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IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

OCTOBER 30, 2013

CENTRAL IOWA

BOONE . STORY . MARSHALL . DALLAS . POLK . JASPER . MADISON . WARREN . MARION

Ready Mobile - newest membership benefit SUBMITTED BY POLK Have you heard about the newest member benefit? Iowa Farm Bureau members can save 10 percent on no-contract wireless phone service and equipment from Ready Mobile. Plans and phones can be changed at any time with no penalties. The member discount is effective immediately and is applied each month for continued savings. There are individual and family plans for Farm Bureau members starting at $13.50 per month. The

wireless service is provided on a national, multi-carrier network platform and members can keep their existing cell phone number and can add family sharing of up to five phones to select plans. You simply provide the promotion code and your Iowa Farm Bureau membership number to qualify. For more information or to place an order, call toll-free (855)327-2661 or visit www.readymobile.com, or stop by your county office to pick up a brochure.

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

White Bean Chowder Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. onion, chopped 2 tsp. minced garlic 2 (15-oz.) cans white cannellini or Great Northern beans, drained 1 (4-oz.) can diced green chilis 1 c. frozen corn kernels 1/2 c. carrot, grated 1/4 c. celery, diced 1 c. low-sodium chicken broth 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. salt (optional) 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 c. shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 4 Tbsp. fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large saucepan, stir together oil, onion and garlic over medium heat until onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1 can of beans, and mash into onion mixture with a potato masher or a slotted spoon (mixture will be chunky). Stir in second can of beans, green chilis, corn, carrot, celery, chicken broth, cumin, chili powder and salt. Bring mixture to a simmer. Blend cornstarch into milk, and stir into chowder. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes, or until corn and celery are tender and mixture thickens. Stir in cheese until melted. Serve in individual bowls, and top with fresh cilantro, if desired.

Mock Cherry Pie Mary Cox, Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 1 c. cranberries, cut up 1/2 c. raisins 1 c. sugar 1 c. water 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. almond extract 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 unbaked pastry crusts

Combine all pie-filling ingredients, and let rest for two hours before placing in bottom pie crust. Place top pastry crust, and slit several openings. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to one hour. Serve with ice cream.

Iowa Organic Conference slated SUBMITTED BY BOONE BY KATHLEEN DELATE, WILLY KLEIN he 13th annual Iowa Organic Conference, scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 17, and Monday, Nov. 18, will once again bring national experts, the latest in organic agriculture production research and the voices of local experience together for an educational event. The conference will be held in Iowa City at the Iowa Memorial Union with a reception and movie showing on Sunday evening and the full conference beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, Nov. 18. Conference organizers are Iowa State University Extension and Outreach organic agriculture, the Office of Sustainability at University of Iowa and New Pioneer Food Cooperative in Iowa City. “This is the second year this partnership has organized the conference,” said Kathleen Delate, extension organic agriculture specialist with Iowa State University. “There is a great concentration of producer

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Combine first seven ingredients in large bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pat into two loaves, and put in an 8x8-inch pan or broiler pan. Prepare topping. Make several holes in top of loaves, and spread topping. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours.

of local food systems; area organic farmers offering tips for best practices during transition to organic farming; and Iowa State researchers – Delate and Cynthia Cambardella – sharing findings from a 16-year comparison of organic and conventional rotations and recent research quantifying carbon sequestration benefits. A Sunday evening pre-conference reception at 6 p.m. and showing of the moving “GMO-OMG” at 7 p.m. will be held in the Memorial Union Ballroom on Nov. 17. Conference registration begins at 7:30 a.m. on Nov. 18 with a welcome at 8 a.m. and concluding at 5 p.m. An all-organic lunch featuring regional foods will be served on Monday. Registration options are available on the conference website at https://www.signmeup.com/95221. Additional details about the conference are available at http://extension.agron.iastate.edu/organicag/ organicconference2013.html or by contacting Delate at 515-294-7069 or kdelate@iastate.edu.

