Page 1

Munny Showcase PAGE 7

Student Composition Recital PAGE 8

E Women’s Tennis PAGE 10

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Vol. 41 Issue 30

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

New day on Campus Improvements Move Toward convenience


2

The Communicator | May 11, 2011

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

news

Campus Innovations: What’s Coming to IPFW Colin McCallister

Students living in IPFW’s student & Kristan Mensch housing will have something to look forward to in the near future: the opening of a CVS pharmacy and convenience store, a Jimmy John’s gourmet sub shop and another fast food outlet that has yet to be determined. These establishments are going to be located on the corner of Hobson Road and Crescent Avenue. “We’re pretty far along in the process. There are a number of okays and sign-offs that we have to get from the state. To get it done, we’re already working with CVS, who has to do a final sign-off. All these papers have to be signed before developers may 2011

can start on the project,” Chancellor Michael Wartell said. IPFW has deemed this project necessary to accommodate the needs of those living in student housing. “We knew we needed a place that would give students more convenience in terms of shopping,” Wartell said. “We looked for a convenience store like CVS or Walgreens, and they really are convenience stores and not just drug stores.” The project is going to be privately funded and will not come from the state or students. The way the project is set up, it will benefit everyone involved including the students, the public, the university and the establishments. “The way they usually finance is a developer works with the people who want to occupy the stores; it’s an entrepreneurial adventure. They try to figure out a business model where the store leases the facilities, the developer builds and then they pay us. This will actually make money for the university,” Wartell said. As far as what the CVS and Jimmy John’s will have to offer, they will not necessarily provide foods that promote a healthy lifestyle. While they do have healthier alternatives like canned fruits and vegetables, they do not exactly compete with the quality of fresh

fruits and vegetables. “Will it provide a healthier lifestyle? Depends on what you buy. I wouldn’t look for fruit and vegetables [at CVS], but that’s why we have a bus system that takes people to Scott’s,” Wartell said. The convenience of having these stores is definitely what students like sophomore Jessica Geyer want, especially since she lives in IPFW student housing the bus system is not always convenient. “Since my car couldn’t work worse if it had square wheels, I take the CampusLink bus to Anthony Blvd. whenever I need to go shopping or pick up a prescription,” Geyer said. “Unfortunately, CampusLink doesn’t run during school breaks or on the weekends, and CitiLink doesn’t run on Sundays, so I’m stuck having to schedule my grocery trips between classes. It’s a hassle.” Given the inconveniences given by the bus systems, Geyer said, “Having a CVS would make my life infinitely more convenient.” Since many students like Geyer will have a use for this project, it will quite possibly make the project worthwhile. “I think it’s an incredibly important thing that we need to do in order to make it easier for students to occupy housing,” Wartell said. In addition to these changes, IPFW informed The Communicator in April that student housing will be home to a police substation, which will be located in Cole Commons and will serve as a secondary station.

may 2010

“We just have to get the connections from the city,” Campus Police Chief Jeff Davis said. The new station will be wired to allow information to flow quicker, and needs to pass a regulatory inspection by the Indiana State Police Department prior to opening. “Our employees are dedicated to this department and this university,” Davis said. “We want to make this campus as safe as possible.” Lastly, the Student Services and Library Complex construction, which began May 2009, is expected to be completed by fall. The complex will include classrooms, student commons, learning areas and an international student center, an indoor running track, multi-use courts and coaching offices, among other additions. The complex is being completed in hopes of changing the center of campus from Kettler Hall more toward the actual center, Wartell told The Communicator last year. According to a pamphlet on the project, it will be approximately 173,000 square feet, with “two stories above grade and a partial lower level below grade.” The complex is “fundamentally for the people we serve,” Wartell said.


