Fotoferia International Exhibition 2012 Photo Contest). This year he got another two awards at the B&W Magazine Single Image Contest 2013. He likes to combine all of his passions which results in his photos being a little unearthly, just like his poems. He wants his works to have a strong and unique character. With an artistic soul, he always follows the heart and cares about the consequence in his actions. Actually, these traits may be his recipe for success.

© Copyright photo Hengki Lee 2013 May

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Presentations

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Hengki Lee

© Copyright photo Hengki Lee 2013 May

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Presentations

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Hengki Lee

© Copyright photo Hengki Lee 2013 May

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Presentations

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Wirginia Bryll

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Wirginia Bryll

Wirginia Bryll was born in 1987. Although she has been photographing since a relatively short time, she always knew that photography was something special to her. At first, she was a model posing in front of the lens but it wasn’t satisfying enough, because she wanted to realise her own ideas. One day, it appeared she didn’t have to search far away – her dream came true when she found herself on the other side of the lens. Her previous experience and the knowledge she gained about posing proved to be crucial at the beginning of her career. She says she is constantly improving her technique by posing for herself.

Model - Wirginia Bryll © Copyright photo Wirginia Bryll 2013 May

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Presentations

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Wirginia Bryll

What she likes to photograph the most is people, with their mysterious emotions and exceptional nature. She likes to take portraits but, due to ambition and curiosity, she goes much further in her work – she is aware of numerous dimensions and possibilities given by photography. She adores photos by Henri Cartier-Bresson, especially for his talent in creating stories, and by Ellen von Unwerth, appreciated for her ability to capture the models’ sexappeal.

Model - Wirginia Bryll © Copyright photo Wirginia Bryll 2013 May

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Wirginia Bryll

Model - Katarzyna Ochocka © Copyright photo Wirginia Bryll 2013 May

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Presentations

She often seeks inspirations in the works of these artists, but she doesn’t want to imitate them – she wants her shots to be unique and original, not copied. She values intuition, impuls and instant. In the future she would like to make photography not only her passion but also a way of life. Finally, it’s thanks to photography that she founds new goals and great satisfaction.

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Wirginia Bryll

Model - Magdalena Gardias © Copyright photo Wirginia Bryll 2013 May

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Presentations

Text | Magdalena Janczura

Mariusz Mr贸z

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Mariusz Mróz

Title - Winter Breeze Model - Daria Kwaśniewska Stylist - Daria Kwaśniewska Horse - Jasio Czartoryski (from Ilona Kurzeja) Assistent - Karol Roczniak © Copyright photo Mariusz Mróz 2013 May

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Presentations

Mariusz Mróz is an exceptionally talented photographer from Wałbrzych. As a young boy he had his first photographic adventures, such as the destroying of his grandmother’s Zorka. But now this long-term passion has also became his way of living. In fact, photography has always been special to him but only the year 2011 brough about considerable success. Firstly, he became the official photographer at the VI Beauty Festival of Lower Silesia. He also took pictures during 4X Festina Night Race and during European Championship in the category Stongman.

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Mariusz Mróz

Title - Winter Breeze Model - Daria Kwaśniewska Stylist - Daria Kwaśniewska Horse - Jasio Czartoryski (from Ilona Kurzeja) Assistent - Karol Roczniak © Copyright photo Mariusz Mróz 2013 May

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Mariusz Mróz

Title - Vintage Stud Model - Łukasz Omiotek Model - Justyna Łodzińska Stylist - Menfashionmadness.blogspot.com Make-up Artist Designer Hair stylist - Luke L. Sienko / Hair by Luke Horse - Maniek (from Kasia Kopera) Assistent - Karol Roczniak Place - Stado Książ © Copyright photo Mariusz Mróz 2013 May

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Presentations

He is also the official photographer of Miss Polonia, Miss Supranational and MRS World Poland. Currently, he’s a professional wedding and landscape photographer. It has to be admitted his pictures are not just usual photographs – these are memories, full of originality and emotions, captured in millions of pixels. For one good shot he’s ready to climb up skyscrapers, because, as he says, he’s fully commited to his work. He’s amibitious, professional and entirely devoted to photography. Although he has a rationalist life attitude, he also allows some fantasy while working on his projects. According to his motto nothing is impossible.

