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IS BUILDING ONE HAUNTED? / SCARY SUBURBS UNITEC AT NIGHT / PHOTOS / FASHION

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ISSUE AT ’A SSOCIATION

27/03/2009 8:41:41 a.m.


R D!! FO SE S E ES IZ R R D P T S E B

I WISH I WAS A ???

USU'S FIRST PARTY OF 2009

come dressed up as a PRINCESS ZOOKEEPER ACTOR PIMP BALLERINA PUNK RACING CAR DRIVER MERMAID CHEERLEADER FIREMAN VET DOCTOR ASTRONAUT NURSE FAIRY PIRATE BARBIE MUMMY RUGBY PLAYER ROCKStaR PRINCESS ZOOKEEPER ACTOR PIMP BALLERINA PUNK RACING CAR DRIVER MERMAID CHEERLEADER FIREMAN VET DOCTOR ASTRONAUT NURSE FAIRY PIRATE BARBIE MUMMY RUGBY PLAYER ROCKStaR PRINCESS ZOOKEEPER ACTOR PIMP BALLERINA PUNK RACING CAR DRIVER MERMAID CHEERLEADER FIREMAN VET DOCTOR ASTRONAUT NURSE FAIRY PIRATE BARBIE MUMMY RUGBY PLAYER ROCKStaR PRINCESS ZOOKEEPER ACTOR PIMP BALLERINA PUNK RACING CAR DRIVER MERMAID CHEERLEADER FIREMAN VET DOCTOR ASTRONAUT NURSE FAIRY PIRATE BARBIE MUMMY RUGBY PLAYER ROCKSTAR FAMOUS MERMAID NURSE FAIRY DOCTOR

THURS 9th april 7PM carrington's Building 33 Unitec Mt Albert FEATURING EXCLUSIVE LIVE VIDEO MIX PERFORMANCE BY DJ REMINISE

$5 USU Members (Unitec Students)

$10 Non-Members (Everyone Else)

$10 Door Sales (If Avaliable)

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The After Dark Issue, 30th March 2009

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Are you getting More Bang for your Buck in 2009? How Safe are Our Streets? Lights out at Unitec, What Really goes Down

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Editorial

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Poll

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Tirade

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Fashion on Campus

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News

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Photos

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Gig Guide

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Whakarongo Mai

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Newsbot

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Artist/grad profile

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Recipes

Dear Barbie Reviews

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My Night in Building One with Ghosts

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EDITORIAL INQUIRIES: ph. (09) 815 4321 ext 7927 inunison@unitec.ac.nz PO Box 44016, Pt Chevalier CREDITS EDITOR: Stacey Knott DESIGNER: Erin Gaffney COVER: Erin Gaffney

In Unison, After Dark.indd 3

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ph. (09) 815 4321 ext. 7384 usuadvertising@unitec.ac.nz

DISCLAIMER Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Submission and contributors are welcome, but the publisher reserves the right to select and edit the material submitted. Materials submitted will remain property of the publisher, unless alternative arrangements are made.

CONTRIBUTORS Joseph Harper / Rhiannon Horrell / Susannah Aitken Stephanie McColl / Newsbot / Barbie / Greg Powell Christian Jensen / Charlene Srhoj

27/03/2009 8:42:06 a.m.


editorial

Loony-tec

A DARK HISTORY After being dragged from his cell to the theatre, the young man is strapped to the bed, held down by four strong doctors with two nurses on each side. He is fully awake and no one is listening to him or answering his coherent questions. A rubber guard is forced into his mouth; gel is rubbed into his temples. The nurse brings over a headband and places it over his scalp. “Ready?” She asks the doctors, they nod. No one asks the patient if he is ready. The dial is turned, a look of pure terror and unnatural strain comes over the patient’s face as the electric bolts go racing through his brain. The device is removed but the patient’s body still uncontrollably jolts. When it passes, he is left comatose and alone in the room. Later he will be locked back in his cell. Whether or not this electroconvulsive therapy worked to cure his “disorder” (he had “dark thoughts” about his mother, apparently this made him schizophrenic) won’t be known for awhile. And who cares anyway, once disordered always disordered, the doctors said.

some lost souls who were subject to terrible maltreatment inside that building, are still there.

What we found on the scattered history of what happened when Building One was an asylum from the mid 19th century disturbed me. Electroconvulsive therapy, solitary confinement and lobotomies all helped subdue the patients, to stop them trying to explain why they did not belong in the cold, lonesome cells. Ill-treatment was a common theme, patients were locked into the asylum so they would not bother “right thinking people” in the community. The disturbed or disordered were not treated as real thinking and feeling people, despite what they were diagnosed with. At times the asylum was severely understaffed, so patients able to help out were not released even if they were fully capable of normal life outside the orange walls. With the culture of “what goes on behind closed doors, stays there,” I doubt the treatment that resulted in death for many patients was ever recorded, or given a second thought.

4

Death is probably the best for such a sad person, I suspect the nurses thought. I believe the human spirit is strong, especially after death, and so it is my belief that some lost souls who were subject to terrible maltreatment inside that building, are still there. Many will guff at this belief, but that is the beauty of this day and age, we have the right to believe whatever we like, and not get locked away for it. Though Joseph Harper’s feature over on page 12 may convince you there is some substance to my belief. The treatment of people with metal illnesses has drastically changed over the last 50 years, particularly with the introduction of drugs and integrating people with mental illnesses into the community. These days, we are better at accepting those with mental illnesses, but we are not fully there yet, from what I have seen, we do treat people with illnesses differently; we let their illness define them. This is something I am ashamed to say I have done. When hearing someone has or is suffering depression or some other mental illness, I have looked at them differently. In the past I have wanted to give up on a friend who was suffering at great lengths because the chemicals in her brain were all out of wack, she was too erratic and hard to be around, and I didn’t understand what was going through her head. It took me awhile to realise that despite what she was suffering, the illness was not who she was. And regardless of the fact she made me uneasy with her new scars every time I saw her, she was a good person and a great friend, we had a lot in common and great times together, the only real difference was her bipolar disorder that was misdiagnosed for years. While I think of myself as an open-minded and compassionate person, thinking and reading about how people were treated behind the closed doors of the various institutions on this land has definitely made me change the way I think about mental illness. It is part of our everyday life, and can affect anyone and everyone, so in respect to those persecuted for their illnesses in the past, and those dealing with theirs today, as the mental health ads on TV say, don’t judge before you know. Stacey Knott In Unison Editor, 2009

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27/03/2009 8:42:54 a.m.


Everdt Venecourt works at the Long Black Café.

etc. etc.

DO YOU BELIEVE IN GHOSTS? HAVE YOU HAD ANY PARANORMAL EXPERIENCES? WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE HORROR MOVIE OR BOOK?

WHAT WAS THE BEST PART OF USU ORIENTATION 2009?

I Like

VOX POP

56% SOUNDS IN THE SUN

“Yes, to a certain degree. Nothing confirmed, but I used to live in an old house where there was a weird feel (to it). Night of the Living Dead.”

6% THE BLACK SEEDS AND TAHUNA BREAKS

Anneli Ammann-Sherriff is doing a bachelor of sport

“Not really, no. Have had feelings. Bad Jelly the Witch.”

31% FREE BBQS AND LUNCHTIME EVENTS 1% USU COMEDY NIGHT

Sebastian Rodriguez, studies civil engineering.

“No. No. The one about the kid…The Omen.”

3% HYPNOTIST

Natalia Kucija works as a costume designer, visiting Unitec for work.

“I am opened minded, so yes. Yes I am really into the paranormal, but have not seen a ghost. The Innocence and the Haunting of Julie.”

2% GAMING DAY SOURCE: www.usu.co.nz

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE SPOT 5 DIFFERNCES IN THE PICTURES BELOW

I have a question to ask all you students out there who utilize the shuttle bus service to and from Waitakere city, the question for all you cleverdickies is this; where does one queue begin and end? Ok now lets just bypass the answer fro now, if you can’t figure it out yet, because it seems that some of you out there don’t give a shit about any bus queue, so long as you get your scabby ass onto a seat, stuff everyone else! The word on re street is, your queue jumping days are over, so beware queue jumpers. Annon. Dear In Unison, Horace Balnket started life at 90%. Having been born without a left thumb would make it all the more stranger when his right one killed him. Now however, Horace was blissfully unaware of his future. He was still at an age when your surprised at just how big your shadow now is. Horace liked his shadow: another nine fingered friend enjoying the sunlight. The shadow could be twisted to sit just how Horace liked. Sometimes you couldn’t even see the missing bits. Sometimes you couldn’t tell the difference between it and a bar of soap’s shadow, and Horace liked that. But shadows don’t like the dark, and soon enough neither did Horace. Got something all up in your grill? Email your letter to inunison@unitec.ac.nz they must have your full name address and phone number, though these will not be printed. Letters must be 150 words max. The editor reserves the right to reject letters. usu

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27/03/2009 8:43:29 a.m.


the president’s tirade

Tirade

NAMASTE… Being the After Dark issue I thought that I would talk about my favourite after dark moment. It is 1983, I’m 7 years old and living in H town. It is a Saturday night and Michael Jackson is top of the charts on RTR countdown, and all of New Zealand is waiting with bated breath for the 8:05 release of “Thriller”… Was I scared? I cannot tell a lie! But hell no...It was the most awesome thing I had ever watched and with the A Team busting down television that’s some heaps awesome as bro… To all of those Bull Rush players out there “Banned since 1985 in most schools”, if you haven’t played this in the dark with a spotlight then you have not lived life. That’s what we call after dark action… Talking action after dark, one of my favourite things to do is play with fireworks and pyro! Hey I’m a guy… The norm is to strap pyro to my stilts and stilt arms and stand up in front of a crowd and set them off, with 76 pieces of fireworks being the most strapped to me at one time. But remember kids “don’t do this at home”, “and I am a professional”!!! And really, burns blow goats. Go the green, and people, just because I have dreadlocks does not imply that I mean the chronic. No it means the celebration of a country that happens all over the world, St Paddy’s day and the party that USU had at Carrington’s. Much fun was had by all and plenty of drunken Irish antics were had, keep your eyes peeled for the pics.

