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Civic participation is important, but Maryanne and I also believe in looking out for the future generations when we still can. CHARLES LO

tells me fits in with my idea of preparing our future engineers, then all I do is give it a little nudge.”

Dynamometer driven, and more At the College of Science and Engineering, supporters of experiential learning—like the Andersons— are steadfast and plentiful. Their gifts are often personal, or driven by personal reasons. “It’s almost an obligation to give back if we received good benefits from a good education,” said Charles Lo (ME ’70, M.S. ’73, MBA ’93). He and his wife, Maryanne, made the inaugural gift for the Thomas E. Murphy Engine Research Lab, which moved into its renovated space at an industrial park near the Twin Cities campus in 2013.

Their contribution led to two new dynamometers, expanding the University’s ability to study alternative fuels and perform stateof-the-art combustion research.

“When we learned that the lab was still using dynamometers from the late 1940s for its teaching and research activities,” Lo recalled, “Maryanne and I decided to help. We felt that the lab needed modern equipment to educate our students and do advanced studies in order to maintain the U’s national ranking.”

William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, was designed to facilitate dialogue and to house Professor Gasiorowicz’s book collection. Faculty, students, and post-docs are regular users of the space. In fact, a weekly conversation over tea is held there—a tradition many have said Gasiorowicz would have appreciated. “Steve was an active, young professor who made it interesting to be at Minnesota,” Bardeen recalled. “I remember him being very busy, but he had a warm personality and was always helpful. He also had a very broad knowledge of what was going on in physics around the world. I was inspired and guided by him.”

It was a former faculty advisor who spurred a gift from William Bardeen (Physics Ph.D. ’68) and his wife, Marjorie (Math ’63).

In addition to being a gifted teacher, Gasiorowicz was instrumental in turning the William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute into an internationally renowned physics research center. He died at age 88 in 2016.

The Stephen G. Gasiorowicz Collaboration Space, located on the second floor of Tate Hall in the

“I’m happy to be able to preserve Steve’s name in the place he helped found,” Bardeen said.

The Stephen G. Gasiorowicz Collaboration Space that houses the late professor’s book collection was donated by William and Marjorie Bardeen (left). Gasiorowicz taught at the U from 1961 to 2001. He pioneered the quark model of hadrons, the theory of glueballs, and the mechanism of quantum chromodynamics confinement.

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I N V EN T I N G TO M O RR OW

Inventing Tomorrow Summer 2019  

In this future-oriented issue, we feature three University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering faculty harnessing “smart” techno...

Inventing Tomorrow Summer 2019  

In this future-oriented issue, we feature three University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering faculty harnessing “smart” techno...