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Bits and pieces of cast off vintage jewelry; resurrected, rearranged and restored.

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$95.00

Yesterday’s Tomorrow

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One of a kind relics.

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For more information contact Hollis at 406-253-3621. 40% of the proceeds benefits the Montana Woman Foundation’s Scholarship Fund.


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Feature Story 35 • The

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12 • tRENDCAST MOVING

Lifestyle

May

Beauty

FORWARD

22 • Living BeautifullY

Business 24 • Taking Care of Business 26 • Serena Rundberg

Home & Hearth

28 • Petals, Projects & Pizzazz 30 • Real Food Revival 32 • Creating with station 8 34 • Details, Details

Health & Wellness

44 • Woman to Woman 46 • Healthy Living 47 • Thinking about Thinking 48 • Karen Lynch 94 • Intuitive inSights 96 • Look to the Stars

52 • Susan Connell 54 • Age-ing to Sage-ing® 57 • Treasure Chest 58 • In the Scheme of Things 59 • Soul Responsibilities 60 • The Creative Principle 62 • Bedtime Stories for Grownups 64 • Jennifer Shelley

Active Outdoor

66 • Amy Grisak 68 • Morgan Araldi 69 • Jessie Harring

Community

70 • The Honorable Ingrid Gustafson 72 • Steppin' out 73 • Did You Know? 74 • Home Sweet Home

Food & Spirits 76 • Keeping It Real 78 • From The MW Kitchen 80 • Western Comfort

Entertainment 82 • Women Artists of GNP 84 • History Lesson 86 • Jeanette Rehahn 88 • Lavonne Mueller 90 • Montana Musings 92 • Thanks, Credits, & Kudos


You’re in caring hands at The Nesting Place. Our highly trained, compassionate staff at The Nesting Place at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center welcomes you and your baby. We offer: • Free childbirth education • Newly remodeled birthing rooms with relaxing Jacuzzi ® baths • Warm, inviting, family -friendly labor and delivery unit • Three Certified Lactation Consultants • Flexible visiting hours • Private postpartum rooms • Celebratory new parent dinner • Well-baby nursery • Complimentary blanket and onesie • Online nursery with professional photography • Daycare on-site

Kelly Bagnell, MD, and Jamie Straub, DO 406-883-5680 | providence.org/montana

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Publisher Editor Cindy O’Boyle

May 2015

Assistant Editor Andrea Blair

Send all letters, original stories, and poetry to: 1103 S Main St Kalispell, MT 59901

Creative Director Cindy O’Boyle Creative Department Diane Mills

Visit our website montanawoman.com

Advertising Department Cindy O’Boyle Sherri Gerek

Email the publisher info@montanawoman.com (406) 755.5753

Photographers Andrea Blair Jill Courtney Jennifer Steven Alisia Cubberly Valerie McIntyre Wayne Murphy Digital Art Department Zach Klehm Jennifer Steven

Photo by Valerie McIntyre

All material appearing in Montana Woman Magazine may not be reproduced in part or in whole without the written consent of the publisher.

Clip & Mail!

All contents © 2015 Montana Woman. The views expressed by the writers are their own and do not reflect the opinions of Montana Woman Magazine.

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WOMAN Yes, please start my 1 year (12 issues) subscription today! Send check or money order to: Montana Woman 1103 S Main St • Kalispell, MT 59901

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Photo by Lovelight Photography

Publisher’s Note Over the years as Publisher of Montana Woman Magazine, I have realized what a diverse group of women read and support the Montana Woman vision. Montana’s diversity of landscape leads to a diversity of women who are blessed to call this majestic state home. From the lush coniferous forests of Western Montana to the rolling prairies of Eastern Montana, women are embracing the freedom to be whoever and whatever they so desire. I love that Montana communities provide the opportunity for women to be career women, hunters, sportswomen, ranchers, farmers, cowgirls, theatrical performers, artists, athletes and glamour queens – all in the same day! I also celebrate the fact that these pioneering women are wives, mothers, daughters, and community members who appreciate and support the differences in each other. As you read this month’s issue, you will notice the strength and diversity demonstrated by women in Montana – across all walks of life. They are women of substance, power, positive influence and women of meaning. I feel that being branded a Montana woman is one of the greatest compliments that can be given a woman. These women embrace their individuality. The pressure put on women in today’s society is immense. We should not let the likes of perfected images or criticism affect us. Being different and imperfect is far more interesting than being a perfect person. I believe that being yourself and feeling happy as yourself- just the way you are signifies the word “beauty.”

The Montana Woman team is excited to present the eclectic group of women that grace this month’s pages. Join us in celebrating the innumerable ways in which the remarkable spirit, courage, and strength of women have added to the vitality, richness, and diversity of the world. The charm, the beauty, and the sheer essence of a woman are untouchable. What a beautiful thing.

Take Care,

Montana women aren’t afraid to use their voice to stand up for their beliefs.

They aren’t afraid to say what they think, say what they believe in, and argue against what they don’t.

Montana women follow their heart. They never give up. They understand that we all have the ability to do whatever it is we want to do and fulfill any dream we want to fulfill; we just have to go and do it. When you find your passion, it creates a meaning in your life and gives you purpose in the world; it generates happiness.

Montana women follow their heart. They never give up.

Montana women honor their morals and values. Living by your morals and values in life

inspires and motivates you to do something significant in the world. As children, we were always being told to be a person of high morals and were educated to understand what our values are. Montana women don’t lose sight of those early lessons.

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Betty Kuffel

Diane Mills

Margie Johnson

Holly Alastra

Nan Russell

Kathleen Maguire

Pat McGlynn

Patty Crow

Mel Mathes

Melanie Blair

Andrea Blair

Lisa Levandowski

CONTRIBUTORS


Sherri Gerek

Colette Gross

Zach Klehm

Elsie Johnson

Promotional

MW

May Showcase Good Finds

Valerie McIntyre

Amber Reiner

Traveler Bracelet With Garnet $194.00 Hand crafted sterling silver chain with charm Charm is oxidized sterling with 14k gold accents and garnet beads stitched on with red silk cord allisonkallaway.com

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Emily Myers

Rena Desmond

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GO digital

Enjoy the May digital edition on your iPad with interactive extras and exclusive content.

Our gift to you

Available in the iTunes Store in May

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A Vintage Decorating Destination Home Accents & Gifts

Spring Open House

Behind The Scenes

MW

Etta Sepp Hair and Makeup by Libertie Barkley of Soucie Soucie Salon & Spa

Saturday May 9th 9-5pm

Monday - Saturday 9:30am - 5:30pm

Cover Photo by Valerie McIntyre

38 Hwy 2 East / Columbia Falls station8antiques.com 406.892.1123

Feature Article

on page 35

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Special thanks to J Scott Couture for providing the beautiful dress for the feature article and the glamorous gowns for the women featured in Trendcast.

J Scott Couture is committed to making the experience of finding the perfect gown or dress, shoes, and jewelry, a special one. Thank you for helping make this month’s photo shoots

7915 MT Highway 35 Bigfork MT 59911 406.837.7902 10

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Photo by Valerie McIntyre

memories that will last a lifetime.


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Beauty

tRENDCAST MOVING FORWARD

Trendcast

Moving Forward

By Cindy O’Boyle | Photos By JMK Photography | Wardrobe by J Scott Couture | Hair and Makeup by Soucie Soucie Salon & Spa

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"We should never stop

rocking,

just because we roll!" - Starla Hilliard-Barnes Ms. Wheelchair Montana 2014

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T

Beauty

he May issue is dedicated to the strength and diversity of Montana’s women. These women are perfect examples that inner strength is like a powerful engine that drives successful people towards accomplishment and achievement. Willpower and inner strength are vital; without them it is difficult to get to the finish line of what you have started.

T

rendcast this month features women that challenge the unrealistic standard of beauty that exists today and demonstrates that there is beauty in confidence, strength, and uniqueness. Some were born with disabilities, others were victims of tragic accidents, but all women who participate in The Moving Forward Foundation share a common goal – to live life without limitations.

...there is beauty in confidence, strength, and uniqueness...

T

he mission of the Foundation “is to enhance the quality of life for the differently-able or those who have been through a tragic event by breaking down barriers and providing adaptive recreational activities.” Co-Founder Starla Barnes knows the struggle first hand. In 2009 while riding her motorcycle, she was hit by a truck. Starla was left paralyzed from the waist down. After months of recovery and physical therapy, Starla wanted to participate in the sporting activities she’d enjoyed since youth. That desire motivated her and her husband, Shannon, to start the Moving Forward Foundation.

T

he Foundation’s biggest project is an Inclusion Playground. The goal for the playground is “to build truly inclusive playgrounds in the Flathead… where adults and children can play together in a fun and welcoming environment, no matter if able bodied or differently-abled, all should be included.”

S

tarla shares, “As an adult with a disability, oftentimes I am left on the sidelines watching my child play. I know I am not the only one. Visiting S.O.A.R. playground in Ohio was the most emotional experience since my daughter’s birth. I never imagined that I would have the opportunity to play face to face with my daughter on a jungle gym. My husband (Shannon) and I vowed from this moment that we would do everything in our power to come back to the Flathead and make just that happen!

We have brought this to the Mayor's attention. Mayor Mark Johnson agrees that the Flathead Valley needs a barrier free playground. In order to avoid having to alter every playground we feel we could focus on one larger project as a priority, with future plans to bring all the playgrounds into compliance. Our next steps are to approve a location and raise monies needed to build an accessible playground. No child or adult should ever be left out. We need to break down the barriers.”

For more information please visit neverstoprocking.com

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Starla Hillard-Barnes

Co-Founder of Moving Forward Foundation | Ms. Wheelchair Montana 2014-15 Wife & Mother “The world around us is an inspiration and each day we have a new canvas to paint. It is inspiring to know that each day I have a new chance for my Lord and Savior, husband, daughter, family, friends and strangers to inspire me. People who selflessly give themselves to others and choose to make what seems impossible possible inspire me. Or those who have iron tenacity and choose to make the most of each day.

“To me strength is not about being physically strong, but what comes from within us. It is the ability to pick ourselves up and move forward without dwelling in the past, no matter what life puts in our path.”

“I believe my iron tenacity and compassion for others is my greatest strength."

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Annie Crone Wife & Mother

“Honestly, everyone around me inspires me. Whether that is family, friends or even someone I will never know. Watching the details of a really great skier and breaking down each little action they take makes me aspire to be a better skier (is an example).

“I think my greatest strength has been learning to look at what is ahead and not dwell on what is behind me. I try to live each day and never take anything for granted. After becoming paralyzed, I realized that if I don’t take advantage of every opportunity that comes my way, I may never get another chance again.”

“Strength, to me, is not being defeated by life’s obstacles."

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Kimberely Barreda

Internet Developer, Operator of Unlimbited.com, Adaptive Skiing.net & Program Director for Vets-Help.org

“People who do not allow other negative attitudes to get in their way of living their dream inspire me. My independence and determination have allowed me to reach my goals and to succeed at things some might think impossible.”

“Standing up for what’s right and what you believe in, even if it’s unpopular and uncomfortable, requires great strength."

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Kelly Sellars Student & Mother

“My sons Dresyn and Carter are my inspiration. They give me the strength to be caring, empathetic, and independent. I am strong not just for myself, but also for my children. I am their image of strength and have to show them that no matter what happens you can never give up on yourself.�

“I live empowered despite my circumstances."

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Emily Berner Artist

“I have always enjoyed art, dance and horses. To me, music is life. Simple words said a certain way can evoke very powerful feelings in a person. “After the accident I thought that doing anything fun and active was not possible. Moving Forward showed me that exciting, fun activities were still possible. I am very grateful to be a part of this organization and look to more adventures in the future. “Strength to me means never giving up. I want to inspire people to do their very best no matter their circumstances. When someone tells me that I can’t or shouldn’t do something, I get an extremely strong ‘I’ll show you’ attitude.”

“I will not give up. I will defeat the odds."

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Melina Peck

Beauty

Student

“I love helping others succeed. I hope my happy and positive attitude helps those who are sad and hurting. My friends and family call me the people pleaser because people are drawn to me and I tend to put other peoples’ needs before my own. I love making new friends!”

“Strength means having courage to do the things you want to do even though it is hard."

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406.755.2337 In a hurry? Our Drive-thru is open 11a.m. to 1:30a.m. - 7 days a week. And....visit Moostly Mooses next door for that unique Montana gift!

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308 + 312 E. MAIN ST. BOZEMAN • THENOVACAFE.COM • 406.587.3973 M O N TA N AW O M A N . C O M

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A

s a professional makeup artist, I have worked countless weddings, and having been a bride myself, I know how important every little detail is. Here are a few tips on achieving a perfect makeup look for your special day.

Bridal Makeup

Say “I do” to flawless wedding day makeup! Living BeautifullY

1. First, if you plan on hiring a makeup artist, make sure you look at their portfolio, bio and professional training. As my MAC trainer and celebrity artist Victor Cembelin taught me, there are a lot of people who may be able to apply pretty makeup, but this is your wedding and you want to know that the person you’re hiring is capable of coming through. Also, plan your consultation no more than one month before the date for the purpose of skin tone and coloring.

By Emily Myers Photo By Kelly Kirksey Photography

EmJ Cosmetics

Professional Makeup Artistry

Bridal 2015 Now booking! On location makeup artistry services specializing in special occasion, bridal and high definition. www.emjcosmetics.com 406-270-9842

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2. As you contemplate your bridal makeup look, keep in mind both the time of day the ceremony is to take place as well as any theme you may have chosen. For instance, if you’re having an outdoor wedding, add a punch of color. If your ceremony is to take place indoors during the day, a pretty, neutral, soft focus look is best. Now, for the brides who have chosen a romantic, evening affair, a more dramatic sultry look will compliment perfectly! 3. To ensure your skin is clean, clear and glowing, plan a facial at least one week before the big day (just in case your skin becomes irritated). Don’t forget, your skin is the base for everything else! 4. Speaking of base, when choosing a foundation, consider the texture. Choose either a matte or satin finish. Please, no shiny or “dewy” finishes. It may look beautiful in person, but not in photographs. For all those pictures that are to be taken, a soft focus look is best. 5. A tip for the adventurous: Now is not the time to try something completely different and new, like green eye shadow! You want your groom to recognize you as you’re strolling down the aisle. This doesn’t mean you can’t have fun with your wedding day look, just make sure it reflects who you are. Your makeup is just as important and critical to your dream look as your hair and the dress that you spent so long looking for. Remember, this is your wedding day and you want it to be perfect. Check out my website at emjcosmetics.com to look at my Services/Pricing Menu and to book your date!!!

y l i m E

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Business

Under Construction Taking Care of Business By Priscilla Garrett

To perform your job to your full capacity you need to understand the difference between a talent and a strength. We are living in a self-serving, self-centered, and self-obsessed modern day rush-rush society filled with negativity and constant tearing down of others. If you want to really differentiate yourself in this world, be people-oriented and start to focus on building others up. Created as relational beings, it is our greatest privilege to enjoy companionship with the people who truly matter in our lives. How can we then be a source of encouragement to our business associates, friends, family and loved ones today?

Here are simple ways to build each other up: Esteem others higher. Leaders esteem others higher than themselves. Have high regards, great respect, and favorable thoughts of the people in your circle of trust and influence.

Be wise in your speech. Communicate more effectively by thinking before you speak. If there’s a word that’s more appropriate in a conversation, use it. Start with a praise. Never confront others. Instead, point out how both of you can make things better. Speak at the same level as your audience; giving them due respect. There’s no need to come in with an authoritarian voice to get your message heard.

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“You

need to be aware of what others are doing, applaud their efforts, acknowledge their successes, and encourage them in their pursuits. When we all help one another, everybody wins.” – Jim Stovall


Be encouraging. Encouragement is an expression and assurance of one’s hope and future in words, presence, and sincerity.

Be quick to forgive. When others make a mistake, be quick to forgive and forget; releasing them from guilt and shame that may take root in one’s heart when not dealt with over time.