The Communicator | May 11, 2011

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The Communicator | May 11, 2011

opinion

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The Communicator | May 11 2011

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

From the Editor’s Desk:

Signing Off

The semester is now over and change is happening everywhere. Some students are moving on, off to graduate, and others are taking the summer off, feeling glad that another school year doesn’t start for three months. For me, I am leaving The Communicator as Editor-in-Chief because it’s time to graduate. Working for The Communicator has been my life for the past three and a half odd years. I started as a Staff Writer during my sophomore year. If I would have known then that I would have stayed with the newspaper for all of these years, I wouldn’t have believed it. During my time in Walb 215, I learned as much as I possibly could about journalism and what it takes to run a paper on campus. The times I spent there were full of learning experiences, both good and bad, but at the end of the day, the experience I gained has been so valuable to my future career. Because of the trust I have in The Communicator and its leaders, it is my pleasure to pass down the title of Editor-in-Chief to Kristan Mensch. She has worked for the paper for two years, first as a Contributing Writer, next as Politics and Money Editor and more recently, as Copy Editor. I will be excited to see the newspaper she creates next semester. In closing, if there are changes you want made on campus or with The Communicator, I urge you to join it. Write, take photos do whatever you can to make what you want to say known to other students and, moreover, the world. Let this paper act as your sounding board and I promise you’ll see great results.

opinion

5

A Letter from the New Editor-in-Chief The Communicator is an awardwinning publication that functions because of the talented, lively group of students who want to report on current events. As the new Editor-in-Chief, one of my main goals is to, along with our staff, bring the most interesting, enjoyable, accurate and quality newspaper as possible to the IPFW community each week. After all, without interested readers, we would not exist. That said, you play an intricate part in our goal. If at any time throughout the year there is something you’d be interested in reading about, we want to know. Walb 215, The Communicator’s office, has a coffee pot that’s always at least half full, plenty of extra mugs and people who love a good conversation. The office isn’t on constant lock-down from the world - we encourage you to stop in and let us know what you think, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. I look forward to the coming year of issues, and am confident that we’ll be able to accomplish whatever tasks we undertake, as a team and individually. I am also especially excited to watch our staff continue to succeed, learn and grow into better journalists - the progression each contributor and editor makes over the course of a year never ceases to amaze me. Kristan Mensch Editor-in-Chief


Arts&Entertainment

Music Movies

Theater

The Communicator | May 11, 2011

Interview with a Music Student:

s u p m a c n o e v i l

r u o y f o t u o t s o m e h get t college experience

apply online today @

IPFWstudenthousing.com

Hope Arthur Disscusses Music International Aspirations This summer Hope Arthur, a double major in Music and German, will be traveling abroad to expand her education by touring across Eastern Europe and attending an intense music seminar in Germany. The Communicator (TC): Please tell us a little bit about the events you’ll be attending. Hope Arthur (HA): The first event is a tour of Eastern Europe. It started as a vacation idea with my friends, but also turned into an educational experience. The highlight of this tour is going to be a four day long music festival focusing on the Balkan trumpet traditions in Serbia. There are going to be folk dances, music performances and competitions. The second event I hope to attend is a two-week intensive music festival in Saarburg, Germany. It’s basically a music boot camp with a focus on chamber music. Students who are accepted to the program receive the music ahead of time and are expected to come to the festival with the music learned and ready to rehearse. TC: What kinds of activities will take place at the festival? HA: There will be an international faculty teaching all sorts of instruments such as violin, voice, piano, clarinet and many others. They also will be performing regularly. Everyone

is assigned to an ensemble, and certain students will have opportunities to perform. There is a strict schedule of rehearsals, lessons and master classes that we have to attend, but I’m pretty sure we have Saturday and Sunday off to tour the town or other surrounding areas. TC: How do you feel these experiences are going to benefit you as a musician? HA: I think both … will help me as a musician because of the exposure they will give me. The Balkan trumpet festival will for sure expose me to all sorts of new melodies, rhythms and musical ideas that are not common in American music. I’ve always been very interested in Eastern Europe and I hope to incorporate the new ideas into my own music that I write. The Saarburg music festival will help me as a musician because of the expectations they have for us before we even get there. We have to learn the music and have it ready to rehearse, which means the faculty will hear it, which means from day one they will be ready to give us criticisms that will help us improve. The experience will challenge my skills on an individual level, but it will also challenge me to listen more and to play with a group.

