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DISTINGUISH A J O U R N A L F R O M T H E O F F I C E O F G R A D UAT E S T U D I E S

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Dear Friends, Colleagues, and Community Members, Welcome back to a new academic year. The Office of Graduate Studies is pleased to bring you Distinguish, our online graduate journal. Distinguish highlights the innovations and success of our graduate students and faculty. Graduate students should be recognized and promoted as your needs are very different from those of undergraduate students. The Office of Graduate Studies is eager to assist you as you navigate your graduate education from admission to graduation. An exciting new program called 3 Minute Thesis (3MT™) is starting this year. Many of you will not be writing a thesis; however, all of you will be completing a scholarly project or a capstone piece. 3MT™ started at the University of Queensland and is now becoming popular at graduate schools worldwide. It offers you an incredible opportunity to showcase your scholarly work. Workshops to prepare you for the 3MT™ competition will be offered throughout the year. These workshops will help you develop skills that you will not only use during the competition, but also throughout your professional career. For an introduction to the concept of 3MT™, check out the website for the Office of Graduate Studies. Best of luck in your graduate education. Please get involved in our Graduate Student Organization and visit the Office of Graduate Studies.

Carol Sternberger

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contents From the Director................................................................ 2 IPFW’s New Designation.................................................... 4 Out of Africa......................................................................... 6 Title IX. . .................................................................................. 8 Athletics and Academics.. ............................................... 10 International Education......................................................... 12 Chi Eta Sigma.....................................................................14 About Us.. ........................................................................... 16 Academic Accomplishments. . ........................................ 17 Graduate Student Perspective. . ..................................... 18

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What Does IPFW’s New Designation Mean? The Chancellor Weighs in IPFW received its long awaited

new designation of a multisystem metropolitan university in the spring of 2015. Prior to this, IPFW was considered a regional campus. A campus designed to serve a small area with an emphasis mainly on baccalaureate degree programs. What does this new designation mean for IPFW, but more importantly what does it mean for IPFW’s graduate programs? Chancellor Carwein believes the new designation puts us in an incredible position in this moment in history because people are looking at IPFW to define what multisystem metropolitan university means. “Under our former classification as a regional campus we were prohibited from offering any doctoral programs whatsoever. When we wanted to start the doctor of nursing practice program (DNP) and began to talk about that, the guidelines from the Commission of Higher Education relative to regional campuses didn’t allow it. To do so, the Commission for Higher Education would have to officially change the regional campus policy to allow us to

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offer the DNP. The adjustment they made was that a regional campus can offer a doctoral program, but only if that program exists at the main campus. So, it would say, “ok IPFW you can offer a doctoral program, but that same program must exist in West Lafayette or Bloomington.” The new designation gives us a lot more flexibility in terms of offering graduate programs, being more responsive to the needs of our region, and at the doctoral level. I don’t know what they might need, but I can envision that we might need to develop a program that doesn’t really exist anywhere. That’s what would be unique about IPFW, if we could develop


programs in response to specific regional needs,” said Chancellor Carwein. Chancellor Carwein added, “Our mission is to respond to the needs of our region, so the first step is making sure we understand what the needs are of the region. What are the graduate programs needed, what are the job opportunities available in those, and where are the gaps between the number of job openings that exist and the number of people available with the degrees to fit those jobs? From there would be having faculty develop the curriculum for the programs to be approved, then of course the big ticket item for all of these

things is resources. So that would be a combination of working with private companies/industry here to maybe provide support.” The Chancellor also mentioned, “For the most part graduate programs are not nearly as large as undergraduate programs, so as we think of adding new programs they’re more expensive, just out of the gate they’re more expensive. Particularly the healthcare programs, the sciences, and engineering. Sometimes you don’t even have 10 students in a class. You have to have smaller numbers, the real value of graduate education is that one to one relationship that you have with faculty.”