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Mariusz Mróz

Title - Vintage Stud Model - Łukasz Omiotek Model - Justyna Łodzińska Stylist - Menfashionmadness.blogspot.com Make-up Artist Designer Hair stylist - Luke L. Sienko / Hair by Luke Assistent - Karol Roczniak Place - Stado Książ © Copyright photo Mariusz Mróz

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History in the Lens

Text | Karolina Wąsowicz

You press the button – we do the rest Certainly, you have hold in your hands an automatic or disposable camera, a photographic film or photos developed on the characteristic paper. The Kodak company since its establishment in 1888 aimed at products that would be easy tu use and affordable for everyone.

It was on the 12th of July 1854, in a small town named Waterville in the United States that a man was born. George Eastman, because it’s him we’re talking about, was about to make a revolution in people’s photo albums. George was a son of Mary George Washington Eastman. He went to school in Rochester where his father wanted to open up The Eastman Commercial College, as a reaction to industralisation of the town and emerging social needs. After the deterioration of G. W. Eastman’s health condition the family had to move to Rochester. Finally, he died and the family started to grow poor. The loss of his father and, later, one of older sisters forced George to leave school and undertake a job at the age of 14. Soon after that he also signed up for an accounting course. Beginning as a delivery man in an insurance company, earning 3 dollars per week, after a few years he became a bank official, with his salary risen to 15 dollars per week. Apparently, the history of Kodak starts with unrealised holidays plans. Young Eastman, already working at the Rochester Savings Bank, decided to spend his holidays on Santo Domingo. In order to picture and preserve memories of that trip he decided to buy a special kit for taking photos using the wet collodion technique. The process was complicated and the equipment appeared heavy and difficult to transport. And although the journey didn’t take place, 24-years-old George remained interested in the new technique

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– he started to conduct his own experiments and to read specialised literature. While incidentally reading some British newspaper he found information about a revolutionary gelatin emulsion that allowed the throwing away of heavy plates, reagents and portable darkroom tent. Consequently, he started to work on its preparation. Basing on a recipe published in the newspaper, Eastman started to improve the emulsion so that it would remain light sensitive even after drying, which was impossible at the time. In 1880, after three years of trials, failures and unslept nights, he finally finished working on, what he called, dry films. He also elaborated a special machine serving for their mass production. In 1884 Eastman also submitted a patent for a flexible photographic roll film (35 mm). A year later people saw the appearance of first advertisements that praised the revolutionary substance, covering the rolled paper. Yet, the solution had one big drawback – it was too transparent and it let through the grain. At first, the problem was solved by spreading paper with two layers of the emulsion: soluble and insoluble but light sensitive gelatine. After developing, the gelatine was moved away, put on a new piece of transparent gelatine and covered with collodion which, after drying, formed a flexible film (see: kodak.com). In the first few years Eastman cooperated with Henry A. Strong under the name Eastman Dry Plate Company.


History of Kodak

© Copyright photo John Kratz, from Burlington NJ, USA The Kodak Stereo Camera

Several years later George finished working on the first photographic camera with 135 film and in 1889 he founded the Eastman Kodak Company (copyright for the name in 1888) in an office rented in Rochester. Inside the first Kodak there was a paper film but it was soon replaced with a celluloid one. Since the very beginnings Eastman was planning to broaden the company’s activity – he even bought an additional engine able to speed up the production when necessary. He also took care of the company’s marketing, publishing Kodak’s advertisement in newspapers, magazines, and in the city space (for instance, on the Trafalgar Square in London). Actually, it was Eastman who came up with an idea of the “Kodak girl,” holding the camera in her hands. But Eastman was not only a skilled enterpreneur, able to see various perspectives and benefit from various possibilities. He’s also known to have introduced a community system in his company, making his workers responsible for the brand which, in fact, they owned. Furthermore, he developed a system of benefits and help for his employees; it was, probably, due to his bad memories from

childhood. Apart from that, he supported, among others, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or the dental clinic in Rochester, and founded the Eastman School of Music, becoming a pioneer of what we call today the corporate social responsibility. As  his health was deteriorating, in 1932, at the age of 77, Eastman commited a suicide. In 1935 Kodak was the first company to launch a coloured film (Kodakchrome). It also attempted to enter the instant photography market together with Polaroid, however, after a trial with its opponent (1986) the company quit the idea. The 90s witnessed minimasation of the size of cameras and an increase in a number of photographs to be taken on one roll (Advanced Photo System technology). Also, a system for cataloguing shots was introduced. As we all know, the idea was never popularised because of the digital revolution which took place in the end of the century. Due to the popularity of the digital technology in 2004 Kodak ceased to produce 135 films. Since a few years the company has experienced serious economic and managerial problems, leading to the selling of particular departments and general restructuring.