TC: This is quite an achievement. Would you give anyone any advice about getting out there and achieving their dreams? HA: Do it! If you’re passionate about a certain dream, don’t be afraid. Figure out a way to make it come true!

Hope Arthur

Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne

Environment for discovery. Services for delivery. Regular semester hours: Monday–Thursday ... 8 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday ... 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Friday ... 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Sunday ... noon–11 p.m.

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260.481.4180 | 4110 CRESCENT AVE facebook.com/IPFWStudentHousing

The Great Munny Showcase: Toys With a Twist painted, added clothes, hair and intricate detail to their creations. The result was a vast array of creatures, including Big Foot, all four of The Beatles, Paul Bunyan and Babe and those that were painted and decorated in no particular theme. “The appeal is that they’re blank, they’re scratchy and you can do whatever you want with them. It’s almost the same as a plain white canvas,” said Paul Robinson, who featured Munnys with a Halloweenlike theme - one complete with a torn off skull and candy corn brains. “I just wanted to make something I thought would be fun. Everyone sees [the project] differently and that’s what makes it so interesting.” The Fort Wayne Museum of Art won’t hold the toys for long. Instead, they’ll be broken up and rotated among the museum and three other locations in Fort Wayne: Rise skate shop, Intergalactic Toys and Conspiracy Boutique.

05-11-836

What is a Munny Doll? That was a question that floated around Fort Wayne before the Great Munny Showcase held at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. The dolls are the product of KidRobot, sold blank, often white, anywhere from 4-18 inches high and made of vinyl. At first look, they have a seemingly adorable demeanor - a bulbous head, pudgy belly, stumpy legs and arms with C-shaped hands that can hold an accessory. They are totally customizable and associated with alternative art and artistic styles typical of those found in tattoo parlors and skate shops. The exhibit displayed about 25 dolls, each customized by different artists from the Fort Wayne area. Artists were given the opportunity to take the seven-inch versions of the dolls and let their imaginations run wild. Some dismantled their toys,

Lindsay Sprunger

6-7

IPFW is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access University

Dick Mooran via Flickr.

Walter E. Helmke Library • 260-481-6512 • lib.ipfw.edu


Arts&Entertainment

Music Movies

Theater

The Communicator | May 11, 2011

Interview with a Music Student:

s u p m a c n o e v i l

r u o y f o t u o t s o m e h get t college experience

apply online today @

IPFWstudenthousing.com

Hope Arthur Disscusses Music International Aspirations This summer Hope Arthur, a double major in Music and German, will be traveling abroad to expand her education by touring across Eastern Europe and attending an intense music seminar in Germany. The Communicator (TC): Please tell us a little bit about the events you’ll be attending. Hope Arthur (HA): The first event is a tour of Eastern Europe. It started as a vacation idea with my friends, but also turned into an educational experience. The highlight of this tour is going to be a four day long music festival focusing on the Balkan trumpet traditions in Serbia. There are going to be folk dances, music performances and competitions. The second event I hope to attend is a two-week intensive music festival in Saarburg, Germany. It’s basically a music boot camp with a focus on chamber music. Students who are accepted to the program receive the music ahead of time and are expected to come to the festival with the music learned and ready to rehearse. TC: What kinds of activities will take place at the festival? HA: There will be an international faculty teaching all sorts of instruments such as violin, voice, piano, clarinet and many others. They also will be performing regularly. Everyone

is assigned to an ensemble, and certain students will have opportunities to perform. There is a strict schedule of rehearsals, lessons and master classes that we have to attend, but I’m pretty sure we have Saturday and Sunday off to tour the town or other surrounding areas. TC: How do you feel these experiences are going to benefit you as a musician? HA: I think both … will help me as a musician because of the exposure they will give me. The Balkan trumpet festival will for sure expose me to all sorts of new melodies, rhythms and musical ideas that are not common in American music. I’ve always been very interested in Eastern Europe and I hope to incorporate the new ideas into my own music that I write. The Saarburg music festival will help me as a musician because of the expectations they have for us before we even get there. We have to learn the music and have it ready to rehearse, which means the faculty will hear it, which means from day one they will be ready to give us criticisms that will help us improve. The experience will challenge my skills on an individual level, but it will also challenge me to listen more and to play with a group.