The Chancellor made note of the need for communication with IPFW alumni. She urges you to make contact with IPFW to let us know how you’re doing by completing the following survey. https://purdue.qualtrics.com/ SE/?SID=SV_5vRdOVhpQPXQBzn -Reported by Julie Stills

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Out of Africa

Mbuba addressing graduate students at Embu University, Kenya

Professor Jospeter Mbuba in the Department of Public Policy traveled to Africa this past summer as part of a fellowship awarded by the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program (CADFP). The Fellowship program facilitates engagement between scholars Ali Alavizadeh born in Africa who are now based in the United States or Canada and scholars in Africa on mutually beneficial academic activities. Mbuba spent three months in Kenya working with Embu University College and Professor Simon Thuranira developing a baccalaureate degree in Criminology and Security Studies. Mbuba is one of 17 African Diaspora scholars who have been awarded fellowships to travel to Africa to collaborate on curriculum co-development, research, graduate teaching, training, and mentoring activities.

Mbuba, second from right, presents the new curriculum to Embu University administration

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Mbuba recieves a few gifts from Embu University

Mbuba, left, makes a book donation to Embu University. Receiving the Research Methods book is the Embu University Principal, Professor Daniel Mugendi

In addition to developing the baccalaureate curriculum, Mbuba said he enjoyed providing a two day workshop covering research methods and proposal and grant writing among graduate students. Embu University College, one of the few public universities in Kenya, was established in 1947 as an agriculture training school and has since expanded to provide opportunities in higher education and research in Agriculture, Agribusiness, Veterinary Medicine, Forestry, Water and Biological and Physical sciences. Mbuba hopes to return to Embu to help with the implementation of the Criminology and Security Studies curriculum. The rapport that was developed through this fellowship will enhance IPFW’s study abroad initiatives as the new curriculum at Embu University can now play host to students in criminal justice and related fields. A collaboration memorandum of understanding between Embu University and IPFW is also envisioned to create additional avenues for graduate students to work with faculty members from both institutions on comparative criminal justice systems as well as cross-cultural issues of crime management, all of which will be made possible through participation in short academic exchange programs between the two institutions. Mbuba anticipates to create a lasting collaboration between IPFW and Embu that could help foster study abroad opportunities for our students, research partnerships, and more internationalization among the universities. -Reported by Carly Thompson

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Title IX at IPFW Carly Thompson, Graduate Student in the Department of Public Policy, talks about her Title IX video project. The video is intended to be part of new sexual violence prevention and awareness training for incoming students, faculty, and staff at IPFW. Do you know what Title IX is about? In its simplest definition, Title IX prohibits any form of sexual harassment or violence as well as sexual discrimination in any federally funded education program or activity. Title IX has actually been around since 1972. Initially, its primary purpose was to make sure that colleges didn’t discriminate against women in the admissions process or in college sports. Today, it serves more as a means to ensure the right of college students – both male and female- to education without the fear of sexual harassment. Title IX requires that universities take action to prevent and correct harassing behaviors. A 2014 study conducted by the Association of American Universities surveyed over 150,000 students at 27 schools across the country, including most of the Ivy Leagues. Results from this study indicated that the incidence of sexual assault and sexual misconduct due to physical force, threats of physical force, or incapacitation among female undergraduate student respondents was 23.1 percent. Overall rates of reporting to campus officials and law enforcement or others were low, ranging from five to 28 percent, depending on the specific type of behavior. Reasons that were given for not reporting included not thinking the incident was serious enough, because they were “embarrassed, ashamed or that it would be too emotionally difficult,” and because they “did not think anything would be done about it.” More information about this report can be found at http://www.aau.edu/Climate-Survey.aspx?id=16525&terms=sexual+assault During my senior year at IPFW, I began to work on a sexual assault prevention video with Julie Creek, director of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, who received a grant from Avon to support sexual assault education and awareness. Tori Zischke, a former IPFW assistant professor of theatre, assisted as well. The idea for part of that video, entitled Sexual Assault Prevention 101, was a sports show like Pardon the Interruption; with student actors commenting on “plays” of certain sexual situations. Sexual assault is not a topic that people feel comfortable talking about, so I wanted to add as much humor as possible to make it more memorable and digestible. Christine Marcuccilli in the Office of Equity, suggested to make some revisions to that video to make it in compliance with Title IX. To meet full Title IX training criteria, Christine suggested that I write another video covering Title IX to complement the Sexual Assault Prevention 101 video. So, I began to create a video about Title IX in a talk show format entitled Don Talk. Although I appreciate the element of humor, I felt like it would not be appropriate in this particular video. It can be funny if a guy is trying to take a drunk girl home and her friend steps in and intervenes by pouring a drink on him; but it’s not funny if the girl passes out and the guy takes advantage of her. I wanted to be sensitive to anyone who watches the video and may have experienced sexual harassment or assault.

