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IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

CENTRAL IOWA

BOONE . STORY . MARSHALL . DALLAS . POLK . JASPER . MADISON . WARREN . MARION

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

ISU northern research farm hires new superintendent The oldest Iowa State University research farm has a new superintendent. Micah Smidt has been named superintendent of the Northern Research and Demonstration Farm in Kanawha. He replaces David Rueber who retired, after working at the farm since 1977 and serving as its superintendent since 1987. Smidt earned a bachelor’s degree in agronomy from Iowa State in 2010. He has worked most recently as an agricultural research specialist with ISU’s on-farm research pro-

gram, called FARM, and was previously a crop consultant in north central Iowa. Smidt is the sixth superintendent at the farm since it opened in 1931. He will supervise 35 research projects on the farm, which hosts 1,000 visitors annually, and will continue to coordinate on-farm research in north central Iowa. The farm is owned by the North Central Iowa Research Association, which partners with Iowa State to conduct site-specific agricultural research related to crops and soils.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew SUBMITTED BY MADISON, MARION, MARSHALL AND WARREN More than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms Off-Road Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race, which takes place on the museum’s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 Team Beef runners sported shirts with the message ‘Beef. Fuel for the Finish,’” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ‘Go Beef’ and ‘Where’s the Beef?’ We answered ‘at the end of the race in the beef stew!’ I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle, and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen

Cattleman Seth Watkins, Clarinda, and charter TEAM BEEF member, heads towards the finish line and a bowl of hot beef stew at the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed. Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H’ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens.

Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305. About the Iowa Beef Industry Council: The Iowa Beef Industry Council is funded by the $1-perhead beef checkoff. Checkoff dollars are invested in beef promotion, consumer information, research, industry information and foreign market development, all with the purpose of strengthening beef demand. For more information, visit www.iabeef.org.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

EAST IOWA

TAMA . BENTON . LINN . JONES . JACKSON . POWESHIEK . IOWA . JOHNSON . CEDAR . CLINTON . SCOTT

ICA supports proposed rule change on Trichomoniasis testing SUBMITTED BY POWESHIEK The Iowa Cattlemen’s Association submitted comments of support on a proposed rule change in Iowa regarding Trichomoniasis testing of bulls entering the state. Trichomoniasis, commonly called Trich, is a sexually transmitted disease that can lead to a 20 to 30 percent rate of cows aborting pregnancies. The proposed rules, which will be submitted to the Iowa Legislature’s Administrative Rules Review Committee, would require Tricho-

moniasis testing of bulls brought into Iowa from out of state. The testing requirement would not apply to rodeo bulls, bulls being sent to slaughter and virgin bulls under 24 months of age. “Due to the detrimental impact of this disease on Iowa’s cow herd, the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association is supporting the proposed rule change put forth by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship,” said Justine Stevenson, ICA’s director of Government

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Relations and Public Policy. “It would be in the state’s best interest for these rules to be implemented prior to the 2014 breeding season.” (If the rules are accepted, they will be in place February 2014.) Bulls are the vector for Trich and unfortunately show no clinical signs so only a test can reveal the infection. “By providing the exemption for bulls used in rodeo or exhibition, as well as animals intended for slaughter, there should be minimal impact on these events and livestock auction markets,” Stevenson said. In 2012, the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association conducted a

Trichomoniasis survey across the state, in which six positive bulls were discovered. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship had three positive cases reported from producers in 2012 and 2013. Prior to 2012, Iowa had no reported cases of Trich. “By preventing positive animals from entering the state, Iowa should be able to maintain and perhaps eliminate the current small presence of Trichomoniasis in cow herds,” she said. Currently 23 states require mandatory testing for bulls to prevent the spread of Trichomoniasis.

Cows and heifers are not subject to the testing because they slough the infection and can successfully be used for breeding stock. There is no treatment for infected bulls. Comments on the proposed rule change to amend Chapter 65, Animal and Livestock Importation, were due Dec. 3. Written comments should be addressed to Margaret Thomson, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Wallace State Office Building, 502 E. Ninth St., Des Moines, IA 50319. Comments may be submitted by fax to 515-281-6236 or by email to Margaret.Thomson@ IowaAgriculture.gov.

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race. PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMA COUNTY.

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew SUBMITTED BY TAMA More than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms OffRoad Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race, which takes place on the museum’s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 Team Beef runners sported shirts with the message ‘Beef. Fuel for the Finish,’” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added.

Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ‘Go Beef’ and ‘Where’s the Beef?’ We answered, ‘at the end of the race in the beef stew!’ I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.”