The article is based on, among others, official pages of the Kodak company.

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History in the Lens

Tekst | Marta Regnowska

Ansel Adams Ansel Adams is an intriguing personality of the photographic world. The American photographer was born on the 20th of February 1902 in Mount Durit, on the outskirts of San Francisco.

Already as a young boy, instead of playing with his peers, Ansel preferred to spend time in nature. At first, he used to collect insects and observe the sky, especially, after he got a telescope from his father. The fact that he was often overexcited as a child resulted in him being expelled from several schools. His father decided he would continue education at home – he was taught by the father himself, one of his aunts, and several tutors. But later Ansel Adams went back to a traditional school. He was also passionate about music – he learned how to read notes

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and focused on playing piano. He even planned to become a professional musician. A milestone in the future photographer’s life was his first visit to Yosemite National Park in 1916. Ansel was under a great impression of that place which resulted in his fascination with nature and will to picture its beauty. Actually, it turned out to be the beginning of his life’s new period. During the trip he also got a gift from his father – Brownie Box Camera by Kodak. He started to take first photos and get interested in photographic techniques.


Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams tried to develop his passion both practically and theoretically, by reading books, going to exhibitions and mettings at photographers’ clubs. To earn some money he also used to play piano at the time. His photos were published for the first time in 1921. His portfolio appeared to be an enormous artistic and financial success. Consequently, Adams got more and more commissions and he became member of the Roxburghe Club. His second portfolio, Taos Pueblo, was published in 1930. Together with Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston they founded the f/64 group, propagating simple and pure photography. It is believed that in 1941 Ansel cre-

ated his Zone System. Five years after that he decided to open a Photography School at the California School of Fine Art in San Francisco. He retired at the age of 60, in 1962. Adam’s works prove of his talent and art. His knowledge of techniques and rules of framing, considering details as well as the overall message of an image – thanks to all these traits Adams was an outstanding landscape photographer. Very often he photographed mountains and trees, thus, his shots also have a symbolic meaning. With his perfect frames, beautiful forms and intriguing messages, Ansel Adams can, certainly, be called the virtuoso of photography.

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History in the Lens

Text | Karolina Wąsowicz

Utilitarian

approach to photography

The invention of photography was a challenge for the 19th century artists. Were they afraid of a new, cheaper and more widely available medium than painting or sculpture? Or, maybe, they were enthousiastic about new possibilities? What did Eugène Delacroix think about the inventin of photography?

It is believed that Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) was an illegitimate son of a skilled diplomat Charles-Maurice Talleyrand. He was a founder and a member of the French Heliographic Society (1851), he collected photographic reproductions of famous works of art (for instance, Rafael’s frescoes or Rubens’ paintings). Delacroix was a great artist and a representative of the romantic movement, as opposed to the academic circles faithful to classical rules. Books about the history of art often juxtapose Delacroix and Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres as two artists whose visions of the world were so distinct. Ingres is the author of stylised and idealistic female acts. All of their elements serve to express beauty and harmony, not always in accordance with the human anatomy. In turn, Delacroix was known to the visitors of Parisian museums and all art passionates,

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not only for his “Liberty Leading the People” (1830) or “The Women of Algiers” (1834). But how will a passionate of art, and especially of everything apart from the “classic,” react to photographs directed by Delacroix and taken by Durieu? Certainly, they are more consistent with the academic esthetics that other exhibited works of Delacroix. In his most famous collection of female and male acts, serving as the basis for sketches and paintings, the model looks as if she was taken from a picture by Ingres. The works of Delacroix did not reflect his formal interests. Only after the figures were drawn on paper and, then, on a canvas, they suited the painter’s esthetics. What is interesting is the fact that only in one case a frame of a photo was directly moved onto a canvas – it’s “Grand Odalisque” (calotype, painting from 1857).


