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Book of Abstracts

Poland - Warsaw 29th July - 1st August 2014


Conference Sponsors And Partners

Sponsors and Partners

Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN SA- Polish Scientific Publishers PWN www.pwn.pl

LOT Polish Airlines www.lot.com

Interactive Agency, ALENTO, POLAND www.alento.pl

Charaktery – Psychological magazine and web portal www.charaktery.eu

European Federation of Psychology Students’ Associations www.efpsa.org

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PRIZM Coaches Association www.prizmcoaching.pl

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Welcome note

Welcome Note WELCOME to Warsaw, host of the IInd International Conference on Time Perspective (ICTP). On behalf of the Organizing Committee of ICTP, we would like to invite you to take part in the conference that will take place from the 29th July to 1st of August 2014 in Warsaw (Poland). Our intention as the Organizers is to provide participants with an opportunity to present their novel research on time perspective, to share their ideas, to establish a collaboration, and to inspire to discover new possibilities of research. The motto for our conference is “Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion” that promises different approaches to temporality. Thus, the program of the conference will cover a variety of topics on time perspective that for sure will be of interest to all of the participants. As the Organizing Committee we are working on providing all the participants with a memorable event. Time is one of the most valuable resources and the most descriptive for the notion of ‚perspective’. Many people are tempted to understand the nature of time and therefore interested in analyzing it. After the 1st successful meeting in Coimbra in 2012 we invite you to the follow-up IInd International Conference on Time Perspective in Warsaw, where the approaches from the Western and Eastern cultures can be confronted. We invite you to take part in this promising and fruitful debate.

University of Warsaw, Department of Psychology

Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

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Contents

Contents Sponsors and Partners .................................................................................. 2 Welcome Note .............................................................................................. 3 Scientific Committee .................................................................................... 5 Organizing Committee .................................................................................. 6 General Information ..................................................................................... 7 Program Overview ...................................................................................... 14 Detailed Scientific Program ........................................................................ 15 July 29th ................................................................................................... 16 July 30th ................................................................................................... 17 July 31st ................................................................................................... 30 August 1st ................................................................................................ 44 Abstracts ..................................................................................................... 48 Keynote Speakers ................................................................................... 49 Special session: Finances and Time Perspective .................................... 55 Workshop ............................................................................................... 58 Round Table ............................................................................................ 59 Invited Symposia..................................................................................... 60 Oral Communications ............................................................................. 90 July 30th ............................................................................................... 90 July 31st ............................................................................................. 115 August 1st .......................................................................................... 135 Posters .................................................................................................. 149 July 30th ............................................................................................. 149 July 31st ............................................................................................. 173 Authors Index ........................................................................................... 196

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Scientific Committee

Scientific Committee Ewa CZERNIAWSKA University of Warsaw, POLAND Juan F. DIAZ-MORALES Complutense University of Madrid, SPAIN Nicolas FIEULAINE University of Lyon, FRANCE Willy LENS KU Leuven, BELGIUM Toshiaki SHIRAI, Osaka Kyoiku University, JAPAN Anna SIRCOVA independent researcher, Copenhagen, DENMARK Thea PEETSMA University of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS Manabu TSUZUKI Chuo University, JAPAN Zbigniew ZALESKI John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, POLAND Philip G. ZIMBARDO Stanford University, USA

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Organizing Committee

Organizing Committee Maciej STOLARSKI – Chair, University of Warsaw, POLAND Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA – Chair, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, POLAND Maria João AZEVEDO, UNIFAI, ICBAS – University of Porto, PORTUGAL Edyta BAŁAKIER, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, POLAND Wioleta BORUCH, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, POLAND Ksenia CHISTOPOLSKAYA, Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, RUSSIA Natalia CYBIS, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw, POLAND Michał CZAKON, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, POLAND Nicolas FIEULAINE, University of Lyon, FRANCE Konrad S. JANKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, POLAND Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, NEW ZEALAND Liz TEMPLE, Federation University Australia, AUSTRALIA Jerzy WOJCIECHOWSKI, University of Warsaw, POLAND Katarzyna WOJTKOWSKA, University of Warsaw, POLAND Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, University of the Republic, URUGUAY & University of Porto, PORTUGAL Marcin ZAJENKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, POLAND Manuela ZAMBIANCHI, University of Bologna, ITALY

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


General Information

General Information Conference Address: University of Warsaw Old Library (Dawna Biblioteka) Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw tp.conference2014@gmail.com http://tpconference2014.com/ http://www.facebook.com/timeperspectiveconference2014

Conference Desk: Conference Desk will be located in the Main Hall of the Old Library. It will be open from 1:00 pm on Tuesday, from 8:30 am on Wednesday, from 8:00 am on Thursday and from 8:30 am on Friday. Language: The official language of the ICTP2014 is English. No simultaneous translations will be provided. Conference Venue: The conference venue is the University of Warsaw Old Library, located at UW campus at Krakowskie Przedmieście, 3 km from the city center. All scientific activities, meals and the Welcome Reception meals will take place in the Old Library. How to get to the Conference Venue: University is located favorably and can be reached either by car or by public transport. By public transport: Bus lines 102, 105, 111, 116, 128, 175, 180, 222, 444, 503, 518 and E-2 stop directly in front of the University campus (bus stop “Uniwersytet”). Current timetable, travel planner and maps are available on the Public Transport Authority of Warsaw website: www.ztm.waw.pl.

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General Information You can also use www.warszawa.jakdojade.pl, which is a very good travel planner available as a mobile application. Ticket vending machines accepting coins, banknotes and major credit cards are available near selected bus stops. By car: As Krakowskie Przedmieście is a street with limited vehicle traffic, you must park your car on one of the nearby streets such as Traugutta, Królewska or Oboźna.

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


General Information Gala Dinner Venue: Hotel Bristol, Krakowskie Przedmieście 42/44, 00325, Warsaw. Hotel Bristol is located within a walking distance from the University. The Gala Dinner is included in the fee and all participants are welcome to join. The Dinner will start at 7:00 pm.

Internet Access: Participants with Eduroam network account can use Eduroam at the University campus. Other participants are welcome to login to a free WiFi network available on the campus. On the list of the available networks select ‘UW-conf’ and type ‘ICTP2014’ password.

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General Information Printing Services: Participants can print their posters, handouts and other materials at a printing facility Skarabeusz located on the campus (Krakowskie Przedmiescie 30, near Department of Geography). Skarabeusz opening hours are 8:00 am – 8:00 pm Monday to Friday and 8:00 am- 4 pm on Weekends. The cost of printing a 95x120cm poster is approximately 60 PLN. Visit www.taniekserowanie.pl/index.php/kontakt. Old Library

Skarabeusz

Oral Communications and Symposia: Speakers are requested to arrive in their session room to upload their presentations 20 min prior to their session – an assistant will be there to help with any technical difficulties. Please prepare your presentations in .ppt, .pptx, .odp or .pdf. format. Session chairs are asked to: introduce each presentation, pay attention to the duration of presentations (and force time limitations) and moderate the questions at the end of the session. Each speaker has 15 min for the presentation, at the end of the session there will be up to 15 min for questions from the audience and discussion. Poster Sessions: Poster sessions will be held in the Main Hall, parallel to the coffee break. Poster stands with a portrait orientation will be available for the accepted posters. Presenters are requested to put up their posters prior to the session (preferably in the morning) and take down their posters at the end of the day. Supplies needed for putting up the posters will be available near the poster boards. Best poster will be awarded during the Gala Dinner.