The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed. Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H’ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef. org or by calling 515-296-2305.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

NORTH IOWA

MITCHELL . HOWARD . FLOYD . CHICKASAW . BUTLER . BREMER . GRUNDY . BLACK HAWK

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew SUBMITTED BY BUTLER, CHICKASAW, MITCHELL ore than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms Off-Road Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race,

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which takes place on the museum’s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 TEAM BEEF runners sported shirts with the message ‘Beef. Fuel for the Finish,’” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends of the beef

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTLER.

industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ‘Go Beef’ and ‘Where’s the Beef?’ We answered ‘at the end of the race in the beef stew!’ I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message to the runners was two-

fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed.

Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H’ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305.

ICA supports proposed rule change on trichomoniasis testing

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SUBMITTED BY CHICKASAW he Iowa Cattlemen’s Association submitted comments of support on a proposed rule change in Iowa regarding trichomoniasis testing of bulls entering the state. Trichomoniasis, commonly called trich, is a sexually transmitted disease that can lead to a 20-30 percent rate of cows aborting pregnancies. The proposed rules, which will be submitted to the Iowa Legislature’s Administrative Rules Review Committee, would require trichomoniasis testing of bulls brought into Iowa from out of state. The testing requirement would not apply to rodeo bulls, bulls being sent to slaughter and virgin bulls under 24 months of age. “Due to the detrimental impact

of this disease on Iowa’s cow herd, the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association is supporting the proposed rule change put forth by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship,” said Justine Stevenson, ICA’s Director of Government Relations and Public Policy. “It would be in the state’s best interest for these rules to be implemented prior to the 2014 breeding season.” (If the rules are accepted, they will be in place February 2014.) Bulls are the vector for trich and unfortunately show no clinical signs so only a test can reveal the infection. “By providing the exemption for bulls used in rodeo or exhibition, as well as animals intended for slaughter, there should be minimal impact on these events and livestock auction markets,” Stevenson said.

In 2012, the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association conducted a trichomoniasis survey across the state, in which six positive bulls were discovered. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship had three positive cases reported from producers in 2012 and 2013. Prior to 2012, Iowa had no reported cases of trich. “By preventing positive animals from entering the state, Iowa should be able to maintain and perhaps eliminate the current small presence of trichomoniasis in cow herds,” she said. Currently 23 states require mandatory testing for bulls to prevent the spread of trichomoniasis. Cows and heifers are not subject to the testing because they slough the infection, and can successfully be used for breeding stock. There is no treatment for infected bulls.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

NORTH CENTRAL IOWA

KOSSUTH . WINNEBAGO . WORTH . HANCOCK . CERRO GORDO . HUMBOLDT . WRIGHT . FRANKLIN . WEBSTER . HAMILTON . HARDIN

New report shows impact of local foods in North Central Iowa SUBMITTED BY CERRO GORDO, FRANKLIN, HANCOCK, KOSSUTH, WINNEBAGO, WORTH AND WRIGHT COUNTIES ocal foods are making an economic impact in Iowa. In fact, sales of food produced in North Central Iowa added nearly $538,952 to the local economy in 2012. In addition, $46,500 of local foods was purchased by grocery stores, restaurants and institutions in the re-

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gion. Healthy Harvest of North Iowa helped collect the data in cooperation with the statewide Regional Food Systems Working Group (RFSWG), which supports local food efforts in 90 of Iowa's 99 counties. The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture coordinated the evaluation for one of the first statewide attempts to measure actual impacts of the local food industry on Iowa's economy. The evaluation traced local food

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

purchases by grocery stores, restaurants and institutions and sales from Iowa farm-based enterprises that marketed their products locally in 2012. Nearly 1980 businesses and individuals participated in the data collection effort, including 74 buyers and 103 producers of local foods. The evaluation also measured job creation as a result of local food production, processing or utilization, and counted funds leveraged by the regional food groups

that comprise the statewide RFSWG network. “We believe there is an intensely powerful story to tell about the value that local foods bring to our communities and commerce in our region,” remarked Jan Libbey, Coordinator for Healthy Harvest of North Iowa. Healthy Harvest of North Iowa covers nine north central Iowa counties, including Cerro Gordo, Franklin, Floyd, Hancock, Kossuth, Mitchell, Winnebago, Worth and Wright, and has been active this year with our Buy Fresh, Buy Local Food Directory, Fresh on the Farm Tours, Farm to Fork dinner

and beginning stages of a collaborative marketing effort. Libbey added, “This is the first time we have systematically captured local food sales and purchase data across Iowa. These numbers were reported by 11 producers and three institutions. I'm thrilled to have this report to help tell the story of local food in our region. Our producers work hard and this report helps put that hard work in perspective of the impact it is having.” Get more details in this report, The Economic Impact of Iowa's Local Food Champions: Healthy Harvest of North Iowa by contacting libbey.jan@gmail.com The statewide report, 2012 Economic Impacts of Iowa' s Regional Food Systems Working Group, is available by title on the Leopold Center website at: www. leopold.iastate.edu/local-food.