November is National Sweet Potato Month

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SUBMITTED BY JASPER he sweet potato plant does not tolerate frost. It grows best at an average temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit, abundant sunshine and warm nights. Annual rainfalls of 30-39 inches are considered most suitable, with a minimum of 20 inches in the growing season. The crop is sensitive to drought at the tuber initiation stage 50-60 days after planting, and it is not tolerant to water-logging, as it may cause tuber rots and reduce growth of storage roots if aeration is poor. Depending on the cultivar and

My Favorite Meatloaf Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 2 lbs. ground beef 1/2 c. milk 2 eggs 3/4 c. applesauce 1 c. fine bread crumbs 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Topping 1/4 c. catsup 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. mustard

and consumer interest in organic production in eastern Iowa, with Iowa City being the central location for the some of the largest organic producer and consumer communities in Iowa.” Organic producers, consumers, conventional farmers and others interested in science-based research in organic agriculture and practical applications for farming systems will find a wide variety of topics and speakers at the 2013 conference. Keynote speaker is Bob Quinn, a Montana organic farmer with 4,000 certified acres producing organic grains, alfalfa hay, vegetables and fruits. He will speak about on-farm biodiversity and the benefits of multiple crops in terms of spreading risk and providing ecological services. Other conference speakers include Miles McEvoy, USDA National Organic Program, speaking about efforts to increase the understanding of organic; Bill Stowe, Des Moines Waterworks, on curtailing nitrate pollution in Iowa’s waters; experts on many aspects

conditions, tuberous roots mature in two to nine months. With care, early-maturing cultivars can be grown as an annual summer crop in temperate areas, such as the northern US. Sweet potatoes rarely flower when the daylight is longer than 11 hours, as is normal outside of the tropics. They are mostly propagated by stem or root cuttings or by adventitious roots called “slips” that grow out from the tuberous roots during storage. True seeds are used for breeding only. They grow well in many farm-

ing conditions and have few natural enemies; pesticides are rarely needed. Sweet potatoes are grown on a variety of soils, but well drained, light and medium textured soils with a pH range if 4.5-7.0 are more favorable for the plant. They can be grown in poor soils with little fertilizer. However, sweet potatoes are very sensitive to aluminum toxicity and will die about six weeks after planting if lime is not applied at planting in this type of soil. Because they are sown by vine cuttings rather than seeds, sweet potatoes are relatively easy to plant. Because the rapidly growing vines shade out weeds, little weeding is needed. In temperate regions, sweet potatoes are most often grown on larger farms and are harvested before frosts.

Save a stamp, renew dues online or by phone

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SUBMITTED BY MARION id you know you can renew your membership online or by phone with a credit or debit card? It’s easy and fast! To pay online go to www.iowafarmbureau. com and click on the Join/Renew green button on the left side of the screen. Then click on the “Renew

your Farm Bureau Membership” button on the right side. Enter your membership number and last name. A screen will come up that either has Membership Dues and shows your expire date, dues amount and the additional voluntary contributions or if you do not have a Web site registration it will give you the option of creating one or signing in as a guest.

The next screen will ask for your debit/credit card information and you’ll get a receipt when complete. If you prefer to speak to someone when paying by credit or debit card, simply call 1-866-598-3693. These are both great ways to save time and postage while paying your membership dues. We thank everyone for their continued support.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

OCTOBER 30, 2013

NORTH IOWA

MITCHELL . HOWARD . FLOYD . CHICKASAW . BUTLER . BREMER . GRUNDY . BLACK HAWK

Food hubs seen as profitable businesses SUBMITTED BY HOWARD A nationwide survey shows that, across the country, food hubs are growing to meet the need for local food distribution infrastructure. The 2013 National Food Hub Survey was conducted by the Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems and the Wallace Center at Winrock International. Food hubs are businesses or organizations that manage the aggregation, distribution and marketing

of source-identified food products. The recent survey results from more than 100 food hubs demonstrate that hubs throughout the U.S. continue to develop as financially viable businesses providing locally produced food to restaurants, schools, grocery stores and other wholesale customers. Food hubs may also provide much needed size-appropriate infrastructure and marketing opportunities for local food produced by small and mid-sized farms and ranches.

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FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

White Bean Chowder Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. onion, chopped 2 tsp. minced garlic 2 (15-oz.) cans white cannellini or Great Northern beans, drained 1 (4-oz.) can diced green chilis 1 c. frozen corn kernels 1/2 c. carrot, grated 1/4 c. celery, diced 1 c. low-sodium chicken broth 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. chili powder

The 2013 National Food Hub Survey represents one of the most comprehensive data sets on food hub operations to date. The survey gathered information on topics such as the financial state of food hubs, the numbers and types of farmers and ranchers that they work with, and the types of customers they serve. Key findings from the survey indicate that food hubs are: 1) Financially viable. Sixty-six percent of food hubs operate independently from outside funding sources. 2) Contributing significantly to the growth of their local economies. The average food hub’s sales in 2012 exceeded $3.7 million. 3) Creating jobs. The average food hub houses 19 paid positions.

