Page 1

DISTINGUISH A JOUR NA L FR OM THE O FFICE O F G RADUATE S TUDIES

|

ISSUE 7

|

NOV EMBER 2 0 17


from the

DIRECTOR

Dear Friends, Colleagues, and Community Members, The fall semester has flown by. Perhaps not nearly as fast for you, our graduate students, who are immersed in your coursework. Well, it is time for to take a walk, enjoy the fall breeze, reenergize yourselves, and prepare to wrap up final papers, projects, and exams. 2017 has been a year of change, and change will be at the forefront of our institution for years to come. For over 50 years we have been Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne. Those in the Northeast Indiana region recognize our university as IPFW. Beginning July 1, 2018, we will become Purdue University Fort Wayne (PFW)*; our colors will change from our classic blue and white to the well-known Purdue black and gold, symbolic of our historic realignment as a new university. The Office of Graduate Studies will say goodbye to the graduate nursing program; some graduate students will complete their Purdue University nursing master’s degree, graduating by December, 2019. Purdue University Graduate School looks forward to adding many new (formally Indiana University) master’s programs. Students with questions about their program transition and teachout should contact their advisor. Additional information regarding the realignment is available on the University’s website at ipfw.edu/offices/oaa/realignment/university-realignment.html if you are interested in delving deeper into the history and the process. Our campus is celebrating the arrival of our new chancellor, Dr. Ronald Elsenbaumer. Dr. Elsenbaumer is our 10th chancellor and will be the inaugural chancellor of Purdue University Fort Wayne. The Office of Graduate Studies will host an open house for Dr. Elsenbaumer during the Spring semester, where he will meet our students, hear their stories, and share his vision for graduate education. My vision for graduate education is to offer you, our students, opportunities for growth, support as you gain knowledge in your discipline, and foster leadership skills that will enable you have a positive influence in your community.

Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs and Director of Graduate Studies/Interim Chair of Nursing

2

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

*Pending higher learning commission approval


contents From the Director. . ....................................................................2 Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Shannon Bischoff . . ...........................4 MasterDon Minute: Featuring Mary Encabo .....................6 Q&A With a Graduate Research Assistant: Featuring Geral’n McGee .. .....................................................8 Featuring Kanika Binzani .. ......................................................9 Where Are They Now Q&A With: Carly Thompson .. ................................................................ 10 Dr. Bill Barge ........................................................................11 Jeff Shriner .......................................................................... 12 Dylan Rudy ........................................................................... 13 Dr. Christina Zumbrun ....................................................... 14 IPFW JobZone is Now Handshake! ................................... 15 2017-2018 GSO Officers ....................................................... 16

DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

3


FEATURES

Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Shannon Bischoff

D

r. Shannon Bischoff has been at IPFW for the past seven years teaching linguistics courses and conducting linguistic research. Dr. Bischoff is program director for the nationally accredited Teaching English as a New Language (TENL) degree on campus and co-director for IRSC where he advocates for faculty and student resources and creates opportunities for faculty and students to share their work with the campus and broader community through events, like the recent Sciences Central Sponsorships Day and publications like Connect. Bischoff is currently working on four major projects that are linked in significant ways. The first involves the development of digital resources (i.e. digital archives, corpora, online dictionaries, etc.) for studying the Coeur d’Alene language and for revitalization efforts within the community. The project involves the University of Arizona Linguistics Department, the American Indian Language Development Institute, and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. A second project involves his research lab in Puerto Rico at the University of Puerto Rico Maygüez where he has been working with colleagues in Puerto Rico and at the University of Leiden exploring bilingualism and education on the island. Currently Dr. Bischoff is working with a graduate student from Leiden and colleagues there looking at questions regarding English as a language barrier to higher education. A third project he is doing involves colleagues here at IPFW working on a wellbeing and language study with Mon refugees in Fort Wayne. A fourth project Dr. Bischoff is working on entails IPFW graduate student, Mary Encabo, where the two of them are looking at the role of complementary schools in the communities where Dr. Bischoff conducts research (e.g. schools developed and run by community members