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

Carroll Ose, pictured center with wife Judy, were presented the Gary Wergin Good Farm Neighbor Award, at Titan Machinery in Williams.

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Hamilton County farmer wins award

SUBMITTED BY HAMILTON he Carroll Ose family, who run a wean to finish hog operation on their farm near Blairsburg, have been named the November winners of the “Gary Wergin Good Farm Neighbor Award.” Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey presented the award to the family on Thursday, Nov. 21 at Titan Machinery' s facility near Williams, located at 3093 220th St. The “Big Show,” which airs on both WHO and WMT radio, broadcasted live from the presentation from on Nov. 21.

“Iowa is fortunate to have many families like the Oses who are committed to doing things the right way on their farm, but who are also active in their community and work hard to make rural Iowa a great place to live,” Northey said. Carroll Ose and his wife Judy have three children, Erin, Mike and Lindsay, and raise corn, soybeans and seed corn in addition to hogs on their farm. The family was nominated for the award by their neighbor, Hamilton County Farm Bureau leader, Randy Greufe, saying Carroll is, “very involved in the communities where he lives and does busi-

ness. He helps make these communities better places to work and live.” Ose has been very active in supporting tree plantings in Hamilton County and has planted over 1,000 trees over the years in order to better protect the environment. Ose is also involved in the Blairsburg Co-op, Van Diest Medical Center, Lions Club, and Hamilton County NRCS and FSA committees and other organizations. Greufe added “Carroll Ose is willing to help his neighbors and community members whenever possible. If there is a need in the community, he is usually there to help.”


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

NORTH EAST IOWA

WINNESHIEK . ALLAMAKEE . FAYETTE . CLAYTON . BUCHANAN . DELAWARE . DUBUQUE

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew

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SUBMITTED BY FAYETTE ore than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms OffRoad Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race, which takes

place on the museum' s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 TEAM BEEF runners sported shirts with the message ʻBeef. Fuel for the Finish,' ” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ʻGo Beef' and ʻWhere' s the Beef?' We answered ʻat the end of the race in the beef stew!' I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message

to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed.

Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H' ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305.

ICA supports proposed rule change on trichomoniasis testing SUBMITTED BY FAYETTE AND WINNESHIEK he Iowa Cattlemen's Association submitted comments of support on a proposed rule change in Iowa regarding trichomoniasis testing of bulls entering the state. Trichomoniasis, commonly called trich, is a sexually transmitted disease that can lead to a 20-30 percent rate of cows aborting pregnancies. The proposed rules, which will be submitted to the Iowa Legislature' s Administrative Rules Review Committee, would require trichomoniasis testing of bulls brought into Iowa from out of state. The testing requirement would not apply to rodeo bulls, bulls being sent to slaughter and virgin bulls under 24 months of age.

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“Due to the detrimental impact of this disease on Iowa' s cow herd, the Iowa Cattlemen' s Association is supporting the proposed rule change put forth by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship,” said Justine Stevenson, ICA' s Director of Government Relations and Public Policy. “It would be in the state' s best interest for these rules to be implemented prior to the 2014 breeding season.” (If the rules are accepted, they will be in place February 2014.) Bulls are the vector for trich and unfortunately show no clinical signs so only a test can reveal the infection. “By providing the exemption for bulls used in rodeo or exhibition, as well as animals intended for slaughter, there should be minimal impact on these events and livestock auction markets,” Stevenson said.

In 2012, the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association conducted a trichomoniasis survey across the state, in which six positive bulls were discovered. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship had three positive cases reported from producers in 2012 and 2013. Prior to 2012, Iowa had no reported cases of trich. “By preventing positive animals from entering the state, Iowa should be able to maintain and perhaps eliminate the current small presence of trichomoniasis in cow herds,” she said. Currently 23 states require mandatory testing for bulls to prevent the spread of trichomoniasis. Cows and heifers are not subject to the testing because they slough the infection, and can successfully be used for breeding stock. There is no treatment for infected bulls.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

NORTH WEST IOWA

LYON . OSCEOLA . DICKINSON . EMMET . SIOUX . O’BRIEN . CLAY . PALO ALTO . PLYMOUTH . CHEROKEE BUENA VISTA . POCAHONTAS . WOODBURY . IDA . SAC . CALHOUN . MONONA . CRAWFORD . CARROLL . GREENE

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until practically set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew SUBMITTED BY CHEROKEE More than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms OffRoad Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the sevenmile race, which takes place on the museum’s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 TEAM BEEF runners sported shirts with the message ‘Beef. Fuel for the Finish,’” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ‘Go Beef’ and ‘Where’s the Beef?’ We answered ‘at the end of the race in the beef stew!’ I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed. Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H’ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional

Cattleman Seth Watkins, Clarinda, and charter TEAM BEEF member, heads toward the finish line and a bowl of hot beef stew at the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can

visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305.

