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HIV/AIDS MAINSTREAMING CHECKLIST & TOOLS

MAINSTREAMING HIV/AIDS INTO OUR Sexual & reproductive health & rights POLICIES, PLANS, PRACTICES & PROGRAMMES


Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sincere thanks to the IPPF ESEAO Regional Office and the Field Office staff for coorganizing and supporting the HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming Workshop in March 2004. Special thanks to Ms Rose Smart, our consultant who steered us through the mainstreaming process. The development and testing of these mainstreaming tools for Sexual and Reproductive Health organizations was made possible thanks to the active involvement of IPPF Member Associations in the Pacific Island Region: Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.

INTRODUCTION hiv/aids mAINSTREAMING TOOLKIT BIBLIOGRAPHY MAINSTREAMING CHECKLIST TOOL 01 ACTIONS FOR EFFECTIVE HIV/ AIDS MAINSTREAMING INTO SRH ORGANIzationS AND PROGRAMMES TOOL 02 mAINSTREAMING HIV/AIDS INTO EXISTING SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES TOOL 03 yOUTH AND PLWHA PARTICIPATION IN SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND HIV/AIDS PROGRAMMES TOOL 04 COMMUNITY CONSULTATION GUIDE TOOL 05 GUIDELINES FOR CONDUCTING A PARTNER/STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS TOOL 06 CHECKLIST FOR CONDUCTING AN HIV/AIDS CAPACITY AUDIT FOR IPPF MEMBER ASSOCIATIONS TOOL 07 TEMPLATE FOR AN HIV/AIDS WORKPLACE PROGRAMME AUDIT IN A SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ORGANIZATION


Our Vision IPPF envisages a world in which all women, men and young people have access to the information and services they need; a world in which sexuality is recognized both as a natural and precious aspect of life and as a fundamental human right; a world in which choices are fully respected and where stigma and discrimination have no place. Our Mission • IPPF aims to improve the quality of life of individuals by campaigning for sexual and reproductive health and rights through advocacy and services, especially for poor and vulnerable people. • We defend the right of all young people to enjoy their sexual lives free from ill-health, unwanted pregnancy, violence and discrimination. • We support a woman’s right to choose to terminate her pregnancy legally and safely. • We strive to eliminate STIs and reduce the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS.

Our core values • IPPF believes that sexual and reproductive rights should be guaranteed for everyone because they are internationally recognized basic human rights • We are committed to gender equality, and to eliminating the discrimination which threatens individual wellbeing and leads to the widespread violation of health and human rights, particularly those of young women • We value diversity and especially emphasize the participation of young people and people living with HIV/ AIDS in our governance and in our programmes • We consider the spirit of volunteerism to be central to achieving our mandate and advancing our cause • We are committed to working in partnership with communities, governments, other organizations and donors

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Introduction A pioneer for sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF works through its international network of 149 Member Associations as a mainstream information and service delivery provider. In particular, IPPF works to mainstream HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care into sexual and reproductive health programmes. Following a rights-based agenda we work to remove the barriers that make people vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, reduce societal and individual stigma and discrimination, provide access to information and prevention and care services. IPPF’s ‘HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming Checklist and Tools’ has been developed as a guide to better enable Member Associations to mainstream HIV/AIDS into all aspects of their work at the grassroots level. Definition Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS means all sectors and organizations determining: 1

How the spread of HIV is caused or contributed to by their sector, or their operations

2

How the epidemic is likely to affect their goals, objectives and programmes

3

Where their sector/organization has a comparative advantage to respond – to limit the spread of HIV and to mitigate the impact of the epidemic

4

AND THEN TAKING ACTION!