4) Supporting regional producers. The average food hub worked with 80 producers (i.e., farms and ranches), the majority of which are small or mid-sized. 5) Contributing to food access. Nearly one-half of all food hubs have operational commitments to equity, increasing food access and/ or community development. Food hubs are pivotal for meeting the growing demand for regionally produced, healthy food because they offer farmers a profitable channel for reaching wholesale markets, provide valuable aggregation and distribution services otherwise often missing, and efficiently manage relationships and transactions with buyers. The impact of food hubs has only recently been studied, and information has been lacking on

many of the characteristics across a wide range of active food hubs. Surveys such as this one provide much-needed data for those looking to fund, evaluate and further investigate the role of food hubs in regional food systems. It also provides a way for us to track the change in food hub development over the next decade. The researchers intend to conduct this survey every two years. The full report can be found at http://foodsystems.msu.edu. Several NE Iowa food producers are marketing through a food hub that has been created as a nonprofit organization. The goal of the hub is to provide an additional marketing venue for producers while also servicing lower margin markets like schools. Learn more at www.iowafoodandfitness.org.

1/2 tsp. salt (optional) 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 c. shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 4 Tbsp. fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large saucepan, stir together oil, onion and garlic over medium heat until onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1 can of beans, and mash into onion mixture with a potato masher or a slotted spoon (mixture will be chunky). Stir in second can of beans, green chilis, corn, carrot, celery, chicken broth, cumin, chili powder and salt. Bring mixture to a simmer. Blend cornstarch into milk, and stir into chowder. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes, or until corn and celery are tender and mixture thickens. Stir in cheese until melted. Serve in individual bowls, and top with fresh cilantro, if desired.

Mock Cherry Pie Mary Cox, Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 1 c. cranberries, cut up 1/2 c. raisins 1 c. sugar 1 c. water 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. almond extract 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 unbaked pastry crusts

Combine all pie-filling ingredients, and let rest for two hours before placing in bottom pie crust. Place top pastry crust, and slit several openings. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to one hour. Serve with ice cream.

My Favorite Meatloaf Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 2 lbs. ground beef 1/2 c. milk 2 eggs 3/4 c. applesauce 1 c. fine bread crumbs 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Topping 1/4 c. catsup 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. mustard

Combine first seven ingredients in large bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pat into two loaves, and put in an 8x8-inch pan or broiler pan. Prepare topping. Make several holes in top of loaves, and spread topping. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours.

The New 4-H Afterschool Club, Osage Snappy Clippers, have kicked off the new school year. PHOTO COURTESY OF MITCHELL COUNTY.

Check-out the 4-H Osage Snappy Clippers SUBMITTED BY MITCHELL The 4-H Osage Snappy Clippers kicked off the year by starting a new 4-H Afterschool club in Osage. Members of the club include Matthew Abben, Cole Adams, Isaac Brumm, Abi Cockrum, Peyton Felper, Keoni Frey, Kyra Johanns, Billy Kraft, Grace Mallory, Mackenzie Ogden, Samuel Reams, Luke Scharper and Matthew Theis. So far the club has made and shot-off handmade rockets with the help of Matthew Olson, member of the 4-H Rocky Ramblers, invited Mark Jenkins from Cedar Springs Camp as a guest speaker to talk about pho-

tography and assisted the group in taking photos around City Park, and also had Angel Westling as guest speaker to tell the group about Doodlers. The group then took a field trip to Doodlers where they got to use their imagination and create a face on a bucket using scraps and “junk”. Jane Michels, Marsha Milton and Radar Milton of Doodlers, also helped. Leaders for this group include Chasity Huber, Tracy Scharper and Ashley Sullivan. Casey Palsic has volunteered his time to help too. This group will normally meet on the first Thursday of the month after school at Osage Middle

School. If you are interested in finding out more information about this club or other area 4-H clubs contact the Mitchell County Extension office, 641-732-5574. There is a 4-H yearly program fee of $30. There may be other fees involved depending on the projects the members decide to make. 4-H is a program open to all youth in the community. If you are interested in finding out more information about the 4-H program and how to get involved, please contact the Mitchell County Extension office at 315 Main St., Osage or call 641-732-5574.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

