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IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

CENTRAL IOWA

BOONE . STORY . MARSHALL . DALLAS . POLK . JASPER . MADISON . WARREN . MARION

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations or agribusinesses.

Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by February 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

ICA members adopt policy SUBMITTED BY MADISON, MARION More than 30 expiring policies of the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association were reviewed during the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting held during the Iowa Cattle Industry Convention in December. New policies were also proposed and following discussion, ICA members ratified the policies, including some key ones on a state cow-calf tax credit, mandatory Country of Origin Labeling, and the use of a standardized template for third-party animal welfare audits. ICA members voted to continue efforts to secure a state Livestock Production Incentive Refund. More popularly known as the cow-calf tax credit, this production incentive was first available through the Iowa Legislature in 1996. It continued through 2009 when the credit was suspended due to the economic recession. During the 2013 legislative session, House File 467 was introduced that would re-enact the cow/calf tax credit. Legislation would appropriate $4 million to the fund (two times the level from 2009) at the same credit

level of $11.15 per hd. Although this legislation was introduced in 2013, it was not adopted by the legislature. Instead, it was passed to a subcommittee but was never brought to the floor in the House. To make the re-instatement of this tax credit a reality, Iowa cattlemen will have to engage on the topic with their legislators, and the association will actively lobby for the passage of HF 467. Another policy that garnered much discussion from ICA members was the association’s position on mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (mCOOL). Since the summer of 2013, ICA has followed an interim policy that instead called for a voluntary COOL that complies with WTO (World Trade Organization) agreements. Eventually, ICA members voted to ratify the interim policy. However, there are still voices on both sides of the issue. Cow-calf producer Jim Werner, Diagonal, said, “I don’t like that it’s mandatory, but in this instance, it’s the only thing that works” to show customers where their beef has been and where it is processed.” Cattle feeder Kent Pruismann,

Rock Valley, said, “I once supported mandatory labeling, but I don’t any more. The problem is there is no equity in that label. I can’t find value in it that comes to my bottom line.” There is one piece of policy from the ICA annual meeting that will be taken to national discussion at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association meeting in February. The policy developed from discussions about Tyson Foods’ FarmCheck program that requires cattle producers to implement various production practices and verify those practices through an audit. The ICA policy does not discount any one packer’s standards; however, it does ask that the beef cattle industry adopt one standard set of guidelines, such as the current Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program that would be accepted for all third party audits. Prior to the ICA annual meeting, there was a great deal of discussion about ICA policy regarding ethanol and its co-products. ICA did not change its current position that supports renewable fuels that maximize access to co-products for Iowa’s cattle industry.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

EAST IOWA

TAMA . BENTON . LINN . JONES . JACKSON . POWESHIEK . IOWA . JOHNSON . CEDAR . CLINTON . SCOTT

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations or agribusinesses.

Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by February 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

ICA members adopt policy SUBMITTED BY LINN More than 30 expiring policies of the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association were reviewed during the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting held during the Iowa Cattle Industry Convention in December. New policies were also proposed and following discussion, ICA members ratified the policies, including some key ones on a state cow-calf tax credit, mandatory Country of Origin Labeling, and the use of a standardized template for third-party animal welfare audits. ICA members voted to continue efforts to secure a state Livestock Production Incentive Refund. More popularly known as the cow-calf tax credit, this production incentive was first available through the Iowa Legislature in 1996. It continued through 2009 when the credit was suspended due to the economic recession. During the 2013 legislative session, House File 467 was introduced that would re-enact the cow/calf tax credit. Legislation would appropriate $4 million to the fund (two times the level from 2009) at the same credit level of $11.15 per hd. Although this

legislation was introduced in 2013, it was not adopted by the legislature. Instead, it was passed to a subcommittee but was never brought to the floor in the House. To make the re-instatement of this tax credit a reality, Iowa cattlemen will have to engage on the topic with their legislators, and the association will actively lobby for the passage of HF 467. Another policy that garnered much discussion from ICA members was the association’s position on mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (mCOOL). Since the summer of 2013, ICA has followed an interim policy that instead called for a voluntary COOL that complies with WTO (World Trade Organization) agreements. Eventually, ICA members voted to ratify the interim policy. However, there are still voices on both sides of the issue. Cow-calf producer Jim Werner, Diagonal, said, “I don’t like that it’s mandatory, but in this instance, it’s the only thing that works” to show customers where their beef has been and where it is processed.” Cattle feeder Kent Pruismann,