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


General Information Social Program: Apart from the Welcome Reception (Tuesday, 6:45 pm, Main Hall) and Gala Dinner, we invite all participants to join one from the following cultural attractions on Wednesday evening (7:00 pm): Old Town guided tour, Warsaw Rising Museum visit and Museum of the History of Polish Jews. Participants will be transported by bus to and from the museums. The events will be organized if we have a minimum of 20 participants. The registration for the guided tour and museum visits will be organized online. Please check the message board (see below) for updates regarding those events during the Conference. Message Board: A message board will be available in the Main Hall to facilitate the communication among participants and organizers. Participants can use it to place messages to other delegates. Please check the board regularly. Lost properties: Participants are requested to deposit found property and collect it from the Conference Desk. Smoking: Smoking is forbidden inside public buildings. On the University campus, smoking is permitted outside buildings, in designated areas. Meals: Buffet lunches and coffee breaks are included in the fee and will be served in the Main Hall. Weather: The weather in Poland in July is generally warm, around 25-30⁰C with occasional rain-showers. Banking Facilities and Money: Most banks operate from 9 am to 6 pm, Monday to Friday. The currency unit in Poland is “Zloty” (PLN). 1 Zloty is divided into 100 “Grosz”. A large number of ATM machines can be found throughout the city. Money can be exchanged in banks or exchange offices (Kantor). Most commonly used credit cards are Visa, Mastercard, Maestro, American Express, Polcard, JCB and Diners Club. Contactless cards are widely accepted.

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General Information Useful Phone Numbers: The overseas is +48. Emergency number: Ambulance: Police: Fire service: PKP Intercity Railway Chopin Airport Modlin Airport Public transport timetables

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international dialing code for Poland from 112 999 997 998 19 757 +48 22 650 4220 +48 22 315 18 80 +48 22 19 115

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


General Information

Useful Expressions in Polish Good morning

Dzień dobry ['dʑɛɲ ,dɔbri]

Good-bye

Do widzenia [dɔvi'ʣɛɲa]

Please

Proszę ['prɔʃɛ̃]

You're welcome

Proszę bardzo [ˌprɔʃɛ̃'barʣɔ]

Thank you

Dziękuję [dʑɛ̃'kujɛ̃]

How much?

Ile? ['ilɛ]

Yes

Tak [tak]

No

Nie [ɲɛ]

I don’t understand

Nie rozumiem [ɲɛrɔ'zumiɛm]

What is it?

Co to jest? [ʦɔtɔ'jɛst]

Street

Ulica /uliʦ̑a/

Day

Dzień [ʥ̑eɲ]

Entrance

Wejście [vɛjɕtɕ͡ɛ]

Where?

Gdzie? [ɡdzʲɛ]

Surname

Nazwisko [naˈzvʲiskɔ]

Name

Imię [imiɛ̃]

Venue

Miejsce [mjjɛ̇jsʦ̑ɛ]

What time is it?

Która jest godzina?[ˈktura jɛst ɡɔˈd͡ʑina]

One ticket, please

Poproszę bilet [poprɔʂɛ ˈbilɛt]

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Program Ovierview

Program Overview

July 29th, 2014 08:00 08:30 09:00 09:30 09:45 10:00 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:15 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:15 16:30 17:00 17:15 17:30 18:00 18:15 18:30 18:45

Scientific Program July 30th, 2014 July 31st, 2014

August 1st, 2014

Secretariat Opening Secretariat Opening

Secretariat Opening Keynote Lecture

Keynote Lecture

Keynote Lecture Coffee Break

Coffee Break Special session

Oral Communications 6

Keynote Lecture Farewell Session Oral Communications 1

Oral Communications 4

Lunch

Lunch

Invited Symposia 1/ Oral Communications 2

Invited Symposia 2

Coffee Break/Round Table

Secretariat Opening

Workshop

Coffee Break / Poster Session 1

Coffee Break / Poster Session 2

Welcome Session Oral Communications 3

Oral Communications 5

Keynote Lecture TP Network Meeting Reception

Social Programme 19:00

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Old Town guided tour / Museum visits

Gala Dinner

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program

Detailed Scientific Program

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 29th

July 29th 1:00 pm Secretariat Opening (Main Hall) 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop (Room D) Jeff JOIREMAN, Washington State University, USA How to Publish High-Quality Research: Paradigms, Processes and Insights from Leading Scholars

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Welcome Session (Auditorium) 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm Keynote Lecture (Auditorium) Ilona BONIWELL, Ecole Centrale Paris, France Time Perspective Coaching

6:45 pm Welcome Reception (Main Hall)

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th

July 30th 8:30 am Secretariat Opening (Main Hall) 9:00 am Keynote Lecture (Auditorium) James JONES, University of Delaware, USA The Past is in the Mind of the Beholder: Cultural variations in the temporal integration of the past and future in the present

10:15 am Coffee Break (Main Hall) 10:45 am Keynote Lecture (Auditorium) Zbigniew ZALESKI, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Future Time in hope and anxiety perspective

12:00 pm Oral Communications 1 Session A1 (Room C) Cross-cultural Comparison on the Relation between Time Perspective and Personality Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Małgorzata SZCZEŚNIAK Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, University of Szczecin, Poland Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Nicolson YAT FAN SIU, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Jacqueline JIAYING LE, Department of Counselling and Psychology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Mónica Pino Muñoz, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chile Time perspective and well-being: some reverse engineering Antanas KAIRYS, Vilnius University. Lithuania, Department of General Psychology, Lithuania Audrone LINIAUSKAITE, Department of Psychology, Klaipeda University, Lithuania. Albinas BAGDONAS, Laboratory of Special Psychology, Vilnius University, Lithuania. Vilmante PAKALNISKIENE, Department of General Psychology, Vilnius University, Lithuania Balanced Time Perspective and Its Relations to Well-Being, Optimism, and Subjective Health: Introducing An Alternative Measure Nipat PICHAYAYOTHIN, Life-Span Developmental Psychology, West Virginia University, Department of Psychology, United States JoNell STROUGH, Life-Span Developmental Psychology, West Virginia University

Session 1B (Room A) The relevance of time perspective for attitudes toward technologies in old age Manuela ZAMBIANCHI, University, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Italy; Department of Psychology, Univertsity of Umeå, Sweden, Italy Maria Grazia CARELLI, Department of Psychology, University of Umeå, Sweden