Be understanding. Wisdom and understanding go hand in hand. Understanding starts by being an active listener (not planning a reply as one is speaking), asking intelligent questions to gain further insights, and being accepting of what the speaker is sharing. Then, answer without condemning. Or don’t answer at all and decide to just be a listening ear.

Zero gossip. Keep others’ secrets. Never speak stuff that causes unnecessary hurt to others by speaking unclaimed rumors behind their back. Share knowledge. Found an article or book

Visualize how and to whom you can build up and inspire changes for the better. Then work towards making that a reality. Continue encouraging and building one another up. And start seeing growth and advancements in your relationship with people in all aspects of your life.

406-407-7300 nikkidemars@spherion.com www.spherion.com 2452 Hwy 93 South in Kalispell

that’s useful? Share it with your friends. Sharing has been made easier thanks to the accessibility of sharing tools on the web, along with help from social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook. Sharing knowledge helps us learn, discover, and understand things that are interesting. They have immediate application for better results in our work and life, edifies our soul, and improves our daily conversations.

Stay humble. Humility and maturity are synonymous. A dignified person accomplishes much, but brags little. They are secure in their standing without needing to make noise, often treating everyone with tremendous respect, regardless of position.

Be positive! Positive thinking goes beyond having the drive and motivation for personal success. Positive thinking is explicit, definite, and outspoken. It’s contagious. Build up your loved ones with your positiveness, allowing them to be open for better things to come.

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Business

Serena Rundberg: Feeding Her Soul By Andrea Blair

There is success, and there’s happiness. Not always do the two things come together seamlessly. Serena Rundberg was successful in the corporate world for about 12 years, but says that her former career in software sales was “sucking my soul dry.” In 2004 she sought the services of a life coach to help her sort it all out and figure out how to live a life that was both successful (by her own definition) as well as happy. Through the process, she began to seriously consider a life that revolved around her passions for food, people, community and creativity.

Serena

When, in April of 2005, she visited her sister-in-law in Bozeman, the dream that was beginning to Rundberg become clear to her suddenly became a lucid and viable reality. The Gallatin Valley is a captivating enough place on its own, but when Serena discovered O’Brien’s, a café for sale in Bozeman, she was all in. She and her business partner both moved from California, bought O’Brien’s, studied the day-today operation of the bustling restaurant and took over. By October of that year, they had rebranded, becoming the vivacious and inviting Nova Café, complete with a new menu and a personalized, welcoming atmosphere for the community.

North Valley Hospital in Whitefish offers

Moms a warm, welcoming environment with personalized health care… Now offering Nitrous Oxide for pain management during labor for our soon-to-be Mothers.  3D Ultrasound, Digital Mammography and DEXA Bone Density Scan with private waiting area.  Minimally Invasive Gynecological, Urological, ENT, and General Surgeries featuring da Vinci Robot.  24-Hour Emergency Department, Imaging and Lab. 

Happy Mothers’ Day!

www.nvhosp.org  406-963-3500

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A different kind of hospital. A different kind of care.


The goal, for Serena, has always been to provide a space for everyone—farmers, students, families, business people, young, old, and everyone in between—to congregate and enjoy great food. And, it should be noted, food that is locally sourced as much as possible. Whether it’s poultry, lamb, bison, beef or pork, it all comes from Montana. Supporting the local economy is a huge priority for Serena, and she’s keen on hiring folks who support the café’s mission. Her team has become a family, and they strive to serve the community in the way that any family welcomes their guests – with a friendly environment and food made with love. In the early days, Serena immersed herself in the process of recipe testing and creating a new menu with spins on old favorites. She helped run the “front of the house,” busing tables, operating the cash register and keeping the ship afloat to the best of her ability. And she says those early days were touch and go, they almost, almost, didn’t make it. However, she points out, somewhere along the line she heard that owners are better off working ON the business, rather than working IN the business, and she took this to heart. The theory proved to be valuable. In 2009,

she bought out her business partner, becoming the sole proprietress. When she hired others to do what she’d been trying to do without enough help for so long, “It really made my life better and the café ran more efficiently.” Hiring new management and staff at the Nova Café opened up more opportunity for Serena to get creative again, which was essentially what she’d been after since moving to Montana. The result of her newfound freedom? Feed Café. Her new culinary venture will focus on taking “what Nova does really well to a whole new level.” Feed Café will offer local artisan fare such as freshly baked bread and pastries, scratch made pasta, teas and coffee, and a fine variety of other delicacies. Serving breakfast and lunch from the historic red barn building in Bozeman, Feed Café is scheduled to open around May 1st, and will be a counter-service establishment where folks can pop in for something fresh and delicious to go. So, there’s success, and there’s happiness. Having followed her heart and taken a little risk, Serena Rundberg is enjoying both tremendously.

BURTON

Gary

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Home & Hearth

Petals, Projects & Pizzazz By Lisa Levandowski

L

ilies are a wonderful addition to flower gardens. They are available in

numerous colors and are very easy to propagate. The best times to plant lily bulbs are spring or in the fall before it frosts. You may plant the bulbs in pots or in your flower garden. Just make sure the soil is fertile, has good drainage, and is in full or part sun. Plant lily bulbs approximately 12"-18" apart and 4"- 6" deep. Come November, if the area you planted the bulbs in will be covered by snow you won't need to do anything; however, if snow coverage is light or nonexistent, mulch before the ground freezes. Don't remove the mulch until spring after the final frost. Each spring you may use a 5-10-10 fertilizer.

Glacier Wallflower

Antiques, Flowers & Chocolates Glacierwallflowers.com 406-892-4069 / 800-406-4157 9 Hwy 2 E Columbia Falls

FTD - teleflora

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W

hen cutting lily stems, it’s best to harvest in the morning. This is when the stems are most hydrated.

To avoid passing diseases from one plant to another, always use clean tools. Lilies are susceptible to aphids and fungal infections. To get rid of aphids, use Malathion or neem soap, and for fungal infections, use fungicide such as Bravo or Greenguard. Your local nursery may have other great choices. Upon bringing lilies into your home, remove the pollen. Be careful not to let the fabrics touch pollen as the pollen may cause a stain. Should pollen fall on fabric, wait until it and fabric are dry, and then use a dry clean cloth, paper towel or even a piece of chenille to gently remove pollen. Do not use your hands or wet fabric as the oil and water will set the stain.

From all of us at Glacier Wallflower & Gifts happy planting. Remember Mother's Day is May 10th. Visit our website for all your floral and plant needs www.glacierwallflowers.com.

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Home & Hearth

Hybrid vs. Heirloom Photo by Amy Grisak

Real Food Revival By Amy Grisak

When choosing the right variety of fruit or vegetables, many people are confused on whether to opt for heirlooms or pick a hybrid. There are positive and negative qualities of each, so it’s important to know the difference. The first step is understanding what open-pollinated, heirlooms, hybrids and genetically modified varieties are. Open-pollinated varieties are those that produce offspring identical to the parents. You can save the seed (as long as they haven’t accidently cross-pollinated with another variety), and enjoy the same variety next season. Heirlooms are always open-pollinated. But to fit the criteria for an heirloom, they usually date back before WWII, and often have an interesting history behind them. For example, the “Mortgage Lifter” tomato was developed during the Depression by a gentleman who sold the seed to pay off his house. 30

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“A hybrid is a fancy way of saying cross-pollination. It’s a natural process,” says Emily Haga, lettuce and tomato breeder at Johnny’s Selected Seeds. “We make hybrids by controlled mating. We choose things that are going to complement in some way.” She says, for example, one parent plant might have great flavor and matures early, but is very susceptible to certain diseases. Breeders might cross this one with another that has excellent disease resistance, yet is a mediocre tasting vegetable. By combining these, breeders strive to create a vegetable with the best of both parents. This creates what’s called “hybrid vigor.” Haga says, “Basically, what hybrid vigor is - is this enhanced vigor you didn’t see in either parent plant. In general, that’s a phenomena people have observed for hundreds of years.” It’s not easy playing the part of the bee. In order to create a hybrid, breeders must wait until the flower is ripe, but


not open. Once it reaches this critical stage, they open up the flower and remove the anther (the male part), unless it’s a variety that’s natural sterile (meaning it doesn’t have viable male parts). Then, they must take the anther from the other parent plant, and hand-pollinate the first one. The plant must be grown out, the fruit or vegetable harvested and the seeds saved. Since the seeds from the offspring will not produce vegetables that are the same as itself, this has to be done every season. Genetically modified cultivars are different than hybrids because breeders take one or two genes, often of a different species, and insert it into the DNA of the plant. “It bypasses the natural process,” says Haga. This is primarily done for commercial crops, such as soybeans and corn, to provide characteristics such as natural disease resistance and the ability to be sprayed with herbicides without damage as a means of weed control. Choosing the right variety depends on what you’re looking for in your vegetables. Most people who grow any openpollinated variety, whether a hybrid or a newer OP breed, do so because they want to save their own seed. As long as they protect the parent plant from being cross-pollinated by another variety (this is done by segregating the crops or covering the flowers), the seed they plant will grow the same variety. Most people grow heirlooms because they love the flavor and, oftentimes, the funky and fun shapes and colors. They want to grow the same carrots, peppers and other vegetables their grandparents grew because they remember how good they tasted. It’s a connection to their roots.

For example, “Brandywine,” an heirloom tomato developed in Ohio in the late 1800s, is renowned to be the best flavored tomato in the world, and is a constant in many gardens. But there are also striped “Tigerella” tomatoes or the equally interesting “Cherokee Purple” with its beautiful color and sweet flavor. Planting heirlooms offers a unique palette of shapes, colors and flavors. There are a few drawbacks of heirlooms including nonuniform fruit, as well as a lack of disease resistance. The first characteristic may not be important to the home gardener who enjoys the crazy shapes and sizes. The second is a concern. There’s nothing more disheartening than having your crop die year after year because it has no resistance to a common fungal or viral disease. That’s where hybrids shine. Breeders purposefully develop varieties that can withstand common vegetable problems. A recent hybrid tomato called “Iron Lady” is resistant to late blight, early blight and Septoria leaf blight, three bothersome diseases that plague tomatoes. There are also plenty of hybrids that protect squash against powdery mildew, beans against mosaic virus, and any number of other issues. If you have specific disease concerns in your area, look for hybrids that offer resistance to them. Even though heirlooms have a reputation for fantastic flavor, hybrids have varieties with exceptional flavor as well. Hybrid sweet corn brings us the flavor we love. The “Carmen” sweet pepper is one of the sweetest peppers you can grow. Whether you choose heirlooms or hybrids, you really can’t go wrong. It’s more important to read the product descriptions to learn how they’ll grow in your area, as well as the traits you want in your fruits and vegetables.

Whether you choose heirlooms or hybrids, you really can’t go wrong.

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Creating with station 8

Cre8ing with

Station 8 By Angelee Crose | Photos by Alisia Cubberly

European Grace to a Montana Place Being born and raised in the Flathead Valley has shaped my perspective of the world, as it would for anyone who has roots. However, fervent desires to visit faraway places have never been lost on me. Watching “The Sound of Music” as a child was the biggest contributor to perceptions that shaped my view of Europe. I vowed to go to Austria and sing, “The hills are alive with the sound of music…,” at the top of my lungs. Well, I did get that opportunity while living abroad for seven years in Germany and the Netherlands. Although we might share quite a few commonalities with these countries, there were also things that I appreciated and enjoyed as a small town girl from Montana. The daily ritual of walking to your local baker would include a view of terra-cotta shingled houses of stucco or brick. Immaculately kept walkways of brick or concrete were weed free and swept clean. Rolling hills of open farmland, bordered by stone walls or hedges, divided pastures. Regularly cleaned windows were graced with overflowing flower boxes. No matter the age of the home or business, it always looked clean and minimalist. In the Netherlands, impeccable gardens were tended to in the traditional wooden clogs. windowscapes were created in typical Dutch homes. Phalaenopsis orchids garnished window frames. Glass vases with botanicals or modern sculptures were prominent as well. At night when lights came on, you could regard the whole interior of a neighbor’s living room. Curtains were rarely drawn in large front windows, as if to say, “Come look at my décor, behold my great taste!” I wasn’t just looking, I felt I was basking in European style!

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Square footage of living quarters in Europe were considerably smaller than what we are used to in the United States. Therefore, the decorating was very direct in its approach — simple, uncluttered, orderly, and refined. Décor trends in these countries leaned toward sleek and modern. If I needed a nice piece of handcrafted furniture, I would check the corner by my house or go to a second hand store. Residents of these countries converted heavy, hand carved wood pieces into lighter feeling pieces. Linear lines combined with smooth surfaces and minimal hardware seemed to be the desired look. Bright, bold colors incorporated into large pieces became focal points in a room. Another prominent type of décor in these two countries was French country. Soft accents of beautiful textiles and provincial patterns are the key signature of French country. Neutrals of various textures and tone-on-tone patterns brought wonderful visual interest to a room among more neutral color tones. Old world style of wood inlay or wood working paired well with architectural details of exposed wood beams, curved archways and rustic stone accents. Natural elements of woven baskets, wool or jute rugs were as common as stone fireplaces. Antiques were an important component of country French decor. Vintage pieces enhanced the European character of the spaces. Even though I miss Europe, I can still enjoy it here at home in Montana. Station 8 is unique in that we cover a range of tastes and styles. We carry industrial, mid-century modern, rustic, French country and shabby chic just to name a few. We take pride in knowing that if you are looking to add some “Europe” to your home, we can accommodate. The current dollar/euro exchange rate is excellent, but a trip to Station 8 is faster and a lot more affordable!

On behalf of Team 8, Angelee Crose The Shops at Station 8

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Home & Hearth

Outside Cleaning Details, Details By Melanie Blair

Finally, spring has sprung!

April showers bring May flowers, green grass and spring cleaning.  I’m sure everyone has most, if not all, of their spring cleaning checklist done (wink wink). When you think “spring cleaning,” the inside of your home probably comes to mind.  With the warm, sunny weather inviting us out, it’s hard to stay indoors.  Now is the perfect time to make the outside beautiful as well! Our homes take a lot of abuse during months of harsh winter elements. As with any big cleaning project, it is easier to approach the chores by diving them up.  Plus, this is Montana and the weather can change at any given moment.  Breaking up the chore list into small chunks over time will make it feel manageable. Freshen up the outside of your home by pressure washing or giving your home a bath to remove dirt and grime. Start at the highest point and work your way down. This will instantly improve your home’s appearance.   Gutter cleaning isn’t just a fall chore, especially if you live in a wooded area or are surrounded by trees. Downspouts have a tendency to clog and are often overlooked. With the sun shining bright, how’s the view through your windows? A bucket of warm water and mild soap will clean screens. Wipe them down carefully and spray them clean using the gentle setting on the hose nozzle. The warm sun will dry them for you.  

glaciercleaning1@gmail.com 406.253.8447

A great homemade glass cleaner is: 1 Cup rubbing alcohol 1 Cup water 1 Tablespoon of white vinegar Mix together in a new spray bottle and sparkling windows are just a squirt away! One area that is always a dirty mess is the garage.  Vehicles track in sand and mud over the winter months, creating a gravel pit. A good sweep out will help with the amount of dirt that enters the house. Decks and patios become additional living space, so this is the time to clean them up and make needed repairs.  If you stored your outdoor furniture, a quick wipe down should do (remember we did the hard work last fall), but if the furniture sat out all winter it will need some elbow grease and scrubbing.  And better not forget that barbeque grill, even if it is used all year long.  A good cleaning and degreasing is still necessary, and you’ll want to check your propane tank and keep an extra on the ready. Now that the outside of your home sweet home has had some TLC, sit back and enjoy the beautiful weather!

All In Stitches 210 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 Mon-Sat 9:30 am - 5:30 pm (406) 883-3643 Quilting, Knitting, & Fun! More Than A Quilt Store.

