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DISTINGUISH A J O U R N A L F R O M T H E O F F I C E O F G R A D UAT E S T U D I E S

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Contents

Dear Friends, Colleagues, and Community Members Every issue of Distinguish gives me a sense of great pride in IPFW graduate students and the faculty. Together we form a dynamic scholarly environment that is both rewarding but challenging. Recently, I was reading The Slow Professor (now don’t you laugh!). The authors focused on the time that it takes to think and reflect, the time that, for one reason or another, we no longer have available. The same should be written about students. You need the time to reflect and think. This is how real learning takes place. Thinking and reflecting is what allows you to be creative and grow in your discipline, enjoy your discipline. The authors write about the value judgments that we and others make when we see our peers who are not busy doing “something of value.” Actually, when it comes to happiness, health, and professional success, time is an important commodity that you need to value and schedule for yourself. I can hear you now, you are laughing and saying that you have no time. Well, I do believe that we will all be more productive and that productivity will be more rewarding and be of higher quality if we take some time every day to think and reflect. One more message from the authors, students have a much greater sense of accomplishment and pride when they are challenged and they meet that challenge or exceed that challenge. So here’s my challenge to you, participate in the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) workshops and contest. Have fun with the BRAINS challenges. And …… take the time to think and reflect.

Carol Sternberger

From the Director............................................................ 2 3MT

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2016-17 GSO Officers..................................................... 6 Faculty Spotlight............................................................. 8 Research Assistants. . .................................................. 10 Engineering a Future........................................................... 14 Mastodons on the Move............................................... 16 About Us.. ........................................................................ 18 Discounts for Dons. . ...................................................... 19

Associate Vice Chacellor for Academic Programs and Director of Graduate Studies/ Interim Chair of Nursing

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Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 at 5 p.m. in Walb Union Ballroom Three Minute Thesis (3MT™) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland. At IPFW both senior undergraduate students and graduate students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis or research topic and its significance. Capstone projects are accepted for competition on the Fort Wayne campus. These projects must include a level of research and scholarship. 3MT™ is not an exercise in trivializing or ‘dumbing-down’ research, but challenges students to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries so they can be presented concisely to a non-specialist audience.

Why participate? During your education there is a strong focus on the production of your thesis and/or scholarly work. The ability to communicate the importance of your research project and articulate your findings is very valuable. 3MT™ provides you with the opportunity to: • Communicate your ideas effectively to the wider community • Describe your research findings to a non-specialist audience • Crystalize your thoughts about your thesis, research project • Increase your profile within the IPFW research community, staff and wider Indiana community • Network with other graduate and undergraduate students.

Workshops The following workshops will be provided throughout 2016-17 to assist participants in creating and practicing their presentations Say What? Voice Training and Speaking Friday January 13th, 4:30pm-6pm Kettler Hall, Room 117 Look at This!—PowerPoint Slide Design Friday February 3rd, 4:30pm-6pm Kettler Hall, Room 117 3MT Practice and Constructive Criticism Friday February 24th, 4:30pm-6:30pm Neff Hall, Room 101 3MT Practice and Fine Tuning Friday March 3rd, 4:30pm-6:30pm Neff Hall, Room 101

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Andrea (Ande) Myers received her undergraduate degree from IPFW with a B.A. in General Studies and is earning a graduate degree in biology.

From: Warsaw, Ind., but has lived in Fort Wayne for the last 7 years or so Likes: I’m a big fan of art, board games, horror films and literature, insect collecting, and my dogs What motivates you?

2016-17 Graduate Student Organization Officers President Andrea Myers myeral05@ipfw.edu Vice President Lindsey Dutrieux Ali Alavizadeh dutrieul@ipfw.edu Treasurer Cecelia Smith smitce10@ipfw.edu

I try to take a minute or two when I’m getting frustrated and bogged down, and just remind myself how interesting the stuff I’m working on is, and how good it feels to get to work every day and be seriously challenged to figure something out. I worked a job for a year before coming back to grad school because it was not a challenging or engaging job. The feeling of getting up every day and going through the motions is what spurred me to come back and work towards a higher degree in the first place. Plus, the thrill of figuring out a solution to a problem is what keeps me working every day.

Lindsey Dutrieux received a B.S. in Biology and an A.S. in Business Administration from IPFW. She is a graduate student in the Public Policy Health Systems Administration program.

From: South Bend, Ind. Likes: Cooking, decorating for holidays, traveling to new places, swimming, and gardening What motivates you?