TC: This is quite an achievement. Would you give anyone any advice about getting out there and achieving their dreams? HA: Do it! If you’re passionate about a certain dream, don’t be afraid. Figure out a way to make it come true!

Hope Arthur

Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne

Environment for discovery. Services for delivery. Regular semester hours: Monday–Thursday ... 8 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday ... 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Friday ... 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Sunday ... noon–11 p.m.

IPFWSTUDENTHOUSING.COM

private bedrooms. fully furnished apartments. individual leases. basketball court.

rian a r b i l ma o r f r my help o f t e G rces u o s re tour Findject y r a pro l libr a u t a vir tudy s e k p a T grou a e v r ess c Resem c a nt- library e roo d u e sts in the h t e Us mputer top p a l co ut a o k c Chemputer co

260.481.4180 | 4110 CRESCENT AVE facebook.com/IPFWStudentHousing

The Great Munny Showcase: Toys With a Twist painted, added clothes, hair and intricate detail to their creations. The result was a vast array of creatures, including Big Foot, all four of The Beatles, Paul Bunyan and Babe and those that were painted and decorated in no particular theme. “The appeal is that they’re blank, they’re scratchy and you can do whatever you want with them. It’s almost the same as a plain white canvas,” said Paul Robinson, who featured Munnys with a Halloweenlike theme - one complete with a torn off skull and candy corn brains. “I just wanted to make something I thought would be fun. Everyone sees [the project] differently and that’s what makes it so interesting.” The Fort Wayne Museum of Art won’t hold the toys for long. Instead, they’ll be broken up and rotated among the museum and three other locations in Fort Wayne: Rise skate shop, Intergalactic Toys and Conspiracy Boutique.

05-11-836

What is a Munny Doll? That was a question that floated around Fort Wayne before the Great Munny Showcase held at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. The dolls are the product of KidRobot, sold blank, often white, anywhere from 4-18 inches high and made of vinyl. At first look, they have a seemingly adorable demeanor - a bulbous head, pudgy belly, stumpy legs and arms with C-shaped hands that can hold an accessory. They are totally customizable and associated with alternative art and artistic styles typical of those found in tattoo parlors and skate shops. The exhibit displayed about 25 dolls, each customized by different artists from the Fort Wayne area. Artists were given the opportunity to take the seven-inch versions of the dolls and let their imaginations run wild. Some dismantled their toys,

Lindsay Sprunger

6-7

IPFW is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access University

Dick Mooran via Flickr.

Walter E. Helmke Library • 260-481-6512 • lib.ipfw.edu


The Communicator | May 11, 2011

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

opinion

8

Student Composition Recital Students Flex Creative Muscles with Original Compositions The IPFW music program has a fantastic reputation for putting on performances of great classics and tackling tricky compositions from all over the world. The Rhinehart recital hall was packed with guests waiting to hear another series of impressive performances. However, this time it wasn’t a long dead composer or contemporary sensation they were anticipating, rather it was the work of IPFW’s very own music students. The IPFW student composition recital was a great success. After working all year long, music students are given the opportunity to showcase their talent by composing several pieces to be performed live onstage b themselves or other students. This year’s performances were compositions from Alicia Pyle, Logan Weber, Steven Spears, Joel Helton, Hope Arthur and Dalen Wuest, and pieces featured a wide array of instruments including baritone saxophone, electric violin, stand up base, piano, stand up bongos, classical guitar and more. “I really enjoyed the time spent mixing the colors in my vocabulary and experimenting with different ideas and concepts from the styles I love to play,” said Alicia Pyle, who performed two pieces, one of which was commissioned by a local church. “I’ve been arranging pieces for a couple of years now, but I just started composing my own music in the last six months or so.” Her pieces were performed by six musicians and swept across the auditorium with the tone of an Oscar-winning movie soundtrack. Other performances were smaller, like the one given by IPFW senior Joel Helton, who played his technically complex solo on guitar. Hope Arthur even added vocals to her songs, one of which was inspired by themes discussed in her German class. At IPFW, students are encouraged not only to master their performance skills, but also to develop their understanding and creativity with regard to how music is crafted. The recital was an ideal opportunity for students to flex their muscles and show the community that talent is ripe on campus. Lindsay Spunger