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HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming Toolkit Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into the operations and programmes of organizations across the world represents a challenge that requires creativity and commitment. This is especially true for organizations, like sexual and reproductive health organizations, that have mandates to work with communities and clients and that have enormous potential to reach and serve populations at risk of HIV infection. Using simple tools and a checklist – such as these – can enhance HIV/AIDS mainstreaming efforts – ensuring that processes are systematic and practical. A checklist and a set of seven tools have been developed for use by IPPF Member Associations to assist them in mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into their services and programmes. The seven tools 1

Actions for effective HIV/AIDS mainstreaming into sexual and reproductive health organizations and programmes

2

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into existing sexual and reproductive health services

3

Youth and PLWHA participation in sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS programmes

4

Community consultation guide

5

Guidelines for conducting a partner/stakeholder analysis

6

Checklist for conducting an HIV/AIDS capacity audit for IPPF Member Associations

7

Template for an HIV/AIDS workplace programme audit in a sexual and reproductive health organization

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In relation to the seven tools it is important to note the following: 1 The tools do not necessarily constitute a comprehensive mainstreaming toolkit. Instead, they are a selection of tools that can be used at certain stages to facilitate HIV/AIDS mainstreaming into sexual and reproductive health programmes. 2 The tools can be used individually, or collectively, as well as in conjunction with the sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS mainstreaming checklist and with other mainstreaming tools that may be available from other sources. 3 Organizations embarking on HIV/AIDS mainstreaming are encouraged to amend the tools as necessary to be context appropriate and specific. 4 Some of the tools have been developed from other existing tools, and the following organizations are acknowledged: Tool 01

Actions for effective HIV/AIDS mainstreaming into sexual and reproductive health organizations and programmes – WHO; ‘Transforming health systems: gender and rights in reproductive health – a training curriculum for health programme managers’ (2001)

Tool 02

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into existing sexual and reproductive health services – IPPF and UNFPA; ‘Integrating HIV voluntary counselling and testing services into reproductive health settings’ (2004)

Tool 03

Youth and PLWHA participation – UNAIDS; ‘Children living in a world with AIDS’ (1998); and IPPF; ‘Standards on youth participation’ (2004)

Tool 04

Community consultation guide – Ministry of Local Government, Botswana

Tool 05

Guidelines for conducting a partner/stakeholder analysis – the South African National AIDS Programme and the POLICY Project

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BIBLIOGRAPHY The following is a list of key mainstreaming resources: • UNAIDS has developed a toolkit entitled ‘Methods and approaches for local responses to HIV/AIDS: Techniques’ (undated). • KIT is a project of the Royal Tropical Institute in the Netherlands, see www.kit.nl. Kit manages a ‘local responses to HIV/AIDS’ information exchange forum funded by UNAIDS. This project provides a database of practices, techniques and training manuals in the form of tools available in English, French and Portuguese. • UNDP has designed tools to facilitate the mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into governance institutions. • WHO and the International HIV/AIDS Alliance have developed a toolkit for programme managers entitled: ‘A public health approach for scaling up ARV treatment’. • The Synergy APDIME Toolkit is a user-oriented, electronic one-stop-shop of HIV/AIDS programming resources. The toolkit contains 5 modules of the programming cycle; Assessment, Planning, Design, Implementation, and Monitoring and Evaluation – go to www.synergyaids.com. • The LSHTM HIV Tools Research Group has a website from which tools on costing and mathematical models for estimating the impact of different HIV prevention interventions can be downloaded, see www.hivtools.lshtm.ac.uk/ • Health Economics and HIV/AIDS Research Division (HEARD) has developed numerous publications and toolkits, including a set of AIDS Briefs for sectors and professions. All are available on www.und.ac.za/und/heard • UNIFEM, in collaboration with UNAIDS, has a comprehensive gender and HIV/AIDS website, www.GenderandAIDS.org, for researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. • GNP+; ‘Positive development: setting up self-help groups and advocating for change. A manual for people living with HIV’ (1998).

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CHECK LIST


HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming Checklist The ‘HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming Checklist’ has been developed for use by sexual and reproductive health organizations. It uses the IPPF ESEAOR framework for action and the IPPF/WHR STI/HIV integration checklist as references. It can be used to supplement the IPPF/WHR STI/HIV integration checklist, which is available on www.ippfwhr.org/publications. The purpose of the ‘Checklist’ is to assess, at specific points in time, the extent to which a sexual and reproductive health organization is effectively mainstreaming HIV/ AIDS into their programmes and services. Note: The checklist can also be used by a Regional Office to monitor the mainstreaming efforts of individual Member Associations.