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Et ta Sepp

By Andreaa Blair | Photo by Valerie McIntyre | Jewelry By Allison Kallaway Jewelry

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The

Big Sky beckons people from near and far, and upon arrival many of us just feel that this is where we’re meant to put down roots. Etta Sepp and her husband, Jon, found this to be true. They arrived last year with the intention of raising their baby girl, some bison and a few horses here, and have been settling in ever since… but let’s start at the beginning. You couldn’t think up an adventure more unbelievably crazy and true than the real-life story of this Montana woman. Born in California to a veterinarian father and a mother she didn’t have nearly enough time with, Etta was swiftly delivered her first and most heart-breaking blow in life when her mother, Syndi, was killed in a horse-riding accident when Etta was just one-and-a-half years old. When her father, Lynn, remarried a couple of years later, the blended family struggled to connect. Etta and her father loved one another, but with the loss of her mother and complex emotions of the new family dynamics, Etta’s relationships with her father and stepmother were tumultuous. Her father, she reflects, didn’t know how to handle such an emotionally charged situation and instead immersed himself in what he did know how to do; he threw himself into his work, building his veterinary practice and providing for his family.

Etta paints a picture of a very young girl who felt lost and alone, constantly at odds with her stepmom. She and her older brother, Manning, were typical siblings; squabbling most of the time, but ultimately loving and protective of one another when it came down to it. She remembers him saying he knew how to cause just a little bit less trouble than she did, flying under the radar with Etta often in the hot seat. Etta had plenty of exposure to all kinds of animals in her father’s practice, and as a child she says she was both terrified of and drawn to horses. When she was five, she began to ride her neighbor’s Shetland pony. Her neighbor was a woman who rode horses with grace and confidence, and Etta remembers admiring her tremendously. Her time with the pony helped to instill a little bit more confidence in her, and she rode for fun and love of the animal, but acquired no serious training at that point.

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back now, she feels that having animals all around her growing up was soothing. She cared about the animals, learned the value of hard work through their care, and she believes that without them she may have resorted to more extreme behavior as a kid.

At the age of nine, Etta was sent to boarding school, another development in her early life that disconnected her from her family. After an adjustment period, however, she came to enjoy her school experience, making friends she still loves today, including “Momma Scott,” a houseparent that Etta describes as the first woman she ever came to trust. When she first arrived, she wanted to join the equestrian team but didn’t have the necessary instruction or skill. She began riding lessons, and in six months’ time was able to join the school’s new vaulting program. When you think of vaulting, gymnastics probably comes to mind, and that’s what it is, except with horses— gymnastics on a horse. Etta, audacious and determined, thought why not, and went for it. For the first year and a half she had a nice, gentle horse. She learned her skills: how to fall off of a horse properly, cartwheel off a horse properly, you know, the usual, and built her confidence by leaps and bounds (literally, you might say). Then she brazenly selected Beeper as her new partner. Beeper was a “mean old brat” that nobody wanted to ride, she says, and she chose him for that reason. By the age of 11 she’d won a national vaulting championship in her age group.

Given the reputation the modeling industry has for potentially being very damaging to young women, and despite the fact that Etta was so young and living completely in charge of herself, she didn’t struggle with these issues or find herself in any serious trouble. Boarding school had given her the advantage of developing a thick skin, and she had no trouble being hired regularly, so the industry wasn’t as tough on her self-esteem as it is known to be for other young women. Her lifestyle was a whirl wind of travel, work and some fun mixed in as well, but she maintains that she was not drawn into the dangers that are often spotlighted in the media. “The drugs were definitely there if you wanted them, but there was no one forcing us to do them.” There were plenty of opportunities to make bad decisions, but she was smart enough to take good care of herself and stay out of serious trouble. She was often so busy that she preferred to be wherever her home base was, sleeping.

Photo by Baii Nguyen

After four years at boarding school, Etta came home, feeling displaced and disconnected. She began modeling with an agency in LA. At age 14, she ran away from home, couch surfing, she calls it, at the homes of any of her friends that would have her. Before long she was showing a lot of promise as a model, and the agency arranged for her to live in an apartment with other models. Their

rent was taken from their earnings, and Etta was hired regularly. She started with mostly print work, but at 14 was hired for a Chanel runway show, which, she puzzles, didn’t mean much to her at the time. By age 15 she was contracted with Georgio Armani, moved to Milan, Italy, and began traveling all over the world. She’s modeled for some of the world’s most recognizable couture fashion labels, in print and on the runway.

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W hat

really bothered her more than anything about her lifestyle at that time, she says, was the lack of people she could trust; she was friendly with everyone but there was always a competitive undercurrent. Traveling was an education that expanded Etta’s worldview. “Seeing other cultures and meeting other people from around the world made me feel less messed up. Hearing other people's stories was good for my heart. It made me feel like just another story out there.” After a couple of years had passed in Milan, Etta became ill with pneumonia. The owner of her agency arranged for Etta to go to his families’ home in the country to recuperate. She was treated very kindly, began to recover well, and after a week of bed rest had the unexpected pleasure of taking up riding again.

“I offered to pay him to ride one of his horses,” Etta recalls. The agent wouldn’t take her money, and matter-of-factly inquired whether she was a capable rider or not. She assured him she was, and for some reason he was compelled to put her on a cantankerous old horse that hadn’t been ridden for quite a while. As she mounted the horse, she recalls that it began to buck and that she couldn’t stop smiling. Her agent quickly turned from dubious to impressed, and gave her permission to ride any horse she chose. She took advantage of the opportunity, and her newly discovered niche gave her an edge in her industry; she continued to model, at times on horseback. Etta returned to California when she was 18. She’d grown tired of the constant travel and living out of a suitcase, and wanted to spend more time in the company of horses. She got a job at a racetrack “walking hots,” or cooling down horses that had just raced. This job led to a connection which, under the guidance of a skilled horseman, allowed her to begin starting yearlings (training them to get used to having a saddle, then a person, on their back and eventually introducing them to the racetrack); a valuable learning experience for Etta. She loved working with the horses and eagerly learned as much as possible, advancing in her training ability as the horses matured and moved on to the racetrack.

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In

2008, as she rounded a bend at nearly 40 miles per hour on a two-year-old filly, another horse came out of a starting gate at the wrong moment, spooking her horse. The young horse attempted to jump a 4-foot gate; a disastrous mishap which injured the horse and nearly killed Etta on the same racetrack where her mother had died. The horse landed on her, crushing her, perforating her lungs and breaking almost every bone in her body. After a two-week hospital stay, she was released but far from recovered. One of Etta’s dreams had been to become a firefighter. After her accident, in her fragile physical condition, she learned that this was not going to be possible due to the extent of her injuries and the lasting effects of them. Unable to return to the racetrack, she enrolled in school to become an EMT, recovering slowly and focusing on her studies. After finishing her training, Etta spent about a year in LA City as an EMT, eventually returning to the racetrack as well, spending her days off there. But the work was grueling, gang activity in the city was prevalent and violent, and the hours proved prohibitive to pursuing her other interests. After that first year, she opted not to return to the city streets and instead used her training to begin assisting people at the racetrack, opening her own business as a medic. Among her many memorable travel adventures is a trip to Colorado that Etta planned after she’d completed her EMT training. Her restless spirit got the better of her again, so she packed up her stuff and two dogs and headed down the road to visit a friend. Her plan was to stay a short while and then head back to California. En route to Colorado, her truck broke down at 3 a.m. in some desolate place on a Utah highway. Etta grabbed her backpack and two dogs, put a note on the truck saying she’d be back for it the next day and

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to please not tow it, and hoped to hitch a ride to the nearest town. Thankfully, a woman pulled over to pick her up, but Etta knew she was in for a very long ride when the driver told Etta that a jackrabbit in the middle of the road had told her Etta needed help. She claimed she could communicate with animals, and spent the next several hours talking to Etta’s dogs as she drove at a leisurely speed to the next town. As odd as things already were for Etta, the road trip took an even more bizarre turn when the driver, a diabetic, fainted while behind the wheel. Low blood sugar had caused her to lose consciousness, but Etta, a freshly trained EMT, was able to revive and stabilize her and then drive them to the next town. There, they parted ways, but Etta was still out in the middle of nowhere with no transportation. Studying the people around her, trying to come up with a plan, she noticed a man who she says looked a lot like Santa Claus. She saw that he was showing pictures of his grandkids to some folks there, and feeling that her options were limited, he was her best bet. She asked him where he was headed. “What’s it to you?” was his reply. She explained her predicament and was glad to find that her intuition had not led her astray. He let her ride with him, but lectured her all the way to town about how dangerous what she was doing was. She had been well aware of this, but with the protection of her two dogs and the limited options available, she took her chances and again lived to tell about it.

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In

2011, she was snowboarding (she was a sponsored competitor) and had another accident, which required surgery on her collarbone. (Just for the record, she’s had about 5 surgeries on her collarbone now, and just in case I haven’t mentioned it, she also broke her leg surfing in Hawaii and has had her jaw broken by rearing racehorses several times.) So, naturally, after her surgery she began researching paragliding. After reading about the first man to paraglide through the US, she tells me she thought, “Who else would I want for a teacher?” So she looked him up and began training. “I never told him about my surgery though,” she casually offers. Etta and Jon were in the air one day in a tandem harness when the wind began blowing and Jon said they would have to cut their trip short and land. The landing was rough, or as Etta puts it, they “ate it.” As they picked themselves up and dusted off, Jon asked if she was okay, and she said she needed to check on her collarbone to be sure. When he inquired why, she fessed up about the surgery only two weeks before, and he laid into her about not disclosing this information. She admitted that she knew he wouldn’t take her up if she had told him about the recent surgery. She was fine, so they gathered their gear and headed back to their parking spot. On the way, Etta noticed he was limping. “Are you okay?” she asked.

Photo by Valerie McIntyre

“I’m fine now,” he told her, “but I broke my ankle a few weeks ago.”

When they reached the car, Jon told her she’d have to find a new instructor. She was indignant and demanded to know why. “Well,” he explained, “I’d like to ask you out, so you’d have to find someone else to teach you.” And so the broken-boned couple went out to lunch, Etta sheepishly admits, and the rest is history. They met on 11/11/11 and were married in July of 2012. From there, the adventure continued with Jon by her side. With Jon in the Air Force, they moved to his base in Massachusetts, and Etta took a new job… at a slaughter house. No, she isn’t the squeamish type. She explained that she had actually scrubbed in quite a few times with her dad during veterinary surgeries and was therefore not uncomfortable in this role. She had a job on the kill floor, and on her first day as she prepared a goat, a customer who had religious conflicts with her in this role pulled out a knife and threatened her. Her boss then produced a gun, which he aimed at the knife-wielding guy to get him to simmer down, and fortunately the situation ended peacefully. Once again, Etta prevailed. She continued at the slaughter house for a short time while also training race horses in Boston. She left slaughter house with some good stories to tell and can now skin a deer like a pro. While they were still in MA, Jon and Etta found out they were expecting a baby. She had been riding horses daily and continued to do so until she was about 4 months along, when her mother’s accident began to weigh heavily on her and she knew she needed to play it safer for her baby’s sake. As a result of her own accident, Etta had been very vigilant about keeping her body strong and healthy, working out often to stave off excessive pain. With all of her old injuries, she says it’s better for her to be active and moving as much as possible than to be sedentary for any length of time. As her pregnancy progressed, she began volunteering her time to help other women with weight training and guiding them in their workouts as a way to stay busy, healthy and helpful during her time off.

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year, she returned to California for her baby shower near the end of her pregnancy. During this time she had the opportunity to reestablish a bond with her brother, Manning, who she had been close to as a child. She had missed him over the years, and she savored the opportunity to reconnect with him. Before they parted ways again, they planned for him to come to Montana after his niece was born. Manning passed away just a few weeks later, at age 30, due to a brain tumor that he’d had since age 16. Her brother was brilliant, she says, and he had never let his illness slow him down for long. After being diagnosed he was prescribed meds that had awful sides effects; he stopped taking those meds and was later prescribed what they thought was working much better for him, so his death came as a shock to the family. Her baby, Syndi Rae, named after Etta’s mother, was born in April of 2014. By then, just barely by then, Etta and Jon had purchased their property in Montana with the dream of building a home and eventually raising bison. At that point, however, “home” was a camper with no electricity or running water, and Jon was returning to school in Texas for eight months. Etta got right back into the swing of things after having her baby. They acquired running water and a generator for power in their camper, but Etta wasn’t one to spend much time indoors anyway. As soon as she was able, Etta went about the business of haying, moving cows, fending off rattle snakes and packrats, often wearing Syndi in a front pack as she worked. She helped out friends and neighbors when needed and looked forward to Jon’s visits home. Now that Jon is done with school, they are all together once again and have the added luxury of residing temporarily with good friends who didn’t want them braving the cold weather in the camper. Etta is enjoying motherhood, the prospect of their home being finished this summer and seeing their dreams come to fruition. Her new business, Flying K Training, will allow Etta to continue training horses.

Etta Sepp decided long ago that she was going to live life on her own terms. This is a story of a woman who took many risks, some out of youthful defiance, some out of necessity, and others out of aspiration or love. She’s never been one to sit idly by, waiting to see where life will take her. She’s been taking chances, exploring the myriad of options available to her and following her heart. Her husband and daughter, a new life in Montana, loved ones near and far, a good relationship with her father that’s getting better all the time, and the ability to do what she loves is what makes the world go ‘round for her. Especially gratifying is to see Syndi growing, healthy and happy, with parents who love her to pieces, animals to love and take care of, and countless adventures ahead.

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Health & Wellness

Woman to Woman By Kathleen Olson, WHNP-BC, MSN, RN Northwest Women’s Health Care

BIOIDENTICAL HORMONES FOR MENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS

Bioidentical hormones are a great option for managing intolerable menopausal symptoms and there are many types of prescription and compounded bioidentical hormones available.

Bioidentical hormones are made by chemically changing a hormone-like substance from another source—usually soy, yams, or plants—to make it exactly the same as the hormones produced in your body (primarily by the ovaries). Both estrogen and progesterone hormones are available and come in pill form, vaginal products, skin patches, gels, lotions, and sprays. These hormone products also come in many different dosages so that you can find the lowest dose to help your menopausal symptoms. The menopausal symptoms that bioidentical hormones can help are hot flashes, night sweats, difficulty sleeping, irritability, vaginal dryness, and vaginal discomfort during intercourse. Supplemental bioidentical hormones can be used to get you through the peak of these symptoms, and once the symptoms are minimal or resolved you can wean slowly off the hormones. Bioidentical hormones are something that we work with at Northwest Women’s Health Care every day. So, if you are having menopausal symptoms or just have more questions about your hormone options, please make appointment to see one of our health care providers today!

www.nwwhc.org

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RICHARD H. TAYLOR, MD ROBERT M. ROGERS JR., MD JANNA SULLIVAN, APRN, WHNP CATHY SIMENSEN, APRN, WHNP

SHAWN SHANAHAN, APRN, WHNP KARRIN SAX, APRN, WHNP JULIE COOK, FNP-BC KATHLEEN OLSON, APRN, WHNP

75 Claremont St. Suite A Kalispell, Montana 59901 Telephone: 406-752-8282 Fax: 406-257-2225


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Health & Wellness

People with migraines have severe headaches with other physical symptoms. In this study, at the onset of acute

migraine, 100 adults took 50 mg of the standard migraine drug, sumatriptan, or 250 mg of ginger powder. Participants kept track of when the headache started and its severity over time.

Healthy Living Information provided by Joe Withey

Ginger for Migraine

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After one month, a similar majority in both groups reported 90 percent pain relief in two hours after taking treatment. Twenty percent of the sumatriptan group had side effects including dizziness, sedation, vertigo, and heartburn, compared to 4 percent in the ginger group reporting an upset stomach, making ginger as effective and safer for migraine.


Q -- My daughter gets the

best grades, but her dad and I are concerned that without our help, her grades would slip. She enjoys reading about her favorite topics. However when she has an assignment that calls for reading in sciences or social studies and some literature, she reads so slowly that we step in and read to her. This way she has a fighting chance at understanding so she can do assignments based on her reading. How can this be? Suggestions?