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From left: IPFW polic chief Julie Yunker, IPFW police officer Trent Ruble, graduate student Carly Thompson, junior Brooke O’Mara, senior Brett Gauger, and graduate student Bryan Saunders rehearsing the Title IX script in IPFW’s CATV. As for making it interesting to students, I’d like to think that watching a video with actual people having a dialogue is more interesting and easier to follow than a power point lecture. Something that is exciting about this Title IX video is that IPFW is partnering with Purdue University West Lafayette. Dr. Carol Sternberger, Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Programs and Director of Graduate Studies, had shown the Sexual Assault Prevention 101 video to Dr. Mark Smith, Dean of Graduate Studies at Purdue. He thought Purdue could make use of a more student friendly Title IX video. Dr. Carol, Cameron Smolinske (who has been an intricate part by filming and editing both videos), and I went down to Purdue to be part of the filming process of a “commercial” that takes place during Don Talk. The commercial focuses on consent and it is most definitely corny- but it keeps your attention and gets the point across, which is the goal. Currently, I am working with a wonderful group of people from IPFW to finish up filming Don Talk. This volunteer group consists of Julie Yunker, IPFW police chief; Trent Ruble, IPFW police officer; Brett Gauger, IPFW senior; Brooke O’Mara, IPFW junior; and Bryan Saunders, IPFW graduate student. In the video, Yunker and Ruble play themselves; Gauger and O’Mara portray students who have been affected by sexual harassment or assault; Saunders plays a lawyer; and I am the talk show host. Don Talk covers what constitutes as sexual harassment and assault, what one should do if they have been harassed or assaulted, the process that takes place when a complaint is made, and what a sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) does during an appointment. The video finishes by discussing how someone can help a person who confides in them about being sexually harassed or assaulted. My hope is that Sexual Assault Prevention 101 and Don Talk can work in conjunction to help students, staff and faculty gain a better understanding of what constitutes as consent and the basics of Title IX. There can be a lot of confusion when it comes to these topics, but these videos will provide information in a comprehensible and entertaining way. Together, we can fight the stigma of sexual harassment and assault and help make IPFW students safer on and off campus.

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Athletics and Academics JW Kieckhefer, IPFW Men’s Volleyball Assistant Coach and Communications Graduate Student, discusses how volleyball and his education have worked together and helped him grow in both areas. Q: Why did you decide to pursue a Master’s degree? A: I decided to pursue a Master’s Degree at the end of my junior year. I had majored in history during my undergraduate tenure but began pursuing a minor in communication during my junior year. I really enjoyed my communication classes and learning about the interaction process between people. As I took a couple more communication classes my interest grew, and I decided that this was a field I wanted to study further. Being so close to completing my undergraduate degree in history, I decided to begin looking at Graduate School as an option to further my studies. Q: Is there a particular reason why you chose a Master’s of Communication? A: One the greatest reasons I am interested in communication is coaching. I began coaching club volleyball during the summers when was 18 years old and continued with it each summer throughout college. In coaching it is important to be able to relay what you are thinking or what you see to your athletes effectively and efficiently. Effective interpersonal communication from one person to another is something that has always intrigued me. I chose communication because it was both very interesting to me, but also because I think it would help me learn how to become a more effective communicator to the players. Q: How do you think furthering your education will help you in athletics/coaching? A: If you ask any coach in any sport, communication is essential to their team’s success. By studying communication in an academic setting, I have a much better understanding about what makes up effective communication and tools that can help me to facilitate that within the team. My involvement within the communication department has allowed me to study certain aspects of communication within the coaching environment which has helped to make me a better coach. Through my required synthesis paper to graduate I hope to add to the body of knowledge that exists between coaching and communication.

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Q: Has volleyball helped you with your education?

A: Something that athletics has instilled within me is a never give up attitude combined with not settling for mediocrity. As a collegiate athlete, you learn very quickly that you have to come out with your best attitude and effort on every single play. On a personal level you are fighting with multiple other people within your team for playing time in matches, and if you are not putting in the work someone else will. The same is true on the team level, where each team is trying to win and if your team settles for anything less than their best you will lose. I try to bring that same attitude with me to the classroom. I want to put my best work forward at all times and want to have the feeling that I know no one else has worked harder than me.

