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IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

CENTRAL IOWA

BOONE . STORY . MARSHALL . DALLAS . POLK . JASPER . MADISON . WARREN . MARION

Despite supply concerns, beef exports off to solid start in 2014 SUBMITTED BY WARREN After setting an all-time value record of $6.16 billion last year, U.S. beef exports have remained strong in early 2014. Through February, exports totaled 183,700 metric tons (mt) – a 6 percent increase in volume over the same period last year. At $994.8 million, export value is 14 percent ahead of last year’s

record pace. Price is also a factor regarding exports to Canada, which are down 25 percent in volume (23,595 mt) and 21 percent in value ($157.3 million) from a year ago. But in this case, the price challenge is mostly tied to exchange rates. The Canadian dollar has steadily declined against the U.S. dollar over the

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

past 18 months, with its purchasing power falling about 11 percent during that time. Canada’s beef production has also rebounded this year, with yearover-year cattle slaughter up 7.5 percent in the first quarter. Benefiting from expanded market access and demand for high-quality U.S. beef, Japan and Hong Kong continue to lead export growth. Last year Japan reclaimed its position as the top destination for U.S. beef exports and it has continued to perform well. Through February, exports are up 51 percent in volume (30,032 mt) and 34 percent in value ($184.7 million) from a year ago. It should be noted, however, that exports to Japan under the expanded 30-month cattle age limit really gained momentum in March of last year, so smaller year-over-

year gains are anticipated going forward. Hong Kong also expanded access for U.S. beef last year – accepting bone-in cuts from under-30-month cattle and boneless beef from cattle of all ages for the first time since 2003 – and the results have been excellent. After shattering previous records in 2013, exports to Hong Kong through February are up another 44 percent in volume (22,835 mt) and 69 percent in value ($144.7 million) from a year ago. Exports to South Korea are running lower in volume (19,250 mt, -14 percent) but higher in value ($133.8 million, +17 percent) so far this year, while exports to Taiwan are off to a sluggish start – down 30 percent in volume (4,023 mt) and 25 percent in value ($32.1 million).

May Beef Month proclamation SUBMITTED BY BOONE The Iowa Beef Industry Council is pleased to announce that May is Beef Month in Iowa. Gov.

Terry E. Branstad has signed the May Beef Month proclamation in recognition of the importance of Iowa’s beef industry to the state’s

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

U.S. beef continues to grow its presence in Central and South America, with exports to the region up 10 percent in volume (5,568 mt) and 15 percent in value ($23.7 million) compared to the record pace of 2013. Recently implemented free trade agreements have helped Panama and Colombia emerge as promising markets, joining mainstay destinations Chile, Peru and Guatemala. U.S. beef also recently regained access to Ecuador for the first time since 2003. Russia suspended imports of U.S. beef in February 2013 over the use of beta agonists and the market remains closed. Russia also recently banned beef from Australia. U.S. beef also lacks access to mainland China, but negotiating teams have set July of this year as a target date for opening the market.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

economy. The Iowa Beef Industry Council is pleased to present the following proclamation. Whereas Iowa is a major beef producing state with nearly 3.70 million head of cattle on Jan. 1, 2014; and Whereas the beef industry contributes greatly to our economy by generating in excess of $5.5 billion annually and creating jobs for nearly 40,000 Iowans; and Whereas today’s beef is a naturally nutrient-rich food providing protein, iron, zinc and B-vitamins; and Whereas beef producers are the original environmentalists working to conserve the soil and making optimum use of natural resources; and Whereas Iowa is a leader in the export of value-added agriculture products, shipping high-quality Iowa beef to other countries around the world; and Whereas there is an ever-increasing need for better understanding of the benefits that the beef industry provides to all Iowans; Now therefore, I, Terry E. Branstad, Governor of the State of Iowa, do hereby proclaim the month of May 2014 as Beef Month in Iowa, and urge all citizens to appreciate the contributions the beef industry continues to provide to our state.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