A

-- Your question brings up research that shows that high interest reading helps bridge the gap between being a reader and a nonreader. Reading a favorite or familiar topic is FUN. It’s fun because with the background experience the reader activates, they are enjoying another dimension of familiar ideas. However, when reading topics for which they have no existing scenarios, they struggle to “get the picture.” It is here that the explanation of picture thinking intelligence takes on meaning. When a student struggles with required reading, consider the possibility that they are losing their ability to focus every time they come upon a word for which they have

no picture or understanding. These words can be as common as 50% of the words on every page, like “it,” “and,” “but,” or “so” or more complicated relationship words. Do you have a picture for “less”? How about “Unless”? What exactly does a “however” look like, or “otherwise,” or “consequently”? That loss of focus won’t seem like much – the reader won’t even know which word it was that started their loss of focus. They will know that they are confused and find themselves rereading over and over trying to figure out what the author is saying.

How can reading be FUN sometimes and not FUN other times? Thinking about Thinking By Elsie Johnson thelearningoptions.com

Yet, when the same material is read to them, what they are hearing is smooth, with no blanks or confusions. Plus the way it is read provides clues to the meaning simply by the tone of voice and emphasis created by the person they are listening to. Without the interruptions of rereading that occur when they read it alone, the listener simply connects what they are hearing with words they have in their hearing vocabulary. Consider the possibility that your bright daughter is quite a strong nonverbal thinker. As such, you might recall other inconsistencies. One example is this - knowing something one day and not the next. A way to understand how this can be is this: what would it be like if you typed at the computer with no program to receive what you’ve typed, then go back the next day and expect to find what you typed?

Dyslexics are very smart people. Often dyslexics would not be identified as having a disability because they are so smart. However, all dyslexics are picture thinkers and struggle with accurate perception and understanding. This is at the base of how reading can be FUN sometimes and not FUN other times. I’ve worked with 4.0 students and made not only the student’s life, but her parents’ life easier with the understanding that comes with tools to take advantage of their way of thinking.

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Health & Wellness

Karen Lynch

Karen Lynch, Living Donor By Sherri Gerek

Everyday hero is an expression commonly used in our society to describe people who go above and beyond what most of us would consider natural to do. I think of the everyday heroes as some of the bravest of hearts to ever walk among us, and I believe we are all better because of their influence in our lives. I met Karen Lynch last October while I was speaking at the annual conference for the Women’s Leadership Network in Helena. Karen was an organizer for the event, and we spoke a few times on the phone prior to the conference. It was only after the event that I came to know Karen for the everyday hero that she is, and I wanted to share her story with you. Four years ago, Karen worked full-time with the Student Assistance Foundation in Helena where she had been employed for twelve years. At that time, she also worked one night a week as a greeter at the front desk of the Broadwater Health Club’s eastside location. While with the health club Karen met Margot Wright, a personal trainer with the club. Karen and Margot didn’t know each other much at all. “Margot would come to the front reception area to await the arrival of her clients, and we would say hello and visit briefly. Back then I had my nails done regularly, and Margot would ask to see what I had done with my nails each time,” Karen said with a smile. About a week before the eastside location of Broadwater Health closed down, Karen received the health club newsletter. “The newsletter mentioned that Margot Wright needed a kidney,” said Karen, “I knew it was a slim chance that I would be a match, but if I was – then it was meant to be.” Without any mention of it, in February 2011 Karen contacted the hospital and volunteered to be tested to see if she would be a donor match. Soon thereafter, she learned her blood work was a match which led to more testing. “They had to verify my kidney would be a compatible size to actually fit into Margot’s body.” That too was a match, so in May 2011 Margot was notified a kidney donor had been found. It was Karen Lynch. 48

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Now, this is where I have to pause just a moment to let this sink in. I imagine most people would readily raise their hands to become a living organ donor if a loved one’s life depended on it. But who among us would be willing to do so for a passing acquaintance? According to the statistics found on organdonor.gov provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human services, every ten minutes another name is added to the transplant waiting list in our country, and each day, on average, twenty-one people die while awaiting a transplant that simply never comes due to a shortage of available organs. While the majority of the US population supports organ donation, few actually know the steps to take to donate their organs. Karen shared that it took four years to get the two of them to surgery due to a number of extenuating circumstances, scheduling delays, and eventually a change of hospitals where the surgery was to be performed. Along the way, Karen had ample opportunity for a change of heart, but she never wavered on her commitment to Margot. “Last spring the Student Assistance Foundation downsized when the government changed much of the system for the student loans in our country. The Foundation didn’t become a federal contractor, which resulted in eleven of us receiving early retirement packages,” Karen said. “Suddenly in March 2014 I was out of a job. I decided to go back to college to work on my bachelor’s degree, and eventually I went to work for Olympus Technical Services, in September 2014.” Originally Karen planned to use vacation time during the one month she would be required to be recovering postsurgery. “That didn’t work out as planned since I didn’t have benefits with my new job. I also have pets, a dog and cat at home, and I had to make arrangements for their care while I was away in the hospital.” Clearly, there is a lesson in selflessness to be learned from Karen. She made numerous sacrifices, and in December of 2014 Karen and Margot were prepped, and both underwent the surgeries required to transplant Karen’s kidney into Margot. My interview with Karen for this article took place in midMarch, and she was happy to report she had just passed her health check-up, and final restrictions were lifted the same week we spoke.

“I have to remember to drink more water than I have in the past,” Karen said. “And I won’t be living quite as adventurously as before. No moto-cross for me,” she said with a laugh. “Did you race moto-cross in the past, Karen?” I asked, “I heard you were an avid motorcycle rider.” “No, not moto-cross, but yes, I do love motorcycles and I try to ride my Indian Scout whenever I can. I just have to be more careful now,” She said, “As for other things – I would have liked to try skydiving someday but I won’t be doing anything like that now.” When I asked Karen what she message she would like to share with the readers, she said, “Not everyone feels okay donating an organ while alive, but please check that box when you renew your driver’s license – say you will donate your organs after you are gone so that someone else can live on.” After speaking with Karen, I called Margot Wright who is still hospitalized while recovering from the transplant operation, and when I asked her how she was doing, “She said, I’m getting better, and I am so ready to return home – it’s been three months. I may be released next week. I hope so.” I asked Margot if there was anything she would like our readers to know about Karen. She replied, “Yes. What can I say about her? She’s an angel,” as her voice began to crack, “Bless her heart,” she continued, “You know…I didn’t even know her last name when she offered to donate her kidney to me.” Again, I find myself pausing for a few moments as what Margot just said sinks in. I believe Karen Lynch is an Everyday Hero. Because of her, another woman, one she hardly knows, has a new lease on life. To give the gift of life, and to bear witness to that gift – how remarkable for them both!

For more information on becoming an organ donor visit organdonor.gov. You can also see Karen’s Go Fund Me page. www.gofundme.com/iyeelo

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- DaVINCI ROBOTIC SURGERY A MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL OPTION Richard H. Taylor, M.D. and Robert M. Rogers Jr., M.D.

Answer Your Questions

by Cindy Branch

- DaVINCI ROBOTIC SURGERY-

Q. How does the Robot enhance surgery? INVASIVE SURGICAL OPTION Drs. Taylor and Rogers have been performing complex surgeryA MINIMALLY A. It provides a 3-dimensional image (versus 2D like a T.V.) and

for women through tiny “keyhole” incisions, with a combined magnifies what the surgeon sees by 10 times! “We are seeing experience of 64 years (since 1989.). By performing thousands of anatomy and tiny bloodH. vessels thatM.D. we’veand never seen before. It Richard Taylor, all major types of female surgeries as “band-aid” surgeries, they Robert M. Rogers Jr.,there M.D. also INCREASES PRECISION and is much less blood loss, have developed techniques allowing patients to safely go home in almost none in many cases of hysterectomy Answer Your Questionsand cyst removal. The 5 to 6 hours after surgery—including patients having surgery for instruments are ‘tiny’ and can rotate in all directions, even around cyst removal and hysterectomies. This is an option for the patient; ‘corners’. We can see better and therefore operate better”. over 90% of patients choose this option,D and grateful. rs. are Taylor and Rogers have been performing complex surgery Q. How does the Robot enhance surgery?

for women through tiny “keyhole” incisions, with a combined A. It provides a 3-dimensional image (versu Q. Is the Robot used for all female surgeries? Q. What is minimally invasive surgery? experience of 64 years (since 1989.). By performing thousands and magnifies what the surgeon sees by 10 tim No. Your doctor will determine what surgery should be A. As described above, surgeries are performed through probes as asA.“band-aid” of all major types of female surgeries surgeries, they anatomy and tiny blood vessels that we’ve neve performed with robot. thin as a pencil with the incision requiring 1 stitch techniques or a steristrip. have developed allowing patients to safely gothe home also INCREASES PRECISION and there is m in 5 to 6 hours after surgery—including patients having surgery

and can rotate in all direc Q. Does the robot do the surgeryinstruments by the pushareof‘tiny’ a button? Q. What percent of surgeries are performed as patient; over 90% of patients choose this option, andis are grateful. ‘corners’. We can see better and therefore A. No. That called push of a button? a “robot”, DaVinci cannot act opera minimally invasive? on its own. Instead, the surgery is performed entirely by your doctor. A. Surprisingly, approximately 70% of surgeries are still surgery? Q. What nationally is minimally invasive Q. Is the Robot used for all female surgeri performed with a large traditional incision. However, Drs. Taylor A. As described above, surgeries are performed through probes A. No. Your doctor will determine what sur thin1% as aofpencil with perform and Rogers make a large incision lessasthan the time, the incision requiring with 99% of all surgeries performed through “keyhole” 1 stitch or a steristrip. Q. incisions. Many are done using lasers!

Robert M. Rogers, Jr., M.D. are Q. What are the board certified gynecologists at advantages of minimally Northwest Women’s Healthcare.

do the push o

a “robo act on the sur entirel

Dr. M.D. Jr., M. gyneco Women

photo by Jill Courtney

Q. What percent of Q. What are the advantages of minimally invasive surgery? surgeries are performed A. Less pain, less blood loss, less risk as of minimally infection, invasive? home very A. Surprisingly, quickly, quicker recovery, small incisions/good cosmetics, approximately70% less scarring, better outcomes and patient satisfaction.of surgeries nationally are still performed with a Q. What is the DaVinci Surgical Robot? large traditional incision. A. The robot simply enhances what we have been However, Drs. doing Taylor and Rogers make a large for years. It’s an advancement in surgical technology. lessthe then 1% of It attaches to the instruments that goincision through tiny the time, with 99% of all “keyholes” in the abdomen. surgeries performed through “keyhole” incisions. Many Dr. Richard H. Taylor, M.D.areand done using lasers!

www

invasive surgery? Dr. Robert Rogers and Dr. Richard Taylor with the “robot”. A. Less pain Less blood loss Less risk of infection Home very quickly SHAWN SHANAHAN, APRN, WHNP 75 Claremont St. Suite A Quicker recoveryRICHARD H. TAYLOR, MD ROBERT M. ROGERS JR., MD KARRIN SAX, APRN, WHNP Kalispell, Montana 59901 Small incisions/good cosmetics RICHARD H. TAYLOR, MD ROB JANNA SULLIVAN, APRN, WHNP JULIE COOK, FNP-BC Telephone: 406-752-8282 Less scarring JANNA SULLIVAN, APR CATHY SIMENSEN, APRN, WHNP KATHLEEN OLSON, APRN, WHNP Fax: 406-257-2225 Better outcomes and patient satisfaction CATHY SIMENSEN, APR

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SHAWN SHANAHAN, AP KARRIN SAX, APRN, JULIE COOK, APRN KATHLEEN OLSON, APR


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Lifestyle

Susan Connell: Desperate Times Turned Dream Come True By Andrea Blair

In a weeklong shift as a flow-tester in the North Dakota oil patch, Susan Connell will typically not see a single other woman on the job. In truth, she’s now a North Dakota resident, but 2010 the economy drove her out of southwest Montana looking for work. She and her husband (now ex), owned a construction company; a dismal business to be in at that time. Fast forward a little more than four years now, and life has changed dramatically since those days. Susan Connell

During the workweek for Susan, she sees few other females, and she also doesn’t see her two children. “It’s very difficult to be away from the kids for a week at a time,” she says. “I would much rather be with them every day of the week.” Instead, she typically gets a few days off between shifts, and now that their father is also living in North Dakota, their children spend her workweek with him. It’s far from ideal, but being hired back in 2011 as a truck driver saved their home, which was in danger of foreclosure. Back when she was first hired, it was three weeks away from home at a time, so this schedule is better in terms of family time. “It was intense,” she says about her decision to purse a job in a heavily male dominant environment. She lived out of her car for the first week as she applied for jobs, and when she was finally hired, for a company that employed 200 truck drivers, she was the only female among them. Since then, she’s achieved her dream of buying a farm for her kids to grow up on. She’s worked her way up, toughed out the obvious drawbacks of her line of work, and sees herself, one day, at home with her kids for good, making a living in agriculture. For now, the reality is that she’s making the sacrifice for their future, working 24-hour days. She lives at the new well sites, overseeing and troubleshooting the flow of the well and the equipment, “covered in crude oil,” she chuckles. “It’s been a challenge all the way,” Susan admits. There are good men out there who are respectful and who have been great to work with, but there are some men who resent her presence among them, who will turn their backs to her in favor of consulting with another guy about the job they’re doing. It’s hard to get hired in the oil fields (as a woman), hard to make the same money the men make, and hard to keep a job, but clearly, Susan isn’t daunted by a challenge. She’s earned a pretty high-ranking position in the industry.

“My dream came true because of this,” she states, in reference to her farm. In addition, this experience has bolstered her confidence. “I feel older, wiser…not a lot can stand in my way.”

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Lifestyle

Age-ing to Sage-ing ® A Profound New Vision of Growing Older

By Ina Albert, Author and Life Transitions Coach Ina Albert, Ina Albert, CSL, Age-ing to Sage-ing®, FVCC Adjunct Instructor, Life Transitions Coach and Author Email: Inaalbert@me.com, call 406 249-4642, or contact me on Facebook.

Our Sandpiper Lives S itting on the beach in San Clemente, California, I was fascinated by sandpipers, the wading birds that inhabit every ocean shore I ever visited. My interest in sandpipers is not new. Whether in New Jersey, Oregon, Hawaii or California, these small, longbeaked birds perched on skinny legs are always present. Their legs whir like buzz saws as they race across the sand, stopping on a dime. They poke their long beaks into the wet sand after each wave tumbles back into the sea, exposing the tiny breathing holes of the sandpipers’ prey. Non-stop, they race in circles in their endless search for food. Sandpipers have fascinated me for years, but on this trip I discovered why.

As they run from place to place with no apparent plan or direction, testing possibilities in each location, they reminded me of my own journey. I have tested each passion, hoping it would be the answer to finding a single purpose. Would it be public relations? Would it be teaching communications? Was I destined to be a housewife and mom? A politician? A coach? A writer? One at a time, I was consumed by each challenge, enjoying moderate to better-than-average results. Then I’d move on to the next challenge, sampling all the feeding grounds, hoping to become totally committed to one course of action. But just like the sandpiper, my exploration always ended in the same fertile feeding ground—communication. 54

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As I look back, I find that they, all my various interests, stem from the same source: how to best make connections with other human beings. Even as a child, I was attracted to people who listened to me and respected my opinions. I felt an energetic contact with them that told me I was safe to express my feelings. In the Public Relations Office in college, I learned the importance of expressing myself clearly. As a legislative aide in New Jersey, I worked hard to communicate the purpose and consequences of a proposed law. Working with patients in hospitals, I understood that how we communicate and listen to them is critical to their health and to the well-being of those around them. As a student, I learned that we are connected energetically to one another in a quantum field of energy. As a teacher and coach I nourished that energetic connection to students and clients by listening deeply for what was being said, and more importantly, to what wasn’t. Finally, I learned to use the power of storytelling to express the ideas and emotions that gave birth to my books, Write Your Self Well… Journal Your Self to Health and Granny Greeny Says Listen Louder. And so, like the sandpiper, I continue to dip my beak in soil that nourishes my growth and feeds my passions to explore different paths to fertile ground. Perhaps it is the accumulation of years of experience that helps us recognize how the common threads of our lives are weaving together. Whatever the reason, our explorations continue to expand as we continue to create an integrated pattern leading us toward the finished fabric. As long as we keep looking for fertile ground to expand our design, we can stay connected to our life’s purpose and remain true to our legacy.

