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SHOP Roger Haxby, above in 2017, with his scholarship recipients Eric Inderieden and Abigail Wolters.

His legacy continues… Outstanding engineering skills plus honesty, reliability, and focus earned Roger Haxby (ME ’58) the respect and confidence of many. Haxby, who died on July 24, played an important role in the college’s direction. He served on the CSE Dean’s Advisory Board for more than 30 years; was an active volunteer fundraiser, serving on the CSE campaign committee; and was a generous donor.

for the Holidays CSE clothing and accessories are just a click away. Surprise a loved one with a gift. Or buy yourself a college souvenir.

Haxby, a native of St. Cloud, Minn., joined Ingersoll-Rand after graduating from CSE. He led the company to unprecedented sales records as its western Canadian branch manager. When oil was discovered in Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay in the 1970s, he moved to Anchorage and formed the Waukesha Alaska Corporation—now led by his son, John. Since 2006, the Roger and Mary Haxby Scholarship Fund has helped 12 students pursue their education in CSE. “I consider it payback time for the good fortune that we’ve enjoyed over the years,” he once said. “I credit much of my own success to the University.”

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In Memoriam: Earl Bakken Earl E. Bakken grew up in Columbia Heights, Minn., and was fascinated with the movie "Frankenstein." For Bakken—who received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948 and, shortly after, founded Medtronic Inc.—the movie “inspired me to bring people back to life with electricity,” he often said. Bakken died on Oct. 21 at his home in Hawaii. He was 94. Over the course of his career, Bakken worked closely with numerous University scientists, engineers, and healthcare providers, including C. Walton Lillehei. The late surgeon was pioneering procedures to help babies born with often-lethal heart defects. Lillehei asked Bakken to find a

solution. He responded by building the world’s first battery-operated, wearable pacemaker. In 2017, the University named the Earl E. Bakken Medical Devices Center in his honor. “Our center wouldn’t be possible without the foundation he built in Minnesota,” said director Arthur Erdman. “We are committed to continuing to live up to his charge, to create new technologies to improve health.” Ironically, Bakken himself had several implanted medical devices, including stents, insulin pumps, and a Medtronic pacemaker. >> Read more about Bakken’s life’s work: z.umn.edu/BakkenTribute

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Inventing Tomorrow Fall 2018  

In this water-themed issue, students and faculty at the College of Science and Engineering use the latest research techniques to study water...

Inventing Tomorrow Fall 2018  

In this water-themed issue, students and faculty at the College of Science and Engineering use the latest research techniques to study water...