I will be the first in my family to receive a master’s degree. If someone had told me when I was a sophomore that I would be pursuing a master’s degree in 2016, I would have said they were crazy. It wasn’t until I was finishing a mentorship program, and the deadline to apply to grad school was just two weeks away, that I knew I wanted to continue my education. I am motivated by the pride my family has in me and knowing that even though the classes are challenging and the papers are long, I know I can get my degree.

Cecelia Smith received a B.S. with honors in Biology from IPFW. She is currently a teaching assistant in

the Department of Biology as she pursues a master’s.

From: Fort Wayne, Ind. Likes: I LOVE to travel and explore new places! I enjoy photography and like to think that I’m good at it.

Find out what events we have planned by liking our Facebook page!

Spicy food, coffee, and chicken wings have helped me get through life this far and I would have to say they’re my favorite foods! There is nothing I love to do more though than to spend time with my family and friends because life is only made out of minutes! Also, Guardians of the Galaxy is one of the best movies ever made.

What motivates you?

My true motivation comes from my family. My son, Brian, who is four, definitely keeps me on my toes! Also, my parents, who have always been there for me, cheering me on.

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Ahmed Mustafa, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology and Director of Life Sciences Resources Center For 15 years, Professor of Biology Ahemed Mustafa has been working with undergraduate and graduate students in the lab to assist him with his research. His current research focus is on stress physiology, where he aims to enhance the immunity within fish and shellfish using nutraceuticals. Growing up in Bangladesh, Mustafa remembers the famous Chinese saying “If you give a man a fish, he will have food for a day, but if you teach the man how to grow fish, he will have food for life.” His research will allow for fish populations to stay healthy when faced with stresses brought on by things such as pollution in their environment. By helping farmers feed the correct functional foods , nutraceuticals, Mustafa’s research will improve both the environment and the communities relying on this available food source. Mustafa completed a master’s degree in Bangladesh and a Ph.D. program in Canada. He recalls while in graduate school one of his professors told him he needed to collect samples from the ocean and create a culture in the lab of what he collected. As a grad student, he was already working an average of 50 hours a week. His trip to the ocean took him another 48 hours: 14 hours driving and 34 hours to collect and record information about the samples. He he did not sleep at all during that trip and says it was “integrated dedication and a sincerity for the work” that got him through the experience.

Professor Mustafa and students, Mursalin Khan and Kenneth Saillant, working in his research lab in the Biology Department

Mustafa has had many students, both graduate and undergraduate, working in the Research Center and in his lab on campus. He enjoys working with the students on research because he helped his own professors when he was pursuing his own degrees. He says he needs the students because it is all about team work and taking care of the animals and tanks in the Research Center, which is not a one-person job. In Mustafa’s lab everyone has their own project but helps each other when they need it. Some advice he gives to his students and those considering going after a master’s or any other degree is “study for learning.” He tells his students they must have a desire for learning and that they need to ask questions. Mustafa says “It is not about getting a degree; getting a degree or certificate and getting an education are two different things. You want to become a good citizen and to do this you need to be able to know more than what you have been tested on.” Mustafa’s recent publications 1. Davies Anuta, Alejandro buentello, Susmita Patnaik, Michael E. Hume, Ahmed Mustafa, Delbert M. Gatlin III, and Addison L. Lawrence. 2016. Effects of dietary supplementation of a commercial prebiotic (PrevidaTM) on survival, growth, immune responses and gut microbiota of pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, Aquaculture Nutrition. 22: 410 - 418. DOI: 10.1111/anu.12257. 2. Tiffany Hough, Christina Glaze, Elliott Blumenthal, and Ahmed Mustafa. Effects of Omega-3 fatty acid Supplementation on Aquaponics- system Raised Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus x Oreochromis aureus) Growth, Physiology, and Immunology. Journal of Applied Aquaculture.2016. 22: 410 - 418.

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IPFW Graduate Research Assistants

Lindsey Dutrieux

In his research he is using elderberry extract in the fish food to observe its anti-viral, anti-tumor, and anti-oxidant effects and whether or not it can reduce stress. There are many challenges that arise when doing research, but two things that he mentions are finding funding and coping with the changes of laboratory techniques. The techniques for biological experiments are always improving and there are always new methods. Some words of encouragement Khan has for students thinking about pursuing a master’s in Biology is, “Biology is an unpredictable science, bacteria change, and there is always some research to do. It is always new and exciting and we need to develop better methods because we are working with ‘US,’ with our own bodies, our own biological systems.” Khan also mentions that it doesn’t matter if you are an undergraduate or graduate student, you need to find something you’re interested in and stick with it, everything changes but know your interests and pursue them.