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After all, aren’t we all sandpipers at heart?

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Lifestyle Nan is the award winning author of four books. More about Nan and her work at www.nanrussell.com

In the Scheme of Things By Nan Russell

Work, Life and Time “Why are you always working?” My

mother’s voice echoes now in my head. It was a question she frequently raised over the years about my career, especially when she felt I was overstressed or losing my work-life balance. “I like working,” I’d always answer. And that would usually be that. At least until she asked again. When I was little, my mother was the only woman on our block who worked outside the home. She started out of necessity during difficult financial times for our family, when I was four, continuing past my college graduation. She worked beyond when she “had to,” finding satisfaction in contributing at a job she liked. Still, for her, work and life were always separate, and her “life” was what happened outside of work.

That’s not the case with me. Maybe it was because she was an atypical mom in the 1950s and I had two working parents, that I evolved a philosophy about work as not separate from life. No matter the job, like it or not like it, self-employed or working for others, my mindset was simply that work was part life. But life’s ebb and flow can challenge us all with mounting to-do lists, consuming workloads, growing obligations, festering unfinished tasks, and “life-happens” events. Too much to do and too little time to do it. I hear those words and feel them, too, no matter my philosophy, feeling at times time-deprived for what I want to do. But, the reality is there will never be enough time for all we need, should, and would like to do.

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How we use our time, the currency of life, shapes our results and our life. We get the same 24-hours a day as our neighbor or co-worker, but use differs. Practice the piano eight hours a day and you’ll be better than people who don’t. Practice and hone any talent or skill and the same applies. Or, spend the day poking around, getting ready to work, shooting the breeze, texting or fiddling with email, and you’ll complete the day having traded your time for limited results. For most of us, our problem isn’t a time problem; it’s a choice problem. Life isn’t what happens outside of work; it’s what happens within the life-time we have; it’s how we spend, use, or invest our time. After all, isn’t our life a reflection of our choices? How we spend our time puts value on what we’re spending it on – the people we love, the dreams and passions we have, the gardens, hobbies, or ideas we grow, the things we learn, commit to, or explore, and the work, paid or unpaid, that uses our uniqueness. In the scheme of things, I can’t imagine not working. That’s because I believe “our work” is about living our life’s potential, in an ongoing process of becoming who we are capable of becoming. And I have a lot more work at becoming to do. What I said to my mother was right: I do like working. I also like playing, exploring, learning, and loving. But, no matter how any of us spend our own time, there is wisdom on the plaque that hangs on my wall:

“Enjoy this moment for this moment is your life.”


Soul Responsibilities By Barbara Hughes

Today I wish to talk about hummers; not the cars that were sold some years ago to China for production, but the curious tiny birds that frequent my deck daily. You see, that is what I have nicknamed these sparkling, energetic, flying hummingbirds. So as I proceed, know that I am talking about delightful birds, not cars.

At first glance, I see a small creature about the size of a small index finger. Their sleek bodies are dressed in basic brown and gray. Some are accessorized with scarlet or iridescent green throats while others are crowned in rich warm russets and intense metallic blues. To the human eye, their wings are only a visible suggestion, perhaps because they beat up to 200 times per second. Their heart rate can reach 1,250 beats per minute. Now that is some kind of metabolism!

Every day without fail, these tiny aeronautical wonders are at our feeders - feeding in such frenzy they actually fight among themselves for one of the several perches available. There is plenty of room for them all, but they often engage in a type of flying combat - hissing and butting each other off the perch. Such wonders. They can fly up, down, backwards and can even hover in the air in a stationary position. It seems there are always at least two of these athletic wonders at the feeder at any given time of the day. They are only hours away from starvation overnight, so they frequent the feeders about 25% of the day. Because of that, they seem to populate the feeders most fervently

in the morning hours (when their bodies are the most empty) and the late dusk hours (when they must store up for the night).

So many will come to the feeder at one time, they hover in formation much like the planes in the Dallas Airport flight pattern, waiting for a feeding spot to open for them. For these hummers, it is all about feeding for strength for the long journey that will take them back to Mexico in the fall. Food is their fuel. They will double their body size over the summer months. They have an innate sense to know where they are and where they are going.

While observing these hummers up close, I am reminded that I am on a journey to the place God has prepared. It is a long journey and I need fuel. Thankfully, I have a permanent place at His table where I can feed on His word wherever and whenever I choose. My prayer is that I might be more like the hummers with that same urgency to get into the Word and gain strength for the journey to my heavenly home. Heb. 11:8,10 "By faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going . . .For he was looking forward to the city with foundations, whose architect and builder is God."

Have you thought about Heaven lately? Are you fueled and ready? M O N TA N AW O M A N . C O M

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I

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am aware that some folks believe what happens in the world does so as the effect of random forces producing reactions in a scientific manner. I am a fervent believer in the scientific law of cause and effect which states: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. However, I'm not a fan of the idea that there are random forces at work creating the set of circumstances we refer to as our lives. I propose to you that the universe has been created on purpose and reacts to us on purpose.

The Creative Principle

If random forces were responsible for your life being what it is, there wouldn't be much of a point in attempting to improve it through the process of self actualization which is defined as:

"The achievement of one's full potential through creativity, independence, spontaneity and wisdom."

By William O. Joseph

Self Actualization In previous articles we discussed the concept of the Creative Principle. The Creative Principle is the energy that flows through your nervous system, continually creating the experience you call your life. It contains within itself many sub divisions or smaller spectrums of energy. Human beings come equipped with five major ways to direct the energy flowing through the voluntary nervous system. The five energy channels of Action, Speech, Thought, Emotion and Intention are expressions of your free will. You have the free will to choose how to use each channel as you see fit in the great experiment of creating your life. In fact, these five channels are pretty much all you have to work with. Everything that happens to you is an equal and opposite reaction to the choices you make in life. 60

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You don't have to take my word for it, but if you want to test this premise, it will be necessary to believe it long enough to prove to yourself that it's true in your own life. How do we establish the process of self actualization as a habit in our lives?

One way is to imagine that you are entering a conversation with the Creative Principle. The way you choose to use the energy of the voluntary nervous system constitutes your side of the conversation. The circumstances and experiences that arise in your life are the equal and opposite reaction that constitutes the other side of that conversation.


Whether you realize it or not, you have been participating in this conversation all the days of your life. The way to make this conversation real in your life is to monitor the choices you are making while you use each of your five energy channels and to be on the lookout for what is happening as the other side of the conversation. When you finally make the connection, a new level of personal power will be your reward. So, you are having this conversation with the Creative Principle whether you want to or not. If it is so powerful in creating your reality, it might serve all of us if you decided to get good at it. In descending order from higher frequency to lower frequency, and from the most powerful to the least powerful the five energy channels of self actualization are:

Intention Emotion Thought Speech Action

You cannot stop expressing intention. You cannot stop thinking and feeling. These channels are active and creating even when you are asleep or disabled. You can opt to stop talking or moving but even if you do that you are still creating on the other three channels. Intention is the most powerful energy channel you operate on. It is the most basic unwritten attitude of your soul. Your intention in life was formed during your pre-linguistic state and represents the hidden agenda that you operate from. Your intention in life is something you continue to express in the here and now. If you fail to employ the wisdom you have collected to update your intention, you will likely live a life of undesirable repetitive experiences. If you feel at the most fundamental level that the only way to survive is to manipulate others, that intention will be carried forth in your emotion, thought, speech and action. If you don't believe you have a right to choose how you feel, you may spend your life trying to influence the opinions of others about who you are

so you can give yourself permission to experience joy for living. If you fundamentally believe that life is to be feared, again that intention will be carried forth in your emotion, thought, speech and action.

Every time you choose to act, to do something physically, to think, feel or speak, you are making a statement with the voluntary nerve energy that flows through you. When you take physical action, you send out radial ripples of energy, both through pushing atoms around (doing work) and through the energy of intention that lies behind your actions. The same is true of speech. You may have noticed that those close to you can interpret the intention and feelings that lay behind the words you are saying and the way you choose to say them. They can read it in your facial expressions. In fact, it is common for there to be a conflict between the face value of what you say and the motivation you are hiding for saying it. Speech is a very special form of action in that it expresses intention better than the other three channels of expression. Thought is a more subtle channel in the sense that it's not physical. Even though that is true, thought is still a very powerful force in creating your life. Thought carries intention as well. Lastly, emotion is the second most powerful of all the channels that you have the free will to use in your side of the conversation you are having with the Creative Principle. Emotion also carries intent and is most often the purest expression of it.

Intention is the most powerful energy that passes through you because it configures everything else from behind the scenes. In order to awaken to your full potential in life, it will be necessary to balance and harmonize all five channels. True self actualization requires that you master your intention.

William O. Joseph is the author of, The Creative Principle: A Cosmology for the 21st Century.

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Lifestyle

Bedtime Stories for Grownups By Patricia McGlynn

I

sit here on the front porch of the cabin early on a Saturday morning. The dew is heavy on the grass and the hummingbirds are feasting at the feeders. The only sounds are a crow chasing a red tailed hawk over the meadow and chickadees in the pines. At times like this I wonder if I really want to leave the cabin to find a home of my own. Then I remember this past winter, shiver and continue my house hunting. I am satisfied as I look out over the lawn and see the beauty I have created here over the past six summers. The turf is well fed and weed-free. The perennial beds are blossoming all around the cabin with roses, black eyed Susans, peonies, hydrangeas and phlox. Pots of geraniums and beds of snapdragons add splashes of color. It has been an honor to care for this historical treasure. The peace and serenity I have found here have added a multitude of textures to the fabric of my being. I look over the railing and observe the fullness of the wild climbing rose I cut down in April. The canes had become woody and non-productive. The weight of the plant was corralled by heavy gauge wire and nailed to the cabin logs. I’d been told by native Montanans that these heirloom roses could be cut down harshly and they would rejuvenate completely. So one very brisk morning, I conducted a dormant pruning. Donned in a canvas jacket and wearing leather gloves, I hauled out a truckload of branches. Then I waited. Temperatures rose, daffodils and tulips bloomed, the rose did not survive. I couldn’t believe I had been so foolish. I know better than to prune more than 30% of a plant at one time. Restoration pruning takes two to three years to accomplish successfully. I had annihilated my favorite shrub. Last year, neighbors had stopped by just to tell me how gorgeous this plant was. What was I going to tell my landlord? I accidently killed a 75-year-old rose that his grandparents, or the settler before them, had place there. Me, the master gardener teacher. By Father’s Day, when the other roses were blooming, there was one green sprout. Please, please grow. Thirty days later, fertilized, watered and prayed over, it is rallying with a passion. The succulent new growth is an emerald green and profuse. Hallelujah! This plant speaks to me on so many levels this morning.

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It speaks of faith that life is reborn from the ashes of what can appear to be insurmountable devastation. Like the mythological Phoenix, we rise from our challenges and greet the new day. My faith and trust are even stronger after walking through the dark night of the soul and reaching the light on the other side. The root system was tough and irrepressible. What appears to be dead can be a matter of timing; it will bloom again. It may not be on our schedule, but it will happen. I reflect on dreams I have carried and wonder if maybe someday… I have dreamed of a partner, a new home, writing a book… These dreams may be dormant but they are not dead. When the time is right, they will bloom. I cannot see it now, but someday I will. There is still life and growth under the surface. One year of flowering was sacrificed for the overall health and benefit of the whole. This rose will be even more glorious next year. Continual thinning will eliminate the necessity of such radical measures in the future. We can make huge changes all at once in our lives or small incremental moves that take us higher on our path. Sometimes we do them both simultaneously. There are times when I have taken an unnecessary detour, and then I see that it was an indispensable fork in order to give me a new skill or a new perspective. The time I forfeited was made up in the awareness I gained.

stiff and rigid belief systems that I inherited. Through the years they have been discarded one by one. In their place is a flexible bough with budding shoots and tiny blossoms. I can bend, I can be pushed flat, but time has shown me that I will rebound even more resilient. So thank you, Rose, for giving me so many messages as I drink my coffee and the morning sun. Thank you for surviving my overzealous efforts. I didn’t mean to be so punitive in my branch removal. It is one more lesson in understanding that sometimes people think they are helping us but can appear to be cruel. Their words can cut to the bone. All the while they are trying to help in their own way. Just say “thank you” and keep on growing. Keep on thriving. Pull up the juices stored in your roots and bloom, bloom, bloom.

Best wishes, Pat For more stories please go to my blog patriciamcglynn.com and www.futuresinspired. com/unexpected-pathways-project/ for the newly published Unexpected Pathways book.

I really dislike this cliché, but it comes to mind, “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” Don’t people tell you this when you are so far down you can’t see any hope? I want to kick them in the shins. The rose says it more beautifully by gentle demonstration. I can see where my rough edges have been worn down by adversity. Maybe it is age or wisdom that allows me to accept the softer side of me. I don’t need the woody branches that were the

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Active Outdoor Jennifer Shelley

Jennifer Shelley: She Shoots Clays By Sherri Gerek

Jennifer Shelley is one active lady. Upon meeting her you can’t help but get the impression that her high energy is just an extension of her overall zest for life. Jennifer is a dynamo in the Flathead Valley real estate market, ranking among the top 5% of sales agents in a challenging market.  She says she feels privileged to showcase the beautiful properties around the Valley she calls home. Mother of four children and self-professed tomboy, enthusiasm for the outdoors dates back to her childhood spent building forts, shooting BB guns, and riding dirt bikes. “My dad was an avid trophy and upland game hunter.” Jennifer continued, “He used to come out west to hunt when I was little, returning home with slides of Alaska, British Columbia, and Montana. He had a lot of influence on me.” Jennifer and her boyfriend enjoy sports they can do together, and it was one afternoon about ten years ago when he first suggested they go upland game bird hunting.  She jumped at the opportunity. “It turns out,” Jennifer began, “I was pretty good at shooting.  I had a knack for it, and I wanted to do more of it.” Soon she found herself at Big Sky Sporting Clays in Polson which Jennifer describes as a world-class facility. “I was hooked right away on sporting clays,” she said. “I loved the moving targets. I found it so challenging, but also very rewarding.  It’s simple but complex, if that makes sense, and I guess that’s what drew me in.”

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Jennifer decided she would try shooting competitively, and in 2010 and 2011 she won the state championship to become the Montana Women’s Sporting Clays Champion as recognized by the National Sporting Clays Association (NSCA). “Shooting clays requires extreme focus, and we women are used to doing several things at one time.  It forces single-mindedness, and I find that incredibly rejuvenating.  It’s the ultimate escape to clear your mind of everything else, and focus to the extent of exhaustion,” she said. In 2011 Jennifer became a certified Level 1 instructor, and started She Shoots Clays, her coaching company in Bigfork, to offer shooting classes. She works closely with Flathead Lake Lodge in the summer, offering private lessons to many of their clients, and additional private instruction at Big Sky Sporting Clays. “I also coach men, as often a husband and wife both want instruction.  The first thing I do is separate them.  They learn better that way. Women who may be intimidated by guns do well when I can help alleviate their fears, and if the man is present it generally affects her learning.” Jennifer continued, “Most men want to step right up and shoot, so I stand back until they ask for my input on how they could improve. There are always areas to refine and improve with every shooter.” It’s clear that Jennifer is passionate about the sport of shooting clays, believing it’s also good for youth. She sees it as a respectful sport that teaches youngsters manners and gun safety at the same time. To further benefit kids, Jennifer was one of the organizers of Clays for Kids a nonprofit 501©3 formed back in 2012.  The charity raises funds specifically ear-marked to benefit homeless and hungry kids in the Flathead Valley.   “I want to do what I can to help local kids.  Our sporting clay events have been hugely successful, and you know – it’s about time to organize another one!”