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Time Perspective and Anxiety in Centenarians: A Chance for Life Review Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS, Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Natália DUARTE, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Rosa Marina AFONSO, Universidade da Beira Interior, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Oscar RIBEIRO, ISSSP, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Time and health in old people Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS, Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Laetitia TEIXEIRA, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal

Session 1C (Room B) Validation of the “Aspiration Index” in a Portuguese secondary education students’ sample Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal Conceptualizing and Measuring Time Perspective in Adolescence: International Implications Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, Psychology, USA Back to ‘the future’: Evidence for a bifactor solution to the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale, and implications for the study of time perspective Michael MCKAY, Liverpool John Moores University, Centre For Public Health, England Frank WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, USA Grant MORGAN, Baylor University, USA Job VAN EXEL, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Content Validity of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory culturally adapted for Puerto Rico (ZTPI-PR) Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Gladys J. JIMENEZ-TORRES, Yale University School of Medicine, USA Alisha NOBLE, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Nanet M. LOPEZ-CORDOVA, Carlos Albizu University, USA

1:15 pm Lunch (Main Hall) 2:30 pm Invited Symposia 1/ Oral Communications 2 Symposium 1A (Room A) Chronotype – the circadian time perspective Chairperson: Konrad JANKOWSKI Affective, cognitive, and physiological underpinnings of chronotype Konrad JANKOWSKI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Can we trace chronotype with neuroimaging techniques? Halszka OGIŃSKA, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Ewa BELDZIK, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Department of Molecular Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland,

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Aleksandra DOMAGALIK, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Magdalena FAFROWICZ, ,Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Tadeusz MAREK , Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland The Influence of chronotype, intelligence, conscientiousness, and motivation on academic achievement in primary school Talat ARBABI, Department of Biology, University of Education, Heidelberg, Christian VOLLMER, Institute of Psychology, University of Education Heidelberg Tobias DÖRFLER, Institute of Psychology, University of Education Heidelberg Christoph RANDLER, Institute of Science, Technology & Geography, University of Education Heidelberg Sensation seeking and circadian typology Anna MURO, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Montserrat GOMÀ-I-FREIXANET, Department of Health Psychology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain; Ana ADAN, Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C),Barcelona, Spain Self-regulatory capacities and the associations between chronotype and time perspective Taciano L. MILFONT, School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th

Symposium 1B (Room B) Time perspective as a cognitive-motivational variable Chairperson: Toshiaki SHIRAI Developmental change of time perspective during the transition from junior high school to high school Manabu TSUZUKI, Department of Psychology, Chuo University Development of early adolescents’ time perspective and selfregulation of learning Thea PEETSMA, Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Jaap SCHUITEMA, Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam; Ineke VAN DER VEEN, Kohnstamm Institute, University of Amsterdam The Influence of reconstruction of the past, present and future on their changes in undergraduates Akane ISHIKAWA, Doctoral Program in Psychology Course, Graduate School of Letters, Chuo University Mindfulness and Identity Formation in Emerging Adulthood: Long-Term Longitudinal Dynamics of Time Perspectives Toshiaki SHIRAI, Faculty of Education, Osaka Kyoiku University, Tomoyasu NAKAMURA, Kyushu University, Japan Kumiko KATSUMA, Naragakuen Career Development Center, Japan The content and extension of Future time perspective (FTP) and their relation to career planning in a sample of Portuguese and Brazilian adolescents Maria Paula PAIXÃO, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra Hilda BAYMA, UNIDERC, Brazil 22

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th

Session 2A (Room C) Using the present to predict the future and the past: Time perspectives and psychological functioning of New Zealand emerging adults Magdalena KIELPIKOWSKI, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, Psychology, New Zealand Paul E. JOSE, School of Psychology, Victoria University , Wellington, New Zealand Psychometric analysis of the Portuguese version of the “Future Time Perspective Scale” José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal Time Perspective and Political Orientation in Adolescence Monika BUHL, Heidelberg University, Institute of Educational Science, Germany Zena R. MELLO, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA Hans-Peter KUHN, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Promotion of students’ perspectives concerning the future career: implementing and assessing practices in school context Renato CARVALHO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal Balanced eudaimonistic-hedonistic approach in intervention for youth Agnieszka WILCZYŃSKA, PARTNER Biuro Szkoleń, Pośrednictwa i Marketingu, Polska

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th

4:15 pm Coffee Break / Poster Session 1 (Main Hall) Consistency and correlation between Flow theory and Time Perspective Approach. Optimal Experience (Flow) frequency is related to the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory's dimensions? Massimo AGNOLETTI, Centro Benessere Psicologico, Italy Exploring the links between time perspective, rumination and aspects of cognitive control Elisabeth ÅSTRÖM, Umeå University, Sweden Maria Grazia CARELLI, Umeå University, Sweden Britt WIBERG, Umeå University, Sweden

anxiety,

Development of a Japanese version of the Adolescent Time Attitude Scale: A preliminary study of college students. Yuta CHISHIMA, University of Tsukuba, Japan Tatsuya MURAKAMI, University of Tsukuba, Japan Takuma NISHIMURA, University of Tsukuba, Japan Temporal types in Polish samples: A cluster analytic approach Natalia CYBIS, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Poland Tomasz ROWIŃSKI, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Poland The relation between trauma exposure, PTSD and posttraumatic growth (PTG): the mediating role of time perspective among motor vehicle accident (MVA) survivors Maria CYNIAK, University of Warsaw, Poland Barbara BIAŁECKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Poland Daydreaming and life goals’ characteristics among high school students Michał CZAKON, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland 24

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Vocational aspirations in childhood: a longitudinal study Rute DAVID, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal Examining the connection of the past, present and future in undergraduates Akane ISHIKAWA, Chuo University, Japan The relationship between time perspective, identity and crosscultural adjustment of Chinese international students in Japan Liang JINHENG, Chuo University, Japan The influence of positive temporal perspective on risky behaviors Grażyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Poland Bożena BURZYŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Sensation Seeking, educational environment, time orientation and risky behavior on adolescents Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Poland Zuzanna WLODARCZYK, University of Warsaw, Poland Hearing impairment in the context of time perspective and its personal correlates Joanna KOSSEWSKA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland Michał GACEK, Department of Psychology, Pedagogical University of Krakow Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory children adaptation Umbelina LEITE, Rio Verde University – UniRV, University of Brasilia- UnB, Brazil Magna MORAIS, Rio Verde University, USA Aquino GOMES, Rio Verde University, USA Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th The Role of Achievement Motivation in a Choice of Maturity Exam Level Michał MEISNER, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Zbigniew ZALESKI, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Validating Adolescent Time Attitude Scores (ATAS) in a Sample of Iranian Adolescents Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, USA Khosro RASHID, Bu-Ali Sina University, Iran Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley Fereshteh FATHI, Bu-Ali Sina University A journey through time – children’s drawings of their time perspectives Thomas NEUBAUER, Heidelberg University, Institute for Educational Sciences, Germany ‘‘I’ll do it tomorrow’ Polish Adaptation of the Procrastination Scale Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Agata BŁACHNIO, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin The impact of Time Perspective on financial decision making depending on the experience of success and failure Katarzyna SEKŚCIŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Time traveling and identity construction: Case study of a conversation about autobiographical memory Toshiaki SHIRAI, Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan Maika KITAMURA, Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan Some aspects the future time perspective in old age Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, University of Szczecin, Poland Beata BUGAJSKA, University of Szczecin, Poland 26