EAST IOWA

TAMA . BENTON . LINN . JONES . JACKSON . POWESHIEK . IOWA . JOHNSON . CEDAR . CLINTON . SCOTT

Central City FFA students participate SUBMITTED BY LINN This year, four Central City High School students participated in the World Food Prize Iowa Youth Institute event, with Agriculture Instructor and FFA Advisor Rob Pangburn, accompanying Jackie Appelhans, Drew Mollenhauer, Brianna Parks and Mikayla Hartl. The students researched climate volatility in Botswana, malnutrition in Mali, climate volatility in Ethiopia and water sanitation in Haiti respectively. Each student having their research accepted earned a scholarship to the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at

ISU along with the invitation to attend the Iowa Youth Institute. The World Food Prize Iowa Youth Institute is growing rapidly into a model STEM program, reaching and inspiring students statewide to fight hunger in their hometowns and to explore STEM career paths The World Food Prize Iowa Youth Institute at Iowa State University is growing rapidly – it has more than tripled in size in three years – and on April 17 brought together over 230 high school students and 120 teachers from across Iowa to explore critical global issues and aca-

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Four Central City High School students participated in the World Food Prize Iowa Youth Institute on April 17. Pictured above are, from left – Brianna Parks, Jackie Appelhans, Mikayla Hartl and Drew Mollenhauer. PHOTO COURTESY OF LINN COUNTY.

demic and career paths in STEM fields. A highlight of the day was student interaction with 2010 World Food Prize Laureate Jo Luck, Gov. Terry Branstad, Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds and ISU President Steven Leath, who is a plant scientist himself. Dr. Norman Borlaug, whose centennial is being celebrated this year and whose statue Iowa recently installed in the U.S.

Capitol, envisioned this and other World Food Prize youth programs as the way to inspire the next generation of scientists and humanitarians to go into critical fields and to help solve the challenge ahead: Feeding the 9 billion people who will be on our planet by the year 2050. To put the number in perspective, when Dr. Borlaug was born 100 years ago, there were about 1.8 billion

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

people on the planet. The Iowa Youth Institute connects students interested in science, agriculture and related fields with Iowa leaders and innovators on the cutting edge of science and research. Each participating high school student wrote a research paper on a key issue that impacts hunger in another a country, such as water scarcity or gender inequality. The students propose their own solutions in small-group roundtable discussions facilitated by academic and industry experts, and students and teachers also participate in hands-on “immersion” activities in research facilities and labs at Iowa State University. The impact of this event is having much more lasting effects that go past the day itself. Participating students and teachers have begun taking lessons they learn back to their hometowns to create and host hunger-fighting programs such as a banquet to raise nearly $800 for school children in Tanzania; a banquet to raise $250 for Oxfam America and local food bank; and class project preparing posters on world hunger and donating food to a food pantry. This year marks the third anniversary of the Iowa Youth Institute, and the 20th anniversary of the very first World Food Prize youth program, the Global Youth Institute. More information is available at www.worldfoodprize.org/iowayouth.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

NORTH IOWA

MITCHELL . HOWARD . FLOYD . CHICKASAW . BUTLER . BREMER . GRUNDY . BLACK HAWK

SUBMITTED BY MITCHELL BY BARB FRANCIS I can hear you groaning now and saying, “As if I don’t get enough exercise!” or “Now I have to fit in time for exercise, too?!” Well, don’t discount this article—I see many of you at the chiropractor’s office or in physical therapy for backs and necks out of alignment! Now-a-days, you are doing more of your loading mechanically instead of by hand, but I know you, when it’s faster to load just one bag of seed by hand, you might not take time to get out the loader! Waa-la! The old back is out-ofwhack! You aren’t doing near the walking due to four-wheelers. Yes,

Exercise for Farmers

I know you still get more exercise than the average man or woman, but I also know you strain your muscles a lot more, too. What can you do different to save time not having to go to the doctor or save yourself some sleepless nights due to pain? Well, you can do something as simple as walking more instead of using that four-wheeler. Did you know there is actually something referred to as the “Farmer’s Walk?” It’s basically carrying even weight with each arm using dumbbells or two buckets of water or sand and increasing the weight until you are capable of carrying heavy weights without hurting yourself. Make