WANKER OF THE WEEK… There are two wankers this week. First is Malcolm Albert Spark, an ex Act candidate and teacher who has been found guilty on 24 child porn charges. Malcolm Spark not only are you a wanker but

EXEC PROFILE: AJAY MURTHY, VICE PRESIDENT WHY ARE YOU ON THE EXEC? For the experience, I get to learn new skills, meet new people and represent other students. As a business student I also get to apply what I learn in class here. Free tickets to all events on campus too! WHAT CAN YOU DO FOR STUDENTS? Use my experience, work with the executive and ensure the USU gets the best governance. We’ve grown a lot in the last year or so, but there’s a lot more we can do for the students! We’ve got some great projects we’re working on this year.

it looks like you wank as well, oh and f#$k you for making it even harder for male teachers to be respected and accepted in New Zealand’s schools. And to the Wanker with a capital W who set my car on fire, I hope the fleas or a thousand camels infest your private parts!!!

DUDE OF THE DAY…

To the big man himself and by that I mean Unitec’s CEO Rick Ede, you rock! Rick ran into traffic on Carrington Road, in the rain, wearing a suit and tie to save our Black Seeds billboard sign that had just flown past his window in the storm that was battering Auckland that day. Rick you are a real dude… Until next time… Greg Powell USU Student President 2009

USU NEEDS A

TREASURER THE POSITION OF TREASURER ON THE USU EXECUTIVE BOARD IS

VACANT

NOMINATIONS ARE NOW OPEN TO RUN FOR THE TREASURER POSITION ROLE OF THE TREASURER: · Report on the financial affairs of USU · Be a cheque signatory · Keep policy up to date · Monitor and Forecast the financial affairs of USU

BENEFITS OF BEING ON THE EXECUTIVE: · Great addition to your CV · The position is paid · Learn new skills · Meet new people · Attend USU Events for free

NOMINATIONS CLOSE APRIL 9, 2009 Candidates will be elected at the Special General Meeting on May 20. Nomination forms available from USU Reception (Bldg 180) or Student Services (Waitakere)

DESCRIBE THE BEST PARTY EVER? Front row at a gig. Especially if it’s a band I really wanna see. 6

WWW.USU.CO.NZ

usu

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27/03/2009 8:44:27 a.m.


is a performing arts student, we caught her in her “work clothes” but we liked the crazy crown touch she gave her ensemble.

fashion on campus

RUBY REIHANA

0LANA*OURNEY &ROM 4O

,EAVEAFTER 



!RRIVEBEFORE AM

'O AYAN SALAD studies early childhood. We dig her oversized hoodie which she borrowed off a friend.

NATASHA BARNES

an osteopathy student, made her skirt out of 16 Disney cartoon themed ties. She says she felt like having a “random day” so wore the skirt. We like her idea of jazzing up a boring Monday with a crazy skirt.

HARLEY MANGAHAS

studies art design, his blinging gold hat attracted us to him like magpies, he got it from the Philippines.

MORGAN HOLYOAK

also studies early childhood, she says her style is “individualistic”. We like the bag her aunty made her.

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01/30/2009 9:54:35 AM 27/03/2009 8:45:24 a.m.


Read me...

news

WANT TO STUDY IN A LEAKY, COLD BUILDING? COME TO UNITEC! By Rhiannon Horrell

UNITEC STAFF ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE MAINTENANCE OF CAMPUS BUILDINGS WHICH REPORTEDLY HAVE WATER LEAKS, ROTTING WOOD AND COLD TEMPERATURES.

department have been haphazard. “If students are in a cold environment with water leaking then they are easily put off which could affect the retention and success of students. It should be brought up to a level the students deserve.”

In addition to this, overcrowding is an issue, with one teacher reporting that 32 students are being crammed into a space fit for 16.

He said Building 108 is often described as a rabbit-warren, because there are so many corridors.

“I’m frankly appalled at the state of the resources in the buildings,” says a teacher who does not wish to be named. “The resources are tired and run down. We have to make-do and this is not what the students are paying for. We are working with third world stuff and it is sub-standard. Rick Ede should get outside and actually walk around and talk to the students who are vitally affected,” he says. “One international student came up to me last week and said ‘I’m paying $19,000 a year for this’ – meaning the facilities.”

Building One is not much better, being older than a century.

UATI has also been highlighted by certain teachers as having maintenance and timetabling issues. “There is health and safety issues in UATI that need to be dealt with,” says USU president Greg Powell. Head of Transport Technology, Iain Seymour-Hart, says the modifications in his

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“My aim is to create a fit-for-purpose teaching and learning environment which is modern and exciting,” says Mr Hart. His $8 million-dollar proposal for new facilities in his department was rejected last year. Mr Powell acknowledged there are some leaky buildings. “Unitec has suffered immensely in maintenance, through the ex-CEO John Webster. The fact was, Unitec was going very slowly and later more rapidly down the financial proverbial gurgler. For years John Webster put money into initiatives to turn Unitec into a university. “Unitec was going to go under. The belt is tight.”

However, Unitec is well aware of the problems says Mr Powell. “Millions of dollars of maintenance work needs to be done. Most of the buildings are around the 30 year mark. “The maintenance bill was passed down on to the shoulders of the CEO which was unfair.” He says Mr Seymour-Hart is a “health and safety Nazi” – in a good context. “He himself walks around noting the condition of things,” says Mr Powell. Health and Safety advisor Irene Allen says she hasn’t heard anything but there are maintenance issues that do pose a problem. In terms of overcrowding, “The guidelines say one person per three metres square,” she says. She advised students and staff to approach her when they feel they have a health or safety issue. Glen Huggard, facilities management admitted there are maintenance issues. “To be blunt we are short of maintenance money and this is right across the campus. UATI are bad at timetabling and this is a separate issue. Funding has improved this year and we have had more capital to deal with larger items. In terms of overcapacity in rooms, we are working with them.”

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27/03/2009 8:45:32 a.m.


news

Me too...

THE GREAT TOLLEY HUNT II:THE SOUND OF SILENCE By Matthew Harnett (Craccum) and Jackson Wood (Salient) ANNE TOLLEY SAYS: ” ,” TUMBLEWEED ROLLS BY Tertiary Education Minister Anne Tolley wasted $400 of student money when she failed to keep an appointment with national tertiary student representatives, in earlier this month. New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations co-presidents Jordan King and Sophia Blair were scheduled to meet with Tolley on March 9. King and Blair, who were touring New Zealand tertiary institutions, flew from Auckland to Wellington, only to be told that Tolley’s office had forgotten the appointment. The meeting had been confirmed twice by Tolley’s office in mid-February, but it was later discovered they had been incorrectly booked for April 9, King said. Tolley’s press secretary apologised after King emailed to complain. “I emailed to say how annoyed I was, given we broke off our tour to fly down especially, and given how Tolley is unavailable next week and overseas the week after.”

King said NZUSA had sought a meeting with Tolley since she was appointed, and even invited her to address their January conference, but “it’s taken her four months to get back to us.” King said Tolley had been in meetings with the Association of Private Education Providers and the Industry Training Federation soon after the Government’s election, yet declined an invitation to speak at NZUSA’s January conference, and “did not acknowledge our desire to have a meeting until February. “We are very concerned about student welfare, and the potential direction of government policy relating to the wider tertiary sector - the Minister needs to hear such concerns and work inclusively with students to address them.” Tolley has proven difficult for many student publications to get in contact with. Craccum, Salient and Critic have tried on numerous occasions over several months to talk with the Minister - or organise a time to talk - only to be seemingly ignored.

LONG BLACK; ON THE MOVE By Joseph Harper ONE OF UNITEC’S MOST POPULAR CAFÉS WILL SOON BE MOVING SHOP AND GETTING AN UPGRADE. The Long Black Café, which is currently situated in the far eastern wing of building one on the Mount Albert campus, will soon be moving its operation to a new, larger space; the old Student Union Café.The Long Black is a hugely popular lunch time dining spot among Unitec students, particularly for the design and arts students in close proximity. Almost too popular in fact, as the problem of a lack of space and a small single door for entry and exit has plagued the café since its move to its current location. Owner Mandy Taylor takes pride in the “quality service” they provide at the café, but feel there is simply “not enough space.” This is the main reason for the move, as the new location is more spacious in terms of both dining, food

preparation and display areas.

However, when Jackson Wood (editor of Salient) called her office, her press secretary said they had only received only two interview requests from the student media. One was from Critic, who supposedly failed to respond with a requested list of questions. Wood says, “We’ve tried everything short of stapling questions to her door. The Aotearoa Student Press Association (ASPA) has an audience of over 80,000 students with whom she could directly communicate. Students are apprehensive about the National government. Some inkling of what’s going on in her head in terms of policy would be nice.”

Craccum co-editor Matthew Harnett had a similar response: “At first we were kind of joking with the “Tolley Hunt” thing. But actually, she is one tough MP to get in contact with. I would’ve thought, as the Minister of Tertiary Education, she might like to chat with the people her portfolio affects. Guess not.” When asked why she didn’t respond, Anne Tolley didn’t respond.

Students can expect the same food and service though at the new location, but on top of this the café will undergo a bit of a revamp. “There will be more of everything, right across the board,” Ms Taylor says. The extra food display space will allow for a greater variety of foods, as well as the addition of hot, ready to serve foods. “No more microwave” Ms Taylor adds. Another exciting addition will be a new separate espresso line for those just looking to get a hot drink. The interiors and furnishings will also receive an upgrade, with new floors, linings, tables and chairs. The space will also function as a student art gallery. The move is set to take place as soon as late April.

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27/03/2009 8:45:39 a.m.


news

Read me...

HALF A G ON CRACK AND HOOKERS OR YOUR LOAN? HARD DECISION By Joseph Harper

TOO BUSY TO GET HELP, OR GIVE IT By Rhiannon Horrell OVERWORKED STUDENTS, WHO ARE BUSY WITH CLASSES ALL DAY, DO NOT HAVE THE TIME TO USE UNITEC’S STUDENT SERVICES, AND SOME OF THE SERVICES MAY NOT HAVE THE TIME TO GIVE HELP.

Dr Evonne Greenfield at Unitec’s health centre says she sees around 50 clients per week and she does see students who are under stress.

The problem, brought to the attention of In Unison by the counselling service, is not easily solved.

“They are reluctant to seek help. Many are working; they have part-time jobs as well.”