4

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

By:Lindsey Dutrieux

to promote mother tongue language and culture). Dr. Bischoff and Encabo are taking lessons from Dr. Bischoff’s collaborative research to promote the reaching of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Bischoff explains his research further, “Specifically, Encabo, who has a graduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania, is looking at my work and revealing how it has implications for approaches to mother tongue instruction and literacy as well as international policy and planning. Together we are working to shed light on how mother tongue complementary schools might serve to help attain the UN SDGs.” They will be presenting their work at an international conference on language and the Sustainable Development Goals in Dakar this December as featured speakers. When asked what the goals of his research were Dr. Bischoff said, “To expand my own knowledge, to raise new questions, to broaden understanding, to address real world issues, to engage with others in collaborative inquiry, to improve my teaching, and to provide opportunities for students.” He is inspired to do this research by, “A debilitating curiosity about the world around and within us.” Graduate students often have been full collaborators and partners in his research. “They have also inspired a number of my research projects. I have been quite fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with a number of advanced students with their own ideas, their own knowledge and experiences, and the curiosity to follow the data where ever it might take us.” Dr. Bischoff has worked with a number of students from different fields that have expertise that he may not possess


Gradaute Reseaerch Assistant, Mary Encabo and Associate Professor of Linguistics, Dr. Shannon Bischoff, stand for a fall photo outside of the Liberal Arts Building

and having these student partnerships “have been especially fruitful and fulfilling. Finally, we are all always learning in academia, and I learn a great deal from my students.”When asked what research he performed when he was a graduate student Bischoff replied that he was a research assistant and was able to work with a well-known scholar in his field. Most of the work he did involved “reading dozens and dozens of articles and writing abstracts. It was a great experience because I not only mastered a large body of literature but I got to engage with this scholar on a regular basis. Learning not only about the subject at hand but the field in general and how the research we were doing fit within the history of the field and its future.” Bischoff recalls his time as a research assistant as being very exciting as he was also able to be a visiting researcher in a lab at another institution where he got to work with the leading scholar in one of his areas of expertise, “The syntax and morphology of polysynthetic languages. I got to work with primary data and do my own analysis under his supervision. People say it is dangerous to meet your heroes because you will be disappointed; however, meeting and working with one of my heroes only inspired me to work harder to be a better scholar, teacher, and person.” When asked about his experiences in graduate school Bischoff says that the best part was collaborating with his classmates. Two of his colleagues were

exceptionally brilliant individuals, one from Japan and one from Finland. Bischoff was able to travel with both classmates and do field work. Bischoff recalls his classmate from Finland, “I was invited to present our work on computational linguistics at a number of different conferences in Spain, Italy, and Germany. We spent a few weeks traveling around Europe meeting scholars, government officials, and corporate executives discussing our research. We presented our work at a former Stasi training school outside Berlin, at the EU Joint Research Center for the Protection and Security of the Citizen at Ispara Italy, and at a conference near the heart of historic Seville Spain. Being involved in research at the international level as a graduate student significantly impacted how I see my research, my teaching, and my place in the world. Those experiences are the most memorable and had the greatest impact on my career.” Bischoff says that learning is not easy and that if you think it is then you are not doing it the right way. “There are always people who are smarter, nicer, and more compassionate than you... find those people and spend as much time with them as you can.” Bischoff wants students to know that, “At IPFW/Purdue Fort Wayne there are opportunities for students to pursue research, scholarship, and creative endeavors that they can’t find elsewhere. Our faculty are connected to the global community and doing ground breaking research: Something a student can be a part of day one here.”

DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

5


Mary Encabo (right) and Dr. Shannon Bishcoff (left), review their research on a laptop

MasterDon Minute: Featuring Mary Encabo

G

raduate Research Assistant, Mary Encabo is originally from Metro Manila, Philippines but currently lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Encabo received her B.A. in East Asian Studies from Bryn Mawr College and her M.S.Ed in International Educational Development form the University of Pennsylvania. Encabo is currently assisting Dr. Shannon Bischoff with his research and said that she, “Appreciates that Dr. Bischoff extended the opportunity to collaborate with him on this research project. I am very much interested in, as well as deeply concerned with, the quality of education in the Global South, the regions that are often called ‘developing’ countries. My academic background is in international education and development, which is why when he mentioned that he would be working

6

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

on research related to mother tongue instruction and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). I felt I could at least offer some thoughts on the matter.”Much of the work that Encabo does is dialogic, formed over weeks of discussions on findings, and interconnected themes that emerge from literature that they examined. “The focus of our research is on complementary schools, which are community-based schools that teach students their mother tongue or heritage language, and how they should become important partners in achieving the SDGs.” Encabo says. She always knew she wanted to teach but that over the course of her education she became more interested in research,” I think teaching and research support and strengthen each other so I’m happy to have the chance to do both.”