Rock Valley, said, “I once supported mandatory labeling, but I don’t any more. The problem is there is no equity in that label. I can’t find value in it that comes to my bottom line.” There is one piece of policy from the ICA annual meeting that will be taken to national discussion at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association meeting in February. The policy developed from discussions about Tyson Foods’ FarmCheck program that requires cattle producers to implement various production practices and verify those practices through an audit. The ICA policy does not discount any one packer’s standards; however, it does ask that the beef cattle industry adopt one standard set of guidelines, such as the current Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program that would be accepted for all third party audits. Prior to the ICA annual meeting, there was a great deal of discussion about ICA policy regarding ethanol and its co-products. ICA did not change its current position that supports renewable fuels that maximize access to co-products for Iowa’s cattle industry.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

NORTH IOWA

MITCHELL . HOWARD . FLOYD . CHICKASAW . BUTLER . BREMER . GRUNDY . BLACK HAWK

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a meritbased grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and sci-

ence,” said Michelle Insco, Monsanto Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number

of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289. For more information about the Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www.GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000)

• Moulton-Udell Comm. School District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www.GrowRuralEducation.com.

December close-out meeting

Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

Region 5 OAs met at the Library in Allison on Dec. 19 for their year-end close-out meeting. Mary Thomas, senior staff accountant with Iowa Farm Bureau, discussed year-end bookkeeping and reports, filing taxes, W-2 forms and other tax reports. The group was informed of changes in rules and a checklist was provided in preparation for the annual county audit. Gifts were exchanged. Those attended are pictured from left, Jennifer Healey, Franklin; Luann Brandt, Bremer; Ruth Seehusen, Butler; Tonya Rosel, Floyd; Karen Richman, Grundy; and Karen Brandau, Mitchell. PHOTO COURTESY OF MITCHELL COUNTY.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations

or agribusinesses. Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by February 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

NORTH CENTRAL IOWA

KOSSUTH . WINNEBAGO . WORTH . HANCOCK . CERRO GORDO . HUMBOLDT . WRIGHT . FRANKLIN . WEBSTER . HAMILTON . HARDIN

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations

or agribusinesses. Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by February 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

Crop Advantage meetings focus on herbicide resistance and crop management topics SUBMITTED BY WEBSTER Registration is now open for the 2014 Crop Advantage Series meeting. Sponsored by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, the Webster County meeting will be held at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, at the Starlite Best Western, in Fort Dodge. “The Crop Advantage Series is targeted to providing the latest information to producers and helping them make profitable decisions for the upcoming growing season,” says Joel DeJong, Extension and Outreach Field Agronomist in northwest Iowa and chair of the planning committee. “Each location has a variety of topics, including crops, pests, soil fertility and farm management.” Extension and Outreach weed specialists Mike Owen and Bob Hartzler will discuss management options when dealing with herbicide resistance as the keynote topic for the 2014 series. In addition, the meeting will feature a full agenda

of workshops that attendees can choose from, developing a personalized meeting agenda. Program topics that focus on local needs and production issues are selected by the ISU Extension and Outreach Field Agronomists for each meeting. “Each year attendees tell me they wish there were more breakout sessions during the day. They are interested in so many of the topics and canʼt be at every workshop. The topics are in demand. Itʼs a great problem to have,” says Mark Johnson, ISU Extension and Outreach Field Agronomist in North Central Iowa. “The Crop Advantage Series provides a statewide message on important issues yet retains local input on topics for that specific area. Crop and pest management issues are different for each area of the state and these meetings are tailored to fit the needs of producers in that area,” says Brent Pringnitz, program coordinator with ISU

Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension. Each of the meetings is approved for Certified Crop Adviser continuing education credits and also offers the opportunity for private pesticide applicators to receive continuing education credits. “Producers have appreciated the opportunity to get their pesticide applicator recertification done at the same time as the Crop Advantage meeting. It makes an efficient learning experience,” states DeJong. Early registration for each location is $35 and includes workshop materials, lunch, and refreshments. Registration less than one week prior or at the meeting increases to $45. An additional fee is charged for CCA credits and private pesticide applicator recertification. Additional program details, registration forms and online registration is available at www.cropadvantage. org or from local ISU Extension offices.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 8, 2014

NORTH EAST IOWA

WINNESHIEK . ALLAMAKEE . FAYETTE . CLAYTON . BUCHANAN . DELAWARE . DUBUQUE

Iowa 4-H Foundation announces 2014 scholarships SUBMITTED BY ALLAMAKEE, CLAYTON, DELAWARE, DUBUQUE, WINNESHIEK he Iowa 4-H Foundation announces its scholarship program for 4H’ers attending or planning to attend college fall of 2014. Students can apply for more than 69 scholarship opportunities totaling $63,200. The various awards range in amounts from $500 to $3500. Some

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of the scholarships are open to students pursuing any field of study, while others are open to students pursuing degrees in agriculture, food and nutrition, agriculture business, animal science or journalism. Former Iowa 4-H’ers and current 4H’ers graduating from high school are eligible applicants for these scholarship awards. The majority of the scholarships will be awarded to students attending Iowa State University. Scholar-

ships are also available to students planning to attend Iowa recent universities, private colleges, or community colleges. Iowa 4-H Scholarship information and online applications are available on the Iowa 4-H Foundation web page at www.iowa4hfoundation.org/scholarships. Applications must be submitted online no later than 11:59 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, for consideration. Since 1949, the Iowa 4-H Foun-

Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) 1 (16-oz.) can pork and beans, drained 1 (8-oz.) can crushed pineapple with juice 2 c. sugar or splenda 2 c. flour 2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. cinnamon Frosting: 1 tsp. baking powder 1-1/2 c. sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 6 Tbsp. milk 1 cup oil 6 Tbsp. butter 4 eggs

1 c. butterscotch chips

Remove pork fat from pork and beans. Mash beans and pineapple with potato masher. Combine all ingredients, and mix well. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 25 minutes in a greased jelly roll pan. Prepare frosting by boiling sugar, milk and butter for one minute. Stir in butterscotch chips until melted. Spread on cooled bars while mixture in thin.

Italian Beef Carol Smith, Dubuque (Dubuque County) 7 - 10 lb. chuck or rolled roast Salt and pepper to taste Italian dressing seasoning package 1 medium onion, sliced 3 c. beef broth

Bake 1-1/2 hours at 400 degrees in covered roasting pan. Cool and slice thinly. Layer meat and sliced onions in large casserole. Pour juice from meat and beef broth over beef. Refrigerate overnight. Bake at 300 degrees Fahrenheit for four hours and serve.

Wild Rice Casserole Ann Rorem Brown, Portland, OR (Hamilton County) 1 c. wild rice, washed 1/2 c. olive oil 1 can sliced tomatoes 1 medium onion, diced 1/2 c. Velveeta Cheese 1 small can diced ripe olives 1 jar mushrooms or fresh sliced 1-1/2 c. boiling water

Saute onions and mushrooms in oil until just tender. Add other ingredients, and put in deep casserole. Add boiling water when ready to bake. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour, stirring constantly. More water may be added if the casserole seems too dry.

Fish Kuhlmann, executive director of the Iowa 4-H Foundation. Through generous donations to the Iowa 4-H Foundation scholarship program, young people can apply what they have learned in 4-H to pursue their educational and career goals. To further explore establishing a scholarship with the Iowa 4-H Foundation, please contact Albert Grunenwald, COO Iowa 4-H Foundation, abgrunen@iastate. edu or call 515-294-4780.