Unitec students may need to attend classes from 9am till 5pm, leaving them no time to ensure their personal health is not suffering. While counselling services’ Iona Winter says if a student really needs the counselling service they will make the time to see someone, they may have to wait. The service advised last week that its high demand means a one to two week wait to see someone, depending on the priority. Unless it is an emergency or crisis situation, they will be put on a waiting list. She advises students accept the first appointment offered or they will have to stay on the waiting list, and as appointments may not suit student’s timetables, lecturers will need to be flexible.

She says students need to be able to access the health services.

“Depression is a bi-product of stress and I saw a lot of it last year – especially before exams.” Te Puna Ako (formerly Te Tari Awhina) lecturer Margaret Wilson sees students that are stressed out over their time and study management, but takes a holistic approach to helping them, she says. “We help with breaking assignments into manageable chunks and never diminish how they are feeling, we just listen,” she says. “There is a minority of students that we see, a small number whose health is seriously impacted by overwork which really has a major impact.” Students need to use services like hers to learn these techniques, she says.

THE NEW ZEALAND UNION OF STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS SAYS A NEW STUDENT LOAN REPAYMENT SCHEME WHICH WILL COME INTO PLAY THIS MONTH AFFECTS FAR TOO FEW. The scheme will see students, including those overseas, who make over $500 worth of voluntary student loan repayments, receive a 10 percent top up to their repayments from the government. The scheme was introduced in the hope that it would encourage students to pay off their debt faster. NZUSA co-president Sophia Blair says the move will be welcomed by a few but most borrowers are already making considerable compulsory loan repayments each week, and can’t afford to make further contributions on top. Students with loans already have to pay compulsory repayments to the tune of 10% of any income they earn of $18,184 per annum. The NZUSA say these repayments are high enough as it is, and having to make extra payments to qualify for this incentive is unjust. “Loan repayment obligations [are] already being met by most loan borrowers, why are the majority being punished and left out of this policy to reduce the debt burden?” Ms Blair says. “Helping to address the massive amount of student debt held in our communities is a key way the government could choose to support families through this recession,” she says. “However the creation of such a narrow and short-sighted policy is a missed opportunity.”

DO YOU HAVE A NEWS STORY? We want to hear about it. Email In Unison on inunison@unitec.ac.nz, or call 815 4321 ext. 7927 see www.usu.co.nz for more news. 10

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27/03/2009 8:45:40 a.m.


news

Me too...

EXECUTION, 19 MARCH: By Joseph Harper

THIS FORTNIGHT’S EXEC MEETING WAS HAMPERED BYTHE ABSENCE OFTHREE EXEC MEMBERS. IN SPITE OF THIS, WITH PIZZA FUELLING THE ENGINES OF ALL,THE MEETING ROLLED ON. AND ON. AND ON.

SPIRITS MADE THEIR PRESENCE KNOWN AT MARAE OPENING By Stacey Knott SPIRITS WERE PRESENT WHEN THE UNITEC MARAE OPENED, SAYS UNITEC’S PAE ARAHI HARE PANIORA. The 4am opening ceremony of Te Noho Kotahitanga on March 13 was attended by about 600 people and Mr Paniora says it was very emotional and spiritual. When people entered and left the marae for the ceremony a good message came in the form of rain, he says. “It was a way of acknowledging that those people who passed away who were significant to the marae are happy and are there with us in spirit.” The sign of the rain becomes a very good sign for us because it’s them acknowledging the past to what is happening in the present.” So far the project has cost $5 million, and is far from complete. There is no dining-room, gateway and the roof is not complete. Workers could be seen doing last minute construction right up until people started entering at 4am. The first part of the ceremony saw prayers spoken by the Ringatu, Maori catholic, Ratana, and Church of England faiths inside the packed wharenui where two people fainted due to the heat, while hundreds stood outside unable to hear the prayers. Mr Paniora says the prayers may have gone on for too long, and many people would not have understood what was being said, however translation would be culturally inappropriate. It would have interrupted the speaker’s train of thought, and their dramatized movements if they had to pause for translation, he says. However, he says the people there were enthralled with the intricate carving, which mixed tradition with contemporary. “People wanted to just stand to observe, enjoy and embrace. People were spellbound, they were moved.” Waitakere mayor Bob Harvey spoke at the ceremony, saying the marae is a “glorious testament of what we can do together, Maori, Pakeha, young and old. It’s a testament of big dreams.”

First up on the agenda was an item of “commercial sensitivity,” and because of this, I was asked (politely) by President Greg Powell to vacate the meeting room. I did so. In Unison can only wage guesses as to the subject matter of this juicy item which led to this outrageous press blockade, and we urge you to keep your eyes glued to the pages of In Unison for further updates.

Next on the agenda was an item I was gladly invited to sit in on. A positively, rivetingly long, power-point presentation from USU Student’s Association general manager Richard Neal, on the pros (from the point of view of the executive) and cons (mainly pros though) of compulsory student membership of our students’ association. As it stands when you enrol in a course at Unitec, be it full-time, part-time or even some kind of short course (such as first aid courses) you are automatically signed up as a member of the students’ association and subsequently charged a membership fee. Whether you like it or not. This is good for the exec as it means the numbers of our student association are much greater (when student membership changed from being voluntary, it rose from around 6,000 to its current level of 55,000), and because of this they have a stronger voice, more money and greater access to information. In theory, this is good for Unitec students too, as a more powerful exec with access to more money should be able to do more for you. Whether or not they are doing enough to deserve your cash is up to you really. If you don’t think so, you need to speak up, go to your class rep, because the only way membership will go back to being voluntary is if you make it go back, students. The next issue tabled was the vacant treasurer position on the exec. There are only three nominees at this stage, so if you think yourself a bit that way inclined, you should go for it. The position is paid, and would look excellent on a CV. Plus you’d get to partake in the joy-in-meeting-form that is fortnightly exec meetings. There will be a Special General Meeting (election) on May 20 at The Hub, to elect the new treasurer. Make sure you’re there reader. Take part in that democratic process.

General executive Togia Lanefale bought up the only item of note in general business, which was a major problem facing Waitakere students. Apparently the shuttles don’t have enough space to transport the growing number of students studying at the Waitakere campus. Because of this, students are being left behind and stranded. “Waitakere is getting bigger, and resources are insufficient,” says Waitakere representative Diane Monteith. While President Powell expressed that this is a major problem that needs dealing with, he said that this is not an issue for the exec. He did however send Lanefale in direction of the appropriate members of USU staff who can solve this problem, which is simply not good enough. This reporter’s thoughts are with you Waitakere. The meeting closed at 7:47 pm. It was a long meeting.

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27/03/2009 8:45:59 a.m.


feature There is something spooky in Building One, and we have proof. The ground on which Unitec’s Mount Albert campus stands (and in particular Building One) has a colourful history. Given that it used to be home to the Auckland Lunatic Asylum, it’s not surprising that it has been the scene for various ghost sightings and other such spookery over the years. We decided to get to the bottom of this, and called in the team from Phoen-X Paranormal to run an investigation. A cynic and a sceptic; Joseph Harper tagged along, steely nerves in tow. The following is his blow-by-blow account. PHOTOGRAPHY: CHARLENE SRHOJ

I’m not going to lie. The idea of ghosts and spectres and all the rest sounds like a bunch of poppycock to me - the kind of stuff that is meant for those with over-active imaginations or paranoid schizophrenia. I went in with a pretty cavalier attitude about this whole paranormal investigation, and this is the very reason why what I witnessed that night scared the hell out of me. I have decided to present my findings in the only possible way one can present information of this scaritude; a Blair Witch Project style journal. 1:08 pm – I arrive at Building One. I’m halfway to the library when I run into a man in a bright orange and black polo shirt. This is Clinton Lawson, founder of Phoen-X Paranormal. He leads me to where the rest of the team are gathered. There are five of them. There is a definite buzz about them as they all excitedly move their various devices up and down the hallways, and take photos of everything. “This is going to be a very interesting night,” says Harley Jones, lead investigator of Phoen-X North. One of the team members, Daniel Robinson had visited the building four years earlier with a different team, where they were physically punched

and scratched by an unknown force. Will it happen again? 1:40 pm – The team starts to bring in equipment. The sheer amount of walkie talkies is astounding. I am given one too. “Keep this on at all times,” says Clinton. 2:06 pm – We enter the basement for the first time. This, along with the old chapel, is where the investigation will centre itself tonight. It is a supposed hotspot for supernatural activity. The air in the basement feels cold and heavy. It smells like damp wool. The investigators are positively brimming with excitement. Investigator Debbie Burns tells us the EMF reading is 1.6, a little higher than normal apparently. Clinton explains the theory behind EMF readings, we all give off an electro magnetic field, and supposedly, so do spirits. However unshielded wires, electrical equipment and power sources also give off high EMFs. And because of this people can get what is known as EMF sickness, a disease which increases paranoia in some individuals. Sounds like a vicious cycle to me.

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2:38 pm – I sit the team down for an interview. They explain that “they are not ghostbusters. Rather they provide help. Help to people whose problems see them laughed at.” After the interview Clinton pulls me aside to tell me that if anything happens tonight, he “won’t hesitate in pulling the plug.” He won’t risk any danger on his team. “These people are my family,” he tells me. And they are like a family. They joke around and poke fun at each other, but they seem to have a very tight bond. 2:49 pm – We go down to what was once a morgue, but is now Unitec’s security centre. The team look around inside the building, except Harley, who stays outside and records notes for himself on a dictaphone. Afterwards the team head off for a while and I am left to my own devices. 6:01 pm – I return to the team. They now have several infrared cameras set up in the basement, and two team members are doing a kind of paranormal surveillance patrol on the third floor. Apparently all is not going smoothly. “Never had this much hassle getting equipment set up as I have on this investigation,” says Clinton. An omen?

off and is spread across the floor. I don’t know what’s going on. I am genuinely scared. Harley is on the radio to the rest of the team.Yelling at them to get up to the chapel. Daniel’s camera stops working. The rest of the team arrive. My heart is beating like mad. I have never been as scared as I was in that chapel. In Unison photographer, Charlene’s camera stops working as well. Everyone is all a flurry. 9:20 pm – Clinton finds a cold patch of air in the otherwise warm chapel. Harley stands in it for a long period of time. He is talking to himself and appears unable to move. I start to feel afraid again. Suddenly he takes off. Sprinting down the halls. He is being led. Clinton and I give chase. We follow him right down to an alcove on the first floor. Harley is crying and talking to himself. But then he stops. 9:35 pm - “It was a young lady, she needed help,” says Harley. Tears still evident in his eyes. “This isn’t me crying, it’s her.” The team doesn’t know what to make of this. Apparently it is a first. I don’t know what to think. Photos taken earlier reveal the mug that smashed was sitting on the other side of the room. I can’t find a logical explanation. But I convince myself that I’m still a sceptic. I’m still shaken though, and I eat two cupcakes as comfort. I feel afraid and fat afterwards. 10:01 pm – We debrief about what happened. No one is sure of anything. Harley is still shaken. This level of excitement is exhilarating. “I can promise you; this won’t be the last action we see tonight,” he says.