“S ince Dr. Bischoff and I come from different backgrounds, I can learn a lot from his experiences, expertise, and world-view” Encabo will soon be a co-presenter at the British Council’s Language & Development Conference in Dakar, Senegal on November 27 presenting, Lessons for the UN from the U.S. work she has been doing in Dr. Bischoff’s lab.When asked to describe the challenges of her studies Encabo says that she sometimes feels she does not have enough time to process everything she is learning and she often likes to step back from her work and to make the connections between the ideas and the reality. In her research one recent challenge she is facing is, “finding [her] voice as a scholar and educator and how [her] thoughts and ideas may or may not add to the current body of literature and practice in the field. Do my ideas support what is already working in the education and development sector and/or do I offer alternatives when I see incoherence among policy, theory, and practice?” Encabo finds that the most rewarding part of her research process is “how iron sharpens iron”. Encabo explains, “Since Dr. Bischoff and I come from different backgrounds, I can learn a lot from his experiences, expertise, and world-view. My sense of accomplishment doesn’t lie in the final product, though certainly I feel accomplished whenever I finish

a project, rather the accomplishment is in realizing that through collaboration and exchange of ideas, I could move a bit closer to understanding how we depict and interpret our past and present realities and how we could act on that knowledge to guide our thinking about our future realities.” Encabo is open to any opportunities after graduate school that will allow her to teach, do research, and/ or work in international development. Some advice she has for other students is “Graduate school and research mean something different to each person, but one advice that I would give, and I remind myself of this as well, is to continue to be curious about ideas and people. Sometimes I think because we have access to so much information nowadays, we do not take time to wonder, imagine, and cogitate on epistemology and the deeper truth(s) of life. Information is not always akin to knowledge or wisdom. For anyone who wants to pursue graduate school, it helps to know yourself – your strengths, values, and limits – well enough before you embark on further studies and agree to do certain types of research, but leave room for cognitive dissonance, discovery, and challenge as well.” ■

DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

7


Q&A

with

a

GRADUATE RESEARCH ASSISTANT:

FEATURING: Geral’n McGee in

Dr. Nachappa’s Lab

Q: Where are you from? A: I am from Fort Wayne, Indiana, a big small town!

Q: What was your undergraduate degree? A: My undergraduate degree is a Bachelors of Science in Biology from IPFW.

Q: What are you doing in your lab/ how are you assisting with research? A: Right now I am creating isofemale lines of Soybean Thrips to compare their vector competency.

Q: Describe the research you are working on briefly. Did you always want to do research? A: Once isofemale lines have been established I will give offspring from each line time to acquire Soybean Vein Necrosis Virus and then time to transmit it. Hopefully, thrips from the same line will show the same ability to acquire and transmit the virus, with some lines being good transmitters and others being poor transmitters. Then their genomes will be analyzed to see what is different between good

8

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

transmitters and poor transmitters. No, I did not always want to do research. During my last year of undergrad Dr. Nachappa was talking to her Entomology class about getting involved in research and how it could be helpful in the future. I decided to look into it, and attended a meeting where different biology professors were talking about the research that was going on through their labs. Afterwards I e-mailed Dr. Nachappa letting her know that I was interested in working in her lab. I started working in her lab the summer of 2016 and that fall she convinced me to apply for grad school!

Q: What are some challenges you have in your research or studies that you face? A: Creating isofemale lines is more difficult than I initially thought it would be. The thrips do not always reproduce or continue reproducing. Planning which procedures I am going to do ahead of time has been difficult. The thrips needing to be at different life stages for different parts of the experiment and they do not all develop at the same

2 0 17

rate, so a lot of the time I have to go check on them before I know which part of the experiment I am going to be working on for the day.

Q: What are your plans after graduate school? A: Honestly, I don’t really have a plan. Right now I am not considering more schooling, so I guess I better get a job so I can move out of my parents’ house!