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Forward via backward. Narrative foreclosure prevention. Urszula TOKARSKA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland Psychological time in films Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Anna TYLIKOWSKA, Nowy Sacz School of Business - National-Louis University, Poland Ideas regarding a holistic assessment of TP and the creation of a transcendental TP scale Jonte VOWINCKEL, University of Twente, Netherlands Time Perspective Test (TPT) scores of a depressed, middle-aged patient Junko WATANABE, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan H. YAMADA, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan Shinichi SAKUMA, International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo Teruchika KATSUMATA, International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo Why angry people are depressed? Mediating effect of time perspective Anna ZAJENKOWSKA, Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Poland Marcin ZAJENKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Chronotype, sleep quality, anxiety and depressiveness among polish grammar school and secondary school students Kamila ZAPAĹ OWICZ, Univeristy of Warsaw, Poland

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th

5:15 pm Oral Communications 3 Session 3A (Room A) The rewriting of history in view of the change of perspectives throughout time Friedrich VON PETERSDORFF, Germany Coloring the past: The effects of colorizing black & white photos on time perception, psychological distance and feelings Arik CHESHIN, University of Amsterdam, Psychology Department, The Netherlands Michael L. W. VLIEK, University of Amsterdam, Psychology Department, The Netherlands Framing time and timing in protest: Kairos in social movement rhetoric Eithan ORKIBI, Ariel University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Israel

Session 3B (Room C) Time sanctuaries: The sociology of time in gambling sites Moshe LEVY, Ariel University, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Israel Slovenian youth and health-related behaviours – does time perspective matter? Urška ŽIVKOVIČ, University of Maribor, Faculty of Arts, Department of Psychology, Slovenia Bojan MUSIL, University of Maribor, Faculty of Arts, Department of Psychology; Faculty of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Information Technologies, University of Primorska

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 30th Is it Beer O’Clock? Time Perspective, drinking motives & hazardous alcohol use Liz TEMPLE, Federation University Australia, School of Health Sciences, Australia Nicole RIDGEWAY, Australia Claire IAGOE, Australia

Session 3C (Room B) Dimensional time attitude: a case of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory validation Umbelina LEITE, Rio Verde University – UniRV, Brasilia University UnB, Psychology, Brazil Luiz PASQUALI, Brasilia University – UnB, Brazil Flourishing in the Now: Initial Validation of a Present-Eudaimonic Time Perspective Scale Jonte VOWINCKEL, University of Twente, Psychology, Health and Technology, Netherlands Gerben J. WESTERHOF, Department of Psychology, Health and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Ernst T. BOHLMEIJER, Department of Psychology, Health and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Jeffrey D. WEBSTER, Department of Psychology, Langara College, Vancouver, Canada Zimbardo Time Perspective , carpe diem and positive orientation Małgorzata SOBOL-KWAPIŃSKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland

6:15 pm Time Perspective Network Meeting (Room A) 7:00 pm Social Program: Old Town guided tour / Museum visits Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

July 31st 8:00 am Secretariat Opening (Main Hall) 8:30 am Keynote Lecture (Auditorium) Jeff JOIREMAN, Washington State University, USA Consideration Retrospective

of

Future

Consequences:

A

Twenty-Year

9:45 am Coffee Break (Main Hall) 10:15 am Special session (Auditorium) Time perspective and Finances Nicholas CLEMENTS, Co-Founder at www.magnifymoney.com, USA Dominika MAISON, University of Warsaw, Poland Katarzyna SEKŚCIŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Ludvig LEVASSEUR, University Paris- Dauphine, France

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

12:00 pm Oral Communications 4 Session 4A (Room A) Crossroads of time perspective research and clinical practice: Psychotherapy through the temporal lens Elena KAZAKINA, Licensed clinical psychologist in independent practice, USA The self in time: is our sense of self associated with our time perspective biases? Liz TEMPLE, Federation University Australia, School of Health Sciences, Australia The self-concept of drug addicts in the time perspective Mikhail BUDNIKOV, The Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, The department of clinical psychology and psychological aid, Russia Can perceived unstability in life be considered as a mediator in the link between socioeconomic status and time perspective? Fr茅d茅ric MERSON, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon. General council of Puy-de-D么me, Health Interventions Service, France Nicolas FIEULAINE, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon, France Marie PREAU, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon, France Jean PERRIOT, General Council Of Puy-de-D么me, Health Interventions Service, France

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

Session 4B (Room B) Perception of the threat of global warming: The effect of temporal distance as a dimension of psychological distance Nurit CARMI, Tel Hai Academic College, Environmental Sciences, Israel Climate change and society’s future: A cross-cultural examination of how future consequences are related to intentions to act on climate change Paul BAIN, University of Queensland, School of Psychology, Australia Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Yoshihisa KASHIMA, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia and Members of the Collective Futures and Climate Change Project Future thinking and pro-environmental engagement: An experimental study Samantha WATSON, Victoria University of Wellington, Psychology, New Zealand Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Consideration of Future Consequences as a Predictor of Environmentally Responsible Behavior. Evidence from a General Population Study Heidi BRUDERER ENZLER, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Sociology, Switzerland

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

Session 4C (Room C) To know thy (future) self: How interacting with one’s older self reduces delinquency Jean-Louis VAN GELDER, Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement, The Netherlands Hal HERSHFIELD, New York University, USA Loren NORDGREN, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, USA PPC as a factor in protecting youth from risky behavior Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland A Present-Hedonistic Time Perspective Predicts Risk-Taking Preferences Lukasz JOCHEMCZYK, University of Warsaw, Departament of Psychology, Poland Rafał BUCZKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Łukasz MARKIEWICZ, Kozminski University, Department of Economic Psychology, Poland Janina PIETRZAK, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland

1:15 pm Lunch (Main Hall)

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

2:30 pm Invited Symposia 2 Symposium 2A (Room A) Out of sight, out of time? New perspectives on procrastination, future orientation, and well-being Chairperson: Fuschia SIROIS Procrastination, mental health and life-satisfaction: The vicious cycles of a fatal relationship Maria- IOANNA ARGIROPOULOU, Department of Psychology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Andreas, SIATIS & Anastasia KALANTZI-AZIZI, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Interventions to overcome procrastination: A review and a research agenda Wendelien VAN EERDE, Business School, University of Amsterdam Procrastination and Perceptions of the Future Self: Implications for Health and Well-being Fuschia SIROIS, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, fsirois@ubishops.ca; Hannah SHUCARD, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University; Jameson K. HIRSCH, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University.