Instructions

1 Assess the extent to which your projects and programmes are mainstreaming HIV/ AIDS by answering ‘Yes’, ‘No’ or ‘Partly’ to the following questions. 2 Select and then take action on priorities from the ‘No’ and ‘Partly’ categories in order to advance your mainstreaming efforts. 3 Use the checklist periodically to assess your progress.

YES

NO

PARTLY

YES

NO

PARTLY

INTEGRATED PREVENTION Have all IEC materials been reviewed and adapted to include HIV/ AIDS? Does behaviour change counselling include counselling on HIV/ AIDS, and risk and harm reduction? Have vulnerable groups been identified – as beneficiaries of SRH and HIV/AIDS prevention activities and services? Do activities with youth – girls and boys, and in- and out-of-school – include HIV/AIDS-related activities? Do adolescent sexuality messages include HIV prevention messages? Does work with and use of the media regularly cover HIV/AIDS?

PEER EDUCATION Does recruitment of peer educators include the recruitment of PLWHAs? Does training of peer educators include comprehensive training on HIV/AIDS? Do peer education activities include HIV/AIDS-related activities?

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YES

NO

PARTLY

YES

NO

PARTLY

SERVICES AND TREATMENT In general, are HIV/AIDS-related services integrated into SRH services? Specifically are the following available as part of SRH services:  • Voluntary counselling and testing [VCT] services with referrals and access to other HIV/AIDS services?  • Prevention of mother-to-child transmission [PMTCT] and PMTCT Plus services? • Sexually transmitted infection [STI] services? Has access to services been reviewed to accommodate clients with HIV or at risk of HIV infection? Do the services target persons living with HIV or those who are at risk of HIV infection? Are services offered in a non-discriminatory and stigma free environment? Are SRH and HIV positive clients counselled regarding HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support? Are HIV positive clients referred to support groups – either run from the SRH service or in the community? Have SRH services been assessed to identify areas that need strengthening in order to integrate HIV/AIDS? Have referral procedures been reviewed to accommodate HIV/ AIDS-related referrals?

ADVOCACY Is there a strategy developed and implemented to lobby for leadership support for integrated services? Do all HIV/AIDS-related advocacy activities involve PLWHAs in the planning, execution and monitoring? Do all advocacy activities involve members of target groups – youth, women and men? Do advocacy strategies prioritise support for disclosure by those who are infected or affected? Does advocacy involve meaningful community consultation and commitment to regular feedback? Does HIV/AIDS feature as a priority in all consultations, including at conferences?

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YES

NO

PARTLY

YES

NO

PARTLY

YES

NO

PARTLY

HUMAN RIGHTS Do all activities and services aim to reduce HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination? Do all activities and services aim for the recognition and protection of women’s rights? Do all training courses include modules on HIV/AIDS and human rights?

PARTNERSHIPS Has a stakeholder analysis been conducted to identify partners for HIV/AIDS mainstreaming? Does the programme/organization participate in national and local HIV/AIDS forums/committees? Does the programme partner with PLWHAs in meaningful and sustained ways?

INTERNAL/WORKPLACE RESPONSE Has an HIV/AIDS skills, knowledge and attitudes audit of staff been conducted? Has an HIV/AIDS capacity-development programme for staff been implemented? Has an HIV/AIDS workplace policy for the organization been developed and implemented? Is an HIV/AIDS workplace programme operational – with both prevention, and care and support activities?

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TOOL 01 ACtIONS FOR EFFECTIVE HIV/aIDS MAINSTREAMING INTO Sexual and Reproductive Health ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMMES


Tool 01 ACtIONS FOR EFFECTIVE HIV/aIDS MAINSTREAMING INTO SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMMES INSTRUCTIONS

The following represent some of the possible actions to be taken to ensure effective HIV/AIDS mainstreaming into Sexual and Reproductive Health organizations and programmes:

Possible actions 1

A formal analysis of policies and processes to identify those where HIV/AIDS mainstreaming must be addressed.

2

Changing specific policies, practices and procedures, where necessary, to facilitate HIV/AIDS mainstreaming, e.g. STI health education to also include HIV/AIDS.

3

Developing a mainstreaming plan, with goals, activities, time frames and responsibility and resource allocations. The plan should also include the means by which the mainstreaming will be monitored.