Q: What is some advice you would give to undergraduates thinking about graduate school? A: It is okay to be unsure. Meet with your advisor and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Advice can be useful when trying to decide what will best help your future. ■


Pictured Left: Biology Graduate Research Assistant, Geral’n McGee, inspecting a Soybean plant under a microscope in Dr. Nachappa’s lab Pictured Right: Graduate Research Assistant, Kanika Binzani, shows Dr. Jin Soung Yoo the research she has been doing

FEATURING: Kanika Binzani in

Dr. Jin Soung Yoo’s Lab

Q: Where are you from? A: I come from a colorful, cultural and diverse country, India. Before coming to United States I used to work in Mumbai. Mumbai being the financial capital of India is a vibrant, fast-paced city just like New York.

Q: Why did you choose to come to IPFW to study? A: IPFW with its expert faculty, excellent infrastructure, great reviews and assistantship on competitive basis made it easier for me to choose IPFW for my graduate studies.

Q: What was your undergraduate degree? A: I pursued my undergraduate degree in Information Technology (IT) from Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya University.

Q: What are you doing in your lab/ how are you assisting with research? A: I am working with Dr. Jin Soung Yoo. Dr. Yoo is an expert in Data Mining and Data Science. She has published many papers in these areas. I am assisting Dr. Yoo on a big data project which

involves analysis and prediction of certain aspects of public health domain.

Q: Describe the research you are working on briefly. Did you always want to do research? A: In this digital era, each person is surrounded by cloud of digital data. This data is highly complex, huge and fast paced. Explosive growth in such data emphasizes the need of computationally efficient methods tailored for analyzing big data. Modern distributed computing platforms allow sifting through this hay stack to find the needle. Hadoop, an open source cloud computing framework, has gained popularity to store and process large scale data on clusters of shared-nothing commodity machines. Our research is focused on big data analytics on Hadoop. As part of my research project, we are utilizing Spark’s powerful machine learning library for classification analysis. I am implementing different classification models on Public Health dataset to analyze, explore and find critical features that can be helpful in predicting certain diseases based on characteristics and symptoms.

Yes, I always wanted to expand my knowledge and utilize skill sets to answer questions. This research opportunity allows me to learn use of computational analysis and trying to predict trends in public health which will eventually assist in improving health and healthcare.

Q: Do you have any publications/ posters/links you would like to share in this article? A: My work on the research project is in progress. The research result will be published in peer reviewed conference such as IEEE International Congress on Big Data or International Conference on Biomedical and Health Informatics, and a relevant international journal. I have authored a patent for Java based framework “Computer Implemented System and Method for Web/Portal Applications”.

Q: What is some advice you would give to undergraduates thinking about graduate school? A: Graduate school is fun if you are ready to work hard, keen to learn new things and have an intent to add breadth & depth in your skill set. ■

DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

9


WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

Public Health Doctoral student and IPFW Alumni,

Carly Thompson Q: What degree did you receive from IPFW? A: A MPM- masters of public management (from the college of Education and Public Policy)

Q: Where are you studying now and what degree are you pursuing? A: I am currently studying at the University of Toledo and I am pursing my doctorate in public health, specifically health education.

Q: What research are you working on now? What inspired your work?

A: I am currently working on four projects: an article on drunkorexia, an article on sexual assault response teams (SARTs), a study on the perceptions of college faculty on approaching students whom they suspect may have a drug or mental health problem, and a study on a body image social marketing campaign. The drunkorexia article was inspired by a new trend in which primarily college students refrain from eating during the day when they know they are going to go out drinking that night; or they use compensatory behaviors the day after they drank a lot. This is their attempt to avoid weight gain. The sexual assault response team article was actually because I partnered with two professors in criminal justice to come up with a comprehensive guide to implementing an effective SART on a college campus. The University of Toledo is currently in the process of enhancing their response to students who experience sexual violence. I decided to work with a fourth-year Ph.D. student on the faculty perceptions 10

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

study for the experience and because I think it is an important topic. The body image campaign and study was inspired by my own experiences with poor body image and finding self-worth. Additionally, the University of Toledo’s wellness council identified negative body image as one of the top concerns students expressed in a survey. We want to encourage students to obtain their best self without the use of harmful means such as steroids, diet pills, over-exercising, etc.