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

sure you keep your shoulders and back straight and your feet apart, bending your knees to pick up the weights in your hands by your side. Avoid slouching and drop the weights if they start straining too much and pick them up after 30 seconds or so. Besides helping your back, this also strengthens

your grip and ankles. You can also wear shoes with good support. My husband discovered he had much less back pain if he wore better boots or even put arch supports in them. The very best exercise, I think, is stretching. Before you do any strenuous chore, just take a couple

National Cattle Congress Fair announces queen contest SUBMITTED BY BLACK HAWK, BREMER, BUTLER, GRUNDY National Cattle Congress (NCC) is seeking contestants to compete in the 2014 National Cattle Congress Queen Contest on Sunday, June 22, at the Historic Electric Park Ballroom. Each contestant must be at least 16 years of age and not more than 21 years of age on or before Aug. 7, 2014. The winner of the NCC Queen Contest will compete at the Iowa

State Fair Queen Competition in Des Moines, Aug. 5-9. Opportunities to win savings bonds and sponsorships will be available. Judging will be based on the following: personality, attitude, appearance and awareness, leadership and citizenship (contribution to community), overall appearance, charm and poise. The NCC Fair Queen contestant must reside in one of the following counties: Black Hawk, Benton, Bremer, Buchanan, Butler, Grundy

SUBMITTED BY HOWARD

When should I prune my shrubs?

The proper time to prune deciduous and evergreen shrubs is determined by the plant’s growth habit, bloom time and health or condition. Spring-flowering shrubs, such as lilac and forsythia, bloom in

spring on the growth of the previous season. The best time to prune spring-flowering shrubs depends on the health or condition of the plants. Neglected, overgrown spring-flowering shrubs often require extensive pruning to rejuvenate or renew the plants. The best time to rejuvenate large,

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

or Tama. A detailed list of rules is available and will be mailed to each contestant that enters. National Cattle Congress will be celebrating its 104th year, Sept. 11-14. If interested in becoming the NCC Fair Queen and a chance to move on to the 2014 Iowa State Fair Queen competition, please call Lori at 319-234-7515 or email at LoriClark@nationalcattlecongress.com for an application. Applications are due June 13.

Spring pruning

referral meets certain milestones. You know what

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

minutes to stretch. Put your leg over the fence and lean forward. Raise your arms and slowly bend side to side. Twist at the waist. The key is not to do it fast, but to concentrate on using those muscles as you do it. Turn you head side to side. Do swim strokes with your arms. Really, it’s as simple as that!

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

overgrown shrubs is late winter or early spring (late February to early April). Heavy pruning in late winter or early spring will reduce or eliminate the flower display for two or three years. However, the long-term results of rejuvenation pruning are restoration of plant health, improvement in plant appearance and greater bloom. The best time to prune healthy, well-maintained spring-flowering shrubs is immediately after flowering. (Healthy, well-maintained shrubs should require only light to moderate pruning.) Pruning immediately after flowering allows gardeners to enjoy the spring flower display and provides adequate time for the shrubs to initiate new flower buds for next season. Summer-flowering shrubs, such as potentilla and Japanese spirea, bloom in summer on the current year’s growth. Prune summer-flowering shrubs in late winter or early spring. The pruned shrubs will bloom in summer on the current year’s growth. Some deciduous shrubs don’t produce attractive flowers. These shrubs may possess colorful bark, fruit or foliage. Prune these shrubs in late winter or early spring before growth begins. Prune evergreen shrubs, such as juniper and yew, in early to mid-April before new growth begins. Light pruning may also be done in mid-summer.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

NORTH CENTRAL IOWA

KOSSUTH . WINNEBAGO . WORTH . HANCOCK . CERRO GORDO . HUMBOLDT . WRIGHT . FRANKLIN . WEBSTER . HAMILTON . HARDIN

T

Iowa FFA chapters enhancing home communities with ‘Be the Seed’ grants

SUBMITTED BY HARDIN welve Iowa FFA chapters have been awarded $2,500 “Be The Seed” grants to spur innovation and progress in their communities, while promoting the importance of farming. The “Be The Seed” Grant Program, providing $35,000 in community funding, is sponsored by the Iowa Food & Family Project (Iowa FFP) in cooperation with DuPont Pioneer and the Iowa Soybean Association.