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

Symposium 2B (Room B) Research on the Consideration Measurement and Applied Issues

of

Future

Consequences:

Chairperson: Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA Smoking, Dental Attendance, and the CFC-14 in Homeless Youth Trilby COOLIDGE, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington Jacqueline PICKRELL, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington Maysha RAYKHMAN, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health Christopher TRIPPEL, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health Christine A. RIEDY, Harvard School of Dental Medicine Future-Oriented Women will Pay to Reduce Global Warming Jeff JOIREMAN, Department of Marketing, Washington State University Richie LIU, Department of Marketing, Washington State University Testing the validity of version in Spanish of the CFC-14 in general Uruguay Sample Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Republic Consideration of future consequences and crime Cristina ESTEVES, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra Victor ORTUÑO, University of Coimbra; Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, University of the Republic & University of Porto

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

Symposium 2C (Room C) The Future of Therapy: Time Travel and Change Chairperson: Sarah CLARKE TactileCBT: The new Time Perspective Therapy Sarah CLARKE, The TactileCBT Foundation, UK TactileCBT: Time Perspective in Clinical Practice Martin SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation Weight Loss with TactileCBT: Brief and effective intervention Marion SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation Future-oriented thinking: What next for TactileCBT? Sarah CLARKE, The TactileCBT Foundation, UK, sclarke@tactilecbt.com; Marion SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation; Martin SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

4:00 pm Coffee Break / Poster Session 2 (Main Hall) Meta-analysis on Future time perspective across life domains Lucija ANDRE, University of Amsterdam, Child Development and Education; Psychology, The Netherlands Thea PEETSMA, Research Institute of Child Development and Education, The Netherlands Annelies VAN VIANEN, Psychology Research Institute, The Netherlands Coping with unemployment: the consideration of the future consequences like antecedent of the transactional stress model. Gauthier CAMUS, University of Reims Champagne-Ardennes, Psychology, France Sophie BERJOT, University of Reims Champagne-Ardennes, Psychology, France Changes in intention for self-change and self-esteem across the life span in Japanese samples. Yuta CHISHIMA, University of Tsukuba, Graduate school of comprehensive human sciences, Japan Affective Forecasting About Future Events: My Friend Better Than Me? Virginie CHRISTOPHE, University of Liège - ULG, Department of Psychology: Cognition and Behavior, Personality Psychology and Individual Differences unit, Belgique Time Perspective and Parenting Stress in Mothers of Children with Developmental Disabilities Aged 3 to 12 Years Karolina GOCLOWSKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Ewa PISULA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st Relation between Adolescent’s Time Orientation toward Present and Effects of Thinking about Death on Their Attitude toward Time Ryo ISHII, Nagoya University, Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan Time for sex in chronotypes Konrad JANKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Time perspective and risky behaviour: cluster analysis approach Antanas KAIRYS, Vilnius University, Lithuania, Department of General Psychology, Lithuania Laima BULOTAITE, Vilnius University, Lithuania, Department of General Psychology Relation between time orientation and self-regulation in adolescents Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Anna MUCKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland An International Comparison of Confirmatory Factorial Structure and Latent Profiles Regarding the Construct of Adolescent Time Perspective Svenja KONOWALCZYK, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany, Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Germany Rüdiger HEIM, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany Zena R. MELLO, San Francisco State University, USA Monika BUHL, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany Intrinsic motivation and time perspective in serbian students Aleksandra KOSTIC, University of Nis, Department of Psychology, Serbia Jasmina NEDELJKOVIC, Faculty of Legal and Business Studies Dr Lazar Vrkatic, Serbia 38

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st The Relationship Between Time Perspective and Perceived Stress in Temporal Discounting among Adolescents Marta MALESZA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Time Relation in American and Nigerian Adolescents and Young Adults Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, Psychology, USA Samuel OLADIPO, Tai Solarin University of Education, Nigeria Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, USA Attitudes toward future among managers in Russian companies Timofei NESTIK, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation Time is not only a treasure of scholars - the relationship between need for cognition openness to experience and Time Perspective Weronika PIKTEL, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Maria LEDZIŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Are we bored in our leisure time? Free-time management and boredom Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Agata BŁACHNIO, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin Connection between time perspective and personal meaning of life orientations: longitudinal study Margaryta RUZHYTSKA, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, Psychology, Ukraine Your Time Perspective Reflects the History of Your Life Oksana SENYK, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Department of Psychology, Ukraine Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st How do we feel and cope with the bank loan. The impact of future time perspective. Mirosław SMYL, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Zbigniew ZALESKI, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Selected aspects of time perspective and experience of pain. Review of research Małgorzata SOBOL-KWAPIŃSKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Włodzimierz PŁOTEK, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland Marcin CYBULSKI, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland In search for the roots of Time Perspective: The key role of closeness, autonomy, and parenting styles Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Transcendental future in old age Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, University of Szczecin, Institute of Psychology, Poland Beata BUGAJSKA, University of Szczecin, Institute of Pedagogy Time perspective and values: a cross-cultural comparison Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Józef MACIUSZEK, Jagiellonian University, Poland Anna KAWULA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland Time perspectives at the work: behaviors, satisfaction and engagement. Katarzyna WOJTKOWSKA, Faculty of Psychology,University of Warsaw, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Poland

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st Gender Differences in the Relationship between Temporal Orientation and Depression among Employees Miku YOSHIDA, Nagoya University, Department of Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan Atsuko KANAI, Nagoya University, Department of Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan Cognitive control and intelligence as predictors of time perspective: high level of cognitive ability reduces maladaptive time orientation Marcin ZAJENKOWSKI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Poland

5:00 pm Oral Communications 5 Session 5A (Room A) Measuring Time Perspective in Work Settings: Japanese Data Analysis Kiyoshi TAKAHASHI, Kobe University, School of Business Administration, Japan Kotoe KONISHI, Kobe University, School of Business Administration Time investment approach and time mental accounting based on time constraint: modeled on project management Mohammadreza SADR, Warsaw International Studies In Psychology, Universitz of Warsaw, Poland Time in project, an approach through management situations Daniel LEROY, Laboratoire Vallorem, IAE de Tours, FacultĂŠ de Droit, Economie et Sciences Sociales, France Lucy VELASCO, Member of Laboratory Vallorem, France

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Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st Time perspective and job search attitude in unemployed Andreja LES, Slovenia Boštjan BAJEC, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana

Session 5B (Room B) Time production under time pressure Pauline MATHA, Université de Toulouse, Clle-LTC, Psychology, France A.-C., RATTAT, Université de Toulouse, Octogone, France J. CEGARRA, Université de Toulouse, France M.-F. VALAX, Université de Toulouse, France Psychological time dilation: An explanation based on general relativity and Bayesian statistical reasoning Lachlan KENT, Federation University, School of Health Sciences, Australia Elizabeth C. TEMPLE, School of Health Sciences, Federation University Australia Terry CAELLI, Victoria Research Laboratory, National ICT Australia Mark F. BENNETT, School of Physics, University of Melbourne Australia Sources of individual differences in the cognitive arrow of time: Examining the role of fluid intelligence, time perspective and chronotype Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Psychology, New Zealand Jan RIES, University of Potsdam, Germany Annika DIX, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany Elke VAN DER MEER, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany Different Times: The Influence of Locus of Control on the Representation of Time in Native Speakers of English and Dutch Annemijn LOERMANS, VU University Amsterdam, Educational Neuroscience, The Netherlands Björn DE KONING, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands Lydia KRABBENDAM, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands 42

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: July 31st

Session 5C (Room C) Self-induced goals in varied temporary horizons Dmitry LEONTIEV, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia Elena RASSKAZOVA, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia Dmitry ZAMYATIN, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia Back to the Future: Goal stocktaking, Future Time Perspective, and Well-being Fuschia SIROIS, Bishop's University, Psychology, Canada Benjamin GIGUÈRE, Dept. of Psychology, Unviersity of Guelph, Ontario, Canada Claude CHARPENTIER, Dept. of Psychology, Bishop's Unviersity, Quebec, Canada Kelsea BEADMAN, Dept. of Psychology, Bishop's Unviersity, Quebec, Canada Time perspective and the persistence in action: the modifying role of temperament Magdalena MARSZAŁ-WIŚNIEWSKA, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Department of Psychology Warsaw, Poland Personality traits, future time perspective, and adaptation to school life in adolescence Renato CARVALHO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal Rosa NOVO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal

7:00 pm Gala Dinner (Hotel Bristol Warsaw)

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Detailed Scientific Program: August 1st

August 1st 8:30 am Secretariat Opening (Main Hall) 9:00 am Keynote Lecture (Auditorium) Keynote Speaker: Philip ZIMBARDO, Stanford University, USA Enjoying the time of your life

10:15 am Oral Communications 6 Session 6A (Room A) Who Looks Forward to Better Health? Personality Factors and Future Self-Rated Health in the Context of Chronic Illness Fuschia SIROIS, Bishop's University, Psychology, Canada Time Perception Deficits in Impulsivity Disorders: A Systematic Review Diana MOREIRA, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Porto, Laboratory of Neuropsychophysiology, Portugal Marta PINTO, Maia University Institute, Portugal Fernando ALMEIDA, Maia University Institute, Portugal Fernando BARBOSA, University of Porto, Portugal A time to be stressed? Time perspectives and stress reactive cortisol dynamics in healthy men and women Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Marie-France MARIN, Harvard University, USA

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Detailed Scientific Program: August 1st Julie Katia MORIN-MAJOR, Université de Montréal, Canada Robert-Paul JUSTER, McGill University, Canada Sonia J. LUPIEN, Université de Montréal, Canada The role of Time Perspective tendencies on the acculturative stress of treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans living in the Unites States Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Gladys J. JIMENEZ-TORRES, Yale University School of Medicine, USA Alisha NOBLE, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Alexis RODRIGUEZ, Yale University, USA Raysa BONILLA-FLORENTINO, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Nanet M. LOPEZ-CORDOVA, Carlos Albizu University, USA

Session 6B (Room B) Time perception and delay aversion Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Andres MENDEZ, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Ana PIRES, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Fernando GONZALEZ, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Ana MARTIN, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Alejandro MAICHE, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Alejandra CARBONI, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay

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Detailed Scientific Program: August 1st Positive time-perspective as an alternative defense from death concerns Ksenia CHISTOPOLSKAYA, Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Suicidology, Russia S.N. ENIKOLOPOV, Mental Health Research Center of RAMS, G.I. SEMYKIN, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, E.V. NIKOLAEV, Uljanov Chuvash State University, L.P. PONOMARENKO, Mechnikov Odessa National University, V.N. KAZANCEVA, Mechnikov Odessa National University Optimism, pessimism and their relation to Time Perspectives Csilla JESZENSZKY, Medical Psychology, Technical University Dresden, , Germany Annamária KÁDÁR, Babes-Bolyai University, Tg-Mures, Romania Zimbardo and Carstensen Time Perspectives, Do They Match? Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS - Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, Portugal Laetitia TEIXEIRA, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal

Session 6C (Room C) Consciousness of Time Perspective leads to Human development Thelma RANI, St. Christopher's College of Education, Department of Computer Education, India U. Deborah SHARON, Ethiraj College, India Future-oriented adult students in Spain: cultural aspects and performance regarding Game Based Learning Mireia USART, Open University of Catalonia (UOC), eLearn Center, Spain Margarida ROMERO, Université Laval, Canada Elena BARBERÀ, eLearn Center, Open University of Catalonia (UOC), Spain

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Detailed Scientific Program: August 1st Measuring time perspective of the prison inmates Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Bozena GULLA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Przemyslaw PIOTROWSKI, Jagiellonian University, Poland Malgorzata WYSOCKA-PLECZYK, Jagiellonian University, Poland

11:30 am Farewell Session (Auditorium) 12:00 pm Coffee Break (Main Hall) 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Round Table (Room E) Elena KAZAKINA, PhD, Licensed independent practice, USA

clinical

psychologist

in

Time Perspective in a Consultation Room: We and our clients. The challenges and rewards of time perspective counseling, psychotherapy and coaching