Q: What advice would you give to graduate students whom wish to seek a Ph.D.? A: Not going to lie, the first semester you will probably think “why did I get myself into this?” “Is this really worth all the stress?” “How do I handle all of these requirements?” But, after the first semester, you start to get the hang of how things work, how to manage your time (and find some time for your own health and sanity), and start to find ways to get involved with research you are passionate about. Also, don’t think that you have to get a Ph.D. in the exact same area of study as your masters. In my program, there have been students who had master degrees in English, Biology, Exercise Science, Psychology, and Public Policy. If you’re not passionate about the area of study you choose, it will be difficult to stay focused and persistent. ■


Associate Professor of Informatics at Trine University and IPFW Alumni,

Dr. Bill Barge Q: What degree did you receive from IPFW? A: MBA in 1998. Q: Where are you studying now and what degree are you A:

pursuing? I earned a Ph.D. in Technology Management at Indiana State University in 2015. My specialization was Data Communication. For my dissertation, I created mathematical models of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) packet loss when a body area network telecardiology system was bombarded by interference in the ISM band.

card. Due to the cohort nature of the program, many of us became good friends.

Q: What are some differences between obtaining your

degree? A: Yes. My undergraduate professors seemed to really enjoy their jobs! After graduation from Miami University (1986), I was accepted in a Ph.D. program in Robotics (EE/CS) at Northwestern University. One of my biggest regrets was choosing to work at AT&T instead of continuing my education at that time.

graduate degree and completing a Ph.D.? A: The biggest difference is the completion date. When I earned the MBA, I knew that when I completed the required courses, I would be done. With the Ph.D., there were more hurtles. I had to complete the coursework, the comprehensive/preliminary written and oral exams, data collection, and writing the dissertation. I was not allowed to defend my dissertation until my committee was satisfied that I had adequately explored every aspect of the topic. Waiting while the committee debated my defense was grueling, but there were no sweeter words than when my committee chair greeted me with “Congratulations, Dr. Barge.”

Q:

Q: What research are you working on now? What

Q: Did you always want to pursue your doctorate

A:

 id you feel well prepared for a doctoral program D based on your education and experience from a master’s program at IPFW? Yes. The experience of taking two courses a semester, each of which met for three hours one night a week while working full-time helped me to become a better student. I had to become organized and plan ahead. These skills helped me complete the MBA, a second master degree, and the Ph.D.

Q: What is one memorable moment you had at IPFW that you would like to share? A: Both of my daughters were born while I was a student in the MBA program. When my second daughter was born, some of the students in my class gave me a

inspired your work?

A: Iam still doing some research in telecardiology systems, but have started research into security of Bluetooth communications. My original research interest was wireless process control systems. This led me to an article by Nada Golmie from NIST where she discussed the problems of having no standard for wireless medical systems. This article peaked my interest. My research into these wireless medical systems led me predict ANT or Bluetooth would be a good standard. I chose Bluetooth 4.0, also known as Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) or Bluetooth Smart. When Apple’s iOS 8 Health app used BLE, I knew I was on the right track. ■ DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

11


WHERE ARE THEY NOW? continued

Mathematics Doctoral student and IPFW Alumni,

Jeff Shriner Q: What degree did you receive from IPFW? A: I received a Master of Science degree in Mathematics in May 2012. Q: Where are you studying now and what degree are you pursuing?

A: I am studying mathematics at the University of Colorado Boulder, and am pursuing a Ph.D.

Q: Did you always want to pursue your doctorate degree?

A: No. In fact, as an undergraduate, I didn’t even want to pursue a bachelor’s degree in mathematics. I earned my B.A. in Chemistry and minored in mathematics. At IPFW, I caught up on some of the courses I was missing in the process of pursuing my M.S. Then, after graduating from IPFW, I worked at a software company for two years before deciding to pursue my Ph.D.

Q: D o you stay in contact with faculty at IPFW? Did anyone assist you in finding a program for your doctorate? A: Yes, the faculty at IPFW were great to work with, and have always been very supportive. Dr. (Doug) Weakley was tremendously helpful in helping with my transition into the program at IPFW. Even with the two year gap between my Master’s degree and Ph.D. program, Dr. Weakley, Dr. Dragnev, and Dr. Redett all wrote letters of support for me for my applications.