4

Aligning this with other planning and reporting processes, such as annual work plans.

5

Establishing a structure – such as a committee – to manage the process.

6

A staff education process to build understanding and competency to mainstream HIV/AIDS; commencing with a skills and knowledge audit and followed by a training and mentoring programme.

7

Ensuring that there is wide-spread responsibility – across the organization for HIV/AIDS mainstreaming.

8

Developing HIV/AIDS mainstreaming indicators for monitoring and evaluating purposes.

9

Allocating resources to support the process – for example, for infrastructure, materials, staff, training, partnerships and monitoring and evaluation.

Done


TOOL 02 mainstreaming hiv/aids into existing sexual and reproductive health services


Tool 02 mainstreaming hiv/aids into existing sexual and reproductive health services INSTRUCTIONS

The following are key steps to be considered when mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into existing services, such as sexual and reproductive health services:

Key steps 1

Identify sites that are best placed to support mainstreaming.

2

Select the components or HIV/AIDS priorities to be integrated.

3

Confirm the target group/s for services.

4

Renovate or reorganize the facilities to accommodate the integrated services, ensuring that they are client-friendly and able to ensure privacy and confidentiality.

5

Amend/adapt existing protocols to incorporate and support the integration.

6

Identify and train or upgrade the knowledge and skills of providers to provide the integrated services.

7

Establish a structure for mentoring and supervising staff and volunteers involved in service delivery.

8

Set up links with and referrals to allied services.

9

Conduct mobilization activities with communities, to raise awareness of the integrated services. Where necessary train staff and volunteers to conduct these activities.

10

Develop tools for the management of information related to the integrated service.

11

Identify indicators and tools for monitoring and evaluation of the service.

Done


TOOL 03 youth and plwha participation in sexual and reproductive health and hiv/aids programmes


Tool 03 youth and plwha participation in sexual and reproductive health and hiv/aids programmes INSTRUCTIONS

This tool can be used in conjunction with the IPPF standards on youth participation [2004]. Child and youth participation is one of the key principles enshrined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). It is also a fundamental principle underpinning the GIPA initiative (Greater involvement of people living with HIV and AIDS). Youth and PLWHA participation can be both a means to achieve particular programme goals as well as an end in itself. The following is a set of questions that should be considered to give effect to the CRC and GIPA principles when mainstreaming HIV/AIDS into existing or planned Sexual and Reproductive Health programmes.

Considerations 1

Do programme staff share a common commitment to and understanding of youth and PLWHA participation?

2

Do the young people and PLWHAs themselves have an understanding of and commitment to participation?

3

Have youth/PLWHAs been involved in recruiting those who will be participating?

4

Have staff (and volunteers), and youth/PLWHAs been given the opportunity to examine and address negative perceptions of one another?

5

Do the youth/PLWHAs have adequate knowledge and understanding of HIV and AIDS?

6

Do they have clear and appropriate reasons for participating?

7

What preparation for participation or opportunities for personal development have they had – including incentives and reimbursement for associated travel expenses?

8

Are they able to influence/set agendas, in particular for their participation?

9

Are there systems in place to enable them to advance in the organization?

10

Is there some form of agreement in place that describes the roles and responsibilities of all concerned?

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Done


11

Are they part of a group which can provide peer support? For example, are PLWHAs who join peer education programmes supported by the organization?

12

Do they have the support of parents, guardians or others who are important to them?

13

Are key partnerships in place to support participation, e.g. adult-youth partnerships?

14

Have all members of the partnership received appropriate training/orientation to support the participation?

15

Do the youth/PLWHAs understand any possible adverse consequences of participating?

16

Do they understand that they can refuse to participate at any time before or during the programme?

17

Is there a system in place to protect them from any form of harm, harassment or abuse?

18

What long-term follow-up support has been arranged for them afterwards?

20

Do budgets and programme finances make provision for participation?

21

How is the participation monitored and maintained, and are youth/PLWHAs integral to all monitoring and evaluation processes?

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TOOL 04 community consultation guide


Tool 04 community consultation guide

INSTRUCTIONS

Use the list below to facilitate your community consultations about HIV/AIDS.