Grant recipients are: Bison FFA, Buffalo Center; Clay Central-Everly FFA; Guthrie Center FFA; Iowa Falls-Alden FFA; Midland FFA, Wyoming; Murray FFA; Pekin FFA; Sibley-Ocheyedan FFA; South Tama County FFA, Tama; Tipton FFA; Tripoli FFA; and West Central Valley FFA, Stuart. FFA chapters will partner with an existing community or school group to conduct activities that are the “seeds” of change, innovation or education to enhance their local communities.

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Chapters will incorporate food and farming themes into their programming, and use the opportunity to educate others on the importance of agriculture, sustainability and community involvement. Grant recipients will be recognized in April at the Iowa FFA State Leadership Conference in Ames. One chapter, determined to have conducted the most successful activity in partnership with its community, will be recognized with a $5,000 Award of Achievement. More than 40 FFA chapters applied for grant funding. “The tremendous response to this program is an indication of the growing interest there is in

FFA and in food production,” said Bart Baudler, DuPont Pioneer business director. “The grant program judges were impressed with the quality of the applications. We now look forward to working with grant recipients to implement their successful programs.” Aaron Putze, director of communications for the Iowa Soybean Association and Iowa FFP coordinator, said the “Be The Seed” grant program furthers the goals of the Iowa Food & Family Project by directly engaging people in agriculture and emphasizing the critical link between farms and communities. 2013 FFA “Be The Seed” Grant Recipient Program Sum-

maries: The Iowa Falls-Alden FFA will collaborate and cooperate with the Ellsworth Community College Ag Department, AGWSR FFA, and the West Fork FFA to provide hands-on learning opportunities in the area of beef production. The program also will utilize professionals from the Iowa State University Large Animal Hospital and local businesses to teach kids about the latest techniques in beef production. Ultimately, the goal is to produce locally grown beef on land owned by the Iowa Falls-Alden Schools. The emphasis on agriculture is to feed the ever growing world population, and that will begin with the students involved in this project.

Member benefits make summertime activities more affordable

S

SUBMITTED BY HAMILTON ummer is coming and if you are thinking of vacation activities or even just a day away for the kids, check out these Farm Bureau’s member benefits:

Adventureland discounts

Your family can enjoy two

parks — Adventureland amusement park and the new adjoining Adventure Bay water park — at Farm Bureau member discount prices. In fact, you will save money and time by purchasing your discounted tickets online before you head to the parks. You can go to www.adventureland.com/tickets to order tickets online. When you arrive at Adventureland, skip the ticket purchase lines and go directly to the entrance gates. The Farm Bureau member discount

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess

price saves you $10 on each regular adult (ages 10 to 64) and $5 on each child or senior ticket (ages 65-plus).

Iowa Hall of Pride

Yo u ’ l l want to stroll the Hall of Heroes, featuring notable Iowans in real interviews — immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and faces of Iowa. Relive the stories, relive the glories — it’s fun for all ages. Be sure the sports enthusiasts in your group visit the game room to hone their skills. As a Farm Bureau member you are eligible for free admission into the Hall of Pride. Please present your Farm Bureau membership card. For more information about the Iowa Hall of Pride located in the Iowa Events Center in downtown Des Moines – visit www.iowahallofpride.com.

so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to 1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

Choice Hotels

Iowa Farm Bureau members save 20 percent off published rates at over 5,000 Choice Hotels worldwide! Save 20 percent off at participating Comfort Inn, Comfort Suites, Quality Inn, Sleep Inn, Clarion, MainStay Suites, Suburban Extended Stay, Rodeway Inn and Econo Lodge hotels. Book by phone: Call 800-2582847 and mention your Iowa Farm Bureau ID No. 00209580 to get your discounted rate.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

NORTH EAST IOWA

WINNESHIEK . ALLAMAKEE . FAYETTE . CLAYTON . BUCHANAN . DELAWARE . DUBUQUE

Bridgewater cattle producers are nominees for environmental award SUBMITTED BY FAYETTE Nichols Farms LTD of Bridgewater is the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association’s nomination for the national Environmental Stewardship Award Program (ESAP). This family farm operation is managed by Dave Nichols, Phyllis Nichols and Lillian Nichols and covers Adair, Adams and Cass counties. As Iowa’s ESAP representative, Nichols Farms has been nominated for recognition at the regional level, which includes four other states.