Q: Did you feel well prepared for a doctoral program based on your education and experience from a Master’s program at IPFW? 12

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

A: I think the transition to a Ph.D. program will always feel difficult, but my experience at IPFW was Beneficial in the following ways: (a) I was given invaluable teaching experience which helped me easily transition into this role within my Ph.D. program. (b) I developed positive relationships with faculty, who welcomed questions and encouraged innovation. (c) I developed positive relationships with my peers, who helped model the mathematical process of struggling through problems together and helping each other review and more effectively communicate our ideas.

Q: What do you plan to do after completing your Ph.D? A: I am currently in the process of applying for faculty positions for the Fall 2018 semester. I am targeting teaching-centered positions at schools that prioritize undergraduate education and research opportunities. I have been fortunate to have had numerous experiences which have allowed me to see the tremendous benefits of a strong mathematics education, and I am excited about the opportunity to share these benefits with students who may have similar assumptions as my undergraduate self, or who may be anxious about mathematics. ■


Pure Mathematics Doctoral student and IPFW Alumni,

Dylan Rudy Q: What degree did you receive from IPFW? A: I received a Master of Science in Mathematics. Q: Where are you studying now and what degree are you pursuing?

A: Iam pursuing a PhD in Pure Mathematics at Texas Tech University.

Q: Did you always want to pursue your doctorate degree? It wasn’t until enrolling in the graduate program that I realized that even when I am not enjoying math, I would rather have it in my life than not.

A: No.

Q: H ow did you select your school for a doctoral program? A: Many math programs would have more than prepared me for a career in academia, that was not necessarily the path that I wanted to take. The program at Texas Tech offers about equal support for students who wish to pursue careers in industry or government work as they do to students wanting to pursue academia.

Q: Do you stay in contact with faculty at IPFW? Did anyone assist you in finding a program for your doctorate? A: I stay in contact with Douglas and Cecilia Weakley, both of whom offered me mentorship while deciding on what future I wanted to pursue after graduating from the Master’s program.

Q: What is one memorable moment you had at IPFW

A: My discussions with the graduate advisor who convinced me I am capable of pursuing a higher degree. I will be forever in his debt for helping me decide on what path I wanted to take.

Q: What are some differences between obtaining your graduate degree and completing a Ph.D.? Professors at IPFW are more engaged with the education side of higher learning than professors at a predominately research institution.

A: More work intensive.

Q: What research are you working on now? What inspired your work? A: Ihave just started research in cryptanalysis. It was always a topic that I was interested in.

Q: What do you plan to do after completing your Ph.D.? A: I would like to work at the NSA as a cryptographer. Q: What advice would you give to graduate students whom wish to seek a Ph.D.?

A: Cultivate strong relationships with your professors. Also, find a professor who is working on something you might be interested in, even tangentially so. Ask them if you can be involved with their work in any capacity to get you more comfortable with the creativity of thinking needed to pursue higher-level abstract research. ■

that you would like to share? DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

13


WHERE ARE THEY NOW? continued

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Trine University and IPFW Alumni,

Dr. Christina Zumbrun

Q: What degree did you receive from IPFW? A: I received the Master of Science in Applied Mathematics degree in 2005 (through Purdue University). I also received the Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics from IPFW that same year (spring/ summer 2005). While a student, I taught at IPFW as a Graduate Teaching Assistant. The academic year after receiving my degree (2005-2006) I was a Limited Term Lecturer in the Mathematics Department. I taught College Algebra and Communicating with Statistics that year.

Q: Where are you studying now and what degree are you A:

Q: What do you plan to do after completing your Ph.D.? A: Ibegan my Ph.D. in 2009 and finished in 2015. I have been on faculty at Trine University since August 2006. I began here as an Instructor and in the last decade or so I have earned my Ph.D. and advanced to the rank of Associate Professor. I’m also the Institutional Researcher at Trine.

pursuing? I received my Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from Western Michigan University in 2015. The degree was earned through the Mathematics Department on campus at Western Michigan University.

Q: W  hat research are you working on now? What inspired your work? A: My research is focused on affect (beliefs and attitudes) toward statistics. In my experience teaching statistics (which began at IPFW), I have noticed that many students enter a statistics class with preconceived notions about the subject, many of which are prohibitive to learning. For my dissertation, I developed a survey instrument that was used to create a beginning profile of secondary mathematics

14

teachers’ affect toward statistics. I am interested in this population because of their impact on students. I would like to expand on this research by going into classrooms and interviewing teachers to delve more deeply into the issues. Since finishing my degree, I have been sharing about my research. I have presented at two conferences (with papers appearing in the conference proceedings) and will give a presentation at a local college this year (where a friend from IPFW is on faculty).