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Abstracts: Keynote Speakers

Abstracts

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers Ilona BONIWELL is one of the most prominent positive psychology academics in Europe. She founded and headed the first Masters Degree in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) in Europe at University of East London. Currently, she teaches at l Ecole Centrale Paris and assists the Government of Bhutan in developing a framework for happiness-based public policy, at the request of the UN. Her research and applied interests include: psychology of time, resilience, eudaimonic well-being and applications of positive psychology to leadership, coaching and education. Dr Boniwell founded the European Network of Positive Psychology, organised the first European Congress of Positive Psychology (June 2002, Winchester) and was the first vice-chair of the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA). Her first bestselling book, Positive Psychology in a Nutshell, has been translated into many languages. She is the author or editor of five other books (including the Oxford Handbook of Happiness) and multiple academic articles. In addition to her academic work, Ilona is passionate about practical applications of positive psychology. Dr Boniwell consults businesses and educational institutions around the globe as Director of Positran, a boutique consultancy specialising in the applications of evidence-based methodologies to achieve lasting positive transformation. Her media work included BBC, Guardian, Times, Psychologies, Top Sante and Cosmopolitan articles and interviews. Keynote Lecture: Time Perspective Coaching Learning to balance one’s time perspective enables individuals to avoid the negative consequences of excessive reliance on particular time frames while optimizing their cognitive flexibility to shift temporal focus to satisfy situational demands. Achieving a balanced time perspective, or even simply minimizing existing excessive biases, is not easy. It requires an awareness of one’s current temporal orientation, overcoming cultural, social and situational pressures for sustaining a more limited orientation, and a will to live a healthy, socially connected, productive life. Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Keynote Speakers This presentation will present a variety of methods, including both evidence-based interventions and questions that can be employed in coaching, psychotherapy or group training sessions to address and develop different forms of imbalance in clients’ time perspective. Importantly, some of the methods will be presented in an interactive fashion, enabling the conference attendees to get a flavour of how these can be utilised in practice. Jeff JOIREMAN is an Associate Professor of Marketing at Washington State University, where he teaches consumer behavior, statistics, and marketing research, and serves as the department’s PhD Coordinator. Dr. Joireman’s research focuses on how temporal concerns predict financial decision-making, health behavior, and consumer behaviors related to the environment. He also has a long-standing interest in understanding cooperation in social dilemmas, situations that involve a conflict between short-term self-interest and long-term collective interests. Dr. Joireman has published over 60 articles and book chapters in psychology and marketing, with many of his publications appearing in the fields’ top journals, including Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of International Business Studies, and Journal of Retailing. Dr. Joireman has co-edited a book with Alan Strathman titled Understanding Behavior on the Context of Time: Theory, Research and Application, and recently co-authored a book with Paul Van Lange titled How to Publish High Impact Research. Dr. Joireman has won numerous honors and awards, including a Fulbright Scholarship to the Netherlands, multiple Dean’s Excellence Awards, an Outstanding Faculty Service Award, and the Department of Marketing’s Professor of the Year Award. Keynote Lecture: Consideration of Future Consequences: A Twenty-Year Retrospective In 1994, Strathman, Gleicher, Boninger and Edwards argued for the existence of individual differences in the consideration of future 50

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Keynote Speakers consequences (CFC), and validated a 12-item scale measuring the CFC construct. Since then, a significant amount of research has explored the relevance of the CFC construct across a wide range of settings (e.g., financial decision-making, health and environmental behavior, functioning in interpersonal relations). The present talk will trace the origin and development of the CFC construct, highlighting key theoretical, applied, and measurement issues. Fundamental theories of intertemporal choice, self-control, broad personality traits, and CFC will be reviewed to highlight the broader theoretical context within which the CFC construct is located. A summary of work illustrating the applied implications of CFC will then be offered. Recent research highlighting the empirical and theoretical advantages of a two-factor structure of the CFC construct will next be presented. Finally, a number of possibly risky but also arguably profitable directions for future research will be outlined, with particular emphasis on untapped potential within the emerging movement known as transformative consumer research, which focuses largely on facilitating consumer decisions that benefit the consumer, society, and the environment in the long-run. James M. JONES is is a social psychologist and Professor of Psychology and Director of the Black American Studies Program at the University of Delaware, and former Director of the Minority Fellowship Program at the American Psychological Association. He published numerous pblications, including "Prejudice and Racism", and "The Psychology of Diveristy: Beyond Prejudice and Racism". Dr. Jones serves on several editorial boards including the Journal of Black Psychology, and is past-President of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. He was awarded the 1999 Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority, the 2001 Kurt Lewin Award by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (Division 9), and the 2004 Distinguished Psychologist Award by the Association of Black Psychologists. In 2011 he received the award for Outstanding Lifetime Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Keynote Speakers Association. He explores the implication of TRIOS, a psychological worldview that combines African-inspired processes of Time, Rhythm Improvisation, Orality and Spirituality as an individual differences construct that predicts overall positive psychological states, and effective coping with challenging circumstances. Social psychology of time remains his major area of research. Keynote Lecture: The Past is in the Mind of the Beholder. Cultural variations in the temporal integration of the past and future in the present. Time perspective generally assesses how individuals self-report the degree to which the past, present and future is Accessible, Vivid, Valued and Valenced. The assessment of TP and the implications for attitudes, cognition and behavior have been generally based on a personal narrative—i.e., autobiographical. I raise the possibility that one’s personal time perspective may be influenced by their awareness of a collective identity, which affects the meaning of the past, present and future. Collective TP may interact with personal TP to forge a convergent time perspective with divergent consequences for different cultural groups. I will specifically focus on the role of the collective past as a context for the personal present and future. I will discuss the Sankofa effect, the Marley effect, Possible selves, and some of the ways on which the past is dynamically linked to the present and future. I will discuss some mechanisms that may mediate how it is construed and integrated with the present self, and provides a basis for decision making about one’s personal future. Using race as the model, I explore how the past is a critical component of temporal integration—the convergence of the past and future in the present—and suggest that this integration is particularly critical for members of marginalized and oppressed groups.

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Keynote Speakers Zbigniew ZALESKI is a Professor of Psychology in the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. Research interests in human motivation, time perspective, values, emotions, private possession and privacy, cross-cultural approach to interethnic contacts. Has teaching experience abroad: UCLA, KULeuven (Belgium), Nancy (France), Free University of Berlin. Keynote Lecture: Future Time in hope and anxiety perspective The vast majority of research on TP is focused on positive planning, thinking, goal setting. It is good so far as it conveys the constructive value of this temporal dimension. However, the attitudes towards personal or world future can be marked by negative feelings, fears and worries. To partly cover this field there has been introduced the concept of Future Anxiety (Zaleski, 1991). Accumulating data show its non-constructive role in the future goal realization as well as in present activities. The psychology of FTP should consider both dimensions – not undermining the powerful role of goal theory but at the same time not devaluating or ignoring the role of future anxiety in individual strivings. Philip G. ZIMBARDO is an internationally recognized scholar, educator, researcher and media personality, winning numerous awards and honors in each of these domains. He has been a Stanford University professor since 1968, having taught previously at Yale, NYU and Columbia. Zimbardo's career is noted for giving psychology away to the public through his popular PBS-TV series, Discovering Psychology, along with many text and trade books, among his 300+ publications. He is a former president of the American Psychological Association. He became known for his Stanford prison study, and with John N. Boyd he developed the Time Perspective Theory. He has authored various introductory psychology books, textbooks for college students, and books including The Lucifer Effect, The Time Paradox and, recently, the The Time Cure.

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Abstracts: Keynote Speakers Keynote Lecture: Enjoying the time of your life My presentation has three phases: First, a summary of my basic ideas on TP illustrated in cartoon fashion in the Secret Powers of Time. Next, an overview of developments by our Z-Time Team in the past few years, highlighting our amazing 24 nation cross-cultural investigation of the universality of the ZTPI. Then a summary of recent findings of particular importance across many domains, including a new study of TP and Financial Health in 5 nations, and another exciting development that uncovered a third dimension of the present, a new Expanded Holistic Present factor, created by my daughter Zara with her colleagues. Finally, as part of my tribute to Dr. Richard Sword, who has recently died from smoking-induced cancer. I will describe our clinical application of TP to curing veterans and other clients suffering from PTSD by supplanting their vision of being stuck in a negative past with a new one of a more vibrant present on the way toward creating a brighter, hope-filled future.