The Phoen-X team in Building One

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6:23 pm – Mysterious clanging sound in the basement. 6:28 pm – Source of clanging found to be artists hanging paintings. The team is extraordinarily professional. They really are all business when they get down to it.

I wish he was right. Unfortunately, the night climaxed in the chapel. It was a brief but intense moment of paranormal activity which has changed the way I look at things. The rest of the night was spent walking around the rest of Building One, and occasionally returning to the chapel in the hopes that lightening would strike twice. It didn’t.

7:53 pm – We eat pizza for dinner. The apricot chicken is divine.

1:00 am - We take one last walk down to the basement and then call it a night. I thank the team and say my goodbyes before cycling off into the night.

8:53 pm – I return to the basement with Clinton. The cold is more consuming this time. Nothing out of the ordinary down there though.

I understand the majority of readers won’t believe my version of events. All I can do is swear to you readers that I’m telling the honest to god truth.

9:03 pm – Harley and Daniel head out on another surveillance patrol, this time to the chapel, I join them.We enter the chapel. For five minutes all is normal. What happens next happens very fast.

While Clinton says he had hoped more could have happened in the night, the chapel incidence was spooky. He thought the intention of the flying mug was to grab attention.

There is a knocking on the stained glass windows. We put it down to pigeons. But it is louder than pigeons beaks. This is a genuine knock. We radio the rest of the team at home base (the library) and ask if the painters are still nailing things up. They aren’t. There is a rustle from the windows. I go to have a look. The building is very dark by this stage and I can’t see much at all. There is a gust of wind and a mug flies into the wall opposite the stained glass window. The handle is smashed

“A ‘get out of here’ feel. It didn’t want us there,” he says. Clinton reveals that he was shown some material compiled on the chapel a few hours before the incidence which detailed a ghost some people have seen, a thin woman with blonde hair. It matched the description Harvey gave and Clinton says there is no way Harvey had a chance to read the file. The team from Phoen-X are hoping to return in a few months time. They want to bring a full team of about twenty, and “give the building the investigation it deserves,” as Clinton put it when discussing the future plans. I look forward to their return.

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A historic photo of nurses at the asylum

Not much is known about the history of Building One, it has gone through plenty of name changes, but the only information we could find was a small booklet detailing how it was built in 1865 as a place to put people who did not conform to the social norms of the time. It was built in sections as more and more people were committed, keeping the males and females in separate wings.

He had also heard of staff getting their papers ruffled when there was no breeze in a room.

It was built to be a self-contained hospital, with staff quarters, medical facilities and administration in the centre. While it was styled as a hospital, the building and the way patients were treated made it seem more like a prison.

“It has a sad history,” Hoverd says.

In an article compiled by The Asylum Collective, Dr Fraser McDonald discusses the nurse to patient ratio that saw one nurse look after 130 patients in 1974 when he worked there as a psychiatrist.

“There would have been suicides, there might have been deaths because of maltreatment from staff or other patients, a lot of which would have not been recorded or reported…swept under the carpet,” Hoverd says.

He says the patients ran the ward, and a hierarchy was evident as to how this was done. The nurses had favourites who they gave power and control to. They were unwilling to discharge their good patients who ran the hospital, “if they had been discharged the hospital would cease to function,” McDonald says. However, as the history of mental health shows, the patients were treated more like a prisoner than a person.

One death that is known of occurred in 1877, when a fire broke out, killing one female and destroying the first floor of the east wing.

“The best nurses were in fact like kindly farmers who looked after their flocks of strange animals in the most humane way they knew how. The possibility of really treating them like other human beings often didn’t cross their minds,” McDonald says. Artist Madeleine Heron echoes this belief. She was admitted to Carrington in 1983.

Before medication of the 50s, the only way to restrain or “treat” a patient was through confinement, shock treatment, lobotomies and straight jackets.

There was a mortuary to accompany the building, so it is suffice to say, a lot of people would have died there over the years.

In addition to this, in a Sunday Star Times article in 2000, reporter Miriyana Alexander says a patient at the institution, then named Oakley, died in 1982 after he was subject ECT treatmentelectroconvulsive therapy. In 1994 Unitec bought the building to hold design and art classes in, as the Asylum Collective article says, “as one culture replaced another, dormitories turned into studios and cells became offices.” Hare Paniora says Unitec blesses Building One when students or staff need them to, he believes there is a “spiritual dimension or element” to the building.

“I found Carrington terrifying to enter as a patient, it felt like entering a prison.” She found the staff unconcerned with her as a person, but more concerned with keeping her “controlled and docile,” she writes.

Mount Albert was occupied by Maori in the pre-European days, says Paniora. This is why they have had kaumatua bless the land since the early 90s. The most recent blessing was two years ago.

She felt separated from the community due to its lack of real interest or care, and the building “overwhelmingly oppressive, both in terms of architecture and clinical practice.”

He says some people feel a presence, whereas others are not sensitive to it, but for those who are, if they are distressed Unitec will arrange a blessing.

Safety and Security’s Paul Hoverd takes a keen interest in the history of the building and often hears stories from lecturers in the area.

However, it is not to rid the area of spirits. Paniora goes on the advice of elders who say the sprits have been there so long, they won’t leave. So it is easier to leave them be, they are asleep and if they wake them up, it could be problematic, he says.

“Apparently lecturers have heard old music playing at night, and not heard where it comes from, as would be played on an old gramophone, you could imagine someone putting it on for the inmates, just to have some music playing.”

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“It is my belief we don’t want them returning back and being present with the living. We let them sleep, we leave them there.”

27/03/2009 8:47:29 a.m.


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photos 16

St Patrick’s Day Party

PHOTOS BY: Sanji & Raymie usu

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gig guide

RANGITOTO EXPLORER TOUR

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Macbeth on ’till the 8th at Unitec A creepy Shakespearian tragedy directed by Cathy Downes, presented by the Department of Performing and Screen Arts.

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ROTORUA EXPERIENCE WEEKEND 20TH-22ND MARCH

Sale St Sessions: Alt Country at Sale St in Freemans Bay Get a dose of good country music in you, for free.

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USU Touch Tournament at the Rugby Fields Unitec, 12.30pm Get a team of 6-10 staff/students choose a team name and uniform colour, there will be prizes after. Registrations close April 2 cost is $30 per team. Northland Air Guitar Championships at the Leigh Sawmill Cafe get your air guitar ready to rock it with the best of em Connan Mockasin at Cassette Number Nine An indie darling sure to make you swoon

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USU I wish I was A??? Party Dress up as whatever you wanted to be when you were growing up. Carrington’s Mt Albert Campus, 7pm Tickets from USU reception

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10 FRI The Datsuns at the Toto Montecristo Room NZ rock and roll legends sure to make you sweat.

The We Rock Club presents: Eddy Kim, Kym & Jas, Ranfurly and The DeLoreans at Fordes Bar. something for everyone, at a cosy homely bar. Music in Parks: Mike Nock & Friends at Tahaki Reserve, Mount Eden. Free Jazz!

0WEDS 8 Waitakere Gaming Unitec Waitakere campus, from 3pm 5pm in the room at the back of Student Services. Play xbox 360, PS3 and heaps of games for free.

11 SAT Easter Paradise ft. Bevan Keys, A.D.A.M, Charlie Ash, Prince Diana at Studio A mix of pop, electo and house to get your booty shaking. $45 door $25 students

DO YOU HAVE AN EVENT COMING UP? Send details and images to inunison@unitec.ac.nz

For information about upcoming events, get a We See New Zealand programme at USU reception today! usu

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usu education research update

ARE YOU GETTING

IN 2009? In October 2008 USU released a massive research report on the quality of education at Unitec called MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK. This project surveyed students and lecturers about good and bad teaching practices across the whole of Unitec. We found that students faced heaps of problems and some serious action needed to be taken. Here is a summary of what we found out and what we tried to do about it. The full report, and a summary of the recommendations for change that we made to Unitec, can be found at: www.usu.co.nz/student-issues/education-research-report. WHAT WE FOUND OUT

WHAT WE ASKED UNITEC TO DO

UNITEC’S RESPONSE

ASSESSMENT ISSUES

OUR ACTION

UNITEC’S ACTION

Some students weren’t getting their assignments back on time, if at all.

We found all of these stories from students unacceptable. It was the biggest finding of the research project.

Unitec accepted our recommendations ‘in principle’ only.

Some students weren’t getting enough feedback on their assignments. Some assignment questions were either too vague or confusing. Exam dates weren’t being given to students at the beginning of a course. Students didn’t know where they were going wrong in their assessments. There was no regulatory Assessment Policy at Unitec (a policy containing rules about when, for example, lecturers have to return assignments).

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We put recommendations to Unitec’s Academic Board to have regulations in place for 2009 around assessments. One of these was that student assignments must be handed back to students within a 3 week period with meaningful feedback attached (this is in line with regulatory policy at other institutions). We put in a total of seven recommendations to Unitec’s Academic Board around these issues. See: www.usu.co.nz/student issues/ education research report.

Academic Board said they did not want to put rules and regulations in place saying that students should get their assignments back within 3 weeks, or get meaningful feedback on them. They agreed to let USU work with them on a new Assessment Policy which they want to be a ‘policy of intent’. A ‘policy of intent’ might not contain any rules about getting assignments back to students. We don’t think this is enough and will continue to fight to see rules in place in a ‘regulatory policy’ so that students get some real BANG for their BUCK!