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Jennifer Shelley has a knack for creating success. Without a doubt her next venture will also be a big hit…and in sporting clays – that’s a winner!

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Active Outdoor

Amy Grisak

Gardening Guru By Andrea Blair

Freelance writer and prolific gardener Amy Grisak says she often jokes that she’s still doing what she’s done since the second grade – growing things. Being a farm kid from Ohio, it’s second nature to her. Her interests, hobbies and work encompass practically all things outdoors; she’s wielded a camera for natural history and wildlife programs on the National Geographic channel and BBC, is an avid hiker, explorer, hunter, fisher and adventurer. Amy is the author of the Real Food Revival column at Montana Woman and has contributed to a multitude of media outlets educating gardeners all over Montana and beyond. She has a wealth of information that she’s gleaned from years of experience and other successful gardeners. “If you’ve killed enough things,” she laughs, “you can tell people what not to do.” She’s become very knowledgeable through the process of trial

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and error, and says she pushes the envelope when it comes to experimenting with what she can achieve in her gardens. In relocating from Ohio to Montana, and then from the Flathead to Great Falls, she’s had to re-learn everything she knew about how to make her garden grow with each move. She’s gone to what you might call extreme lengths (dubbed “acts of insanity” by Amy) in battling the elements that stood in her way. In western Montana it was “horrid,” rocky soil, and in Great Falls it’s “bad soil, expensive water and terrible wind.” Plus there are always garden grazers to contend with (Amy is also known as the “Pest Patrol” expert for PlantersPlace.com)—plenty of reasons anyone else might be tempted to call it a day or never start in the first place. Resourcefulness and tenacity are undoubtedly among her most useful gardening tools, and she is dedicated to arming all growers with the best information and implements, including a can-do attitude.


From extending the growing season to improving the soil, when to plant and harvest, and the best ways to preserve your hard earned bounty, Amy’s got answers. “Gardening can be as intensive as you want it to be,” she advises. For example, planting a handful of your favorite veggie varieties in raised beds requires relatively little effort as compared with amending and improving the existing soil on your land, maintaining large crops and keeping your veggies in the ground well into the cold weather. She advises would-be gardeners to start small, not be afraid to make mistakes, and to not necessarily adhere to everything they read in books. With experience, you’ll find what works and what doesn’t in your garden.

“see that everything on your plate is from your own effort is extra special,” she admits.

Amy and her husband, Grant, a biologist for Fish, Wildlife and Parks, procure about 50% of their food locally or by their own effort. In addition to an extensive garden, they raise hens and bees (“Grant has taken bee-keeping to a whole new level,” marvels Amy), they hunt and fish and seek out local resources as much as possible. She’s also an accomplished cook, talented at turning her harvest into family-pleasing, nutritious meals. To sit down to a meal and

“Because of the work it takes to grow anything, Amy appreciates the time and effort it requires to put food by at the end of the season and to make beautiful meals with the bounty of the harvest throughout the year.” (amygrisak.com)

Her household is bustling day in and day out. She homeschools her two young sons, writes about 4-6 articles per week (for the Great Falls Tribune, Farmer’s Almanac and Hobby Farms, to name a few), home schools her two young boys, teaches gardening classes (she co-founded River City Harvest, Great Falls’ community garden, and spent 6 years at the helm) and still takes time for the outdoor adventures her family is so fond of. This has been her lifestyle for so long, she reflects, she almost doesn’t know any other way to live.

Find more gardening advice and other stories about Amy by visiting her website at amygrisak.com

Turning emotional pain into relief GRIEF - LOSS - TRAUMA Colleen M. Johnson, LCSW Therapist/Counselor colleenjohnson3@yahoo.com 406-250-3845 301 First Ave. West Columbia Falls, MT 59912

colleenjohnsoncounseling.com

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Active Outdoor

Morgan Araldi Aircraft Mechanic and Float Plane Instructor Morgan Araldi By Betty Kuffel, MD

From the Bahamas to Kalispell, Montana, Morgan Araldi is comfortable flying float planes. Not only is she a flight instructor, Morgan is also an aircraft mechanic. She grew up on a grass airstrip next to her grandfather’s cabin. As a young girl, in exchange for flight lessons, Morgan worked with family friends helping with their biplane ride-hauling business and washing airplanes. She flew with her father and her grandmother, who now flies a Hawker corporate jet. The flying enthusiasm in her family engulfed Morgan at a young age. When most teens are getting their drivers licenses, Morgan had already soloed in a Cherokee.

For two summers as a teenager, Morgan worked on a flight line and as an assistant bear guide, flying tourists out of Homer, Alasksa, on trips to Katmai National Park to view the famous fishing Alaskan brown bears. She had many bear encounters and learned to shoo away curious misbehaving “teenage” males. Morgan taught flying at Jack Brown’s Seaplane Base in Winter Haven for a few years before taking a job flying Caravan aircraft on floats in the Bahamas. She recently left her job in the Bahamas and drove nearly three-thousand miles from Florida to Kalispell with her dog and cat to take a job with Back Country Flying Experience in Kalispell. Morgan is currently helping recover a Piper Super Cub on floats but will be flying again when the weather warms and lake ice melts. The transition from tropics to a Montana winter has been an adventure for her, but adventure is what she seeks. Morgan has found the people of Montana friendly and accepting. She loves her new job and view of the Rockies from her red caboose rental home. She is looking forward to hiking and exploring Montana.

At her young age, flying is second nature to her. More than anything else, she loves to fly and teach. To reach Morgan for flight lessons, you can contact her at morganaraldi@gmail.com.

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Jessie Harring

Jessie Harring A Survivor Article and Photo by Betty Kuffel, MD

Long ago, she learned to focus on good and move forward each day.

How many women do you know who decided to take up skydiving? How about skydiving at age eighty or ninety? That may sound like a first, but I met Jessie nearly thirty years ago, and she still surprises me with her enthusiasm and interest in life. She’s jumped out of a few airplanes, and last year for her 92nd birthday, she and two grandsons went skydiving together. Quite a historic event. Jessie sets the standards high for women of all ages. She is a survivor, a very special survivor, who continues to pass on her celebration of life to others, humans and animals. Jessie survived two years in the Theresienstadt Nazi concentration camp. She has suppressed the horrors to live a life filled with love.

Long ago, she learned to focus on good and move forward each day. Jessie beat cancer twice, but lost her daughter to breast cancer. Her husband of 50 years died two years ago. She has two sons and numerous grandchildren. Jessie’s love of sailing, swimming and downhill skiing has filled her life. The former Forestry Service Big Mountain Ski Ambassador not only skied after having both of her hips replaced, she wore out those joints and had to have them replaced a second time. She doesn’t ski now, but each year enjoys rides down the slopes with the Make a Dream team. Many animals have been beloved members of her household. Cats show up at her door and stay. She has rescued a number of huge Great Pyrenees dogs and most recently adopted a devoted black British lab.

Jessie’s recommendation for happiness is to never to turn down an invitation to go out and have fun. Be willing to make changes and focus on the positives in life. Her favorite quote is: Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift. That’s why it is called the present. M O N TA N AW O M A N . C O M

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Community The Honorable Ingrid Gustafson

The Honorable Ingrid Gustafson By Sherri Gerek

The first time I had the occasion to meet the Honorable Ingrid Gustafson was not in the courtroom, rather, it was at the starting line of the annual Montana Women’s Run in Billings. It struck me that I had more than a few preconceived ideas about what a Yellowstone County 13th District Court Judge might look and act like, and it turns out I was wrong on both accounts. Ingrid Gustafson personifies rugged athleticism, and in her mid-fifties her looks defy the calendar. Ingrid appears much younger than many women her age, and to say she is highly energetic would be an understatement, yet her personal style could be described as laid-back. Although soft spoken, Ingrid’s quick to toss out a witty comment, and when she laughs she does so with a twinkle in her eye. She’s a far cry from the over-the-top personalities you might see on a television reality show. Ingrid has recorded a long history of awards and recognition for her sporting accomplishments, which reads more like someone you would expect to find coaching at the college or professional level rather than someone who received her undergrad business degree from MSU before transferring to UM to earn a law degree (Juris Doctorate with honors, no less) in 1988. It turns out Ingrid is a member of the Sun Valley Ski Team Hall of Fame, an NCAA 70

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All American and was inducted into the MSU Athletic Hall of Fame for skiing in 2010. Ingrid’s love of skiing earned her scholarships, but she has also earned numerous awards in soccer, racquetball, and slow pitch softball over the years. In 2003 Ingrid was also recognized as the Montana Youth Soccer Association’s Coach of the Year. Perhaps you, too, are beginning to recognize a theme here. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and working with many high achievers throughout the course of my lifetime, and the common thread with all of them seems to come down to this: excellence in all things. It’s not enough for people like Ingrid to excel only in sports or only in work. They hold the same high standards for every area of their lives, and they create success wherever they go. In 2013 I had the pleasure of sitting in on the Thursday afternoon proceedings of Judge Gustafson’s courtroom. Thursday afternoon is reserved for the Adult Felony Drug Court, and I spent a couple of hours observing as Judge Gustafson interacted with several non-violent offenders her program works to provide treatment for. It occurred to me that her manner in the courtroom was much the same as it was outside. I would describe it as no nonsense with a healthy dose of compassion.


It’s clear when you are speaking to Ingrid that she is passionate about her work. Beyond her normal duties, there are a number of special projects she is working on. In addition to Adult Felony Drug Court, Ingrid also piloted a program for Dependency and Neglect to work toward reform and improvement of family reunification. “Termination of parental rights was at a much higher rate than we should feel good about. It didn’t seem like we were attaining as good of outcomes as we could. No judge has a crystal ball, and no one wants to place children where they will be unsafe, but too often children who, with the right intervention, could do well in their family of origin were removed. In turn, this can create other significant problems. This is important work we are doing in the area of abuse and neglect and it requires system change. It’s a slow process, but it has shown promising results.” Ingrid said. I asked Ingrid about a statistic I read somewhere indicating that Yellowstone County judges have somewhere around 650 open cases at any given time, and she said she believes it is considerably more than that. The county currently has six justices, and a recent workload study indicated that Yellowstone County should have five more. “It’s difficult to do improvement work when the normal workload is so steady,” Ingrid said with a smile. “Still, we are doing great work down here.” With Honorable Ingrid G. Gustafson on the bench, I am certain that’s the case. When I asked Ingrid what kind of Judge she sees herself as, she said, “I’ve practiced law for years, and I know that telling people what to do doesn’t work very well. When people believe you are concerned about them and you want to be fair, they will trust you and know you are doing the best you can to help them. It works much better than if I were to attempt to use power and control.” I couldn’t help but wonder how much of Ingrid’s manner in the courtroom might have its roots in coaching and sports. “I find people do better when you’re interested in them. People make mistakes, we all make mistakes, and everyone deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.” She continued, “I believe people can be rehabilitated. No one has ever come out of jail better for it, so it seems to me we should try to do something to rehabilitate them.” Ingrid’s work day is long, although she’s not sure how long because she’s never stopped to consider the hours. She arrives at the courthouse early in the morning, works through lunch and tries to wrap up around 5pm. Many times she works on projects in the evenings. She tells me she spends about half of her time on the bench, and half of her time on other duties like every other judge does. “I probably have job induced A.D.D.,” she added with a chuckle, “I’m constantly moving from one fire to the next most days, and drug court is really a 24/7 job as issues tend to crop up on evenings or weekends. That’s generally when I handle requests for search warrants and issues of that nature.”

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Community

Steppin' out By Rena Desmond

THE MONTANA WOMAN FOUNDATION & PGA JR. LEAGUE PROGRAM These two organizations are partnering to present the 1st annual golf tournament fundraiser.

The event will take place at Village Greens Golf Course on June 20th, 2015. The funds raised will support the Montana Woman Foundation Scholarship program and the PGA Jr. league scholarship for girls.

The Montana Woman Foundation is designed to provide assistance for the success of Montana women of all ages. It is the goal of the Foundation to encourage these women to then give back to their communities by helping fellow Montana women in need, no matter their social, economic or cultural differences. The Foundation promotes positive feedback and a circle of giving.

The Foundation was started by a group of women who realized that they would not have achieved their goals without the mentoring and support of other strong women. With this in mind, the Foundation was formed to provide a resource that could extend a hand of support, encouragement and nurturing to women (and girls) striving to reach their goals, lead positive lives and be contributing members of their community.

Be sure to mark your calendars for the1st annual golf tournament fundraiser on June 20, 2015 at 9 a.m.

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Village Greens Golf Course 500 Palmer Drive Kalispell, MT 59901

Since 1916 the PGA of America has maintained a two-fold mission: to establish and elevate the standards of the profession and to grow interest and participation in the game of golf. By creating worldclass championships and innovative programs, the PGA of America elevates the public’s interest in the game, the desire to play more golf, and ensures accessibility to the game for everyone, everywhere.

League Golf, LLC was established in 2011 with a mission to create and operate grassroots and recreational team and league programs for golfers of all ages. The objective is to deliver a portfolio of offerings that grow the game of golf through regularly scheduled participation with teams. PGA Junior League (PGA JLG) was designed in 2011 as a pilot program to better socialize the game of golf for boys and girls, ages 13 and under. PGA JLG features team vs. team in structured leagues that provide a popular, less stressful scramble format as opposed to stroke play competition. This is a great way to get kids involved in the game. Due to the fun team scramble format, players of every skill level can participate. All participants have the opportunity to play in every competition.

Whether you have that little girl tugging at your pant leg, begging to go hit golf balls or a girl thinking about starting to play golf, this is a great way to introduce her to the game of golf. Like many sports, the game of golf develops character. I don’t know of any parent who doesn’t want their daughter to show respect for others as well as themselves, be a good team player, make good judgments, be honest and fair, have a strong sense of responsibility, and display self-discipline in setting and meeting goals. The game of golf provides tools the girls can rely on throughout their lives. For more information, please call

406-755-5753.

“You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.” - Zig Zagler

All funds raised will support the Montana Woman Foundation and the PGA Junior League Golf Scholarship Fund for Girls.


May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month Did You Know?

Information Provided By Genia Tartaglino There are many amazing, strong, confident women that work in the Flathead City-County Health Department. These women hold positions that include health care providers, leaders, educators, nurses, working with pregnant and parenting teens, and support positions. These women provide a system of support that is vital to the well-being of our community, but by no means do these women do it alone. Every woman in the community should play a supportive role. Because May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month, we would like to highlight two of our outstanding women and the work that they do to prevent teen pregnancy and to work with the parenting teens in the Flathead. Holly Jordt, a public health nurse, works with the teen mothers and fathers and recently asked them what they would like to see from the community. Their responses were eye opening and should be taken to heart. “We would like people to be less judgmental about teen parents. Just because we are teens does not make us irresponsible and not good parents.” A powerful statement from another teen was, “We wish that we had better access to sexual health resources and education. We wish our parents would talk to us openly about this.” Mandie Fleming, a Health Educator at the Flathead City-County Health Department, emphasizes, “Every woman can help prevent teen pregnancy. For example, you can choose to be a positive role model and lead by example. Show young women that success, self-confidence and happiness are attainable. Teach girls to invest in themselves from the inside out. Have open and honest conversations about sexual health that encourages them to make healthy choices.”