OCTOBER 30, 2013

NORTH EAST IOWA

WINNESHIEK . ALLAMAKEE . FAYETTE . CLAYTON . BUCHANAN . DELAWARE . DUBUQUE -

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

White Bean Chowder Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. onion, chopped 2 tsp. minced garlic 2 (15-oz.) cans white cannellini or Great Northern beans, drained 1 (4-oz.) can diced green chilis 1 c. frozen corn kernels 1/2 c. carrot, grated 1/4 c. celery, diced 1 c. low-sodium chicken broth 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. salt (optional) 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 c. shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 4 Tbsp. fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large saucepan, stir together oil, onion and garlic over medium heat until onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1 can of beans, and mash into onion mixture with a potato masher or a slotted spoon (mixture will be chunky). Stir in second can of beans, green chilis, corn, carrot, celery, chicken broth, cumin, chili powder and salt. Bring mixture to a simmer. Blend cornstarch into milk, and stir into chowder. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes, or until corn and celery are tender and mixture thickens. Stir in cheese until melted. Serve in individual bowls, and top with fresh cilantro, if desired.

Mock Cherry Pie Mary Cox, Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 1 c. cranberries, cut up 1/2 c. raisins 1 c. sugar 1 c. water 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. almond extract 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 unbaked pastry crusts

Combine all pie-filling ingredients, and let rest for two hours before placing in bottom pie crust. Place top pastry crust, and slit several openings. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to one hour. Serve with ice cream.

My Favorite Meatloaf Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 2 lbs. ground beef 1/2 c. milk 2 eggs 3/4 c. applesauce 1 c. fine bread crumbs 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Topping 1/4 c. catsup 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. mustard

Combine first seven ingredients in large bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pat into two loaves, and put in an 8x8-inch pan or broiler pan. Prepare topping. Make several holes in top of loaves, and spread topping. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours.

Northeast Iowa Farm to School growing BY TERESA WIMERSLAGE SUBMITTED BY ALLAMAKEE, CLAYTON October is National Farm to School Month. Farm to School is alive and growing in northeast Iowa schools because of the support of the NE Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative (FFI). FFI adopted Farm to School (F2S) in 2009 to connect children to agriculture, tackle the challenges of procuring food locally and build school gardens. Their chapter is a unique model in Iowa in that they are spear-heading efforts in school districts across multiple counties. The work is led by staff of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Luther College Center for Sustainable Communities. FFI believes schools are the hub of small communities. The FFI collaborates with 18 school districts that range in size from 300 to 1,700 students. Their work builds relationships with school administration, staff and supporting community members to strengthen school wellness teams to provide structure and accountability and focused work to create healthy school environments. FoodCorps and AmeriCorps service members are on the “front line” of their work in schools and communities. Service members work within schools as “resource contacts,” and provide educational programs, facilitate meetings and secure resources for schools to enhance capacity for long-term changes.

Below are brief descriptions of programs and activities conducted by FFI and their school and community partners as they maximize the impact of Farm to School in classrooms, cafeterias and communities.

in many disciplines, including natural and social science, math and language arts. Gardening increases students' preferences for vegetables and fruits and provides an opportunity for physical activity.

The cross-age teaching model engages high school youth as 4-H Farm to School educators. High school students become “cross-age teachers” after attending a training offered by ISU Extension where they learned about stages of youth development and benefits of local foods. The training equipped them with the skills necessary to deliver monthly lessons about a local food to elementary school students.

In partnership with six school districts, FFI has created five-week cycle menu that meets the new nutrition requirements of the Healthy, HungerFree Kids Act. Variations of the menu focus on local and seasonal fruits and vegetables. Menus will increase local food procurement, strengthen buying power of small rural districts, create food service learning community, teach students about the value of local fresh food, and align with gold standards of the Healthier US School Challenge. In the 2012-13 school year, NE Iowa schools purchased over $20,000 of products from local farms.

Cross-Age Teaching

Teacher Workshops

Luther College hosts a three-part workshop for teachers, to expose them to ways of infusing wellness education into the curriculum, and looking at food culture in school as part of the educational environment. If teachers see the value in crossdisciplinary food education they are more apt to incorporate such education into the classroom and model healthy eating habits.

School gardens

FFI is creating a new generation of gardeners. Fifteen out of 20 NE Iowa school districts had school gardens in 2011-12 compared to only one school district with a garden in 2009. There are 23 schools with gardens among the 15 districts. The gardens are a laboratory for experimental learning

Seasonal, Cycle Menu

After-School Cooking or Gardening Clubs

By partnering with local 4-H programs, several schools have offered after-school cooking clubs to teach students menu planning, ingredient selection, and food preparation techniques. The goal is to teach kids how to prepare healthy snacks and meals for themselves and their family. Farm to school efforts rely on volunteers. Learn more about NE Iowa Farm to School at your school at www.iowafoodandfitness.org/wegrow.