Alycia Herndon, Mursalin Khan, and Kenneth Saillant inspecting a Tilapia in Mustafa Fish Lab in Life Sciences Resource Center

Khan is now a teaching assistant at Auburn University in Alabama. where he is pursuing a Ph.D. He plans to conduct research in the future on how two subjects behave differently when exposed to identical environments, and how allele specific genes can be expressed at different levels contributing to differences in behavior.

Md Mursalin Khan

Professor of Biology Ahmed Mustafa’s Lab Md Mursalin Khan studied genetic engineering and biotechnology in his native country of Bangladesh. Mursalin Khan says “Research is the only thing that creates new information in the world,” and that is the reason he finds the work he does so rewarding and important. Mursalin was inspired to do research as an undergraduate and chose to reach out to Professor Mustafa after hearing about the work he was doing in his lab. Khan likes the research he has done here because he likes the collaboration with other professors. One very important task Khan does is feeding the fish used for research. The food used for the experiments needs to be prepared fresh every three days so that it does not degrade and lose nutrients. “ Working with live animals is difficult, and collecting the samples we need to study is also difficult because cells can quickly die, affecting our results,” says Khan. He tells me that the reason they use fish and shellfish species instead of terrestrial mammals is because of the environmental factors. “Fish are more sensitive, they are always in their ambient environment and can detect any levels of stressors,” Khan said.

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Professor Ahmed Mustafa (right) and his graduate student Mursalin Khan (right) examining a live fish in the Life Sciences Resource Center.

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IPFW Graduate Research Assistants Lindsey Dutrieux

Tyler Shuman

Syed Hussain

From: New Haven, Ind Undergraduate: B.S., Biology, IPFW

From: Bangladesh Undergraduate degree: B.S. Electrical and Electronics Engineering

Professor Punya Nachappa’s Lab

In his work, Shuman assists the principal investigator and trains the undergrads who are also working in the lab. Shuman is currently working on the effects of water stressors and insecticides on soybean aphids. This project is important to northeast Indiana because because of the different weather patterns and fluctuations we experience year to year. Tyler Shuman didn’t always know he wanted to do research, because when he was an undergrad he wasn’t sure how to get involved. However, he was able to take part in a project with Thrips insects and that motivated him to pursue research. Shuman says everything is challenging when it comes to research and you’re always learning and gaining new skills. Some advice he has for students is to make time lines and note every due date. He says being prepared to follow and jump in when issues arise is very important. Put your personality into your statement of purpose so the reviewing faculty can get to know you better. That’s a very important strategy when you’re ready to apply to graduate school. Shuman plans to pursue a Ph.D. outside the United States and is interested in Witwatersand University in Johannesburg, South Africa or the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, England. Tyler Shuman’s Publications: Effects of Soybean Vein Necrosis Virus on Life History and Host Preference of Its Vector, Neohydatothrips variabilis, and Evaluation of Vector Status of Frankliniella tritici and Frankliniella fusca http://jee.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/07/12/jee.tow145.abstract

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Professor Abdullah Eroglu’s Lab

Syed Hussain always wanted to do research. His current project is creating a radio frequency energy harvester that can create electrical energy out of air. “There are always radio frequencies in the air, such as those used by radios or cell phones, and that energy is often wasted. My device will capture that energy from the air.” The new devices will be replacements for the conventional battery. Right now this unique method of technology development is being explored on the IPFW campus. Hussain says one of the challenges he faces is the creation of the PCB board. This is the copper board needed to match the resistance of the wave of the low energy frequency. “Working with components that use such low frequencies is very difficult because the precision and length of wire each play crucial parts. There is no room for error and because the boards are small, the work must be done very carefully.” Hussain plans to get a Ph.D. at Purdue West Lafayette. He always wanted to and still wants to do something to improve the condition for renewable energy and address pollution problem, this research is helping him do that. The advice he has for students considering doing research is to set goals for yourself, really know what it is you want to do and where you want to go to study. This will make your goals more realistic to achieve. Syed Hussain’s Publications: Design of a charge controller based on SEPIC and Buck topology using modified Incremental Conductance MPPT http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?reload=true&tp=&arnumber=7026999 Far-Field RF Energy Harvesting System for Distribution Power Lines http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=7465303