Preparing for the consultation 1

Talk to community stakeholders (traditional and religious leaders, women and youth groups etc.) in advance to let them know that you want to discuss HIV/AIDS at the next formal consultation. Get their support and encourage them to bring up HIV/AIDS themselves during the consultation.

2

Identify community ‘champions’. These are people who will help you include HIV/AIDS in community consultations and support interventions.

3

Identify specific language or words that people in the community use to talk about HIV/AIDS to avoid confusion and misunderstandings. Use words you are comfortable with.

4

Talk with a local NGO or CBO who works in the community for suggestions on the best way to start discussion and to identify major problems and concerns about HIV/AIDS in the community.

5

Practice talking about HIV/AIDS with your colleagues or fellow employees and others to increase your comfort in discussing HIV/AIDS. Get advice from HIV/AIDS counsellors who specialize in helping people talk about HIV/AIDS.

6

Do your homework. Gather relevant facts, figures and information about the community and about current HIV/ AIDS activities. Be sure about what you will be talking about, including anticipating what kinds of question may be asked.

7

Take someone with you who is knowledgeable about HIV/ AIDS.

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Done


During the consultation 1

Ask for permission to talk about HIV/AIDS if no one has brought it up. “It is very important that we talk about AIDS. This is a crisis for our area. Does everyone agree?” Open the discussion to all participants to ensure a common understanding of the purpose of the consultation.

2

Some people will not want to face dealing with HIV/AIDS and may exhibit various forms of denial (e.g. nothing can stop the epidemic; it is under control in our Region etc.). Acknowledge that talking openly about HIV/AIDS can be difficult and embarrassing. Even confess your own initial discomfort but remind community participants that there is no other way to fight the epidemic.

3

Ask about HIV/AIDS activities already underway and what seems to be working. This will help people identify unmet needs and problems. Ask anyone currently working in HIV/AIDS prevention or care to volunteer information and suggestions.

4

Tell people about HIV/AIDS projects that are operating in other parts of the country and Region to give them ideas about other approaches and opportunities.

5

Reassure participants that supporting HIV/AIDS interventions will not take money from other activities.

6

People often say, “We cannot talk openly about sexual issues. It is not part of our culture.” The reality is that there are very few cultures that embrace open discussion about sexuality either between partners or especially among parents and children. However losing young adults to a disease like HIV/ AIDS, in the prime of their lives, is also not part of any culture. HIV is a crisis. In times of crisis, cultures must adapt.

Done

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7

Remember that HIV/AIDS is not a moral issue. It is a public health and development crisis. Making judgments will not help prevention, care and support. After the consultation

1

Review the discussion. Think about problems that blocked discussion and how you can be better prepared for the next consultation.

2

Get some feedback. Ask a community participant for his or her opinion on the consultation. What could you do better the next time?

3

Give some feedback.

4

Document the issues raised and the opportunities identified carefully.

5

Be sure to follow-up on any tasks that are allocated to you.

HIV/AIDS – toolkit

Done


TOOL 05 Guidelines for conducting a partner/stakeholder analysis


Tool 05 Guidelines for conducting a partner/ stakeholder analysis

INSTRUCTIONS

When embarking on HIV/AIDS mainstreaming partnerships, it is useful to have a clear idea of who is out there, doing what. Follow this step-by-step process to conduct such a partner/stakeholder analysis. TASK 01: Identify (i) your organization’s current sexual & reproductive health partners and (ii) any potential future partners from: Current 1

Within Government – different Ministries

2

Within Government – different spheres/levels

3

Parastatals/quasi-government organizations

4

Chiefs and Royals

5

Agencies (including other donors)

6

Networks

7

Boards

8

Associations (professional and voluntary)

9

Associations of PLWHAs

10

Private sector (commerce and industry)

11

Training institutions

12

Research institutions

13

NGOs and civil society structures

14

The informal sector

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Future


TASK 02: Identify – both for current and potential future partners – their (i) current and (ii) potential future areas of involvement – both those that are HIV/AIDS-related and those that are not. For example, who is, or can be involved in: Current 1

Policy making

2

Advocacy

3

Planning

4

Co-ordination

5

Implementation

6

Technical input

7

Monitoring and evaluation

8

Other areas

Future

TASK 03: Describe who they work with, where and at what level (coverage)