Fall cover crop field days SUBMITTED BY FAYETTE, WINNESHIEK Farmers can attend a Practical Farmers of Iowa and Iowa State University Iowa Learning Farms field day this fall if they want to learn more about cover crops, want to see cover crops that were aerial seeded into a standing crop or drilled this fall, or are simply wanting to learn about more advanced cover cropping ideas.

View cover crops and hear about ways to improve your success with cover crops. Events are free to attend and a meal is included. Contact Erica Andorf with Practical Farmers of Iowa at 515-232-5661 or Liz Juchems at 515-294-5429 with Iowa Learning Farms for more information. • Friday, Nov. 1, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Buena Vista County

Extension Building Storm Lake. • Tuesday, Nov. 12, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Rick Juchems' farm near Plainfield. • Wednesday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m. to noon, Don Elsbernd's farm near Postville. • Thursday, Nov. 14, 1 to 3 p.m., Mark Peterson's farm near Stanton. • Tuesday, Nov. 19, noon to p.m., Fred Abels' farm near Holland.

Ag Outlook and Management meeting Nov. 14 SUBMITTED BY BUCHANAN Iowa State University Extension will host an Ag Outlook & Management Seminar in Waterloo from 9-11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 14, at Tama Hall at Hawkeye Community College, 1501 E. Orange Road, Waterloo. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. The seminar is designed to provide agribusiness professionals and producers with an evaluation of current and outlook market

conditions and expected trends in crop and livestock income potential. Dr. Chad Hart, ISU extension economist will discuss the market outlook for corn and soybeans. The Midwest has experienced extreme weather variability in 2013 and the size of the corn and soybean crop is still uncertain. How big is the crop and what will happen to demand in the coming months? You won' t

want to miss the information on the production and demand for corn and soybeans in the coming months. Shane Ellis, ISUEO farm management field specialist will discuss the beef and pork outlook. Shane will also discuss how the livestock industry may respond to current production costs and future demand. What will lower grain prices and the current global economy mean for the future

of the meat industry? Kristen Schulte, ISUEO farm management field specialist will highlight trends in agriculture including price cycles, land values, and leasing practices. Schulte will also discuss the CSR2 update and other current agriculture issues. Registration is $20 per person with registration in two days advance and $25 per person for late registration. Fee includes all

meeting materials and refreshments. Phone registration is required on or before Tuesday, Nov. 12 by calling (319) 234-6811. The Waterloo site is one of several locations statewide where similar seminars are offered. These sessions are open to the public. More information on other meeting dates, locations and how to register is available at: www.extension.iastate.edu/ agdm/info/meetings.html.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

OCTOBER 30, 2013

NORTH WEST IOWA

LYON . OSCEOLA . DICKINSON . EMMET . SIOUX . O’BRIEN . CLAY . PALO ALTO . PLYMOUTH . CHEROKEE BUENA VISTA . POCAHONTAS . WOODBURY . IDA . SAC . CALHOUN . MONONA . CRAWFORD . CARROLL . GREENE

Assembling a winter car survival kit SUBMITTED BY SIOUX No one likes to think of needing to prepare for emergencies. But, unfortunately we do. In the winter it’s a good idea to have a winter car kit with you. This kit should include the following (partial list): always try to maintain a 1⁄2 tank of gas, Class ABC fire extinguisher, flares, jumper cables, tow strap, non-perishable food stored in coffee can, bag of sand or even kitty litter, shovel, first aid kit and manual,

radio and batteries, bottled water, blankets or sleeping bags, matches, nylon rope, candles or sterno fuel cans, compass, pencil and a map, tissues, pre-moistened towels, plastic garbage bags, essential medication. It’s also a good idea to check the weather and Iowa road conditions before traveling. The Iowa Department of Transportation web site offers some very helpful travel reports and information: http:// www.iowaroadconditions.org.

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FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

White Bean Chowder Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. onion, chopped 2 tsp. minced garlic 2 (15-oz.) cans white cannellini or Great Northern beans, drained 1 (4-oz.) can diced green chilis 1 c. frozen corn kernels 1/2 c. carrot, grated 1/4 c. celery, diced 1 c. low-sodium chicken broth 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. salt (optional) 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 c. shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 4 Tbsp. fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large saucepan, stir together oil, onion and garlic over medium heat until onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1 can of beans, and mash into onion mixture with a potato masher or a slotted spoon (mixture will be chunky). Stir in second can of beans, green chilis, corn, carrot, celery, chicken broth, cumin, chili powder and salt. Bring mixture to a simmer. Blend cornstarch into milk, and stir into chowder. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes, or until corn and celery are tender and mixture thickens. Stir in cheese until melted. Serve in individual bowls, and top with fresh cilantro, if desired.