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Engineering A Future

Lindsey Dutrieux

Maxwell Fowler

Graduate student: Applied Computer Science From: Granger, Ind. Undergraduate: Computer Science from IPFW Fowler knew his sophomore year of high school that he wanted to pursue a degree in computer programming and he decided to attend the program here at IPFW because he was awarded a Chapman Scholarship. The primary research Fowler is currently working on involves Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). As an undergraduate he never imagined working on AGI research, his experiences were mostly working on web app development. He became involved in this research when approached by Professor John Licato, who needed a graduate student to assist in developing a human level learning software. Fowler’s research in AGI gets closer to the actual artificial intelligence as we usually image it whereas common Artificial Intelligence (AI) is more so a support machine using predictive algorithms. “Writing codes for the different logical rules to try to get closer to the human style of reasoning” is what he told me when I asked what it is he does in the lab. Fowler says it is not all just the coding and development but he is also working on the logic side, programming a machine to behave and reason such as a human would has specific challenges that must be Fowler says there are two parts he finds challenging in his research. The first obstacle is having to go though someone else’s work, updating what is already there and adding to what someone has already found. The second challenge he says is the logical end, “Logic for representing human reasoning, this is very new and developing new logic using an event calculi is difficult.” In simplest terms he is, “Trying to write the logic to represent human thought but we only have observations and barely have the information on how our own minds process and perceive information.”

Max Fowler (left) showing the voice control software for a Roomba machine to an attendent at Science and Society at IPFW (SASI). D I S T I N G U I S H

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Fowler does want to pursue a Ph.D., hopefully in something related to AGI or in visualization web route. His first choice is to apply to Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania or to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Along with his Chapman Scholarship as an undergrad, he has received many awards including the Best Paper Award for his research on data visualization at the Cognitive Science Conference at the University of Dayton last spring. He is also a graduate teaching assistant here on campus for the Computer Science introduction classes 160 and 161. Some advice he would give to students is, “ Try to participate, submit an undergraduate paper to the IPFW Investigations Journal on your research, it is great for graduate applications.” He suggests that you sell yourself as a student but also on the work you do and can do for research. “When looking at universities to attend for Ph.D. programs, find a professor you can see yourself working with, an advisor that can help you and that you share common views with.” Fowler also says that you need to decide how you want to develop as a researcher and use that as your starting point. Don’t go to school just for that institution’s reputation, go for the passion and work.

When asked about what an end goal for his research would be, Max described AGI as a slow-to-develop field, and that creation of a system that can reason close to that of humans is not achievable in the near future. He wishes to advance the field in any way he can by contributing to the ‘cognitive event calculi’ and developing a way to model human reasons on a specific topic. He says that adding to the cognitive architecture to actually model how the human brain reasons would also be great.

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In his free time outside the lab, Fowler likes to work on fun projects with undergraduate students, such as programming one of their Roombas™ to be able to pick up a coffee from the lobby of the Engineering building and take it back to the lab. He is also the only student board member of the Institute for Research, Scholarship, and Creative Endeavors (IRSC) here on campus.

Science Central Out Reach Day, Demonstration of how the Roomba vaccume was used to self navigate through a maze using new pathing algoritum.

Max Fowler at Science Central during their Outreach Day, describing how Microsofts Kenect™ could be used to be used as an image processor.

Link to the AGI 2016 paper talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1oADCWyIPA&feature=youtu.be&list=PLZlLHCryX93L40ZLylvbO8zqfbz3ZNwmm Slides for that talk: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8djQzVzMZ7SX295NjBIYlNCbGc/view MAICS 2016 Best Paper Link: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1584/paper20.pdf

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Mastodons on the Move

Lindsey Dutrieux

Meghan Menchhofer

Graduate student: Communication, Teaching English as a New Language (TENL) Certificate Undergraduate: Social Work

Menchhofer gettting ready to present at the Turkish Migration Conference in Vienna Austria