If it is successful in the regional competition, Nichols Farms will move on to the national level. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association initiated the environmental award program in 1991 to highlight exceptional work done by cattle producers to protect and enhance the environment. Since its inception, Iowa cattle producers have won 15 regional awards and three national ones. Nichols Farms is known internationally for its innovative tech-

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

niques in using genetic and production data from cattle to produce beef more efficiently. However, the farm operation has always been conservation minded since Dave Nichols’ parents purchased land in Adair County in the late 1930s. The family purchased farmland that had been highly eroded — and in some cases abandoned — and began the process of nursing it back to health. Dave Nichols says the philosophy used by the family is simple: “It needs to be better when you are done.” The area where the Nichols both own and rent land is known as the Hungry Canyons area, which is identified with deep cut gullies and stream trenching. Over 70 percent of the farmland managed by the Nichols (some owned, some rented) has been designated as highly erodible. Typical for the area, row crops are grown on 64 percent of the land, with 29 percent in grassland and pasture production. Nichols Farms has 46 percent of the farmland in row crops, and 54 percent in grassland and pasture production.

“Managed livestock production is a crucial component to rebuilding highly erodible land that has been mismanaged,” Dave Nichols says. In the 1960s and ‘70s, Dave and his brother Lee outlined a plan to include livestock production which would hold soil in place and reclaim the land’s productivity. “It took at least three to 10 years of both commercial fertilizer and manure applications to get the land to be marginally productive,” Dave says. Between owned and rented farmland, Nichols. Farms has 1,480 acres that has been in no-till for 34 years. There have also been 35 ponds and 50,860 feet of terraces built. There is also more than 2,700 acres of refurbished pastures. Eventually, on the reclaimed land they could run a cow-calf pair on about half the acres needed by adjoining property that was not renovated or conserved. Dave says the greatest challenge in maintaining the farm operation was when his brother Lee died in the early 1980s. Lee had been the leader on the crop production side

Another member benefit AAA membership discount SUBMITTED BY DELAWARE As a paid Farm Bureau member one of the benefits is a discount on AAA memberships. To purchase

an AAA membership or get your discount on your existing membership, simply call toll-free 1-800222-1333. To receive your Farm

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

of their cattle and crop farm. “After Lee’s death, I walked out to the machine shed and looked at seed corn stacked to the ceiling and a no-till planter that Lee had built (commercial planters were still scarce at the time), and I thought ‘I can’t do this. The response from his wife Phyllis, and Lee’s widow Lillian, was strong commitment to moving the farm operation forward. “Their support, along with the support of four very committed employees, kept the farm operation alive. Together we formed a team,” Dave says. It won’t be known until August whether Nichols Farms was selected as the ESAP Region 3 winner. If it is selected, it will compete for the national ESAP title with six other regional winners. The national winner will be announced during the Cattle Industry Annual Convention and Trade Show in San Antonio in February 2015. ESAP is supported by the National Cattlemen’s Foundation, Dow AgroSciences, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

Bureau discount indicate you are a Farm Bureau member and mention our Farm Bureau group number G875. Farm Bureau members are entitled to the following with their AAA Individual Membership package: Automotive: Emergency roadside assistance, auto financing, auto repair work (direct repair shops) and traffic safety. Auto Travel: Triptiks Routings, tour books, maps-local and state, USA lodging reservations, land tours, theme park tickets, camp books and club magazines. Travel Agency: Tours, cruises, land/air tours, motor coach tours, ATI special priced packages, monthly member on trips, car rental, passports and specialty and group trips. Show your card and save: National savings — save up to 20 percent or more on glasses, apparel, shoes, dining, sporting events, fitness, auto repair and maintenance, dry cleaning, museums, restaurants and entertainment, theme parks, lodging, car rental, truck rental, leisure, fitness, prescriptions and savings at Prime, Tanger and Reebok outlet malls. Community: Traffic and safety education, seat belt safety, quality safety, child fingerprinting, safety patrol, child passenger safety seats, teen driving, older wiser driving and how to read a map.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