TASK 04: Then describe how they work together and how effectively

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TASK 05: Describe how those with the potential to become involved, but who are not as yet involved, should be recruited

TASK 06: Finally, from the list, identify those organizations whose involvement is key to the success of your organizations’s HIV/AIDS initiatives. These then become the prioritized organizations with whom to pursue collaborative relationships

HIV/AIDS – toolkit


TOOL 06 Checklist for conducting an hiv/aids capacity audit for ippf member associations


Tool 06 Checklist for conducting an hiv/aids capacity audit for ippf member associations

INSTRUCTIONS

This tool should be used by the heads (Executive Directors) of Member Associations. For each staff member decide which of the ‘areas to be assessed’ will constitute his/her capacity audit. NB: each staff member will be required to have different levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge and different skills, and so their HIV/AIDS understanding and competency should be differently assessed. Mark those that you want the staff member to be assessed on, and then administer the tool yourself, or have it administered by an external person with the requisite HIV/ AIDS and training background. There are no absolutely right or wrong answers, but the responses should indicate each respondent’s strong and weak areas. Use the results of all the audits from all the staff to develop an HIV/AIDS capacity building programme for your Member Association.

AREAS TO BE ASSESSED COMPETENCY

QUESTIONS TO ASSESS COMPETENCY

Basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS and other STIs

What is the difference between HIV and AIDS? What is the ‘window period’? What is the relationship between HIV and other STIs?

In-depth knowledge about selected aspects, like VCT, PMTCT, HAART

What does a VCT programme consist of?

In-depth knowledge of legal and human rights issues

What is meant by the right to privacy and bodily integrity?

HIV/AIDS – toolkit

What intervention/s is/are available to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV? How does HAART prevent the progression of HIV?

What is the difference between confidentiality and secrecy? What is the difference between stigma and discrimination?

RATING 3

2

1


AREAS TO BE ASSESSED COMPETENCY

QUESTIONS TO ASSESS COMPETENCY

Ability to talk openly and comfortably about sex, sexuality, relationships and HIV/AIDS and STIs

What words would you use for ‘penis’ and ‘vagina’ when talking to young people about sex?

Attitudes towards PLWHAs, homosexuality, sex work etc.

What do you think about sharing a cigarette/ apple with a person living with HIV/AIDS?

RATING 3

2

1

What qualities are important in a service provider who is working with the youth? What advice would you give parents wishing to talk to their children about sex?

What do you think about gay couples adopting children? What would you advise sex workers who are HIV positive about continuing their work as sex workers?

Communication skills

How would you explain the effect of HIV on the immune system to a primary school child/ farm worker/fellow colleague? How would you describe how to use a condom to a blind person?

Advocacy skills

What is meant by advocacy? Why is advocacy on SRH important? What SRH and HIV/AIDS integration messages does IPPF support? What HIV/AIDS advocacy messages does IPPF support?

Counselling skills

How would you define counselling? What are the qualities of a good counsellor? What information should be given to a client during pre-test counselling?

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AREAS TO BE ASSESSED COMPETENCY

QUESTIONS TO ASSESS COMPETENCY

Community credibility

What sort of techniques are appropriate for use with communities? What are some of the pitfalls when working with communities? What is meant by community gate-keepers?

Knowledge of referrals to health and social services

Where would you refer a client with suspected TB? What services or grants are available to people with disabilities, and where would they go to get these? Where would you refer a child/young person in need of psychosocial support?

Research ability

How do we, in this country, estimate the HIV prevalence in the population? What is the difference between prevalence and incidence? What is meant by ethical research?