Utilitarian approach to photography

© Copyright photo Jean Louis Marie Eugène Durieu (1800 - 1874)

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History in the Lens

Delacroix claimed photography was a painter’s treasure – in fact, he noticed only its utilitarian aspect and saw it as subordinate to other arts. Appreciating new possibilities given to a painter by photography, he regreted that it had been invented so late. According to Delacroix photography allowed a perfectly detailed and objective representation of nature. On the contrary, all works produced by human minds and hands reflect their authors’ perception and, thus, they are subjective. Despite his fascination with photography, pictures composed with Durieu were purposefully made a little blurred, which was also influenced by the calotype technique. In his “Journal” Delacroix pointed to the perfection and reality of photography. He believed that such a detailed representation is eye-tiring and impossible for a regular perception of the world. It is because we are always focused on a given part of the surroundings, not on all its elements at once – on the contrary to photography which captures every detail. Consequently, photos should be imperfect, they should have flaws made on purpose, in order to better represent human perception. Ingres also made use of the new technique but, when comparing works of the two artists, one can see that he used photography in an entirely different way than Delacroix. Ingres treated photos as a point of departure for other artistic activities, such as painting.

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It’s worth to mention that these differences are not visible in composition or postures, inspired by photographs – they stem from the process of painting itself, the colours used, and other aspects of the artists’ individual styles. It can be argued, in the given context, that photography was a classical departure point for many different artistic visions. Eugène Durieu (1800-1874) was hired by Delacroix in 1854. Working as an official, he enjoyed spending time in artistic and theatrical environments. He was a friend of, among others, Alexandre Dumas – the author of “The Three Musketeers.” In 1832, Durieu and Dumas published a play entitled “A Widow’s Husband.” Together with Delacroix Durieu was also a founder and member of the Heliographic Society, later transformed into the French Photographic Society (governed by Durieu till 1857). His photographs’ distinguishing marks were the use of light clothing and only these accessories which were necessary in a scene planned by Delacroix. “The Durieu Album,” containing thirty two photographs of female and male models posing for Delacroix, is the effect of two photo sessions in 1854. A folder with calotypes and albumen prints was purchased by a critic Philippe Burty. Later, it was owned by Maurice Tourneux who offered it to the French National Library in Paris in 1899.


Utilitarian approach to photography

© Copyright photo Jean Louis Marie Eugène Durieu (1800 - 1874)

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Books

Text | Marta Regnowska

Book Review

“Understanding Photography Field Guide” Bryan Peterson

Bryan Peterson – “Understanding Photography Field Guide How to Shoot Great Photographs with Any Camera” The book by Bryan Peterson – not only a professional photographer, but also a teacher and the founder of the Perfect Picture School of Photography – should interest people who are not satisfied with amateur photography and want something more. All issues are discussed from theoretical and practical point of view, and illustrated with a number of Peterson’s photos.

The book presents many aspects of photography and a wide range of related problems. The author explains the questions of exposure, creativity, composition, lightning, close-ups, portraits, unconventional techniques and tools. The publication opens with the motto by Henry David Thoreau – “It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” It seems that the aim of the author is to attract the readers’ attention to the way they perceive the reality. He wants to teach people to see the world and shoot photos in a creative manner; not to rely on incident, but to create an image reflecting the vision of the author. It is also supported by theoretical knowledge, necessary for some artistic visions to come true. But, obviously, rules can be broken if it’s creative and profitable for the final effect. To sum up “Understanding Photography” is an overall guide into the theory and practice of photography. The author clearly presents the most important issues necessary to understand in order to become a professional photographer.

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© Copyright photo Bryan Peterson


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Text | Magdalena Janczura

iPress Choice

iPress Choice Send us your photos – the best will be published in the next issue

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Steven Frebourg Steven Frebourg is a fashion photographer living in Paris. He is young and his head is full of astonishing ideas. He grew up in a clothing shop belonging to his parents and he admits that childhood had an enormous impact on his current profession. For his 20th birthday his girlfriend gave him a reflex camera, which turned out to be a perfect present. Since then photography has become Steven’s passion. He’s inspired by the works of Patrick Demarchelier or Helmut Newton.

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© Copyright photos Steven Frebourg


iPress Choice

Edyta Dufaj

Edyta Dufaj was born in 1988 in Krosno, where she graduated from an artistic high school. Currently, she studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków. She had her first success in high school, where she took part in reviews and trips. She was awarded with a Grand Prix at the International Biennial of Landscape Photography and with the 1st pri-

© Copyright photos Edyta Dufaj

ze in a photo contest organised by the Exklusiv magazine. She also got a distinction in an international contest called “Untouchable – Niedotykalne.” What is more, her works were exposed during the Mediations Biennial I in Poznań. Currently, she works for Shock Mode Dance Academy, Plejada theatre and Theatre Monique Stalens from Paris.

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IPRESSPHOTO #6 - EN