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This summer Menchhofer recieved funding from IPFW to travel for a week-long conference. After the conference Menchhofer stayed eight weeks traveling to 10 different countries in Europe, from the end of June till August. Her travels began when she presented her research on, “How Media Impacts the Lives of Muslim Immigrants and Refugees in Fort Wayne, Indiana” at the Turkish Migration Conference in Vienna, Austria. She was encouraged to submit her proposal for the conference by Professor Steve Carr and was assisted in her research by Professor Michele Kelsey-Kearl. Working with the local refugee community for the last 10 years sparked Mechhofer’s interest in researching issues in their community. The frequent fears and the impact on families and children dealing with stereotypes and discrimination sparked her interest showing the impact media has on refugees and immigrants and what they have to say about it, especially with the negative representations of Muslims and refugees in recent media. While at the conference she learned how to present professionally and the differences in conferences held internationally. The conference had many different presenters and various topics. She was able to meet with many fellow researchers and gained knowledge on new issues and different methods of collecting data. Menchhofer said she got to hear about public perceptions and facism/racism of migration issues. To save money on her trip she flew into and out of the Istanbul Airport and did the rest of her traveling by bus and train. One challenge she says while traveling was navigating and relying on offline maps. She said she is very grateful to IPFW for helping her fund her trip and it taught her many critical thinking skills which you cannot learn in the classroom. Even though everything was in German and Kilometers she throughly enjoyed herself and wishes to attend next years conference in Athens, Greece. After attending her four-day conference in Austria, Meghan says that her most influential experiences took place when she volunteered at one of the refugee camps in northern Greece. The camps were comprised of Syrian refugees with the Yazidis, Kurdish, Arabs, Afghans, and various African refugees fleeing wars. There were many mothers alone because their husbands and older sons went to Germany prior to the borders closing. They are now divided because of the borders and the long asylum processes.

Menchhofer said that a large portion of the campus was made up of mothers and children, because before the borders were closed on the European countries the dads and husbands traveled to Germany to find jobs. It became impossible to get from Greece to Germany (Germany hasn’t closed their borders to refugees) the wives and mothers had no other options but to This Syrian family, like most Menchhofer met, was extremely hospitable, and they made her tea and grilled cheese using the solar energy stay in the camps and wait for in their tent. They are waiting to go to any country in order to have a their loved ones to send money normal life. Menchhofer is in contact with them a few times a month to them for basic, daily human and would like to find a way to sponsor them, and others, to stay with needs and depend on humanitarher and help them start normal lives. ian aid. While in the camp Menchhofer volunteered in a women’s center teaching English and going around to the different tents and passing out sunscreen, bananas, and minimal provisions that were donated. She says that it is difficult to find long term volunteers in the camps and, “the people in these camps are losing a generation of students, because every few weeks a new person comes to teach them and needs to become familiar with everything over again.” There are also college students in the camps, some of whom were only a semester away from graduating with their degrees when ISIS invaded and war broke out. She tells us that a lot of the refugees have mixed feelings about returning to Syria if the war ever ends, and most people just want safty and to start their lives again. Even with the aid of many charitable organizations it is expected to take years before families will be able to reconnect and rebuild their lives when the borders are finally reopened. Menchhofer is still working on the research she is doing on interviewing Muslim immigrants and refugees locally. Menchhofer plans on getting a doctoral degree in Refugee Studies and Migration Issues and is looking at several programs such Oxford University or Cambridge. Some advice she has for students is to “dream big, travel internationally, attend a professional conference in something you’re interested in, and open your mind to your own potential.” Menchhofer said this was one of the best experiences she had in her life and is very grateful to her mentors in the Communication and TENL departments, the offices that provided funding for the Turkish Migration Conference, and to the IPFW community for making this possible. She hopes to attend next year’s conference in Athens, Greece and be able to volunteer in a camp for six months to a year.

The Yazidis have suffered much trauma under ISIS and were out on the road for days with no protection from heat, wind, dust, and insects until buses could be arranged to take them to a new camp. D I S T I N G U I S H

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About Us

Graduate Studies staff members help turn ‘information seekers’ into proud college graduates.

W

e are the first point of contact for prospective IPFW graduate students, helping to guide them through the requirements necessary for submitting a successful application. Once a student decides to apply to a master’s program at IPFW, we work to connect them with their appropriate graduate department. If a potential graduate student isn’t sure what program best suits them, we direct them to Professor Barton Price, who provides guidance. Our office sends the admission notices (via email) and we are the “gatekeepers” of applications. Our day-to-day relationship with the applicant will last through the application process to admission. It is through graduation certification that we see all those we have assisted through admission attain their academic goals by earning their master’s degree or graduate certificates.