Q: How has the Graduate program at IPFW helped you grow personally and as a coach?

A: The graduate program at IPFW has helped me become a better coach through understanding how to communicate with athletes in ways that they will understand. It has opened my eyes to adapting my communication style to the audience I have at the current moment. I think I coach much differently now than I did last year because of my graduate school experience. The communication program has helped to mold my coaching style throughout the last 3 semesters, and I think getting the chance to learn effective communication has given me an advantage over other young coaches. It gives me the ability to learn by using the classroom setting and my personal experiences to explore different methods of communication between myself and the athletes. -Reported by Carly Thompson I N D I A N A U N I V E R S I T Y – P U R D U E U N I V E R S I T Y F O RT WAY N E

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The Office of International Education For the fall 2015 semester, IPFW welcomed a total of nearly 100 new international students to our campus, bringing the total number of students from outside the U.S. to 259 - an increase of almost 20% over the past year. The Office of International Education has partnered with the Office of Graduate Studies and academic units over the past several years to better promote how an education at IPFW can be an option that best benefits the academic, social, and financial needs of international students. We know college is a big journey, even for students right here in Indiana. For international students—joining us from around the globe—we understand what they are looking for and the challenges that they might experience. Promoting IPFW overseas can be a challenge. After all, there is no “U” in “IPFW”. When students and their families begin to understand, however, just who we are, heads begin to turn. The fact that IPFW grants degrees from both Indiana University and Purdue University can be somewhat confusing at first for these students, who come to IPFW from places like Buckinghamshire, Chittagong, Kisumu, and Vung Tau City. Students choosing IPFW understand the advantage that earning a degree from IU or Purdue can bring, along with the added benefits of having more personal attention, hands-on opportunities, and the affordability of a smaller campus.

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One success story is that of Geeta Buda, a student from Kathmandu, Nepal, who entered the M.S. Biology program in fall 2013. Geeta is working to complete her thesis and will graduate at the end of the fall 2015 semester. While at IPFW, she has successfully managed to excel as both a student and graduate teaching assistant while simultaneously immersing herself in student activities and leadership positions on campus. Geeta has served as an officer for the Graduate Student Organization, vice-president of Club Kathmandu (the Nepalese Student Association), and student worker and new international student orientation leader in the Office of International Education. Last year, Geeta also managed to fit in time to lead traditional Nepalese cultural performances at the Global Student celebrations in the fall and spring semesters. When a devastating earthquake hit Nepal last spring, Geeta led a relief effort that raised thousands of dollars to support victims of the tragedy. Fortunately, Geeta’s friends and family escaped serious harm, however, she then personally travelled to her homeland to provide assistance to those in need. As IPFW moves forward in expanding our geographic representation and cultural diversity on campus, Geeta’s story certainly serves as a testament as to how our institution can positively transform lives and make a truly global impact, even from our corner here in Northeast Indiana, U.S.A.

IPFW offers a unique learning environment with diverse ongoing research opportunities. I couldn’t miss the chance to utilize these remarkable resources to launch my academic and professional growth. Since IPFW is a perfect example of a global community with an engaged campus culture, as an international student, I always felt it was truly a home away from home. The academic rigors and research experience has gotten the best out of me, and I would like to thank IPFW for helping students prepare for the challenges in the future. Geeta Buda Class: Graduate Student Major: Biology Country: Nepal -Reported by Julie Stills I N D I A N A U N I V E R S I T Y – P U R D U E U N I V E R S I T Y F O RT WAY N E

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Chi Eta Sigma members pose at the site they volunteered for during The BIG Event.

Chi Eta Sima members pose with supervisors after recieving awards.

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CHI ETA SIGMA Stands Out During the 2014-2015 school year, Chi Eta Sigma was not only awarded a 3-star organization, but two members were recognized for their hard work at the Student Achievement Celebration. Chi Eta Sigma’s former president, Cassie Wolfe, was awarded the Outstanding Leadership Award, and Catanna Roberson, Chi Eta Sigma’s Professional Development Chair, received the Outstanding Commitment to Diversity Award. In addition, during the College of Education and Public Policy graduation awards ceremony, Richele Groeneweg was the Outstanding Scholarship award recipient.