HIV/AIDS – toolkit

RATING 3

2

1


TOOL 07 Template for an hiv/aids workplace programme audit in a sexual & reproductive health organization


Tool 07 Template for an hiv/aids workplace programme audit in a sexual & reproductive health organization INSTRUCTIONS

The purpose of an HIV/AIDS workplace programme audit is to provide a ‘snap shot’ of the organization’s HIV/AIDS workplace programme at a certain point in time. It is necessary to conduct regular audits in order to track progress over time from a base-line position. In the absence of regular audits, workplace HIV/AIDS responses tend to be ‘spray and pray’ as opposed to well-considered, planned responses that build on the current reality and past achievements. This tool should be used by the heads (Executive Directors) of Member Associations. Use this template to develop an audit tool that is appropriate for your Member Association. It is important to invest time and effort in developing a tool that can be used over and over, as this will allow for comparisons to be made when future audits are done. Different categories under the ‘STATUS’ column can be defined, for example: ‘nonexistent’, ‘in place’ or ‘excellent – average – poor’. This tool can also be used to monitor a Member Association’s HIV/AIDS workplace programme. Elements of this audit may be more appropriate for IPPF as an organization, as opposed to the individual Member Associations.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES ELEMENT

DESCRIPTION

Policy

An HIV/AIDS policy describes the organization’s or association’s commitment to addressing the epidemic. Monitoring and review mechanisms are institutionalized.

HIV/AIDS focal point person and structure

HIV/AIDS coordinator is appointed and structure is established with responsibility for planning and implementing the policy and programme, as well as for monitoring and reporting. HIV/AIDS work plan is developed and budgeted for annually.

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STATUS


Governance, leadership and commitment

HIV/AIDS is a strategic priority of the Member Association. IPPF Board Member is responsible for reporting on the programme. HIV/AIDS budget is a line item in annual budget. HIV/AIDS key performance areas are included in all job descriptions and performance appraisals.

Legal compliance and personnel issues

Review of organizational/association policies ensures compliance with relevant national laws and international agreements. HR guidelines cover recruitment, confidentiality and disclosure, protection against discrimination, access to training, promotion, benefits, performance management, grievance procedures and reasonable accommodation.

Surveillance

Employment/HR data is analyzed on an on-going basis and trends are reported regularly to management. Management information system is modified (if necessary) to capture and provide HIV/AIDS-related information.

Skills succession plan

Critical positions have been identified, and interventions put in place that includes multi-skilling, shadowing and mentoring.

HIV/AIDS WORKPLACE ACTIVITIES ELEMENT

DESCRIPTION

HIV/AIDS prevention activities

Knowledge, attitudes and practices survey is conducted regularly, to inform the programme and to monitor trends. Awareness activities, using varied techniques, are scheduled on an on-going basis, according to an agenda of priority issues. Training on HIV/AIDS is conducted for managers. HIV/AIDS is included in induction courses.

STATUS

Peer education

Peer educators are identified, and receive initial and on-going training. Peer educators conduct informal sessions with colleagues weekly. Peer educators are encouraged to participate in community HIV/AIDS activities.

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Condom promotion and distribution

Condom promotion activities take place regularly. Male condoms are available free of charge, or dispensed for a subsidized fee, in every toilet facility. Female condoms are available free of charge, or dispensed for a subsidized fee, in all female toilets. Condom uptake is monitored.

STI management

STI health-seeking behaviours are regularly promoted. STI services are accessible, at IPPF clinics, or at health facilities in the community.

Voluntary counselling and testing

VCT is promoted on a regular basis. VCT services are accessible, at IPPF clinics, or at agencies in the community. VCT uptake is monitored. HIV/AIDS counsellors are identified, trained, and mentored.

Infection control

Equipment and training is provided for first aiders according to workplace legislation. Protocol for managing occupational exposure is operational. Starter packs for post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) are available, if not on site, then at local health facilities.

Wellness programme

IPPF wellness programme is promoted. Infected employees who enroll in the programme receive nutritional advice and supplements, immune supporting medications, and prophylaxis and treatment for opportunistic infections. Infected employees, and their immediate dependents, if also infected, receive antiretroviral therapy [ART] and medical monitoring. Terminally ill employees, who are dismissed due to incapacity, are referred to community services, such as home-based care [HBC] services. On-going counselling is available to infected and affected employees.

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What is IPPF? The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global network of Member Associations in 149 countries and the world’s foremost voluntary, nongovernmental provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights.

International Planned Parenthood Federation 4 Newhams Row, London, SE1 3UZ, United Kingdom Telephone: +44 20 7939 8200 Fax: +44 20 7939 8300 Email: info@ippf.org Web: www.ippf.org UK Registered Charity No. 229476


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