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WHAT WE ASKED UNITEC TO DO

UNITEC’S RESPONSE

SEQUAL EVALUATIONS

OUR ACTION

UNTEC’S ACTION

Students hated filling in SEQUAL evaluations. They said they never got any feedback and nothing ever changed.

We asked for all the lecturers reports on SEQUAL results for their courses to get sent to us, so that we could show students what lecturers said would change for the next year.

Unitec agreed to all our recommendations on this issue. They agreed to re-design SEQUAL with our involvement (it’s happening this year).

We learnt that SEQUAL is poorly designed. We learnt that if not enough students fill in SEQUAL forms Unitec can’t generate a report because it isn’t fair. That’s why there’s often no feedback. We learnt that SEQUALs are frustrating for lecturers too. We learnt that the Maori student experience was not being evaluated properly.

We said we wanted to work with Unitec on evaluation mechanisms, so we could make sure that feedback gets to students. We asked them to re-design their evaluation mechanisms, with our input. USU working with Unitec has taken over the Student Satisfaction Survey this year, and we will make sure students get proper feedback from it. We asked Unitec to evaluate the Maori student experience properly.

Unitec agreed to give us the lecturers’ reports on their SEQUALED courses, so that we could communicate any findings and changes to students. They said they would start doing that this year. They promised to measure the Maori student experience in every evaluation survey at Unitec. Students got some real BANG for BUCK here.

REPRESENTATION

OUR ACTION

UNITEC’S ACTION

We realised that many problems could be avoided if we had good communication with all the Student Reps. at Unitec.

We thought the best thing to do would be to engineer a communications plan with lecturers, so we could start a database of Student Reps. at Unitec.

Unitec agreed to all of our recommendations, and really supported our approach to communicating with Programme and Class Reps.

We put recommendations to Unitec’s Academic Board asking that all details of Programme and Class Reps. be forward to USU.

Thanks to heaps of helpful lecturers, we currently have 109 of Programme and Class Reps. on our database. This is awesome compared to last year when we only had 25!

USU staff and Executive are able to take on issues at a high level, whilst Programme Reps. are constrained by more local issues. Sometimes we need to check things out with Student Reps. across Unitec to see if a problem is occurring everywhere, or only in one specific programme.

We asked to be able to enter classrooms to see how things were going. We asked to sit on Programme Committees if the Programme didn’t have a Student Rep.

usu education research update

WHAT WE FOUND OUT

We are giving training to Students Reps. and producing handbooks for them. In 2009 Student Reps are going to help students get much more BANG for their BUCK!

So, USU got Bang for Buck for Unitec students in some areas, but not in others. What we really want are some regulations about giving students their assignments back within a specific time period. We want it to be a rule across the whole of Unitec, as we believe that students learn from getting meaningful feedback. This year we are working with Unitec to discuss this issue and develop an Assessment Policy. What do you think should go into this policy? If you want to have your say on this issue please email usueducation@unitec.ac.nz. Although the Bang for Buck research project was completed in 2008, we are always interested in getting your opinions about the quality of education at Unitec. We also are interested in doing further surveys or having meetings with groups of students who want a specific issue investigated. If you have any problems on your course, find out who your Class or Programme Rep. is. Don’t know how to find out? Email usueducation@unitec.ac.nz, tell us your programme of study and we’ll put you in touch. If you haven’t got one, we will represent you.

The Education Team at USU.

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feature

How safe are our streets? Walking the streets is something you wouldn't think twice about. Everyone does it – whether it is to get to class, to visit a friend or just walking to the dairy. However, with street violence plaguing some parts of Auckland and crime being unpredictable, Rhiannon Horrell investigates just how safe the streets surrounding Unitec Mt Albert are. Last year local business owners were concerned with the lack of policing in the area. Dairy owners often suffered graffiti and gave up trying to repaint it as it would happen again. Shelly Kumar of the Harlston Superette does not feel safe. She says thieves have entered the store and tried to grab cigarettes and chips. There were also incidents of youths smashing the glass of a public phone booth outside her premises. “It mostly happens on a Friday or Saturday night. Mt Albert is known for crime.” Brian Sajch from the Mt Albert dairy echoes this opinion. “With the economy down, people steal stuff,” he says. “You never know in Mt Albert but it is safer than areas like Mangere. I have three security cameras inside.” He says the cameras do not make him feel safe and that the offenders often enter wearing hooded jumpers and sunglasses so it is hard for the cameras to identify them. Sajch says he does not feel the police care as thieves may steal up to $1000 at a time. Community Constable Darren Calkin admitted there were incidents of handbag snatching around the Mt Albert shopping area. Management of Triniti of Silver Café, which backs on to the train station, say they haven’t had much of a problem with crime. “We are a day time operation and we are all out of here well before the sun goes down. We do see police cars racing up and down New North Road all the time so they must be going somewhere.”

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“There are muggings and other things that go on but often they are related to the people involved,” he says. He believes it is fairly safe. Mayes acknowledges there is only one community constable for the area and says although he does not find the policing inadequate, he would like to see more. “The train station is unsafe and MARA is working toward improving the whole of Mt Albert, to make it a better place for the public.” “By and large, the incidents are isolated events, and there does not seem to be a pattern. It is relatively safe.” A Neighbourhood Support Group operates out of the community constable’s office. Garth McVicar of the Sensible Sentencing Trust says the concerns they are receiving from their Auckland members are huge. “I believe crime is being committed by people progressively younger and I also believe crime is being carried out by repeat offenders who may be on home detention or carrying out community work. Perhaps they have been released by the parole board after serving a fraction of their sentence.” He says there is a lot of frustration, that people are taking the law into their own hands because they have lost faith in the justice system. “That is the current situation,” McVicar says. “Christchurch is comparative with parts of Auckland in terms of crime. Tauranga was 18 months ago a safe place to live but this is quickly reversing. Nelson would be my pick of the bunch, it is one of the safer communities from that area. There are gang activities and gang members are astute businessmen so safe towns are easy picking.” The website Daily New Zealand News quotes information from Newstalk ZB saying New Zealand cities rank among some of the world’s safest. In the latest figures of the top 20, Auckland dropped three places to eighth, tied with Bern, Copenhagen and Sydney.

feature

Tony Mayes of MARA, the Mt Albert Residents Association, says the local streets are not as safe as he would like them to be.

Wellington was number 14, up one spot from last year. Despite some fears that crime would increase as a result of the economic downturn, McVicar says this has not been the case so far. “I have not seen it in practice as yet. If you look at previous recessions the reality is it didn’t happen. If people lose jobs they are not the type of people to commit a crime. There is no evidence yet crime has increased.” In October last year, Prime Minister John Key pointed out that violent crime had risen 48% during the time that Labour had been in power. From October 2007 to October 2008, crime jumped 11%. The Auckland City Harbour News reported that MARA was concerned Mt Albert would turn into a slum area due to rubbish problems, train station issues and deterioration. In 1989 the Mt Albert council amalgamated with the Auckland City Council and $15 million dollars worth of assets were handed over, the article reported. MARA would like to know where the money has gone. On the New Zealand Police website, several tips are provided for avoiding handbag snatching or mugging: • • • • • •

Walk upright, be aware and hold your handbag firmly. Look and act confidently. Carry your bag so it cannot be snatched from behind. When you walk near moving vehicles, hold your handbag on the side that faces away from passing traffic. Avoid isolated areas. Consider keeping your Eftpos card, credit cards and keys separate from your handbag. Be wary of people who may be trying to distract you. If you are suspicious of their intentions, move your handbag into a position where it cannot be easily seized. Look and act confidently. Keep away from anyone who makes you feel uncomfortable.

Basic common sense will keep you safe most of the time when you walk the streets. But remember crime always happens to those who expect it the least, so do not become complacent. Auckland Sexual Abuse Help was not available for comment on the safety of the local streets.

Incidents on our streets In January a motorcyclist was hit by a car and subsequently died at Auckland hospital from his injuries. He was hit by a Volvo when it was exiting a driveway.The 31-year old victim was a Mt Albert resident, travelling on Allendale Rd at the time. The Salt family, who live on Range View Rd, will finally move from their state house after Housing New Zealand tried to evict them several times. They have been accused of terrorising the street

and making life there unbearable.TV3 reported that the family was stopping cars, assaulting visitors and residents and causing havoc. In 2007 up to 30 gang members hanging out at the local Mt Albert shops were responsible for intimidation, drinking, drug use and vandalism. Local business owners were concerned they were intimidating elderly patrons. At the time, three people were arrested for disorderly behavior and breaking bail conditions. usu

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feature

lights out at Unitec Drunken girls scrambling up hills, funny smelling ghosts, couples steaming up their car windows and burglars hiding around dark corners are all in a normal night for the Unitec Safety and Security team, as Stacey Knott finds. With nothing better to do on a Saturday night, I decide to see what happens at the Mount Albert campus after dark, tagging along with the three security guards patrolling the campus, Tarun, Kamran and Raymond.* I find what goes down on campus is astutely watched and recorded, and security guards have some pretty good stories. The guards are on constant look out for taggers, burglars and drunks. The night starts with the lockdown, where we visit all the buildings to lock them and set the alarms, or ensure they are already locked and alarmed. This starts with the Library and ends with Building One. As we lock up Building Six, Tarun says many of the break-ins are people looking for valuables such as laptops. We spend about two hours going in and out of the maze of the buildings checking all the external doors, only accompanied by long torches. A few alarms go off during the night but no burglars are spotted, however they have had some scary run-ins in the past, Tarun says. “I have come across face-to-face, two burglars, they had all sorts of tools with them to fight with and two friends waiting in the car.” Lucky for the unarmed guards, the pair ran and did not take anything. Tarun says they need some sort of defensive equipment when they are on patrol at night and come across situations like this. However, New Zealand law restricts such items to the police. The night before, the guards saw some people tagging a building down the northern end. The taggers saw they had been spotted, so 22

security chased them, however, they got away. Being unarmed though, security must observe and report, relying on thier vigilance, notebooks and pens. In places Unitec is really dark at night. Walking down from Building One to meet the guards at Building 16, I had to walk through pitch black, surrounded by trees, using my cell phone light to guide me. This is one of the biggest problems areas for darkness I find. Tarun says the dark and isolation of some areas is uncomfortable for students heading back to Accommodation, aside from the darkness they also have to pass the Mason Clinic- home to the criminally insane. While there has never been an incident of a patient from the clinic accosting a student, the presence of the clinic can be alarming for some people. Early in the round we visit the Oakley Creek Bridge, a prime example of an isolated destination, however, the area is lit with floodlights and covered by security cameras. Last year a student was attacked and robbed in Oakley Creek, which was captured on the security cameras. The incident was a set-up; the victim was hit, and his laptop, cell-phone and wallet were stolen. Throughout the night, the guards point out the numerous trouble spots, such as the UATI and PIPA complexes. A common theme is they are all dark and, after midnight, they go pitch black, the perfect environment for trouble to brew. People don’t realise the campus is not always safe place to hang out at night, Raymond says.