Farmland value reach historic average

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Pork and Bean Bars

dation has provided financial resources to develop and deliver quality 4-H programs and recognition opportunities for Iowa’s 4-H youth. “I appreciate and applaud the donors who prioritize their contributions to 4-H by providing these scholarships. Selected 4-H’ers are grateful for the scholarship opportunity and acknowledgement they receive for their dedication to the 4H learning experience,” says Kris

SUBMITTED BY ALLAMAKEE AND CLAYTON verage Iowa farmland value is estimated to be $8,716 per acre, an increase of 5.1 percent from 2012, according to results of the Iowa Land Value Survey conducted in November. Values increased in 2013 for the fourth year in a row and achieved historic peaks. The increase is similar to results of other recent Iowa farmland value surveys, including the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the Iowa Chapter of the Realtors Land Institute surveys. Scott County, with an estimated $12,413 average value for all farmland, saw the highest average county values in the Iowa State survey. Scott County also had the highest percentage increase and highest increase in value, 12.45 percent and $1,374 respectively, of the 99 Iowa counties. The Northwest Crop Reporting District reported the highest land values at $10,960, which was a decrease of $445 (3.9 percent) from 2012. O’Brien County showed the highest dollar decrease in 2013

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of $478. Osceola, Dickinson and Lyon counties along with O’Brien County all shared the greatest percentage decrease in 2013, with 3.72 percent. “The 2013 land value survey shows a market in flux, with strong and weak price sales occurring at the same time,” said Michael Duffy, Iowa State economics professor and extension farm management economist who conducts the survey. “The key question is if this shows the market is going to settle, if it is just pausing before another takeoff in values, or if the market has peaked and due for a correction.”

Northeast Iowa Results

For the Northeast Crop Reporting District, the average land value was estimated at $9,161 per acre, an increase of $638 (7.5 percent) from 2012. Land values for high grade land averaged $11,423 per acre, while medium grade land averaged $8,573 per acre; low grade land averaged $5,670 per acre. Within the crop reporting district, values ranged from $11,239 in Black Hawk County to $5,910 in Allamakee County.

For the district, 20 percent of respondents reported more land sales in 2013 compared to 2012; West Central and Northeast Iowa had the highest percentages reporting more land sales in the state. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported the same number of sales and 43 percent reported less land sales in 2013. Maps showing 2013 values, percentage change and comparisons to 2012 data are available at www. extension.iastate.edu/topic/landvalue. The Iowa Land Value Survey was initiated in 1941 and is sponsored by the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station, Iowa State University. The survey is based on reports by licensed real estate brokers and selected individuals considered knowledgeable of land market conditions. The 2013 survey is based on 476 usable responses providing 674 county land value estimates. Questions can be directed to Mike Duffy, mduffy@iastate.edu or 515-294-6160, or Kristen Schulte, kschulte@iastate.edu or 563547-3001.

Applications for Conservation Stewardship Program due

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SUBMITTED BY CLAYTON SDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is, will receive first consideration for funding selections. CSP is offered through a continuous sign-up, but NRCS periodically makes funding selections. Last year, Iowa NRCS obligated more than $3.8 million through 381 contracts covering 175,346 acres. The program emphasizes conservation performance — producers earn higher payments for higher performance. Through CSP,

producers install conservation enhancements to make positive changes in soil health, soil erosion, water quality, water quantity, air quality, plant resources, animal resources and energy. CSP also supports the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy through various enhancement options. The Iowa strategy includes practices designed to reduce nutrient loads from nonpoint sources such as farm fields. Some popular nutrient reduction enhancements used by Iowa farmers include: • Cover crops to scavenge residual nitrogen. • Precision application technol-

ogy to apply nutrients. • Split nitrogen application (50 percent after crop emergence or pasture green-up). • Plant tissue tests and analysis to improve nitrogen management. A CSP self-screening checklist is available to help producers determine if the program is suitable for their operation. The checklist highlights basic information about CSP eligibility requirements, stewardship threshold requirements and payment types. Learn more about CSP by visiting the Iowa NRCS website or your local NRCS field office.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