The members of Chi Eta Sigma recognized The BIG Event as a call for action, and as a result produced the highest percentage of members volunteering at The BIG Event. For the 2015 BIG Event, Chi Eta Sigma was able to provide service to a site very near and dear to their hearts; the IPFW Community Counseling Center. Students were able to not only clean the clinic, but were able to create art to inspire clients of the counseling center as well. For this upcoming 2015-2016 school year, Chi Eta Sigma is already off to a running start. Two of its members, Nicole Howard and Ashley McMahon, were bestowed scholarships from the Lutheran Foundation for their work and dedication to the mental health profession. Chi Eta Sigma will also have three more officers/committee chairs enrolled in graduate assistantships: Alex Harvey, the treasurer of Chi Eta Sigma, Lyla Dean, the newsletter chair of Chi Eta Sigma, and Kelly Hake, the fundraising committee chair of Chi Eta Sigma. As future leaders, counselors, and advocates within the community, members of Chi Eta Sigma will continue the counseling honors society’s proud tradition of hard-work and dedication to its campus and community.

IPFW’S VERY OWN COUNSELING

Many of Chi Eta Sigma’s members also contribute on campus through their graduate assistantships, and their hard work rarely goes unnoticed. Chi Eta Sigma’s vice president, Julie Stills, was the 2014- 2015 recipient of the IPFW Student Employee of the Year Award. Chi Eta Sigma’s former and current presidents are very active in the student community as well. Cassie Wolfe and Nicole Howard did an exceptional job behind the scenes pulling The BIG Event together. With over 700 students, alumni, faculty, and staff being sent to 58 local non-for-profits in the Greater Fort Wayne for one BIG day of volunteer services, The BIG Event continues to grow and positively impact lives of many in the community.

HONORS SOCIETY, CHI ETA SIGMA, IS DOING BIG

THINGS IN THE COMMUNITY.

-Reported by Julie Stills

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About Us

The staff in the Office of Graduate Studies (OGS) performs a wide variety of work that helps students to go from “information seeker” to proud college graduate. The staff in the Office of Graduate Studies work with prospective as well as current graduate students. Applying to a graduate program can be an intimidating process and every program has its own set of requirements. The Office of Graduate Studies is available online, by phone, and in person. We do not serve as sources for curriculum information. Any curricular information must come from the program director or advisor. Beginning in July, the Purdue University graduate programs began using Slate Technologies for application process. We anticipate using Slate Technologies for our Indiana University graduate programs effective fall 2016. So far, the student and program response to this online application process is very positive. The Office of Graduate Studies is very pleased with the new system and we look forward to have all of our programs using this online application system. The staff in the Office of Graduate Studies work closely with the Graduate Student Organization (GSO). We want students to feel connected to IPFW not just academically but professionally as well. Together our office and the GSO sponsor workshops and activities designed for graduate students. The staff has been diligently working to prepare resources to assist students in developing their 3MT™ presentations. Remember you do not have to have at thesis in order to participate. The following workshops will be available throughout the year. Watch your student email and the Graduate Student Organization Facebook page for workshop dates! • Think Tank: Brainstorming your 3MT™ ideas • Cram It In: Condensing knowledge • Think on your Feet: Improvisation Class • Say What? - Voice Training • Look at This! - PowerPoint Slide Design • 3MT™ Practice and Constructive Criticism • 3MT™ Practice and Fine Tuning If you have ideas for our spring edition of Distinguish, please email graduate@ipfw.edu.

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Acknowledging Academic Accomplishments The following students recieved funding to reveal their work and represent IPFW at national conferences during the 2014-2015 school year. Way to go! Lauren Hall, Biology, presented her poster, Basking Platforms and Wildlife Cameras as Novel Monitoring Techniques for Aquatic Reptiles, at the 2014 Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in Chattanooga, TN. Emily Stulik, Biology, presented her poster, Modeling Anuran Occupancy and Habitat Use in a System of Restored Wetlands, at the 2014 Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in Chattanooga, TN.

Regina Shannon, Biology, presented her oral presentation, Stress Responses in Sea Cucumbers Exposed to Salinity, at Aquaculture America 2015. Gloria Diaz, English, presented her paper, Letters to Karla, at the TRANS Writ Large: Writing Difference Conference at the University of Cincinnati. Eric Stadig, Biology, presented his research at IAGLR’s 58th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research. Adam Warrix, Biology, presented his poster, Influence of Fire on Callery Pear in a Managed Prairie, at the 2015 Midwest-Great Lakes Society for Ecological Restoration Chapter annual meeting.