Iowa delegates to the 2013 National 4-H Congress announced BY CAYLA TAYLOR, CHRISTOPHER LIGHTFOOT SUBMITTED BY CRAWFORD Nineteen 4-H’ers have been selected to represent Iowa as delegates to the 2013 National 4-H Congress in Atlanta. The event took place Nov. 29 through Dec. 3 and is the 92nd year of National 4-H Congress titled, “Passport to Excellence.” National 4-H Congress is an op-

portunity for leaders in 4-H to meet and learn from each other. The event recognizes the delegates’ outstanding leadership and community work, and is one of the highest honors in 4-H. Events will include keynote speakers, tours of Atlanta, service work around the city, workshops and an international banquet and formal gala. “This is one of the highest recognition opportunities for senior 4-H’ers

in Iowa,” said Cayla Taylor, state 4-H program coordinator with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. “These youth were selected because they have demonstrated exceptional skills in leadership, citizenship and overall achievement.” Major donors supporting the youth delegates’ trip to National 4-H Congress include the estate of Marvin Walter, Ames; Iowa Farm Bureau;

Iowa Poultry Association; Bryan and Allison Whaley; and donors to the Iowa 4-H Foundation National 4-H Congress Endowment. The Iowa delegates are from Adair, Benton, Boone, Crawford, Greene, Hamilton, Johnson, Linn, Madison, Polk, Sac and Worth counties. Crawford County 4-H’er Matt Staley, Charter Oak, is the son of Rick and Julie Staley.

An eight-year member of 4-H, Staley has been involved in the communication, electrical, woodworking, leadership and citizenship project areas. He has served as president of his 4-H club. Staley has participated in his county 4-H council, the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference and state 4-H council. “4-H has done nothing but improve who I am as a person,” said Staley.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

SOUTH EAST IOWA

MAHASKA . KEOKUK . WASHINGTON . LOUISA . MUSCATINE . MONROE . WAPELLO . JEFFERSON . HENRY . DES MOINES . APPANOOSE . DAVIS . VAN BUREN . LEE

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew

M

SUBMITTED BY KEOKUK ore than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms Off-Road Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race, which takes place on the

museum’s grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 TEAM BEEF runners sported shirts with the message ‘Beef. Fuel for the Finish,’” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ‘Go Beef’ and ‘Where’s the Beef?’ We answered ‘at the end of the race in the beef stew!’ I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message

to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed.

Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal science students, 4-H’ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305.

Iowa photographer looks at women in farming SUBMITTED BY DES MOINES, VAN BUREN Women have always been an important but mostly undocumented aspect of agriculture. In recent years, women are rising to the forefront of agriculture in so many ways; as owner/operators, land-owners, workers, mentors and so many more.

Iowa photographer Marji Guyler-Alaniz has launched a project documenting women in agriculture. Her goal is to show women at work on the farm, caring for animals, finishing chores, doing all the things women do to make a farm successful. Take a look at her website — www.farmher.com. Also on the

website is a television report on the project. Farm Bureau members might be interested in registering as a FarmHer user and join the FarmHer mailing list. Here you can stay updated on future photo releases and from time to time, hear more about what is going on with FarmHer.

Boal takes new role within Farm Bureau SUBMITTED BY DES MOINES, HENRY Agent Chad Boal has taken a new role within the Farm Bureau Organization as an agency manager. The agency he is responsible for is the same agency he was an agent in, therefore he will not be relocating. He will still be involved directly with the agents

his clients will be serviced by. He wants to thank all of his clients for business over the years and the friendships that have developed. He has assigned either Brad Notestein or Jim Batterson the task of servicing his accounts. Both Brad and Jim are experienced agents that will do a great job exceeding your expectations

through this transition. Please give Brad Notestein or Jim Batterson a call at 319752-2229 if you have any questions.