CASA When you really need to customize your learning.

ipfw.edu/casa


9

The Communicator | May 11, 2011

student issues

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

Tapestry Ready for Walkers

Kristan Mensch

Tapestry Walk the Talk, a socially-oriented walking group, is ready for women to register this year. The program, which runs from July 5-Sept. 22, holds educational meetings on how to eat right, stretch, manage time, deal with stress and shoes, among others. Meeting are available Tuesdays at 8 a.m. and Thursdays at 6 p.m. Cost is $20 a person, $10 for IPFW employees.

Tapestry awarded a record six scholarships, totaling $38,500, to health sciences students at IPFW at the tenth annual Tapestry - A Day for You, April 29 according to ipfw.edu/tapestry. “Since the scholarships began in 2002, $371,681 has been raised, with scholarships going to 24 IPFW students,” the site said. The program is limited to 250 women.

In March, Tapestry sent out a newsletter with these tips on packing: -Don’t pack more shoes than days you will be away. -Don’t pack your entire beauty routine. -Don’t pack what the hotel provides. -Don’t pack your fine jewelry. -Don’t pack to be prepared for every occasion.


10

www.ipfwcommunicator.org

The Communicator May 11, 2011

sports Summit League

Champs All Photos Courtesy of gomastodons.com

For the second consecutive year, the IPFW Women’s Tennis team has one the Summit League Tournament and earned a spot in the NCAA tournament. In the final week of April at the Pine Ridge Racquet and Fitness Club in Fort Wayne, IPFW defeated the Kangaroos from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. “I am so proud of the way our team has competed all season,” Head Coach Eric Burns said. “We had a tougher schedule than last year and we were able to battle through it Logan Pea

and achieve our best record in school history and two championships.” In the singles portion, Caterina Kiefer, the sophomore from Germany, got the ball rolling for the Mastodons with a 6-3 and 6-0 win. After Kiefer’s dominating win, IPFW began to smell the Summit League Championship and took care of business. With the win, IPFW advanced to the NCAA tournament for the second year in a row. Last season, the Women’s Tennis squad joined the Women’s Volleyball team at NCAA tournaments in the same year. Both teams were out in the first round.

Third Time is Charm Amy Recht for Summit League

IPFW Women’s Tennis standout Amy Recht has been named the Summit League Athlete of the Month for the third time in her collegiate career. The committee made the announcement that Recht would hold these honors for the month of April on May 6. Throughout the month, Recht tied the Women’s Tennis record with her eleventh Player of the Week award, captured the Player of the Year honors for the fourth consecutive year, which has never been done, and led her team to the NCAA tournament for the second year in a row. Recht finished 9-0 overall in the month of April and has definitely made her place in IPFW tennis history. Recht is a general studies major at IPFW and is a graduate of Homestead High School where she earned All-State honors. Logan Pea