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feature

The guards’ boss Safety and Security Supervisor Paul Hoverd says he does not have a problem with most of the people legitimately on campus after hours, because they provide extra eyes and ears for the guards which should deter criminals. However the guards themselves find it would be better if the people were not there. But, because it is an open campus, with a public access route, policing people on campus proves hard. A young couple sitting by the business school are cautiously approached by Raymond, who asks what they are doing. They answer with bemused looks “we’re just having a walk and sitting here.” “Are you students?” he asks. “Yes…we were just on a walk and are taking a break.” The grilling seemed a little odd, clearly they were harmless but Raymond says it is for their own sake, its better they are not on campus at night. Likewise, a couple driving to Unitec for a bit of privacy is also a no-no in security’s books. The night before this investigation security had to ask two couples steaming up their cars to move on. When Tarun and Kamran head off to Building One to start the lockup, they try to convince me to go with them, to overcome my fear of ghosts in the building, but I’m a wimp. I stick with Raymond and the safety of the van. Raymond reveals through the night how he feels about ghosts in the allegedly haunted buildings. While he is not set either way on their existence, he says he prays before entering Building One sometimes. “Sometimes it feels like there are extra eyes looking out of the building (at me).” He points out a rambling old staircase outside the building, and says whenever he is near it, he gets a cold feeling. When patrolling outside the area sometimes he sees things. “Sometimes I’ll open my eyes and see someone, and then close them and open again and they will be gone.” As the night goes on, he opens up more to his to experiences, saying it is mainly a feeling, or sometimes a smell that makes him think someone is there with him when he is patrolling. “It smells like old stuff something old and different or a smell of old perfume or candles sometimes,” he says. Though he does not see any cause to be concerned. “If they’re happy they let you feel it as well.”

Also on the night round, is visiting the vet to stand guard while the nurse takes the dogs out onto the lawn to do their business. The guards astutely note where people are hanging out and radio through to each other who they see and where they are, predicting their movements. Raymond sees two people with hoodies up, and calls the others about them. “People use Unitec to cut through to Waterview. At night it’s dangerous they might have sharp objects or a bottle ready to smash us,” Raymond says. “We have to deal with people loitering around at night, we have to be skilful, we don’t want to antagonise at night. If we antagonise them it can backfire on us, they could graffiti or break a window,” he says. Later I discover the guards also work as chauffeurs; we come across two girls walking through the dark lanes of Unitec, heading back to the village after a night out, and give them a lift, the 500 or so metres it is. At 1am I am starting to feel ill from lack of sleep and my eyes start to glaze, the others, however are fine. Tarun says it is important they take breaks and refreshments to keep themselves awake and alert, because their jobs depend on them being healthy, awake and aware. While tonight doesn’t seem like there’s too much going down, Hoverd says there is a variety of things that can happen any given night on campus. “If there are cars around campus they might get broken into or stolen, or Unitec can be used as a dumping ground for stolen vehicles. We’ve had cars recovered here that have been stolen previously, the most significant incidence of that was last year just before Christmas where a car was stolen locally, and driven into Unitec and set on fire and just about burnt down a nearby classroom.” At 2am I’ve seen enough, and with security being as careful as they are, they drive me the 200 metres to meet my taxi. While I’m a little disappointed there were no burglars to catch or angry young men punching each other to photograph, I’m certainly sure Unitec is in safe hands after dark. *last names withheld for privacy reasons.

Our conversation is interrupted by some drunken yahooing over at the rugby fields. We see two young drunk girls, shoeless, scrambling up the bank. They stumble down the road to get their taxi, and turn around to face us in the van like lost rabbits caught in the spotlight.

GOT A VIEW? WANT TO COMMENT?

Check out the In Unison online at www.usu.co.nz/inunison

With a party going on at Carrington’s we assume that’s where they came from. usu

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USU

TOUCH TOURNAMENT

FRIDAY 3RD OF APRIL – 12.30PM UNITEC RUGBY FIELDS GET 6 – 10 FRIEN DS TOGETHER OPEN TO ALL UN ITEC STUDENTS AND STAFF

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usu OCIATION

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Registration forms are available from the USU reception, Bldg 180, and on the website, or email Narissa at ususport@unitec.ac.nz

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tOUCH POSTER 2009.indd 1

WWW.USU.CO.NZ 27/03/2009 8:54:12 a.m. 5/03/2009 8:50:35 a.m.


Dear

FREE GEAR HIRE IN APRIL AND MAY!! ONLY $4.50 EACH BEFORE 5PM ANY DAY!!

xox

BARBIE

PLAY SQUASH AT MT ALBERT CAMPUS!!

dear barbie

UNITEC STUDENTS/STAFF!!

Dear Barbie, I’m hungry. What should I eat? <3 McQuillanator

Get your fellow students /staff together now for some fun!!

Are you serious? You really think I have time to answer such menial dribble? Pfft. Food is for fools.

Book a squash court now ! For bookings Ph 815 8602 or email play@natsquash.co.nz or book via our website. www.play@natsquash.co.nz

Hi Barbie, I’m feeling a bit depressed. I am unemployed, don’t really get up to much and love eating.My day consists of: me sleeping in until about 1pm, getting up, eating a microwave pie covered in grated cheese, some fries and drinking bottle of coke. Then I watch Jeremy Kyle and Dr Phil, sleep some more, get up- go and buy dinner which usually consists of greasy chips-a large meat lovers pizza and a deep fried Mars Bar for dinner. I then watch Shortland Street and whatever other trashy TV is on until I fall asleep around 2am. I know it sounds like a pretty fun/relaxing life, but I think I’m becoming a bit unhealthy. It’d be fair to say that I’m packing on a few pounds. I’m beginning to notice that I sweat a lot too. Walking to and from Pizza Hut I return to my house drenched in pools thick smelly sweat. Even when I’m watching someone exercise on TV I perspire. I don’t shower very often but I often have to wipe the insides of my rolls because they get all gunky and rashy if I don’t…. (abridged, go to www.usu.co.nz/inunison to read this whole pathetic problem).

• • • • •

Subway Restaurant on site. Pro Shop, Restringing service Shower facilities Refreshments available Coaching available

The National Squash Centre is located inside the Unitec Campus, Gate 3, Carrington Road, MT Albert - beside O’Ryan’s Gym.

-Big Ted Fatty, you’re taking up all the room on this page, let alone chairs, footpaths and movie theatres. LOSE WEIGHT. That is why your life sucks, you stink and you make girls want to vomit. There is NO excuse for being fat. No more pies and takeaways. I suggest you also wire your jaw shut, like they did in the good ol’ days. If you can’t find a doctor with morals flexible enough to do this, then you need to rid yourself of all your food (throw out all those pies) and also, go and spend every cent you have on exercise equipment so there is no more money for fatty gross food. Now exercise will be your new comfort, your new food. When you get so hungry you want to faint, have a line of speed and get back on that treadmill. Just do it. The thinner you can get the better. Ken says ideally a man should be 0% body fat, so that is your goal, when you get to that goal then the ladies, if they know what is good for them, will be a flocking to your skeletal frame. If you really are a fat, lazy SOB and can’t shed the weight/lifestyle then I suggest you look up Chubby Chasers on the internet and find yourself a feeder. Just make sure you never leave the house so people like me don’t have you see your lard ass.

A

Are you tired of being inactive?

Here’s an opportunity to change that! We are investigating the influence of a resistance training program on tissue sensitivity. We require participants between 18-50, who are currently not undertaking any regular physical activity. You will be required to complete an eight week resistance training programme with testing of tissue sensitivity prior to, and immediately following, the research period. You will have access to gym facilities during the research period.

For more information, please contact: Cushla Storey, Master of Osteopathy Student Mobile: 021 042 9619 Email: unitecresearch@hotmail.com

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column

Whakarongo Mai WITH JOSEPH HARPER

Bumming

THE RAPISTS AND RABBITS OF WATERVIEW There ain’t nothin’ like a little bit of late night strollin’. Especially when the moon’s a-glowin’ and the hills are a-rollin’ beneath your feet. Unitec’s Mt. Albert campus is rife with such conditions. And so, in the summer months, I often set of in my swandri and my $39.00 Pat Rafter signature tennis kicks (from Dunlop - by way of K Mart) and get my stride on. Night walking (like morning running) has its pros and cons. And on the extreme end of either end of the spectrum are big Rs. R is for Rapist. I’ll be frank with you, in my 20 years, I’ve yet to see a rape or a rapist.Yet when I’m out walking at night, although Van Dyke Parks is singing sweetly through my ipod, in my head, every bush is a potential ambush spot. I’m being silly though right? Why would anybody rape me on a Friday night? Why would anybody rape me on any night of the week? I don’t even have a perky butt. In saying this, the more often I walk, theoretically (and this is not taking into consider the amount of crispy and/or peanut M&Ms I buy. Or whether my girlfriend bakes cookies ’n’ cream cup cakes (HOW CAN I SAY NO TO C.&C.C.C’s?!?)), the perkier my cheeks become. And the faster I walk, the faster the rate of perkification. So really by walking faster past bushes and public toilets to avoid the old rapeski, I’m increasing my rapability! That all hinges on my math being correct, I guess. Jesus who am I kidding? I did NCEA level 1 maths a year early and still spanked it. I’m as good as butt pumped : ( In saying this; R is also for Rabbit. I don’t know about you but I love bunny rabbits. Absolutely my favourite animal (actually equal with horses, so not actually absolute). To see a living, breathing rabbit chewing on grass as I walk by gets me swooning like nothing else. The only thing a like better than a rabbit gazing, is a rabbit up on its hind legs. Totally adorable. I even wrote a novelty rap song about them. I rapped as a rabbit in the first person. My rhyme included several references to Watership Down and this absolutely punnerific gem; “I’m into carrots/ but not in terms of bling,in terms of vegetable/They’re full of vitamins and minerals.” (More astute readers will have picked up another pun in the sentence before the L.L. Cool J-esque rhyme I slung.) I don’t know where the root of my love of rabbits lies. It’s not a fetish. I just dig them in a major way. Perhaps psychologically, I like how easily they are scared by me. All I need to do it walk by and they’re terrified out of their little bunny wits. They probably feel the same way about me as I do about rapists. Oh bunnies, fear me not. I have very little interest in bumming your wee cotton-tailed bottoms.

