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CODY DUTY

Chemical engineering graduate Leon Binitie-Cassidy works as a facilities engineer at G2 in Houston. He credits the connections he made and the experiences he had as a CSE student for his success.

After graduation, he landed a job as a product development engineer at 3M. He later was recruited by PPS in Houston to work as a project engineer building a $150 million natural gas processing plant in his native Nigeria. He now works at G2, another Houston firm, which helps to design and manage oil and natural gas facilities and pipelines across the

United States and Canada. He hopes to return home someday and work in Nigeria’s burgeoning oil and gas industry. “Something I remember vividly,” said Binitie-Cassidy, “was during my senior year. One professor pointed out that you may have the best idea or the best invention, but as an engineer

if you do not communicate your ideas to business people and laypeople in non-technical terms, you’ll never get anywhere. I feel that captures everything about my education in Minnesota. It prepared me not only from a technical and professional standpoint, but also how to communicate effectively with different types of people.”

W INT E R 2 0 1 6

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Inventing Tomorrow, Winter 2016 (Vol. 40, No. 1)  

College of Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota Drive, determination and a CSE education pay off for young alumni; CSE re...

Inventing Tomorrow, Winter 2016 (Vol. 40, No. 1)  

College of Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota Drive, determination and a CSE education pay off for young alumni; CSE re...