www.ipfwcommunicator.org

The Communicator | May 11, 2011

Letter to the Editor

11

To the Editor: I read with interest Kelly McLendon’s recent editorial (“Why College Feels Like a Scam,” April 19, 2011) and Prof. David Schuster’s letter to the editor in response. I agree with Dr. Schuster that it is not IPFW’s fault, nor is it the fault of the teachers, guidance counselors and parents who assured Ms. McLendon that a college degree would lead to a good job, that Ms. McLendon has not yet found a good job for after graduation. However, I strongly disagree with Dr. Schuster that it is somehow your fault, Ms. McLendon, that you have not found a good job in Fort Wayne. There was a time when people with a college degree could feel quite confident that they would find a professional job upon graduation, but changes in the economy and labor market over the past few decades have made that less and less of a guarantee. Globalization of labor markets is the result of large corporations explicitly making shareholder profits their supreme goal. Globalization means that good U.S. manufacturing jobs started being exported decades ago, but once U.S. manufacturing had been more or less destroyed, the imperative to always increase profits meant that white-collar and information jobs had to be exported as well. I used to work as a copyeditor but got out of the business because more and more publishers were sending this kind of work, which required a master’s degree in the job where I got my training, to India. Blaming individual students and job-hunters for systemic problems of long duration (now made more acute by the economic recession) avoids putting the blame where it lies: on the capitalist value of increasing profits above all else. Jobs have left Fort Wayne because jobs have left the United States, and I don’t believe that you are wrong to believe that, as a college graduate, you should be able to find a job with a living wage without having to leave your family, friends and community to relocate to a better labor market. Unfortunately, as dismal as employment prospects are for college graduates, the situation is much, much worse for those with less education. Whereas the unemployment rate for college graduates in December 2010 was about 5 percent, the figure was approximately 10 percent for high school graduates and 15 percent for those without a high school diploma [according to Paul Davidson’s article, “Unemployment rate for college grads is highest since 1970” for usatoday.com]. Please, though, Ms. McLendon, don’t blame IPFW. Don’t blame yourself. Don’t blame the well-meaning of teachers, Donating plasma at BioLife Plasma Services guidance can save a life and pay you back. counselors and parents who gave For a limited time, bring the Bonus you advice based Coupon to your second donation for on what used to an extra $10. be true. Blame the globalization of the labor market, and add your voice to those calling for business leaders to consider SChEdULE YOUR dONATION TOdAY AT 260.489.8215 values other than maximizing 7921 coldwater rd • fort wayne, in 46825 profits when www.BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM making decisions.

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Rachel Hile Department of English & Linguistics

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EDITORIAL POLICY Editorials are the opinion of The Communicator. The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of IPFW, its employees or its student body. A column is solely the opinion of its author. The Communicator welcomes responses. Letters to the Editor must be signed, dated and accompanied by a current address, telephone number and class standing/major or title (if applicable). Letters not meeting these requirements will not be considered for publication. All submissions made via e-mail will be verified by telephone or in person. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published. Submissions must be typed and no more than 700 words. The editorial board of The Communicator reserves the right to edit all submissions for length, grammar, style, and clarity. Letters deemed potentially libelous by the editorial board will not be published under any circumstances.

We Regret the Error Due to a reporting error, the story about Lloy Ball on May 4 said he was from Woodland, IN. Ball is actually from Woodburn, IN.

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PROOF 2

D O C u M E N t PAt H

Initials Date

Cyan Magenta Yellow Black

Colours CMYK

Client Signature

4-28-2011 9:48 AM

Last Modified

CONtENt

Filename

Account Executive: Kate Davies

PErSONNEL

Job # 3RFCU

SEtuP

12

NOtES

Code #2

• Beautifully furnished at NO ADDITIONAL COST • Spacious rooms with WALK­IN CLOSETS • Full size washer & dryer IN EVERY UNIT • Party porch & BBQ GRILLS • CampusLink Shuttle to Campus • PRIVATE bathrooms attached to each bedroom • 24 Hour Fitness Center & TANNING BEDS • COFFEE Bistro, Harvard Style Library & Game Room • Resort­Style Pool, sand volleyball & basketball courts

The Grove @ Ft. Wayne 6231 St. Joe Rd. Fort Wayne, IN Phone# 260.486.5202 Fax# 260.485.9761 Infoftwayne@gogrove.com

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The Communicator

Volume 41 Issue 30  

Volume 41 Issue 30

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