NORTH WEST IOWA

LYON . OSCEOLA . DICKINSON . EMMET . SIOUX . O’BRIEN . CLAY . PALO ALTO . PLYMOUTH . CHEROKEE BUENA VISTA . POCAHONTAS . WOODBURY . IDA . SAC . CALHOUN . MONONA . CRAWFORD . CARROLL . GREENE

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations

or agribusinesses. Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by Saturday, Feb. 1, in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

Meeting looks at stover harvest for needs of biomass feedstock industry SUBMITTED BY CLAY, PALO ALTO, POCAHONTAS Opportunities to harvest corn stover exist in two regions of Iowa – near Nevada in central Iowa and near Emmetsburg in northern Iowa. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach will host a meeting in January to address emerging opportunities related to stover harvesting for the biomass feedstock needs of local industries. The northern Iowa meetings will be held Jan. 21 at Water’s Edge Events Center in Algona. The northern Iowa meetings are in collaboration with POET-DSM. The meeting will start at 9:45 a.m. Stover harvesting can impact economic, agronomic and water quality production factors. The meetings will address many of the positives and negatives of stover harvesting and discuss how stover harvesting can be managed within corn production. Crop producers,

land owners, crop consultants, agronomists, service providers and others with an interest in stover harvest and its removal from farm fields are encouraged to attend. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach meeting speakers include: Mark Licht and Paul Kassel, field agronomists; Kelvin Leibold, Melissa O’Rourke and Kristen Schulte, farm management specialists; and Kapil Arora, agricultural engineering specialist. Industry speakers on the agenda include: David Ertl, technology commercialization manager, Iowa Corn Growers Association; Dennis Penland, DuPont business development manager; Andy Heggenstaller, agronomy research manager, DuPont-Pioneer; B.J. Schany, commodities manager, POET-DSM; and Steve Petersen, end use product manager, Monsanto Corn Crop Management. Barb Stewart, state agronomist,

will present the USDA-NRCS perspective on soil health and stover removal at these meetings. A noon lunch will be sponsored by industry partners during the meeting at no cost to the participants; however, preregistration is required. Industry representatives will be available to meet with participants during lunch and at the close of the meeting. The meetings are funded in part by a grant from Iowa Energy Center.

Meeting registrations

• Jan. 21 – Kossuth County. Register with the Kossuth County Extension Office by calling 515295-2469, or online at http://www. extension.iastate.edu/kossuth/ There is no fee to attend the meetings. Registration is required for correct meal and handout counts. Walk-in registration the day of the meeting will only be accepted if space is available.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

SOUTH EAST IOWA

MAHASKA . KEOKUK . WASHINGTON . LOUISA . MUSCATINE . MONROE . WAPELLO . JEFFERSON . HENRY . DES MOINES . APPANOOSE . DAVIS . VAN BUREN . LEE

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the Americaʼs Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State

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he Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Saturday, Feb. 8, at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations or agribusinesses.

Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@ iastate.edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by Feb. 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

Crop Advantage Conference set for Jan. 29

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SUBMITTED BY KEOKUK ike Owen, ISU Extension Weed Specialist, and Elwynn Taylor, ISU Extension climatologist, will be featured at this yearʼs Crop Advantage conference at the Clarion Highlander in Iowa City on Jan. 29. Owen will discuss “Managing Herbicide Resistant Weeds,” and Taylor will look ahead to the weather outlook for 2014. Also featured at the conference are topics on making fertilizer decisions, and corn rootworm manage-

ment strategies. The conference is one of 13 scheduled around the state, where crop producers can choose among a variety of topics, including pest management, cover crops, bio-energy crops, soil fertility and grain marketing. “Each year attendees tell me they wish there were more breakout sessions during the day. They are interested in so many of the topics and canʼt be at every workshop. The topics are in demand. Itʼs a great problem to have,” says Jim Fawcett, ISU Extension field agronomist in eastern Iowa.