CHAD BOAL


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

DECEMBER 11, 2013

SOUTH WEST IOWA

HARRISON . SHELBY . AUDUBON . GUTHRIE . ADAIR . CASS . WEST POTTAWATTAMIE . EAST POTTAWATTAMIE . MILLS . MONTGOMERY ADAMS . UNION . CLARKE . LUCAS . FREMONT . PAGE . TAYLOR . RINGGOLD . DECATUR . WAYNE

OA meeting held

Office assistants from across the state met at the annual Iowa Farm Bureau convention on Dec. 3 at the CCCUCC in downtown Des Moines. Several classes were offered with topics covering the membership application, outlook tips, Spokesman ideas, preparing for yearly audit and round table discussions with ideas for county annual meetings. Shown are Area 11 OA’s, Sherri Menefee (Cass), Joyce Isaacson (East Pottawattamie), April Evans (Union), Ruth McGinnis (Adair), Mary Smith (Guthrie) and Sandy Wheeler (Audubon). PHOTO COURTESY OF CASS AND EAST POTTAWATTAMIE COUNTIES.

ISU Ag Studies student Bailey Morrell, Van Meter, serves a bowl of hot beef stew to a runner in the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Mom’s Buttermilk Cookies Carol Yochum, Agency (Wapello County) 1/2 c. butter 1 c. sugar 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2-1/2 c. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 c. buttermilk Frosting: 3 Tbsp. butter, softened 3-1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/4 c. milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 c. walnuts, finely chopped (optional)

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, and mix well. Drop by rounded tablespoonsful 2-inches apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on wire racks. Prepare frosting by combining all ingredients, and beat until smooth. Frost cookies and sprinkle with nuts (optional) Yield 3 dozen cookies.

Corn Beef Salad 1-1/2 c. hot water 1 (3-oz.) package lemon gelatin 2 c. celery, chopped 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 1 c. salad dressing 1 c. chilled corned beef, chopped 3 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add salad dressing, and mix completely before gelatin cools. Chill until partially set. Add remaining ingredients, and chill completely before serving.

Green Beans and Tomatoes Eileen Miller, Sherrill (Dubuque County) 6 slices bacon 3/4 c. onion, chopped 1 small green pepper, chopped 2 tsp. corn starch 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 quart tomatoes, drained 2 cans green beans, drained

Brown bacon, and drain on paper towels. Sautè onion and green pepper in bacon drippings. Add tomatoes and corn starch. Combine the remaining ingredients, except green beans, and heat through. Add beans and continue heating until ready to serve.

Thousands of runners refuel with beef stew SUBMITTED BY DECATUR, FREMONT/MILLS, PAGE/TAYLOR, RINGGOLD, UNION ore than 75 Iowa beef industry volunteers served hot beef stew to thousands of runners in the 35th annual Living History Farms Off-Road Race on Nov. 23. Runners from across the country endured the single digit weather to run the seven-mile race, which takes place on the museum's grounds in Urbandale. “This year, more than 20 TEAM BEEF runners sported shirts with the message ʻBeef. Fuel for the Finish,' ” said Nancy Degner, executive director of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. “TEAM BEEF is composed of Iowa State University faculty and students with majors in animal science, as well as other cattle farmers and friends of the beef industry who are passionate about beef,” she added. Seth Watkins, cattle farmer from Clarinda, said, “I am proud to wear the TEAM BEEF shirt and hear all the support along the race from runners and by-standers who shouted ʻGo Beef' and ʻWhereʼs the Beef?' We answered ʻat the end of the race in the beef stew!' I was proud to have cattle farmers serving the beef stew at the end of the race.” Degner said the beef checkoff became involved to carry a message to the athletes. “Our message to the runners was two-fold,” said Degner. “First, that beef provides high-quality protein needed to build, maintain and repair muscle and is a great recovery food after endurance exercise. Second, we wanted to give runners the chance to meet local cattle farmers as they

M

Cattleman Seth Watkins, Clarinda, and charter TEAM BEEF member, heads toward the finish line and a bowl of hot beef stew at the Living History Farms Off-Road Race.

served the beef stew.” The hot beef stew greeted frozen runners after a route complete with several creek crossings and other obstacles. The beef checkoff provided the 2,000 pounds of beef cubes used in the stew prepared by the Iowa Machine Shed. Serving was completed in less than two hours by volunteers that included cattle producer families, Iowa State University animal sci-

ence students, 4-H' ers, Madison County Youth Beef Team members and friends of the beef industry. Beef certificates were awarded as prizes for the race, replacing the traditional frozen turkeys and chickens. Those interested in joining or learning more about TEAM BEEF can visit the Iowa Beef Industry Council website at www.iabeef.org or by calling 515-296-2305.


Area News Dec. 11, 2013