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

2 0 17

Q: What advice would you give to graduate students A:

whom wish to seek a Ph.D.? I would recommend that once they have found a strong program, they should seek a solid support network. Earning a Ph.D. is a long, difficult process and supportive people around them will help them stay with it and finish the degree. I could not have finished my Ph.D. without my family, friends, and colleagues. ■


IPFW JobZone is Now

Handshake! Check it out at https://ipfw.joinhandshake.com

I

t is much easier to navigate, allowing users to create a profile similar to LinkedIn with categories like work experience, organizations, and projects. Users can search and apply for jobs as well as schedule appointments and register for upcoming Career Services events. Students who work during the day have a number of virtual options, such as appointments over the phone, Skype mock interviews, and virtual resume critiques. We also have a drop box in our office that students can leave resumes and cover letters in if we are closed, outside of drop-in hours, or if the student does not have time to meet with someone face-to-face. Once it’s dropped off, one of our career peers will scan it, review it, and email it back to the student. Our office is open until 6 p.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays, which gives students the opportunity to schedule appointments later in the day. One of the many appointment types available is career exploration. This is helpful for students who are committed to what they are studying but would like to know more about what jobs are available in their field. For those that have specific jobs in mind, but are unsure

how to find them, students can come in for help with job searching. Aside from the typical websites, there are additional resources suited to particular areas of study. We can also provide assistance in building a professional network on websites such as LinkedIn. We have webinars on Wednesdays at noon; these are virtual presentations on various career development topics. During the presentation, viewers are able to ask the presenter questions in real-time. Be sure to follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on all of our events and giveaways! Facebook: www.facebook.com/IPFWCareerServices Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram: @IPFWCareer LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ipfwcareerservices For a full list of services and events, visit www.ipfw.edu/career

DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

15


Get to know your Graduate Student Organization

2017-2018 Officers

16

President Lindsey Dutrieux received a B.S. in Biology and an A.S. in Business Administration from IPFW. She is a graduate student in the Public Policy Health Systems Administration program.

motivated by the pride my family has in me and knowing that even though the classes are challenging and the papers are long, I know I can get my degree.

great add-on for an excellent study abroad experience. Here, apart from a degree one can develop a broad and improvised view of the present day global society.

From: South Bend, IN Likes: Cooking, decorating for holidays, traveling to new places, swimming, and gardening What motivates you? I will be the first in my family to receive a master’s degree. If someone had told me when I was a sophomore that I would be pursuing a master’s degree in 2016, I would have said they were crazy. It wasn’t until I was finishing a mentorship program, and the deadline to apply to grad school was just two weeks away, that I knew I wanted to continue my education. I am

Vice President Manikanta Kurri (Reddy) is perusing a degree in mechanical Engineering and is a Graduate Teaching Assistant for CE/ ME 319 Fluids Mechanics lab.

Treasurer Abhijeet Bisht is majoring in Biology and choose to study at IPFW because it has distinguished faculty and a reputed degrees in a rich and diverse environment. As an international student, the culture and educational diversity at IPFW is a great addon for an excellent study abroad experience. Here, apart from a degree one can develop a broad and improvised view of the present day global society.

DISTINGUISH

|

N O V E M BE R

From: India Likes: Spending time with friends and family, cooking, reading books written by Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam Treasurer Abhijeet Bisht is majoring in Biology and choose to study at IPFW because it has distinguished faculty and a reputed degrees in a rich and diverse environment. As an international student, the culture and educational diversity at IPFW is a

2 0 17


Office of Graduate Studies Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne 2101 East Coliseum Boulevard Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805-1499 Kettler Hall (KT), Room 140 Telephone: 260-481-6145 Fax: 260-481-0347 Email: graduate@ipfw.edu Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

DISTINGUISH IPFW is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access University. DI S TI N G UI S H

|

N O V E MB E R

2 01 7

1

Distinguish fall 2017  

IPFW Graduate Studies

Advertisement