Mock Cherry Pie Mary Cox, Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 1 c. cranberries, cut up 1/2 c. raisins 1 c. sugar 1 c. water 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. almond extract 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 unbaked pastry crusts

Combine all pie-filling ingredients, and let rest for two hours before placing in bottom pie crust. Place top pastry crust, and slit several openings. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to one hour. Serve with ice cream.

My Favorite Meatloaf Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 2 lbs. ground beef 1/2 c. milk 2 eggs 3/4 c. applesauce 1 c. fine bread crumbs 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Topping 1/4 c. catsup 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. mustard

Combine first seven ingredients in large bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pat into two loaves, and put in an 8x8-inch pan or broiler pan. Prepare topping. Make several holes in top of loaves, and spread topping. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours.

Pro-Ag Outlook Forums set for Nov. 20 SUBMITTED BY CLAY, LYON, O’BRIEN, OSCEOLA Agricultural lenders and suppliers, producers and policymakers grow nervous when commodity prices, input costs, farmland values and lease rates become volatile says Melissa O’Rourke, Farm and Agribusiness Management Specialist for Iowa State University (ISU) Extension and Outreach. “Add in prevented and late planting last spring with drought conditions for good measure and there is plenty of excitement to manage for the 2014 farming year.” That’s why O’Rourke recommends that producers and ag professionals attend a Pro-Ag Outlook Forum on Nov. 20 in either Le Mars or Spencer. “Iowa State University agricultural economists have recently cautioned farmers to be prepared for a potential downturn in the values of commodities and land,” notes O’Rourke. “Especially in light of these volatile conditions, we’re offering opportunities for producers and ag business professionals to get updated information to help make decisions that need to be made during the post-harvest period,” says O’Rourke. “The Le Mars forum begins at 9 a.m. on Nov. 20. Then we’ll repeat the same program starting at 1:15 p.m. in Spencer,” O’Rourke explains. “This gives interested producers and professionals a choice of times and locations for the half-day program,” O’Rourke states. “We want to give everyone in northwest Iowa an opportunity to get this valuable information.”

The opening speaker is Dr. Lee Schulz, ISU Livestock Marketing Analyst. Schulz will review the livestock situation, reviewing the profit potential and survival techniques in the livestock sector. Dr. Schulz will be returning from an international trade mission and will share information focusing on volatile beef and pork prices driven by demand and world economy factors, including exports, herd size and feed costs. Dr. Schulz specializes in livestock economics, agricultural marketing and risk management and has expertise in topics including fed cattle trade, feeder cattle pricing, meat demand, and price risk management and analysis. His research on a host of livestock economic issues has resulted in multiple publications and numerous outreach contributions. O’Rourke will present a brief outlook on the trends in farmland rental rates. “I continue to get calls from both producers and owners with questions about fixed and flexible cash rent arrangements and related land value trends,” says O’Rourke. “I’ll give a brief overview of what we are seeing and what we believe the trends are for 2014.” The forum features a keynote presentation by Dr. Chad Hart from the Department of Agricultural Economics at ISU. As uncertainty abounds in the crop markets with questions about crop size and global demand, Dr. Hart will discuss the cyclical nature of the markets including the factors shaping the markets and the keys to watch as

farmers market their grain over the coming year. Prior to joining the Department of Economics at ISU, Chad Hart was the U.S. Policy and Insurance Analyst with the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) and a scientist with the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at ISU. His projections and outlooks are sought after by agriculture professionals across Iowa and the nation. The forums last two and a half hours and the cost to attend at either location is $20 per person if pre-registered. Walk-in registration is $25. The Le Mars program will be held at the ISU Extension and Outreach office of Plymouth County (upper level of the Le Mars Convention Center) located at 251 12th St. SE in Le Mars. The Spencer program will be held at the Iowa Lakes Community College—Spencer Campus at 1900 Grand Ave. (Gateway North Mall) in Spencer. Advance registration is recommended by calling the ISU Extension and Outreach office in Plymouth County (Le Mars) at 712-546-7835; or Clay County (Spencer) at 712-2622264. More information and registration form visit the Clay County Extension website at www.extension. iastate.edu/clay. Call your local county ISU Extension and Outreach office for more information or contact Melissa O’Rourke at the ISU Extension and Outreach of Sioux County office at 712-737-4230 or email morourke@ iastate.edu.