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NEWS ROUND UP WITH THE NEWS-BOT Over the last few weeks it was revealed that corrections got in trouble over parole for prisoners, and were in denial over how much violence prison staff are exposed to. Police were also under the toasty grill, first they left a confidential document at a Mob members place in Wellington, then it was found they left a camera full of grisly, gross images of beaten women and a corpse at a house they raided, the guy who found it went straight to the media. Shame. In other grisly news, the media has practically been projectile vomiting any new updates in sweater-lover David Bain’s retrial, with such things as the time a computer was turned on under close scrutiny, and if his fit was faked, while the jury has been subject to photos of the murdered bodies. Nelson lost a whole bunch of jobs, expect huge dole lines soon, thanks recession, you’re a star. The recession monster also struck out at TVNZ where 90 jobs were cut, in a bid to save $25 million. I hear there is a job going at In Unison if any of those veteran journalists are interested? Guess those made redundant won’t be taking John Key’s advice to give their upcoming tax cuts to charity. Charities started salivating at the suggestion, but April will be the telling time if the wealthy’s extra cash will go on more diamonds or the homeless. A woman gave birth on a plane from Samoa, and then LEFT her baby on the plane in a toilet cubicle. Perhaps the best parenting tactic I have ever heard of, leave it in the loo to toughen it up. Speaking of toughing up, a report on bullying in schools was released and it’s not good news, New Zealand sucks at stopping kids from hating on each other. Hopefully the Hamilton kid who won the national Spelling Bee comp and is now heading to the USA to out spell other smarties, doesn’t get his head dunked in a toilet anytime soon.You know how jealous kids can be over good spellers. There were two very public murders also reported over the last two weeks that made my steel skin crawl; a man stabbed his wife to death on a petrol station forecourt in Wellington, and a fatal gang brawl at the Sydney Airport horrified onlookers as they witnessed a Hells Angels associate be bludgeoned to death, expect plenty of talk about the problem of gangs, and National to use this as ammunition to get them banned in New Zealand. That moronic copyright law was scrapped, finally, after pretty much anyone with half a brain complained about it. Lastly, my favourite, which made my robotic head spin; the Pope told Africans that using condoms would increase the problem of spreading AIDS in their country, yes he was talking about a place where over 25 million people have died from AIDS. Let sinners die from their sins, or their partners sins.Very humane.

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reviews

Views

CIRCUS OZ 30TH BIRTHDAY BASH

In association with the Auckland circus Festival 2009 The name sounds impressive and from all accounts so far Circus Oz has received favourable reviews. In all honesty though, I was mildly disappointed. An excited audience clapped the show into action as the performers wowed the crowd by swinging from a pole. Climbing up and down it, hanging on to it with precarious precision and at times looking like they were falling off it, the performers proved their incredible strength. The next performance was also dramatic as a pair of acrobats balanced several chairs upon four glass bottles, which were standing on a small wooden table. They climbed the delicate construction and eventually hung from a large lamp near the ceiling. An array of lights then appeared on the back wall which provided a pretty backdrop for the graceful acrobat hanging from the lamp. This is where it got worse, though. The show was interwoven with a character named Justin who was the clutz; the loveable fool who just wanted to be a part of everything. Agreed, it was funny the first time he tried his charm on the crowd, but

CHANT DARLING

by repeatedly pulling out the same gags it quickly lost appeal. Circus Oz used a lot of slapstick comedy which can only be taken in small doses.

Near the end of the show three men, dressed in skin-tight metallic suits, performed an act where they simultaneously leapt through rings. I was ready to be impressed. But during various attempts, they kept knocking down the rings and having to place them back. Excuse me, but for a circus that has been running since 1978, one would expect their acts to be polished. They managed to pull off the trick eventually after much time spent replacing the rings. As a family show this was probably alright but for a discerning student wanting an interesting night out perhaps eye up some of the other Auckland Festival events. Reviewed by Rhiannon Horrell

Lawrence Arabia

Released by Honorary Bedouin Records and Shock Records music Lawrence Arabia, solo moniker of Reduction Agents frontman James Milne, set himself a very high bar with his 2006 self-titled debut effort. The Christchurch born and now London based Milne has cleared the bar; springing forth on the strength of his sugary blend of Bonzo Doo Dah psychedelic pop. Chant Darling is a wriggly, drippy, implosion of melodic wonder and lyrical brilliance. Milne has mastered the art of catchiness to the extent that he will have you singing along to songs you’ve never heard before. Auckland CBD Part Two is a prime example with its tropical swagger and jogger of a melody. The production on this song is almost unbelievable. Perfect levels of reverb preside over throwaway, almost loungey vocals, an intricate percussive arrangement and punchy little snippets of trumpets. It’s like listening to Brian Wilson smoking reefer in a genuine Hawaiian tiki lounge. Sort of. The Crew of the Commodore is my personal favourite, it’s a far out trip about some kind of Aotearoan space programme. The

vocals have a late-John Lennon quality and the refrain bursts forth like a rocket and will have you asking where it came from and where did it go. There are obvious hits in the Beautiful Young Crew, Apple Pie Bed and I’ve Smoked Too Much. The latter sees Milne waxing about drug induced visions of death and love. It is a beautiful thing and is genuinely romantic, add to this a melody which is crafted by god himself, and Milne has crafted something near perfect. Why Lawrence Arabia isn’t topping charts around the world or cleaning his beard in piles of gold and money is anybody’s guess. Fingers crossed it’ll happen soon though. If there’s one kiwi who deserves to knock the bastard that is the world stage off, it’s Mr James Milne. Reviewed by Joseph Harper

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reviews

DUB DUB DUB

Views

A play performed by theatre The Outwits

The Outwits are a primarily improvisational theatre group from Christchurch. Dub Dub Dub is a live theatre piece which they developed in Christchurch and brought up to Auckland as part of the Fringe Festival. The show involves the three Outwits, Andie Spargo, Jared Corban and Rikki Cosgrove, who dub sound effects and dialogue over a variety of footage. Famous scenes from films, youtube videos, even Shortland Street get the Dub treatment. It sounds like it would be funny right? Unfortunately, there were but a few shining moments and they were drowned out by a sea of retarded jokes about drugs and/or sex. It was really disappointing to see these three comedians, who I know to be extremely intelligent and funny, fall back on what seemed like crude filler material, like Sesame Street characters talking about heroin and masturbation - super wacky. Corban provided the most genuine laughs. He seemed at time to be reaching out to a less base audience. Yet he was continually dragged down by Spargo who seemed content in

dwelling in the kind of humour that would have been a riot had the theatre been full of 15 year old boys. Almost constantly the show seemed under-prepared (I know, it’s improvised, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be polished) and straws felt like they were being frantically grasped at. Cosgrove, who made the sound effects, didn’t really seem to do much at all. It may have been an off night for The Outwits, which is a very strong possibility given the nature of improvisational comedy. Too bad for me. Reviewed by Joseph Harper

THE WIFE WHO SPOKE JAPANESE IN HER SLEEP

Maidment Theatre, Auckland University theatre Honey Tarbox, better known as motherly Evonne from Shortland Street, is a middle-aged frumpy woman who enjoys going to the mall with her shopping trundler and entering competitions. She always hopes to win a new Volkswagen Golf. Her husband Howard is head of the Gardening Society and has an obsession with yakka plants. Throw into the mix one strange obsessive language teacher Clementine and you’ve got an incredibly entertaining play. Near the beginning, Howard is grumbling over the television remote which isn’t working. Mrs Tarbox (Alison Quigan) tells him to record “Shorty St” to see if it is working, which has the audience laughing. Mrs Tarbox begins to keep her husband awake at night with strange babblings in Japanese. To cut a long story short, she is discovered to be an oracle. The local community comes to her with their questions. She can only speak the language in her sleep and has no recollection of the event while conscious.Vivienne Plumb certainly had a good imagination when writing this.

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The once dowdy housewife transforms into a sophisticated, kimono-wearing expert in control of her finances, and you guessed it, the driver of her very own Volkswagen Golf. With her husband feeling neglected and losing even his precious garden to a Japanese zen feature, he turns to Mrs Tarbox’s assistant Clementine for a raging affair.