Certified crop advisors can earn up to five credits at the conference in Iowa City and private pesticide applicators can become re-certified. Advance registration for each location is $35 and includes workshop materials, lunch and refreshments. An additional fee is charged for CCA credits and private pesticide applicator recertification. Registration less than one week prior to the meeting or at the door is $45. Registration materials for all sites are available at www.cropadvantage. org or from your local ISU Extension office.

Fuel storage informational meeting scheduled SUBMITTED BY DES MOINES, HENRY, JEFFERSON, LEE, VAN BUREN, WAPELLO The Henry County Young Farmer Committee will be sponsoring a fuel storage informational meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m. at the

Henry County Extension Office in Mt. Pleasant. The EPA has implemented a rule requiring farmers to put together and implement an oil spill prevention plan. The deadline for these plans has come and gone, but many farmers

still have questions and concerns. The program is free to Farm Bureau members and will include dinner. Space is limited so RSVP to your county Farm Bureau or Henry County Farm Bureau (319) 385-3174 to reserve your seat.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

JANUARY 15, 2014

SOUTH WEST IOWA

HARRISON . SHELBY . AUDUBON . GUTHRIE . ADAIR . CASS . WEST POTTAWATTAMIE . EAST POTTAWATTAMIE . MILLS . MONTGOMERY ADAMS . UNION . CLARKE . LUCAS . FREMONT . PAGE . TAYLOR . RINGGOLD . DECATUR . WAYNE

Monsanto fund aids math and science education For the third consecutive year, America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, will give Iowa farmers the opportunity to enhance math and science programs in their communities. Now until April 6, 2014, farmers can nominate a local public school district to compete for a merit-based grant of up to $25,000. Administrators of nominated school districts may then submit grant applications through April 21. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded to 1,289 across 39 states. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Mon-

santo Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDA-appointed Crop Reporting

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Tomato Soup Lois Oaks, West Branch (Cedar County) 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 c. tomato juice 1/2 c. water 2 Tbsp. sugar 1/8 tsp. salt 3/4 c. wide egg noodles, cooked (optional)

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter or margarine. Add flour, and stir to form a smooth paste. Gradually add tomato juice and water; stirring constantly. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add sugar and salt. Stir in egg noodles, if desired, and heat through completely. Yields two servings. This recipe may be doubled.

“Chicken-Lickin” Good Pork Chops Mrs. LeRoy Stevenson, Sibley (Osceola County) 1/2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 1-1/2 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 6 lean, boneless pork chops 2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 can chicken with rice soup (low-sodium)

Combine flour, salt, mustard and garlic powder in a ziploc bag. Shake pork chops in bag until well coated. Brown in large skillet with canola oil. Place in crockpot, and add soup. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours.

Sour Cream Date Dreams Kathy Snitker, Postville (Allamakee County) 1/4 c. shortening 3/4 c. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1-1/4 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 c. dairy sour cream 2/3 c. chopped dates Walnut halves

Cream shortening, sugar and vanilla. Add egg and combine well. Sift together dry ingredients and add to the creamed mixture, alternating with sour cream. Stir in dates. Drop by teaspoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Top each cookie with a walnut half. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10 minutes. Yields three dozen cookies.

District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289.

For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com. In 2013, the following Iowa school districts received a total of $165,000 to enhance math and science curriculums: • Alburnett Comm. School District ($10,000) • Boyden-Hull Comm. School District ($25,000) • CAL Community School District ($10,000) • Forest City Comm. School District ($10,000) • Moulton-Udell Comm. School