Cover crops field day in Storm Lake Nov. 1 SUBMITTED BY BUENA VISTA, CALHOUN Iowa Learning Farms, along with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, will host a cover crop field day at the ISU Extension and Outreach Buena Vista County office in Storm Lake on Friday, Nov. 1. Registration begins at 10 a.m. and the program will start at 10:30 a.m. The field day will wrap up at the cover crop trial plots located northeast of Storm Lake. The field day will focus on cover crop management for soil health and grazing. Cover crops are an excellent resource as part of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy to help protect Iowa’s water quality. They reduce soil and nutrient runoff and build soil organic matter. The plots in Buena Vista County consist of a mixture of cereal rye, tillage radishes and turnips, and were aerially seeded into standing corn and soybeans. The plots are part

of the North Raccoon River Watershed project to improve water quality within the watershed. The field day is an opportunity to learn about growing cover crops mixtures and their costs and benefits. Speakers for the field day include Iowa Learning Farms soil scientist Jill Motschenbacher and ISU Extension and Outreach field agronomist Paul Kassel. ISU Extension and Outreach beef specialist Beth Doran will talk about the benefits and cautions in grazing on cover crop acres. Anita Patrick, with Natural Resources Conservation Service, will discuss cost share opportunities for growing cover crops. After lunch, attendees may travel to the cover crop trial site to see the growth of the cover crop mix. Kris Kohl, ISU Extension and Outreach agricultural engineer, will discuss the cover crop trial plots and answer questions. The field day is free and includes a complimentary

lunch. The public is invited to attend. The field day is sponsored by Iowa Learning Farms in cooperation with ISU Extension and Outreach in Buena Vista County. The Buena Vista Extension office is located at 824 Flindt Drive, Storm Lake. The field trial plots are located east of Storm Lake, one mile north of the intersection of county roads C49 and M50. Iowa Learning Farms takes a grass roots approach, offering innovative ways to help all Iowans have an active role in keeping the state’s natural resources healthy and not take them for granted. A goal of Iowa Learning Farms is to build a Culture of Conservation, encouraging the adoption of residue management and conservation practices. Farmers, researchers and ILF team members are working together to identify and implement the best in-field management practices that increase water and soil quality while remaining profitable.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

OCTOBER 30, 2013

SOUTH WEST IOWA

HARRISON . SHELBY . AUDUBON . GUTHRIE . ADAIR . CASS . WEST POTTAWATTAMIE . EAST POTTAWATTAMIE . MILLS . MONTGOMERY ADAMS . UNION . CLARKE . LUCAS . FREMONT . PAGE . TAYLOR . RINGGOLD . DECATUR . WAYNE

Estimated one-third of U.S. farmers suffer hearing loss

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SUBMITTED BY CASS armers are assaulted every day by the squeals of hogs, the roar of tractors and the whine of grain dryers during harvest. An estimated one-third of the nation’s 3 million farmers have some level of hearing loss caused by their inner ears’ daily bombardment from sounds that can rival a rock concert’s decibel

level. Even farmers still in their 20s can end up with the muffled hearing of someone in middle age if they fail to protect their hearing. Most farmers agree “You just can’t get away from the machinery. We’re driving those tractors and they’re so extremely loud. Many farmers are on their own when recognizing their elevated risk of hearing loss, because only

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FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

White Bean Chowder Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. onion, chopped 2 tsp. minced garlic 2 (15-oz.) cans white cannellini or Great Northern beans, drained 1 (4-oz.) can diced green chilis 1 c. frozen corn kernels 1/2 c. carrot, grated 1/4 c. celery, diced 1 c. low-sodium chicken broth 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. salt (optional) 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 c. shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 4 Tbsp. fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large saucepan, stir together oil, onion and garlic over medium heat until onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1 can of beans, and mash into onion mixture with a potato masher or a slotted spoon (mixture will be chunky). Stir in second can of beans, green chilis, corn, carrot, celery, chicken broth, cumin, chili powder and salt. Bring mixture to a simmer. Blend cornstarch into milk, and stir into chowder. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes, or until corn and celery are tender and mixture thickens. Stir in cheese until melted. Serve in individual bowls, and top with fresh cilantro, if desired.