NORTH WEST IOWA

LYON . OSCEOLA . DICKINSON . EMMET . SIOUX . O’BRIEN . CLAY . PALO ALTO . PLYMOUTH . CHEROKEE BUENA VISTA . POCAHONTAS . WOODBURY . IDA . SAC . CALHOUN . MONONA . CRAWFORD . CARROLL . GREENE

Mary had a little lamb SUBMITTED BY SAC OK – it wasn’t Mary who had this little lamb. It was Sac County Farm Bureau’s Ag in the Classroom (AITC) coordinator Candace Booth and her husband, Dennis, who had a little lamb, but they did bring him to school one day. In fact, the lamb visited several schools! Dennis and Candace brought their little lamb to visit students in the Sac City, Odebolt and Schaller elementary schools. As the children “laughed and played” with the lamb, the Booths

taught them that: * Sheep are raised for their meat and wool. * Lambs are most often born as twins and weigh around nine pounds at birth. * Lambs can walk within minutes after birth. * Lambs will drink their mother’s milk until they are around four months old. * Lambs are born with eight milk teeth that are like human baby teeth. Two of these teeth will fall out each year until they

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Dennis Booth is sharing some facts about lambs with young scholars at the Schaller-Crestland Elementary School.

have all been replaced with mature teeth. * Lambs are born with long tails but most have their tails cut

off when they are only a few days old to prevent infections. * The first shearing of a sheep’s wool produces lamb’s wool. It is

Safe foods webinar scheduled SUBMITTED BY CALHOUN Media reports of foodborne illness outbreaks in the U.S. have shaken some consumers’ trust of the food system. However, nutrition and health professionals can help restore this trust through effec-

tive food safety. That’s why the spring 2014 Current Issues in Nutrition conference examines food safety concerns and what safe food really means. The online conference for nutrition and health professionals is organized

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

much softer than mature wool. The lamb is shorn for the first time when they are between 7 and 9 months of age.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and the ISU Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Pre-recorded presentations already are available and the live question and answer session will be May 1, noon to 1:30 p.m. CDT. Featured speakers are Catherine Strohbehn and Angela Shaw from Iowa State University and Tami Cline, of Cline Consulting. Strohbehn, adjunct professor in hospitality management, and Shaw, assistant professor of food safety, will address misconceptions about what is “safe” to eat, policies and best practices currently in place to ensure the safety of the U.S. food system and science-based impacts of different production methods on food safety. Cline, who has more than 20 years of experience in the foodservice industry, will discuss how nutrition practitioners can effectively communicate food safety messages to the public that reduce fear and avoid promotion of one food system strategy over another. To participate in Current Issues in Nutrition, register online at www.cpm.iastate.edu/cin. The cost is $35 for each participant and payment may be made by credit card, check or purchase order. All registered participants will be emailed instructions for viewing the pre-recorded presentations and for participating in the interactive question and answer session.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

SOUTH EAST IOWA

MAHASKA . KEOKUK . WASHINGTON . LOUISA . MUSCATINE . MONROE . WAPELLO . JEFFERSON . HENRY . DES MOINES . APPANOOSE . DAVIS . VAN BUREN . LEE

Lunch and Learn webinar on Bed Bug prevention SUBMITTED BY DES MOINES, HENRY, LEE In the coming months, as many Americans travel for summer vacations, some will return with more than memories and mementos of their trip. Some will accidentally bring bed bugs into their homes. Bed bug populations are expanding rapidly in many areas of the country, infesting hotels, homes and businesses. The small, reddish brown-colored insects can make their way into the luggage of unsuspecting tourists. Iowa State University Extension and Out-

reach is hosting a webinar - Lunch and Learn: “Don’t Let The Bed Bugs Bite” in Henry and Lee Counties to help combat this issue in our area. Henry County’s webinar will be held on Tuesday, May 6, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Henry County Extension office, 127 N. Main, Mount Pleasant. The cost is $5 and includes a light lunch. Register by calling 319-385-8126 or visit www. extension.iastate.edu/henry. Lee County’s webinar will be held on Wednesday, May 7, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Lee County