Our staff stays connected with the graduate students as we help organize social events and schedule graduate student workshops. The week before school starts in August, we sponsor the graduate assistant orientation and graduate faculty mentoring workshops. Provide entertaining social events for our graduate students. Besides the behind-thescenes crucial, administrative duties, we collaborate to produce this online journal. We have enjoyed developing the content, writing articles, and interviewing students and faculty for feature articles. We hope that you find Distinguish insightful and inspiring, and hope it increases your pride to be part of the IPFW Graduate Program. Stay in touch throughout your time at IPFW as a graduate student and share your successes after you graduate.

Discounts for all IPFW Name

Location

Services

Exhaust World

4504 Lima Rd.

10% discount (parts and labor)

Fort Wayne Clutch

2424 Goshen Rd.

Fox and Fox Frame Service

512 Van Buren Street

10% discount 5% discount (parts and labor)

Glenbrook Hyundai

4801 Coldwater Rd.

Discounts depends on vehicle contact store for more details

Grease Monkey

4535 Coldwater Rd.

$3 off any service and $5 off any oil change

The Import Doctors

4520 North Clinton Street 5% discount on labor

3330 Engle Rd .

10% discount (not to exceed $500)on automobile body repair and painting

Jiffy Lube

4334 Coldwater Rd.

$5 off signature oil change

Summit City Car Care

2311 Crescent Avenue

5% on parts; 10% on labor

6202 Plantation Lane

10% discount off of parts

Indiana International Collision

Tuffy Auto Service

Food

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2016-17 Recreation Name

Location

Services

Crazy Pinz

1414 Northland Blvd.

Buy games 2 get 2 free (no bowling)

Georgetown Bowl

670 E State Blvd.

Buy 2 games get 2 free

Northwood Cinema Grill

6069 Stellhorn Rd.

$1.00 off sandwich with student and employee I.D.

Regal Cinema

Tokens-n-Tickets

$8.50 tickets every day 211 W. Washington Center after 6pm M-Th. (No Rd. weekends) 5820 Coldwater Rd.

Purchase 8 tokens and get 8 tokens free (only once per day)

Services Name

Location

Services

Alpha Computers Mac and PC

301 Stable Drive

25% discount on in-store labor

Armstrong Flowers

726 E Cook Rd.

20% off cash purchases only

3215 N. Anthony Blvd (Suite A)

$50.00 flat repair fee Includes: Virus/malware scans; technician diagnostics; Virus removal; and expected turn-around time 3 days or less

Cashland

4852 Calhoun Street

1.5% discount on student loans or financial aid (check cashing service)

Delmar Video

5311 E Merchandise Rd.

Rent one movie for regular price, get second movie for 99 cents.

Flower Gallery

3442 Stellhorn Rd.

10% discount cash & carry

Rogers & Hollands

4201 Coldwater Rd. #318

Discount depends on purchase

Mr. Moonwalk

935 PerryWoods Cove

15% discount (inflatable rentals)

Name

Location

Services

Applebee’s

4510 N Clinton St.

10% discount

Buffalo Wild Wings

10524 Maysville Rd

10% off total meal

Chrome Plated Diner

3434 N. Anthony Blvd.

10% discount

Don Halls Triangle Park

3010 Trier Rd.

Complimentary soft drink with any purchase

Dunkin Doughnuts

5767 Saint Joe Rd.

10% off

Flat Top Grill

4150 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Lunch $1 off Dinner $2 off

Health Food Shoppe

3515 N. Anthony Blvd.

10% off all single serving items

LaMargarita

2713 S. Calhoun Street

10% discount on regular price menu items

McDonald’s

3202 Saint Joe Center Rd.

Free small drink with purchase of regular sandwich

Papa John’s

2616 Maplecrest Road 5440 Coldwater Rd.

1 large/2 topping pizza $6.99

Waiter on the way

6205 Stoney Creek Drive

Half off delivery charge (food delivery service) (only valid on Monday)

Name

Location

Services

Wooden Nickel

3422 N Anthony Boulevard 3627 North Clinton Street

10% discount

Famous Hair

5525 Coldwater Rd.

10% discount off cuts

Grooming

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Students

Automotive

Benson Communications

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Office of Graduate Studies Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne 2101 East Coliseum Boulevard Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805-1499 Kettler Hall (KT) room 258 Telephone: 260-481-6145 Fax: 260-481-0347 Email: graduate@ipfw.edu Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

DISTINGUISH IPFW is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access University. 1


Fall 2016 Distinguish