Christopher Culkin, Biology, presented his poster, Physiological and Molecular Mechanisms of Drought Stress in Soybean: Impacts on Soybean Aphid Populations and Virus Infection, at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America in Portland, Oregon. Timothy Leonard, English, presented his paper, The Influence of Charles Dickens on Sensation Fiction, at the Western Illinois University English Graduate Organization and Sigma Tau Delta Annual Conference Victoria Mumaw, Biology, presented her poster, Phylogeography of the Blanding’s Turtle, Emys Blandigii, at the 75th Annual Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference. Sasha Tetzlaff, Biology, presented his paper, We Didn’t Start the Fire: Impacts of the Non-prescribed Burning on Eastern Massasaugas Near Their Northern Range Limit, at the 75th Annual Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference. Michael Ravesi, Biology, presented his poster, Translocating Massasaugas as a Conservation Measure, at the 75th Annual Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference.

“The highlights of the meeting were being introduced to other restoration ecologist, plant ecologists, fire ecologists, and pro fessionals in the field who could use my research and had also participated in research similar to mine. The feedback I received was helpful. My results were preliminary, so the expertise of the other members will help me in the interpretation of my results. They also assisted me in solving some of the hurdles that I had encountered. It was also interesting seeing the work researchers do outside of academics.” -Adam Warrix

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Take Advantage of a Student Discount in the IPFW Area! Name Exhaust World Grease Monkey Jiffy Lube Alpha Computers Applebee’s Auntie Anne’s Pretzels Buffalo Wild Wings Dunkin Donuts Health Food Shoppe Pizza Hut Flat Top Grill Yum Yums, Yogurt U Make Famous Hair Regal Cinema Georgetown Bowl

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Location/Phone # 4504 Lima Rd. 260.484.0341 4535 Coldwater Rd. 260.637.0711 4334 Coldwater Rd. 260.483.3779 301 Stable Dr. 260.471.5800 4510 N. Clinton St. 260.484.6060 4201 Coldwater Rd. 10524 Maysville Rd. 260.486.9464 5767 St. Joe Rd. 260.486.9000 N. Anthony Blvd. 260.483.5211 5801 St. Joe Rd. 260.485.7593 W. Jefferson Blvd. 260.432.4100 Maysville Rd. 260.245.0096 5525 Coldwater Rd. 260.484.1903 Washington Ctr Rd. 260.483.0225 670 E State Blvd. 260.749.9610

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Graduate Assistant Perspective Abigail Schnelker, Graduate Assistant in the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs As a native to Fort Wayne when it came time to choose a University to attend after high school IPFW just made sense. I was able to ride my bike to class in nicer weather, and staying close to home meant my scholarships stretched further. After graduating I entered the working world and moved out of state, realizing I wasn’t happy with what I was doing and knowing there wasn’t room for advancement I decided to go back to school. I’ve been able to return to IPFW and work with Dr. Mark Jordan in the biology department for my thesis research. Teaching assistantships are limited in the biology department and I was not awarded one. I reached out to other departments on campus that I had ties to from my undergraduate career and was lucky enough for Ken Christmon in the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs to bring me on to his staff. The ODMA is responsible for cultural programing on campus, as well as, work done with the Carl Perkins grant. This grant is dedicated to motivating historically underrepresented groups in to obtaining their associate’s or bachelor’s degrees in STEM and CTE fields. My role in the office is to take care of the office’s social media accounts and to organize Perkins programming for the students. You do not have to be a Perkins student to take part in the activities, as all student can benefit from the career and life skills workshops we host. Through my work in the ODMA and with the students I work with, I am learning how to motivate students to get to graduation. Balancing my time has been a real learning experience, because I am not working in my academic department of study, I have been learning how to balance my time between my research and my office hours. Through my work in the ODMA, I have gained invaluable insight in to what it is like to hold an administrative role at a university and what it means to help students realize their potential. Learn more about Grad Studies at IPFW • List of programs - http://www.ipfw.edu/offices/graduate-studies/programs/ • Give to IPFW - CLICK HERE

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DISTINGUISH IPFW is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access University. 20

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Distinguish issue 1 fall 2015  

IPFW's Graduate Studies online magazine.

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