The funniest part of the play would have to be a cameo appearance, pre-recorded with John Campbell. Throughout the play, Honey and Clementine hint at the handsome man who appears after the six o’clock news on TV3. Given that some of the characters are over the top, parts of the play are carefully constructed. Worthwhile for some humour delivered directly and for the sheer blandness of suburbia that will make you smile. Reviewed by Rhiannon Horrell RUNS MARCH 12 - APRIL 4

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reviews

Classic Book Review

THANKS TO THE “BOOK LADY” IN THE HUB ON TUESDAYS

THE RUM DIARY Hunter S Thompson

book

I’m sure everyone with a creative/left leaning bone in them has heard of writer Hunter S Thompson. Johnny Depp made him a bigger deal than he already was when he stared in Fear and Loathing in Los Vegas, a screen adaptation of the book Thompson wrote, pretty much all about life on drugs. While The Rum Diary was written before Thompson really got his esteem, before he coined the gonzo journalism genre (journalism written subjectively, often in first person, humorous, blending fact and fiction), the groundwork for the above is evident. The Rum Diary is fictional, told through the eyes of Paul Kemp, but is surely modelled on Thompson’s own experience of being a drunken, loud, hilarious, prone to trouble and haggard journalist. It is set in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in the late fifties (Thompson had worked as a journalist in Puerto Rico in this time too). The book begins with Kemp giving up on journalism in New York, and heading to Puerto Rico to take up a post at an English language paper. Even on the plane over he gets in trouble for assaulting an old man who took the seat of a woman Kemp had been eyeing up in the terminal. The woman, Cheanaut’ becomes a main character in the story, as one of the reporter’s girlfriends at Kemp’s new job. On the island and in work, Kemp and his cronies spend their time drinking coffee at hotel bars, getting blind drunk on rum pretty much everywhere, and eating hamburgers at the only decent bar in town. The paper he works at is full of equally meandering reporters, there’s time spent in jail, fast paced, adrenaline fused descriptions of huge parties and an attack on the paper’s boss. My favourite line in the book is when Thompson describes the journalists that go to work in San Juan as “ill-tempered wandering rabble,” which creates a vivid image of the old school journalists this book is based on, who drink till 4am then get to work at 9. It’s basically a rambley tale of life as a journalist in the stinking heat of Puerto Rico, then seen as an extension on the US economy, coming up against corrupt police and locals with a thing against Americans. Through the book Kemp comes to terms with the fact he’s aging, he probably drinks too much, and lusting after his friend’s lady is not such a good idea, but good enough to act on it, all with a hilarious swagger and style only Thompson could pull off. Reviewed by Stacey Knott

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band profile

ARTIST PROFILE: MC TOURETTES TOURETTES IS AN AUCKLAND RAPPER AND SPOKEN WORD POET WHO HAS JUST RELEASED A NEW ALBUM, HE TALKS TO RHIANNON HORRELL ABOUT HIS WORK.

Profile

TELL ME ABOUT YOUR NEW ALBUM –WHO SAID YOU CAN’T DANCE TO MISERY. I have been working on it for four years; it is a real relief to get it finished. It is about everyday stuff with a twist that is surreal. I have released two albums and an unmixed tape. ON FRIDAY MARCH 20 YOU HAD A LAUNCH PARTY AT WHAMMY BAR TO CELEBRATE THE RELEASE OF THE ALBUM. WHAT ARE YOU PLANS FROM HERE? I’m going to keep performing and tour around New Zealand. I might take it to Australia later. I’m involved with an arts show where five artists are given different poems which they have to interpret visually. That is at the end of April. WOULD YOU TOUR FURTHER THAN AUSTRALIA? That’s the plan for the end of the year, I’ll see how things go. TELL ME ABOUT THE THEMES AND INSPIRATION FOR YOUR ALBUMS. This album is quite varied, there are some love songs. My single at the moment, Almost Out of Water, is a story, a metaphor. I write a lot about the city and the effect living somewhere has on people. There is not much happening in Auckland. I try to turn the everyday into something interesting. There is a song called Help a Monkey, which is like the twilight zone. The feedback has been overwhelming, really positive. YOU PARTICIPATED IN AN AUSTRALASIAN MC BATTLE IN 2003. ARE THERE ANY MORE EVENTS LIKE THAT ON THE HORIZON? It has died a lot here but it is really big in Australia. I would rather be writing than battling. I haven’t done it since 2004. YOU HAVE SUPPORTED THE LIKES OF DIZZEE RASCAL AND BUSTA RHYMES. WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? It is weird, the crowd is waiting for them so you feel like you have to get off. It looks good on the CV though.

GRADUATE PROFILE: HANNAH-MAY THOMPSON By Stacey Knott

HANNAH-MAY THOMPSON GRADUATED FROM UNITEC IN 2006, WITH A BACHELOR OF DESIGN, MAJORING IN PAINTING. She is part of a collective who put on an exhibition called the greatest idiot in new zealand, where they called for nominations for someone who is “a really simple compassionate person, who will put themselves out to the point of lunacy.” They made pieces of clothing to honour the top five nominations. The exhibition was held at the Snow White Gallery, in Building One. Now, she is co-organising the second annual Metonymy, an exhibition that pairs artists with writers. The organisers pair up the writers with artists where they think good work can be made, the pairs are given one month to work, then the winning combinations get to exhibit their creations at Aotea Centre Gallery. Thompson says she made the most of her time at Unitec, and the resources on offer, and recommends current students do the same. “Use your time here and the resources as best you can. This project (The Greatest Idiot) is because I had a relationship with a tutor here, so make friends with the tutors here, they are choice people.” Use everything you can get your hands on, use being a student to your full advantage.” She also has wise words for stressed-out design students; “a big thing is to persevere, all things can be modified to what you want it to be.” Unitec students are welcome to enter Metonymy, go to www.metonymy09.blogspot.com for details.

WHAT RAPPERS OR HIP-HOP ARTISTS DO YOU LOOK UP TO? Increasingly there are less and less. There are some rappers in New York called Def Jux, they play on their own terms with progressive hip-hop. Hip Hop is changing and it always has been. I have been listening to it since I was eight and it has changed so much. Rappers make it more their own. There are fantasies about drugs and guns but it is a stereotype. People judge me on the way I look, they say Do you want to be black or something? There is a mainstream perception of gangster rap.

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recipes

STEPHANIE MCCOLL’S

LEARNED THROUGH BAKING With anything in life you can learn lessons – so why not when baking and eating wonderful treats?! You can think of baking as intensive therapy and personal growth, plus all of your friends and flatmates will love you for it! LIFE LESSON # 2 – TRY NOT TO BE SO HARD ON YOURSELF! When making these tortillas, just have fun! With some practice, you’ll be whipping out these flour tortillas in no time. An additional incentive to trying these tortillas out is that making a bunch off and freezing them is far cheaper than buying tortilla wraps from the grocery store!

FLOUR TORTILLAS

• • • • • • •

(makes 10-12)

1 ½ cups (360 ml) unbleached flour ½ cup (120 ml) whole wheat flour 1 tsp (5 ml) white sugar 1 ½ tsp (7.5 ml) baking powder 1 tsp (5 ml) salt 5 tbsp (75 ml) vegetable shortening ¾ cup (180 ml) hot water

Home Comforts WITH SUSANNAH AITKEN

Yum Yum

Life Lessons

Hi. I’m Susannah. When I’m not skipping breakfast I like to make my own granola.

It can be difficult to get enthusiastic about breakfast on weekdays, particularly if you’re on a budget and in a hurry. I have a shameful tendency to skip breakfast when I’m in a hurry, but if I have a batch of this in the pantry I actually go to bed looking forward to the first meal of the day. It’s sweet and crisp and slightly spicy, a bit like waking up to milk and cookies each morning..

GRANOLA •

500g rolled oats (you can use any kind). If you like clusters in your granola, you can also encourage these to form by reducing half of your oats to a fine powder, running them through a food processor, before you combine the ingredients.These will hold together better than the oats that have not been ground up.

• • • • •

1 C water or fruit juice (apple is nice) 1 tsp cinnamon ½ tsp cardamom ½ tsp nutmeg Approx. 1 C nuts and/or seeds of your choice, coarsely chopped (I like almonds, walnuts, Brazil nuts, macadamia nuts, ground LSA – linseed, sunflower and almond mix – pumpkin seeds and grated coconut)

1. In a large bowl, mix together the dry ingredients. Using the tips of your fingers, add shortening by working it into the dry mix until little pea-sized balls form. Gradually add hot water while using your other hand to mix with a wooden spoon. When the dough is too stiff to mix with a spoon, reach in with your hands and gently knead for 2 minutes. Shape into a ball, place in a clean bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rest for 1 hour. 2. Next, line a baking tray or dish with baking paper, sprinkle with flour and set aside. Pinch off the dough in golf ball-sizes. Roll the dough in your palms to form smooth spheres. Dust lightly with flour, set on baking paper and cover loosely with plastic. Set the tray aside, covered to rest for another hour. 3. Then lightly sprinkle flour on the counter and set a ball of dough in the centre, pressing lightly to flatten. Roll the disk out with a floured rolling pin, working from the centre and rolling outwards to the edges to form 20 cm rounds, stack tortillas between sheets of baking paper. 4. Heat a cast iron pan or non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Brush lightly with oil and cook tortilla on the first side until you see bubbles forming underneath. Flip over and cook until lightly golden. Wrap in foil and keep in a warm oven until all of the tortillas are cooked. Serve immediately!

• • • •

1/3 C melted butter or vegetable oil 2/3 C brown sugar, golden syrup, honey or maple syrup 1 tsp vanilla extract Dried fruit, coarsely chopped (Some flavour combinations I recommend:)

- Dried apple, cinnamon and raisin (use apple juice in place of water); - Honey, fig and walnut; - Apricot, coconut and almond - Dates, cranberries, cherries and tropical fruit are also very good.

Place your oats in a large mixing bowl and combine with spices, nuts and seeds. Heat water, sweetener and oil or butter in a small pot and allow to bubble for a couple of minutes. Remove from heat, stir through vanilla and pour over oat mixture.You will need to combine this thoroughly; the best way to do this is by hand. The mixture should be evenly damp. If it looks too dry, add a couple of tablespoons of water and mix again. Leave to stand for a few minutes while you heat the oven to 150 C. Spread into the base of a large baking dish in a thin layer and cook for 25-35 minutes or until slightly darker and crisp on top. Stir, breaking up any very large clusters, and return to oven. Repeat this process 3-4 times or until the granola is entirely dry. It should be light, crisp and golden brown. Cool completely before adding any dried fruit you might want, and then transfer to an airtight jar. usu

In Unison, After Dark.indd 31

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27/03/2009 8:56:34 a.m.


usu

IN COLLABORATION WITH JACKSON RUSSELL A GENERAL LAW PRACTICE FIRM LOCATED IN THE CBD, STAFF AND STUDENTS ARE ABLE TO RECEIVE A FREE INITIAL 20 MINUTE CONSULTATION SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY AND DEMAND* IF YOU GO ON TO USE THE SERVICES OF JACKSON RUSSELL, USU HAS NEGOTIATED A 20% OFF THEIR NORMAL LEGAL FEES. * conditions apply For more information email: usuadvocate@unitec.ac.nz In Unison, After Dark.indd 32

27/03/2009 8:56:36 a.m.

In Unison - After dark - 2009  

In Unison is the free fortnightly student magazine of the Unitec Students' Association.

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