A strong woman knows she has strength enough for the journey. But a woman of strength knows it is the journey where she will become strong”. - Deborah Hultin

Holly and Mandie work hard to provide education and resources that allow teens to make informed decisions. If teens are unable to have these important conversations at home, they need to have adults in their lives that they trust and who can provide guidance and accurate information regarding services available to teens. One such service is the Family Planning Clinic at the Flathead City-County Health Department, which works on sliding fee scale. This may simply mean a small donation for some. We need to remember that for some of these teen parents, they are struggling with getting their basic needs met: housing, food, clothing, and shelter. Some that have housing are struggling with family violence and abuse. There is also financial instability, their own health and mental well-being as well as that of their child. According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, once these basic needs are met then all people want to feel love and belonging. This takes us full circle to not being judgmental and providing love and a sense of belonging to these young women. To find out how you can help, call Holly at 406-261-9698.

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T

Community

he late John Denver may have sung “Springtime in the Rockies,” but I threw the party! And you can too. Gals, here is a creative idea for a reunion planned from your Montana Home Sweet Home. If you have a large family, host a chick party. It is a clever way to keep female cousins or maybe even all your Montana High School girlfriends connected. Whether you have a big or small group of gals, you can pull this off. Last month was my 4th one. Each reunion or party has an entirely different theme. The last one I wrote about was our Pampered party. Forty of us gals went to Montana Athletic Club here in Libby to exercise, have massages and enjoy make-up classes. That afternoon, my brother, whose name is Montana and who was once a chef, cooked a delicious meal for us.

Backing-up a bit… being the youngest of 16 siblings,

I like keeping my huge family with all our female cousins and aunts connected to their Montana roots. Cousins are wide-spread throughout the U.S. and may only meet because of a family funeral. And because life guarantees us all sad times, I wanted us to create some happy times as well.

SPRINGTIME in the ROCKIES

Home Sweet Home By Margie Johnson

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Here’s an abbreviated version of the invitation I sent. Just tweak the ideas to fit your own needs for a family or girlfriend gathering. -------

It’s time for the Hutton Cousin Chick Party!

April 23rd -26th needs to be highlighted in chick yellow on your 2015 Calendar. We only do this every 5 years, so don’t miss out. And now is the time for getting great airfares. Can you believe this will be our 4th one? Each party has a different theme and this one is “Springtime in the Rockies.” I would love to spill all the jelly beans about what we will be doing, but you will be handed a complete agenda once here. But first things first! This is the hardest part for me to mention, so let’s make it first. Because there are many young nieces comingup, please make sure they are age 15 before they attend. This is not planned for younger ages. Certainly if you are a nursing mom, tuck baby under wing and don’t miss coming. Remember: Ages 15-19 are Chickadees, ages 20-49 are Chicks, ages 50-79 are Hens. At age 80 you get to start all over by becoming a Pullet because we may have to help PULL you out of the car and help PULL you off the couch! No Stewing Hens allowed.

2015 Chick Party Theme: Springtime in the Rockies What are you to pack in your suitcase to protect your Fluffy Feathers? Because it is springtime and we will be outdoors much of the time, rain gear

is probably needed. Pack nothing too dressy. Go online and see our weather forecast. You don’t want to get soaked and look like an ugly duckling.

our traditional Bean Soup so we can tip a cup to all those ‘party-poopers’ who never came! Warm cheesy bread and yummy desserts will also be served.

Also don’t forget to pack an item or two for our fun Cousin Clothing Exchange. Bring something(s) you no longer wear. Our past clothes rummaging pile was a big hit. Remember, we all come in different sizes...from fluffy to few feathers. And some have tall drumsticks and some have short drumsticks. Some are big breasted and some aren’t bragging! But plan to toss some item in our pile to be pecked through.

Thursday night you will be handed a printed agenda with details on times and everything we will be doing on Friday and Saturday.

Also remember we have a gift exchange. Buy one and keep it at around $15. One more thing to pack: family photos. It is extremely important you bring them. Time is set-up for us to reproduce prints. Everyone can go home with relative’s photo, from greatgreat-great grandparents to aunts, uncles and cousins. Don’t miss-out giving and receiving photos of our heritage.

When do we first meet? Fly or waddle in Thursday, April 23rd and fly or waddle out Sunday, April 26th.

Where do we Roost? Libby Venture Inn and Restaurant. Everyone will pay or split room cost with other chick(s). So, please make your own nesting arrangements.

What happens once we arrive in Libby on Thursday? 6 PM Kick-off: Meet at the SOUP COUP for dinner. That is my home, Aunt Margie. (Address and phone number) As usual I will stuff you with Grandma Hutton’s Homemade Chick N’ Noodle Soup. (Sorry she never made it with beef ). We will also have

When is it all over? Plan to drive, fly, waddle or drag home on Sunday. So come join us whether you are silly or shy. You will find a comfortable place being the chick you are; either perched and quietly chuckling or strutting and noisily clucking.

-------

Once they arrived, a detailed agenda for the weekend was given to everyone. Our weekend was chock full of fun, incorporating family history, a group photo for the Record Newspaper, local tourist attractions, music and dancing, and all of the aforementioned activities.

Springtime is appropriate because it’s a time of year there is rain and sun ...tears and joy. We are always sad it is over but glad that it happened. Montana will always be Home Sweet Home.

This is a wonderful way to keep in touch, get to know your extended family members better and help ensure that younger generations will also have memories of their family and stay in touch as they get older. For any group of people who find themselves short on time or far away geographically, a chick party is an event to look forward to!

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Food & Spirits

Kohlrabi Keeping It Real By Cindy O’Boyle

You have probably spotted knobby purple or green kohlrabi at the farmers’ market and wondered what the heck this odd shaped thing with the weird name is. Well, it’s a fantastically versatile vegetable with a taste and texture somewhere between cabbage and broccoli stems. I think it is time for kohlrabi to step up and take a more prominent place in our spring and summer cooking. Here are my favorite ways to eat kohlrabi.

Raw When raw, it is slightly crunchy and mildly spicy, like radishes mixed with turnip. You can toss it in a salad, make a slaw out of grated kohlrabi, or eat it with just a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkling of sea salt.

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! y o j n E Fries Kohlrabi can be cut into thick sticks like home fries, browned in a small amount of oil, and seasoned with chili powder (my favorite), curry power, cumin or paprika. It is a very satisfying and healthy fry.

Soup While kohlrabi can be the perfect addition to a basic chunky vegetable soup, I particularly like it in a creamy, pureed soup with mild spices so that sweet kohlrabi flavor can really shine through. It can also be added to recipes of cream of potato, cream of broccoli, and even cream of mushroom soup.

Roasted Like most other vegetables, when roasted in the oven, the outside of the kohlrabi caramelizes, and the flavor sweetens and mellows. I like to toss it with other roasted vegetables like eggplant, beets, carrots, onions, and potatoes for a hearty side dish.

Fritters

Steamed

This is a great way to get kids to eat kohlrabi. Shred it and mix with egg and a few tablespoons of flour or breadcrumbs. Heat oil or butter in skillet, drop in small mounds, and flatten slightly with the back of your spatula. Turn after a few minutes, and serve when both sides are crispy.

Once steamed kohlrabi can be used in literally anything. I throw steamed kohlrabi into frittatas, stir-fries, and pasta dishes. I also like to puree it with a little cream and simple spices. There are even recipes for stuffing kohlrabi into empanadas and calzones!

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Food & Spirits

Happy Mother's Day! From The MW Kitchen By Epi Curious

I am excited to share some of my favorite brunch recipes this month for the families who will be celebrating this special day at home. These elegant and enticing brunch recipes are perfect for celebrating moms of all ages. The best part is that they allow you to create a relaxing meal without slaving away in the kitchen – allowing for more time with mom!

Bon Appetite!

Glazed Fruit Salad

This recipe is one of my mom’s favorites. The fruit is the perfect grand finale for a brunch sure to please. Ingredients • 1 can (20oz) pineapple chunks • 2 large firm bananas, cut into 1/4 –inch chunks • 2 c green grapes • 1 can (15oz) mandarin oranges, drained • 1 medium red apple, sliced • 1 medium green apple, sliced • 2 c strawberries, sliced • 1 c kiwi, sliced • ½ c sugar • 2 T cornstarch • 1/3 c orange juice • 1 T lemon juice 78

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Directions Step 1: Drain pineapple, reserving juice. Combine the pineapple, bananas, grapes, oranges and apples in a large bowl; set aside. Step 2: In a small saucepan, combine sugar and cornstarch. Add the orange juice, lemon juice and reserved pineapple juice; stir until smooth. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Cook and stir for 2 minutes. Step 3: Pour over fruit; mix gently. Cover and refrigerate until serving.


Jumbo Maple-Pecan Scone

This scone is easy to make and comfortably serves eight people. Ingredients • 3/4 c buttermilk, plus more for brushing • 1 tsp vanilla extract • 2 1/4 c all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting • 1/4 c granulated sugar • 1 T baking powder • 1/2 tsp baking soda • 1/2 tsp grated orange zest • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon • 1/2 tsp kosher salt, plus a pinch • 12 T (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces and chilled • 1/2 c pecan pieces, toasted • 1/4 c confectioners' sugar • 3 T maple syrup

Sun-Dried Tomato, Goat Cheese & Fresh Basil Frittata

This frittata fits perfectly in a brunch menu and its gourmet flavors will leave your mom thinking you worked on it all morning. Lucky for you, it only takes 15 minutes! Ingredients • 1 T olive oil • 1 c minced onion • 4 large eggs • 2 egg whites • 1/4 tsp pepper • 3 oz sun-dried tomatoes, packed without oil • 1/4 c goat cheese • 1/4 c basil chiffonade* * (Stack basil, then roll the stack, and slice it into feathery, 1/4-inch pieces.)

Directions Step 1: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Combine the buttermilk and vanilla in a small bowl and set aside. Step 2: Put the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda, orange zest, nutmeg, cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a food processor and pulse until combined. Add the butter and continue to pulse until the mixture looks like fine meal. Step 3: Add the pecans and pulse once. Add the buttermilk mixture and pulse 3 or 4 times, or until the mixture is just moistened. (Do not over mix or the scones will be tough.) Step 4: Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knead until it just forms a ball. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and pat into an 8-inch round, about 3/4 inch thick. (To make individual scones, cut into 8 wedges and space apart on the baking sheet.) Brush with buttermilk and bake until golden, about 25 minutes. Let cool 2 minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a rack to cool completely. Step 5: Mix the confectioners' sugar, maple syrup and a pinch of salt in a small bowl until smooth. Drizzle over the scone. Cut into wedges.

Directions Step 1: Preheat the oven to broil. Use a well-seasoned, 10-inch iron skillet or a nonstick skillet with a heatproof handle. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in the skillet over medium-high heat, and add 1 cup minced onion. Cook until the onion is translucent, about 3 minutes. Step 2: Whisk together 4 large eggs and 2 egg whites, and season with 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Pour the egg mixture over the onions, patting down any lumps with a wooden spoon. Scatter 3 ounces sundried tomatoes, packed without oil evenly over the pan surface. Step 3: Distribute 1/4 cup goat cheese over the top of the frittata, then place the skillet under the broiler for 2 minutes, until the frittata rises slightly and becomes light and settled. Remove from broiler and top with 1/4 cup basil chiffonade. Step 4: To remove the frittata from the iron skillet, place a large plate over the top of the pan, invert the frittata onto the plate, and cut it into wedges. With a nonstick skillet, slide the frittata onto a serving plate, cut into wedges. M O N TA N AW O M A N . C O M

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Food & Spirits

It’s All About the

Punch

Western Comfort By Brandi Glass

Forget flowers and chocolates; Mother’s Day is all about brunch. While Mimosas and Bloody Marys are our standard beverage for the meal, I believe mom deserves something really special on her day. Champagne punch is perfect for Mother’s Day brunches. Here are a few of my favorite recipes.

Champagne Punch Ingredients • 1 (12 oz) can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed

• 1 (12 oz) can frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed • 1 (12 oz) can frozen limeade concentrate, thawed • 1 (2 liter) ginger ale, chilled

• 1 (2 liter) bottle champagne, chilled Directions Step 1: Mix the juice concentrates in punch bowl (do not add water). Step 2: Stir in ginger ale.

Step 3: Add champagne (do not stir).

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Mock Champagne Punch Ingredients • 1 (2 qt) bottle white grape juice • 1 (2 liter) bottle ginger ale

• 1 package blueberries (about 1 pint fresh or a small package frozen)

• 1 package blackberries (about 1 pint fresh or a small package frozen) Directions

Spring Champagne Punch Ingredients • 1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry juice concentrate, thawed • 1 (12 oz) can frozen pink lemonade concentrate, thawed • 1 (12 oz) can frozen limeade concentrate, thawed • 1 bottle white wine, chilled

• 2 bottles champagne, chilled • 1 lemon, sliced

• ½ cup fresh mint

• * 1 (12 oz) package strawberries • * 1 (12 oz) package raspberries

Directions Step 1: Combine all in a large punch bowl.

Step 1: Place white grape juice and ginger ale in frig overnight or until well chilled. Placing them in the freezer for a couple of hours before serving if you’d like will make them slushy. Step 2: In a serving picture or punch bowl, pour equal parts white grape juice and ginger ale. Step 3: Stir gently.

Step 4: If you’re using fresh berries, freeze them on a lined cookie sheet overnight so they stay separated and don’t freeze into clumps. They make lovely ice cubes to add to the punch and will add flavor as they thaw. If you’re using frozen bagged fruit, be sure to gently break apart the clumps of fruit to smaller bits before adding to the punch.

Cheers!

Step 2: Add frozen fruit to the punch, being sure large chunks are separated into small pieces. Step 3: Stir in mint.

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The Hockaday Museum of Art Honors Women lacier National Park has been the subject of countless artists using many and Glacier mediums throughout time. Few of those recognized for their talent have ever National Park

Entertainment

G

been women. On May 28, 2015 the Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell will reveal “A Timeless Legacy, Women Artists of Glacier National Park.” The exhibit celebrates and brings to the forefront an important part of women’s history, as well as Glacier’s.

Denny Kellogg, Historian and Project Researcher states that, historically, “the societal structure of the Eastern establishment offered very narrow parameters for women artists (they were expected to paint still-lifes and domestic scenes). The West welcomed them with more opportunities for self-expression.  They were free to trek the wilds and offer their vision of their experiences to the world.  The West has always given women more latitude when it comes to cultural exploration… “Some of the deceased artists had achieved recognition in their own time but without continual promotion have faded into obscurity.  Leah Dewey Leabo and Lucile Van Slyck fit his category. With the exception of Katherine Leighton, none of these women received commissions from the Great Northern Railroad while almost all of the male artists had.  John Fery, Adolph Heinze, Winold Reiss, Joe Schereule, Julius Seylor, E.W.Deming, etc. had all been supported by Louis Hill and the Great Northern.” Lucile Van Slyck attracted local notoriety in 1930, when she snow-shoed into Many Glacier as the lake ice was just breaking up, with only a month’s provisions and her painting supplies, determined to catch the dark water against the snowy white backdrop. Her story and others further bring to life the dramatic Park scenery captured by the progressive artists who were intent on painting it.

The Hockaday Museum of Art Honors Women and Glacier National Park By Andrea Blair

“A Timeless Legacy, Women Artists of Glacier National Park” will open May 28, 2015 and run through July 15, 2015. Please see the Hockaday Museum of Art website www.hockadaymuseum.org for details.

Carole Cooke, Linda Tippetts, Rachel Warner and Kathryn Stats in Glacier National Park, Summer 2014, Photograph by Ed Gillenwater.

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Ice on the Edge, Carole Cooke, 18 x 23, collection of the artist, photograph by the artist.

McDonald Creek Study, Kathryn Stats, 9 x 12, collection of the artist, photograph by the artist.