Extension office, 414 N. Main, Donnellson. The cost is $5 and includes a light lunch. Register by calling 319835-5116 or visit www.extension. iastate.edu/lee. Prevention is key to combating bed bugs, and this upcoming webinar will provide details on preventing these troublesome pests from infiltrating the home. Chris Becker, a Regional Extension Agent for the Alabama Cooperative Extension System will moderate the webinar and the speaker will be Dr. Dini Miller of Virginia Tech. “With the vacation season under way, this is a very timely information,” Becker said. “It is much easier to prevent bed bugs than it is to

get rid of them once they infest your home. The webinar will include some information on controlling bed bugs but will focus on preventing them from getting into your home.” Becker said a pest control professional is typically needed to eradicate the blood-sucking insects once they make their way into your home. He said there are a lot of misconceptions about bed bugs. “Many people think bed bugs only infest budget hotels and unclean homes,” he said. “I’ve had people call me with questions about how to get rid of bed bugs who said they picked them up in a luxury hotel. There are people who live in very nice homes that are kept extremely clean.”

Becker said any home could become infested with bed bugs if the residents are not careful when they travel. Residents can also bring bed bugs into their home on used bedding and furniture. The insects can also be left behind when someone moves out of an apartment or rental home. ISU Extension and Outreach is part of an educational network supported by Iowa State University, local county governments, and the United States Department of Agriculture. ISUEO works to increase learning opportunities for citizens of Iowa by providing unbiased, research-based information that will improve quality of life.

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Muscatine High School’s FFA horticulture class has taught the students how to seed, germinate and transplant many different plants. PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSCATINE COUNTY

FFA horticulture class blossoms Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

who should be one! Send an email to RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

SUBMITTED BY MUSCATINE The Muscatine High School’s FFA has a wonderful learning experience with our beloved horticulture class. Through this class we have learned how to seed, germinate and even transplant many different plants. This year we have grown several new plants such as houseplants, sensitive plants, herbs and fountain grass. We have seeded many different plants which include impatiens, pansies, coleus, marigolds, petunias and many more! After the seeds started to germinate we took them out to the greenhouse and prepped for transplanting. After we finished transplanting all of the seeded plants we then start on cuttings that we have got from wholesalers. We transplanted these cuttings into larger containers and allowed them to put out plenty of foliage growth but no reproductive growth. Once we get closer to the greenhouse opening date, we will allow them to put out reproductive growth and bloom. Our greenhouse sales started April 24 and we are open Thursdays and Fridays. Thanks for your time.


IOWA FARM BUREAU SPOKESMAN

APRIL 30, 2014

SOUTH WEST IOWA

HARRISON . SHELBY . AUDUBON . GUTHRIE . ADAIR . CASS . WEST POTTAWATTAMIE . EAST POTTAWATTAMIE . MILLS . MONTGOMERY ADAMS . UNION . CLARKE . LUCAS . FREMONT . PAGE . TAYLOR . RINGGOLD . DECATUR . WAYNE

Second annual Iowa Women’s Landowner Conference SUBMITTED BY WEST POTTAWATTAMIE This year’s Iowa Women’s Landowner conference will take place Thursday, June 19, at the Michael J. Mannatt Community Center in Brooklyn. Women farmland owners have the potential to transform Iowa’s landscape and farm communities in significant and positive ways, given that women own or co-own nearly half of Iowa’s farmland.

Women, Land and Legacy has partnered with Iowa Land Sales and Farm Management to provide information to women who want to learn more about how to care for and pass on the land. Featured speakers will include: Senator Liz Mathis - Iowa State Senator; Mike Pearson - Moderator; Mark Hubbard - Financial Advisor with Farm and Business Financial Services; Kate Timmerman - Iowa County District Con-

servationist, NRCS; Jennifer Ness - Iowa County Executive Director, FSA; Rachelle L.K. Johnson - Attorney; Kevin McClure - Production Adjustment Specialist, FSA State Office and Joan Johanson - Humorist. Visit www.iowaland-

sales.com for more information including the day’s schedule and full speaker bios. Registration fee is $30 and includes breakfast, lunch, refreshments and door prizes. Visit iowalandsales.com to register and

pay the fee online. To register by phone, call 641-623-5263 and ask for Whitney; by mail, call or email Iowa Land Sales and request registration materials. Registration fee through June 9 is $30 and is $40 thereafter.