District ($10,000) • Newell-Fonda Comm. School District ($10,000) • Riceville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Schaller-Crestland Community School District ($10,000) • Springville Comm. School District ($10,000) • Washington Community School District ($10,000) • West Lyon Community School District ($25,000) • Western Dubuque Comm. School District ($25,000) To view a list of all the winning school districts from previous years and for more information visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Student-sponsored ag outlook conference set for Feb. 8 at Iowa State The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization (AMMO), a new Iowa State student organization, will be hosting an ag outlook conference on Sat. Feb. 8th at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames. The conference will be held in 127 Curtiss Hall. Farmers, students, and the general public are welcome to attend. There is a suggested donation of $30 for attendees. Lunch will be provided. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. the day of the conference. The opening session is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Speakers featured in the confer-

ence include: Elwynn Taylor, ISU climatologist sharing his weather outlook for 2014 and beyond; and Steve Johnson, ISU extension farm manager giving tips on how to manage tighter profit margins for row crops in the coming year. The conference will end at 1:30 p.m. The Agricultural Marketing and Management Organization was founded in the spring of 2012 – making it one of the newest Iowa State University clubs. The club emerged out of an ag marketing class to provide members with take home, tangible knowledge for their own farming operations or agribusinesses.

Though it started with only 15 members, the club now has over 60 members of various majors in the College of Ag and Life Sciences. This conference will serve as a fund raiser for the club in order to send members to conferences and industry tours as well as support club activities. For more information, contact Dacia Dykstra at ddykstra@iastate. edu or Donna McCune at dlmccune@iastate.edu. Please RSVP at isuammo@gmail.com or by calling Donna McCune at (815) 303-3287 by February 1 in order to have an accurate head count for lunch.

Iowa Beef Center Heifer Series addresses challenges SUBMITTED BY DECATUR One of the biggest challenges facing cattlemen today is maintaining young cows in their herd long term. The Iowa Beef Center, in partnership with the Iowa Cattleman’s Association, is offering a program series focusing specifically on management practices to keep young cows in the herd to improve long-term profitability. The Heifer Development 2: Maintaining Your Investment series of programs is a follow-up to the 2012 series on yearling heifers, Heifer Development – Rebuilding our Future. The goal of the 2014 series is to pick up where the 2012 series left off, and looks at the nutrition, health, calving and reproductive management of bred heifers through their second breeding season. All sessions include a meal for those preregistered at least two days prior to the event. The $20 fee is payable at the door. Walk-in registrations are $25 per person and a meal is not guaranteed. Heifer Development 2: Maintaining Your Investment locations and dates

• Jan. 16, Maquoketa – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Centerstone Inn/Suites, 1910 Nairn Drive. To preregister, call 319472-4739. • Jan. 21, Nashua – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Borlaug Learning Center, ISU Research Farm, 3327 290th St. To preregister, call 641-394-2174. • Jan. 21, Postville – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Postville Vet Clinic, 110 Hyman Drive. To preregister, call 319-4724739. • Jan. 23, Anita – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Anita Community Center, 805 Main St. To preregister, call 712-769-2600. • Jan. 28, Spencer – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Spencer School Administration Bldg., 23 E 7th St. To preregister, call 712-262-2264x10 or email mhorst@ iastate.edu. • Jan. 29, Holstein – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Lohff-Schuman Community Center, 301 Lohff Schuman Drive. To preregister, call 712-225-6196 or email sechler@iastate.edu. • Feb. 4, Humboldt – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Ox Bow Park, Izaak Walton

League, 7 Park Rd. To preregister, call 515-332-2201. • Feb. 5, Mount Pleasant – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Henry County Extension Office, 127 N. Main St. To preregister, call 319-385-8126. • Feb. 5, Albia – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Monroe County Extension Office, 219 B Ave. W. To preregister, call 641932-5612. • Feb. 6, Winterset – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Madison County Fairgrounds, Jackson Bldg., W. Summit St. To preregister, call 515-462-1001. • Feb. 6, Osceola – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Clarke County Fairgrounds Event Center, Hwy 34 W. To preregister, call 641-342-331. • Feb. 19, Ames – 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Hansen Ag Student Learning Center, 2816 Mortensen Rd. To preregister, call 641-774-2016. For more information contact a beef specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach or the Iowa Beef Center website at: www.iowabeefcenter.org.


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