The works of living artists Linda Tippets, Rachel Warner, Carole Cooke and Kathryn Stats will also be on display during the exhibit, honoring the kindred spirits and talent of these modern day adventurers. “I’ve spent over 40 years painting Glacier – some of those stints were interrupted by blocks of time when traveling, but an artist always returns to ‘The Source.’ I enjoy the seasons of Glacier and especially very early spring and very late fall – that’s when the weather changes and Glacier’s landscape are most dramatic,” says Linda Tippetts. “I’m envious of those women artists who came before,” Ms. Tippetts continues. “It is an admirable envy for sure, and their recognition is long overdue. This exhibit pays homage to their spirit as well as their works of art.  The importance of recognizing the likes of Nellie and Lucile and Elizabeth will give future generations the hope and proof they, too, can achieve their dreams.” Inspiration, Van Slyck in Glacier Park, April, 1929, Pac 93-28, Montana Historical Society Research Center Photographic Archives, Helena, MT.

Evening Pines, Rachel Warner, 30 x 30, Collection of Lee and Marlene Snyder, photograph by Rachel Warner.

Daybreak on Rising Wolf, Linda Tippetts, 30 x 36, collection of the artist, photograph by the artist. M O N TA N AW O M A N . C O M

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Entertainment

A Sunday Tradition History Lesson By Cindy O’Boyle

F

amilies across the country will be going head to head, trying to beat each other out in securing brunch reservations at their favorite dining spots in order to celebrate Mother’s Day. Ever wonder how brunch ever came to be? Well I have, and this month I would like to share a bit of history on brunch. People started indulging in this delicious little slice of Sunday madness around the late 1800s. As is the case with many culinary traditions, the origins are a bit hazy. There are two main theories for the beginning of brunch. The first being that the meal has its roots in England’s hunt breakfasts where lavish multi-course meals featured a smorgasbord of goodies. The second is that some historians imply that the Sunday brunch derives from the practice of Catholics fasting before mass and then sitting down for a large midday meal. On a lighter note, one of my favorite theories on brunch gives credit to Guy Beringer. His inspiration: the hangover. My research shared that the English writer first proposed the idea for the mixed meal in his 1895 essay “Brunch: A Plea.” In it, Beringer defended those nursing their Sunday morning hangovers.

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Instead of rousing folks from bed and confronting them with a heavy spread of meat pies, Beringer proposed a midmorning compromise: a hybrid meal that could lead with tea and pastries and segue into heavier dishes. This would allow brunchers to slowly shake off their headaches and calm their gurgling stomachs. If someone needed to chase the meal with a hair-of-the-dog cocktail, nobody would judge.

Whatever caused the initial spark of genius came from, the tradition definitely seems to have caught on in the U.S. during the 1930s. It was a meal championed by hotels since most restaurants were closed on Sundays and, with church attendance flagging after World War II, people were looking for a new social outlet that also let them sleep in a bit. Restaurants recognized the financial gain and soon embraced this trend. They started offering decadent spreads of foods and signature morning cocktails, such as Bloody Marys and Mimosas.

Oddly enough, the first American city known for brunches wasn’t trendy Los Angeles or the fashionable New York, but the Windy City of Chicago. Back in the days before transcontinental flights, movie stars who had business on both coasts would stop over in Chicago on their treks across country on by rail. The Ambassador Hotel’s Pump Room was well known for their elaborate brunches.

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In addition, after World War II, large numbers of American married women entered the workforce for the first time. Married women needed a relief on Sunday, too, thus the rise in popularity of Sunday brunch being eaten out. Will you be celebrating mom by way of a big brunch buffet this Mother’s Day or do you have a Mother’s Day dining tradition you like to keep? Share your traditions on Montana Woman’s Facebook page during the month of May to be entered into a drawing for brunch for two. If you are the winner, you will receive a gift certificate to a brunch location in your community.

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Entertainment

Jeanette Rehahn, Artist Article and Photo by Betty Kuffel, MD

Jeanette Rehahn

Jeanette Rehahn is an artist with talents as broad as the Montana sky. You will feel her love of the many grasses that carpet the earth when you see her exquisite pastels in the Frame of Reference Gallery in Bigfork. Her artwork is in many locations in this area and collections across the country. Jeanette and her pilot husband have made Flathead Valley their home for more than ten years after living in California and traveling the country. Jeanette’s mother recognized her daughter’s interest and talent in art before age four and nurtured the talent. Evolving to attend The Art Institute of Chicago, University of Chicago and majoring in sculpture, Jeanette has explored many art forms. Her experience includes working as an illustrator at a national science museum, a book illustrator, and in free-lance projects including courtroom presentations, graphic design, and logo art. Jeanette is an accomplished ceremonial gourd artist with many awards. Her gourds carry a unique in spiritual focus with unusual coloration and metallic paints. Nature captured her heart as a child, and her prolific creations reveal a passion for painting scenes from this expansive part of Montana. Selections include views into Glacier National Park, the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Holland Lake, Swan Lake, and Upper Swan River areas. Camping and boating with her husband bring them close to the world she captures in her work. You will experience her communication with nature and joy of art when you view the peace and expanse of Montana through her eyes. You can also see her work at jeanetterehahn.com.

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Montana Theater

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Entertainment

Lavonne Mueller

Lavonne Mueller Playwright, Poet, Author Article and Photo By Betty Kuffel, MD

Lavonne Mueller is a renowned playwright and Woodrow Wilson Scholar who has had eight plays produced Off-Broadway in NY. Her successes as a playwright, poet, fiction and nonfiction author come from a tireless focus on her work. Lavonne has traveled the world as an Arts America speaker. She chooses Whitefish as her primary home where she reads and writes daily, spends time with her two grandchildren, Neil and Brooke, and takes daily walks under Montana skies. Lavonne’s awards are too many to enumerate, but include a Guggenheim Grant to study in Russia, where she fulfilled a life-long dream to visit the home of her favorite writer, Leo Tolstoy. She also received a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, and a Fulbright to Argentina where she researched and marched with the Mothers of the Disappeared. Lavonne also received a Rockefeller Grant to write plays and a Fulbright Fellowship to Jordan where she studied Arab literature. Lavonne traveled on an Asian Culture Council Grant to Calcutta where she worked in Mother Teresa’s mission washing babies and wrote a play about Mother Teresa. On her extended US Friendship Commission Grant to Japan, she studied kabuki. The former Columbia University professor is author of the textbook, Creative Writing. Her first novel, about Eva Braun, was published in 2013. Lavonne is currently completing a trilogy of her plays about women in war: Mothers of the Disappeared, Comfort Women of WW II, and Hiroshima Maidens - about twentyfive women disfigured by the bomb who were brought to the US for reconstructive surgery. Her play, Five in the Killing Zone, was selected for Sundance.

Themes in her work often exemplify abuse of women with an aim to expose and reduce world injustice. Recently, her play, Hotel Splendid, the story of Korean women captured by the Japanese and used as sex slaves, was produced in Korea, Argentina, and at a festival in Iran.

Lavonne supports local writers, helping them improve their work. In September she will be presenting again at the annual Flathead River Writers’ Conference. For additional information on more amazing achievements see her website: lavonnemueller.com. 88

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Entertainment

Brewing a Bright Future Montana Musings By Patty Crow

R

ecently I visited Sarah Dinning and Kristin Smith, business partners and friends. In July 2014 they opened the first brewery in Libby, Montana, Cabinet Mountain Brewing, which also has the honor of being the first solely femaleowned brewery in Montana.

(blueberry/huckleberry) were also available. In additions to those, popular choices are Bobtail Blond and Ross Creek Red. The artisan selection of beers can be enjoyed at a number of locations in around the Flathead Valley, Libby and Rexford. (Visit the Cabinet Mountain Brewing website for more info.)

When we last met the floors, walls and ceiling were still under construction. The vats hadn’t been delivered yet and power cords snaked throughout. It was like a beehive of craftsmen all working toward a common goal. Now the brewery is clean, comfortable and inviting—like being in a friend’s living room.

Kristin and Sarah agreed that their business plan had been conservative to allow for higher than expected costs, but reality was expensive. There were unavoidable delays with equipment delivery and construction that consequently pushed out the opening date. Another delay was getting permits and ordinance rewrites to enable them to include the outdoor seating area. Sarah and Kristin agreed that the city council and other officials were very cooperative and enthusiastic and worked quickly to resolve those issues. They praised their 5 employees and the brewer after admitting the first few weeks were organized chaos.

The brewery has become a popular place for fundraisers, benefits and meetings, including book clubs and Red Hats, jam sessions with local musicians and a very popular yoga class on the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month. Every Tuesday night is trivia night, and there’s live music every Friday or Saturday night. Friends and families congregate here for a beer or soda, snacks and conversation in a lovely, lively atmosphere. The sample tray of a variety of beer is popular, as well as the hand crafted ginger ale and root beer. During the summer they offered seasonal light, refreshing releases, Spruce Tip and Melon. Huckleberry and a Nordic Berry

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Both Sarah and Kristin still believe there is no reward without risk.


"Unity is strength. . . when there is teamwork and collaboration, wonderful things can be achieved." --Mattie Stepanek

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Entertainment

Thanks, Credits & Kudos Thanks, Credits, and Kudos

May is the perfect issue to showcase the diversity and talent of Montana’s women. As you thumb through the pages you will get to know women of resilience, integrity, and strength. The Montana Woman Team is blessed to be able to share the collaboration of this issue with many like-minded professionals. We would like to thank these businesses and individuals for helping elevate our vision to a level of elegance and grace. Valerie McIntyre Photography JMK Photoraphy Libertie Barkley Marie and Team Soucie Soucie Salon & Spa Andrea Blair Genia Tartaglino Dennis O’Boyle J Scott Couture Shannon Barnes Allison Kallaway Jewelry Matthew Sather David Singleton The Summit Thank you to Starla Barnes for sharing her vision of a couture adaptive sport shoot. The women you brought together for this grand event are inspirational and true women of strength.

A special thank you to all the women who graciously shared their stories with Montana Woman Magazine. Last but certainly not least, thank you to all the talented writers that introduced us to these amazing women!

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Mel Mathes

20 Over

By Mel Mathes

Years of

Dear Readers, May is a terrific month for every kind of endeavor.  You may take a trip, you may contact a long lost friend, you may finish your spring cleaning, you may recommit to your New Year’s resolutions, or you may even manifest something new and amazing!               I would like to wish all mothers a Happy Mother’s Day.  I believe children are an amazing gift from God and the Universe! They are a living, breathing, and independent piece of you.  All the wonderful qualities you see in them are the same wonderful qualities that can be found within yourself. You may have had someone else help you, but you were and probably still are the closest person to them…after all, you are their mother!  I hope they tell you often how much they love and appreciate you! I would also like to offer my love and support to all women being who they are and doing what they do.  Many of you have your own challenges and yet you still make the time to help and support your friends, families, and others in need.   Some of my friends, and I consider you one of my friends, have spent years helping children with autism, taking care of aging parents, running foundations, searching for family members, mentoring displaced teens, finding homes for pets, traveling back and forth across the continent to check up on a friend, and more. I commend you for you selflessness and passion for doing what you feel is just “doing the right thing.”  When you felt someone should do something, you realized that you might be that someone and took matters into your own hands!  I support you, and I hope you realize the impact you’ve had on the peoples’ lives you’ve helped! Some of my friends are overcoming difficult journeys in their lives. They are learning to rise above what life, their families, mates, or situations have shown them. They are realizing that for their children or for themselves there has to be a better way to live. They are choosing to empower themselves and rediscover who they are now!  I want to tell them to be patient because the best is yet to come! I’m here if you need me! 94

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Some of my other friends with grown children are finding themselves wanting something just for themselves.  Some of these ladies want a new career, some want to travel, others want to go back to school, and some want to try a new relationship. They all want to do something more with the rest of their lives. Those that want new careers are leaning towards healing and teaching.  These ladies are optimistic and looking towards their futures.  How exciting for them! They are embracing the future and meeting it head on!! From The Secret When you look at yourself and feel dissatisfaction about any part of you, you will continue to attract feelings of dissatisfaction, because the law mirrors back to you exactly what you are holding inside.   Be in awe and wonder at the magnificence of you!

May the joy be with you! I can answer your question, or you can share your thoughts and concerns with me daily.  I’m available from 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM MST.  You can always reach me by telephone at 1-406-892-8934. I return all messages! Or you can call for an appointment and meet with me in person. You can also view more about me on my new website www.foryourheadonly. net.  I’m looking forward to speaking with you! Watch for my specials on Facebook!


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Look to the Stars

By Star Gazer

Taurus

April 20 – May 20 Nervous tension could cause a temporary malaise that keeps your energy low towards the beginning of May. Tasks and chores need to be done, so you will probably drag yourself up and try to finish them in spite of the way you feel. Try not to get overworked, and try not to take your weariness out on others. It's better to let work go than make yourself and everyone else more stressed out.

Gemini / May 21 – June 20 A group with which you're affiliated may be temporarily torn apart by politics and quarrels. If so, it's best to stay out of it. A friend could be having trouble and come to you for advice and help. Don't get too frustrated by his or her weaknesses. This could be a frustrating time for you - one best spent working on your own projects. All will be better soon.

Cancer / June 21 – July 22 Changes in your home could cause temporary frustration that creates some tension with family members. Perhaps you're moving, cleaning, or refurnishing, and everyone is getting in everyone else's way. The best way to handle this situation is to try to get the job done as quickly as possible. Once it's done, tempers will subside and all will be fine.

Leo / July 23 – August 22 Miscommunication with someone far away could lead to bruised egos, heightened emotions, and angry phone calls. Don't get sucked into a quarrel. Try to sort out the problem. Changes in your neighborhood could cause trouble getting around, so be prepared for blocked streets and heavy traffic. Walk, if you can. It will clear your head and get you where you're going more quickly.

Virgo / August 23 – September 22 Your psychoanalytical talents could be put to work this month when misunderstandings come up. Your friends aren't likely to be thinking clearly and may not respond to reassurances. Use your intuition to determine the best way to defuse the situation. Finances might cause some worry now, but your

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ingenuity and fiscal sense should put things right. Go out and have a good time.

Libra / September 23 – October 22 A person you're attracted to may seem to be interested in someone else. This could bring up your insecurities and jealousy. Don't make yourself crazy. Try to learn the facts before letting the situation get the better of you. Invitations to more than one social event for the same night might force you to make an uncomfortable choice. Make the choice that's best for you.

Scorpio / October 23 – November 21 Someone is keeping secrets from you. We all have private issues we don't wish to share, but this affects you. Your intuition will probably tell you who this person is. Try to get him or her to open up without exerting pressure. Unfinished tasks could be driving you crazy. You may try to run through them quickly, causing too much stress. Get the most crucial done and let the others go.

Sagittarius / November 22 –December 21 Perhaps you planned to attend a group event but circumstances beyond your control got in the way. Maybe it was canceled. This could cause some disappointment for you and others. Find something else to do. A project of your own is likely to need some attention, and this challenge could keep you engrossed for hours.

Capricorn / December 22 – January 19 A visitor who needs a little sympathy could visit you this month. Your friend probably wants some advice about some problems. He

or she could also bring information involving new scientific or metaphysical studies that you find fascinating. This information could trigger your own insights. Write down your ideas. You will want to remember them.

Aquarius / January 20 – February 18 Some important plans, perhaps for a vacation or involving education in some way, could be temporarily blocked by circumstances beyond your control. This can cause considerable upset and might even set your temper on edge. You may be tempted to take your frustrations out on others. It would be far more productive to find ways to make your plans work, even if there's a delay. Go to it.

Pisces / February 19 – March 20 A letter or phone call could bring upsetting news about money. Your first reaction may be to blame yourself or someone else, but the circumstances are probably beyond anyone's control. Chances are good that it can be set right. Before anyone gets too upset, it's best to investigate and find out what needs to be done. It may take some effort, but all will be well.

Aries / March 21 – April 19 Jealousy could rear its ugly head this month. This may involve a romantic relationship. Jealousy is often groundless. If you want to avoid an upset, try a little communicating. This is definitely the time to make the effort to turn a disadvantage into an advantage. Strong emotions can work for you under some circumstances. A passionate reconciliation is better than an angry estrangement.


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May 2015

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JULY 17-18, 2015 Ennis, MT

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Montana Woman Magazine May 2015  

Montana Woman Magazine May 2015

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