FARM FAMILY FAVORITES

Cheddar and Mushroom Breakfast Squares Midwest Dairy Association recipe 2 tsp. butter 2 c. sliced white button mushrooms 1/2 c. sliced green onion, including green tops 6 slices country style bread, cubed 2 c. egg substitute

2 c. shredded, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 2 c. fat-free or low-fat milk 1 tsp. red or green hot pepper sauce (optional) 1/4 tsp. salt (optional)

Spray an 8x8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with cooking spray; set aside. In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add mushrooms. Cook mushrooms about 5 minutes or until softened and brown at edges. Stir in green onion; set aside. Place half of bread cubes in prepared baking dish. Scatter half of mushroom mixture and half of cheese over bread cubes. Layer remaining bread cubes and mushroom mixture; set aside. In a large bowl, beat milk, egg substitute, pepper sauce and salt, if desired, until well blended. Pour milk mixture over bread cubes, and top with the remaining cheese. (Make ahead suggestion: Cover dish with foil and refrigerate for 8-10 hours before baking.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake covered for 45 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes or until top is puffed up and cheese is browned at edges. Let cool for 5 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Lemon Layer Dessert Jody Nelson, Hornick (Woodbury County) Crust: 1 c. all-purpose flour 1 c. finely chopped walnuts 1/2 c. cold butter Filling: 2 boxes cook and serve lemon pudding & pie filling Topping: 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened 2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Griswold FFA takes the plunge SUBMITTED BY CASS On April 9, the Griswold FFA Chapter did the “Plunge

for Landon.” Landon Shaw is a 5-month-old baby that is fighting cancer. As a way to help out the

Did You Know? You can earn up to $4,000 when you refer someone who becomes a Farm Bureau agent! The Farm Bureau Financial Services Recruiting Rewards program pays up to $4,000 when your referral meets certain milestones. You know what qualities a Farm Bureau agent should possess so you’re the perfect person to tell us who should be one! Send an email to

1/3 c. cold milk 1 ( 12-oz) container whipped topping 1 package instant lemon pudding

Prepare crust by cutting butter in flour and nuts until mixture resembles course crumbs. Press into greased 9x13-inch baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Set aside to cool. Prepare filling by cooking lemon pudding and pie filling according to package directions. Cool slightly and pour over crust. Cool completely. Combine cream cheese and lemon juice. Add milk; mix until smooth. Spoon whipped topping over mixture. Sprinkle with instant pudding mix, and mix well. Mixture will be thick. Spread over cooled filling. Chill for 4 hours before serving.

RecruitingRewards@FBFS.com with your name, member ID and your referral’s name.

family, people all over the area have been participating in a massive polar plunge to raise support. How it works is someone will challenge you and offer up so much money for every person who accepts. Once you are challenged you have to complete your plunge in 24 hours. You record your plunge, state who you challenge, how much money you will donate for each one, and jump into the icy water. Griswold’s FFA Chapter was challenged by Clarinda’s FFA, so on April 9, they accepted the challenge. Everyone participating in the plunge gathered in the Ag room then set out to Cold Springs Park. Kinzey Nicklaus announced who Griswold’s FFA Chapter was challenging: Atlantic FFA, Orient-Macksburg FFA, Nodaway Valley FFA and East Mills FFA. They pledged $50 for each chapter that follows through. Everyone participating in the plunge from the chapter included Jacob Dorscher, Tyler Bourrette, Mandi Backhaus, Tatum Dolph, Sydney Steffens, Kylie Beebe, Jessica Marshall, Hannah Misner, Alyssa Dean, Kinzey Nicklaus, Jackie Rush, Tyler Wyman, Walker Mundorf, Hannah Willms, Austin Lorenz, Lexi Watson and Mr. Blair. Everyone had fun and enjoyed helping to support a good cause.


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