Mock Cherry Pie Mary Cox, Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 1 c. cranberries, cut up 1/2 c. raisins 1 c. sugar 1 c. water 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. almond extract 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 unbaked pastry crusts

Combine all pie-filling ingredients, and let rest for two hours before placing in bottom pie crust. Place top pastry crust, and slit several openings. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to one hour. Serve with ice cream.

My Favorite Meatloaf Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 2 lbs. ground beef 1/2 c. milk 2 eggs 3/4 c. applesauce 1 c. fine bread crumbs 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Topping 1/4 c. catsup 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. mustard

Combine first seven ingredients in large bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pat into two loaves, and put in an 8x8-inch pan or broiler pan. Prepare topping. Make several holes in top of loaves, and spread topping. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours.

the largest U.S. farms operate under federal workplace safety regulations. Although the risks have been known for decades, only more recently have nonprofits, university researchers and federal agencies focused on trying to educate farmers and their children how to avoid hearing loss by wearing sound-cutting earmuffs or ear plugs. Design changes in farm machinery have made some equipment run quieter, but many still use older, noisier models. Livestock still produce the same volume of noise, a squealing hog can be as loud as a running snowmobile. To nudge farmers to protect

themselves, Extension often highlights sobering noise-impact facts at trade shows or conventions. 4-H programs and some FFA chapters use online resources to urge the next generation to wear earmuffs or ear plugs to ward off noises such as operating an open-cab tractor— which can damage hearing in only 15 minutes without protection. Manufacturers have started making quieter machines. Deere & Co., has added sound-dampening panels to the roofs of its tractor cabs and incorporated soundabsorbing laminated glass and other features.

Hearing protection

It’s a startling fact that people

who seek help early on for their hearing loss retain more of their natural hearing ability as the years pass than those who don’t. One of the number one ways to preserve your hearing if you are showing signs of hearing loss is to use proper hearing protection for potentially damaging activities. Whether you are showing signs of hearing loss or regularly participate in activities like hunting or farming that put your hearing at risk, then it is time to consider your hearing protection options. Today there are several ear protection devices available including: ear muffs, ear plugs and digital sound compressing hearing aids.

Got an issue? It’s a good time to share it! SUBMITTED BY WEST POTTAWATTAMIE s a farmer, you are faced with many moving parts when it comes to running your business. You must be business savvy, stay ahead of technology, and know how local, state and federal government policies affect your

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farm – all while trying to run your operation, raise your family, and lead your community. You know which government policy choices affect your farm most. Your common sense ideas about government actions will benefit everyone. By helping to surface and prioritize issues, you can shape the policy direction of the Iowa

Farm Bureau. Your involvement can lead to positive changes in government, and ultimately for your farm. Make your issue “our” issue. By working together, we can make it happen! Go to the Iowa Farm Bureau website, www. iowafarmbureau.com under the Members Only section to share issues of concern to you.

Practice farm shop safety

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SUBMITTED BY PAGE/TAYLOR t never fails that machinery breaks down at the most inopportune time, especially during harvest. This requires repairs be done in the farm shop and in the field. Page and Taylor County Farm

Bureau offers the following farm shop safety tips. Information is supplied by the National Safety Council’s Agricultural Division, the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety (NECAS) - www.necasag.org or 888-8446322.

Reminders: - Organize your workshop so that everything has a designated place. Make sure items are secure so they will not fall on anyone. - Clean walkways to reduce trips and falls. - When working on agricultural equipment, make sure that the equipment is turned off, all rotating parts have stopped moving, and safety locks are put in place. - Keep all guards and shields in place on power equipment. - Use hand tools only for their intended purpose. - Equip your shop with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters to help prevent electrical shock. - Make sure your shop is well lit. If the shop is heated, ensure it is properly vented and that flammable liquids are kept out of the shop area. - Wear personal protective equipment (PPE) when performing repair jogs. Standard PPE for a farm shop should include leather gloves, chemical-resistant gloves, safety glasses, face shields, earplugs or muffs, steel-toed boots, respirators, hard hats, protective aprons and welding shields.

Service and maintenance tasks can often lead to serious injury. The farm shop and the field are the primary locations where repair operations are completed. Make sure your farm shop is part of a farm safety solution, not a problem.

Inspection: __ Are electrical cords undamaged? __ Is an appropriate fire extinguisher present and operable? __ Is a fully supplied first aid kit available? __ Are guards and shields in place? __ Are walkways clear of debris? __ Are chemicals stored in a locked cabinet?


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