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Abstracts: Special session

Special session: Finances and Time Perspective Nicholas P. CLEMENTS, Co-Founder at mignifymoney.com, USA Financial products can be complex and difficult to understand. And the consequences of poor financial decisions are severe. Borrowing money at an excessively high interest rate means that you have to work years longer to pay off your debt. Following the wrong investment advice can make your retirement difficult. Buying a home you can not afford, with a mortgage you can not pay, increases the risk of bankruptcy, foreclosure or worse. Traditional public policy has focused on financial literacy training. For example, people are taught how to calculate compounding interest. Or, they are taught the difference between different types of investment products. MagnifyMoney.com was founded by veterans of the financial and banking industry. And they had a hypothesis: people often make poor financial decisions. And the reason they make those poor decisions is not limited to a lack of financial literacy. Financial decisions are made in the heat of the moment, and your time perspective has a big influence on the decisions you make. So, MagnifyMoney.com teamed up with Professor Zimbardo and conducted research in 6 countries, with over 3,000 people. We administered the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, a Financial Literacy exam and a Financial Health survey. We found that your Time Perspective is strongly correlated with financial health. In some cases, it is more important that being able to do the math (the traditional financial literacy measure). For example, a Present Hedonist has a high likelihood of being Financially “Sick,� even if they have a high degree of financial literacy. The strong correlation between time perspective and financial health raises important questions for public policy, financial regulation and corporate responsibility. It also offers a way for consumers to protect themselves in a confusing financial world, using their time perspective as a guide to the financial decisions they should make.

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Abstracts: Special session

Dominika MAISON, University of Warsaw, Poland Katarzyna SEKĹšCIĹƒSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Traditionally, financial decisions are explained using economic variables (mostly income and price) and demographics (e.g. age, gender, education or place of living). Therefore, it is often believed that people who have more money to their disposal (higher income) should have higher savings and be more interested in financial instruments associated with investing and insurance than those who have less money. Analogically, the difference among those who save vs. do not save money or are interested in different financial products is often explained by differences in level of education, age or gender. As a consequence, financial institutions define their target groups and look at their clients mostly from perspective of those features. This way of thinking about financial decisions and motivators explaining it is very simplified. In the presentation we are going to show empirical proofs that explaining different financial decisions (e.g. saving, investing, buying insurance)needs taking into account both objective (e.g. level of income, demographics) and psychological (life satisfaction, perception of financial situation and especially time perspective) factors. Presented data are based on 3 survey studies conducted in Poland, all based on nationwide representative sample (each n=1000 participants). The questionnaire included the basic financial decision questions associated with saving, investing and insurance, demographic variables and psychological variable, such as life satisfaction and time perspective. Time perspective was measured using the SZTPI-15 - shortened version of the questionnaire ZTPI (Howell, Zhang, 2014). The results showed that people more satisfied with life are more prone to save and invest money and to buy different type of insurance. Moreover time perspective also seems to be a very important psychological factor determining financial decisions and behaviors. Three dimensions of time perspective are the most important to explain the financial decisions and behaviors related to securing the future and deleying gratification: past negative, present fatalistic, future. High level of past negative time perspective characterized people that do not have any optional ensurance. People who were high on the past negative and 56

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Special session present fatalistic variable are less prone to save (and do not have savings) and invest money (and have less experience in that) but more prone to consume. Strong future time perspective is connected with a propensity to purchase different optional ensurance, tendency to save (and having savings) and invest and experience in investing (also in risky financial instruments). Other time perspectives were not relevant in context of financial decisions and behaviors, except the propensity to consume – here, next to earlier mentioned perspectives, also relevant was present hedonistic: those who scored higher on this dimension were more prone to spend their money on consumption, than on saving or investing. Ludvig LEVASSEUR, University of Paris-Dauphine, France Findings from seminal and recent articles indicate that the sum of the views individuals hold about their past, present, and future (i.e., their time perspective) influences their cognitions and behaviors. We extend these findings to the field of entrepreneurship and suggest that time perspective influences entrepreneurs’ alertness. We propose a theoretical framework to better understand the role time perspective plays in key aspects of entrepreneurship (herein, entrepreneurial alertness).

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Abstracts: Workshop

Workshop How to Publish High-Quality Research: Paradigms, Processes and Insights from Leading Scholars Jeff JOIREMAN, PhD, Department of Marketing, Washington State University, USA This 3-hour workshop will offer attendees a systematic overview of the processes and paradigms leading to high-quality research, based on the forthcoming book “How to Publish High-Quality Research” (Joireman & Van Lange; forthcoming in December 2014 from the American Psychological Association). The workshop will be arranged around three major steps in the research process, including discovering, building, and sharing the contribution. Insights and illustrations from leading scholars in the fields of social and consumer psychology will be highlighted throughout the workshop. Topics Covered: • Sixteen “action strategies” for discovering high-quality ideas • Crucial role of theory in framing research contributions • Navigating emerging ethical challenges in data collection, analysis and reporting • Eight distinct “paradigms for publishing high-quality research” (e.g., bridging disciplines, challenging assumptions, combining moderators and mediators, venturing into the real world). • Tips for writing and revising • Process Model for Publishing High-Quality Research with implications for training and mentoring After presenting the key topics noted above, the workshop will be opened up to questions, answers, and feedback. The workshop is designed to be of interest to graduate students, emerging scholars, and established scholars in a wide range of social and behavioral disciplines.

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Abstracts: Workshop

Round Table Time Perspective in a Consultation Room: We and our clients. The challenges and rewards of time perspective counseling, psychotherapy and coaching Elena KAZAKINA, PhD, Licensed clinical psychologist in independent practice, USA Two years ago, at the Ist International TP Conference in Coimbra there were only few of us who practiced Time Perspective therapy, however the interest in this topic was very strong. Now, in 2014 in Warsaw it is exciting to find out new developments in this emerging area of TP. This Round Table intends to give voices and to see faces of those of you who are already using temporal interventions in your work with clients, and also those who are just becoming interested in the application of TP empirical findings into clinical practice. Here are some issues we will address: • What exactly is Time Perspective Therapy? • What is a healthy time perspective? • What temporal interventions seem most productive on a path to psychological health? • How do our own personal and theoretical temporal ideas, preferences and biases affect our work with clients? • How our clinical discoveries can inform further research ? The Round Table discussion will be moderated by Elena Kazakina, PhD, licensed psychologist in independent private practice in New York Metropolitan Area, USA. Kazakina earned her doctorate from Columbia University and developed time perspective counseling based on her dissertation research. She has 15 years of experience in applying temporal strategies in her clinical work including at Trinitas Hospital, Shorefront Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing Care and Comprehensive Sleep Disorder Institute.

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Abstracts: Invited Symposia – July 30th

Invited Symposia 30th July Chronotype - the circadian time perspective Chairperson Konrad JANKOWSKI, Faculty of Psychology University of Warsaw, Poland konrad.jankowski@psych.uw.edu.pl Symposium Chronotype, also termed the morningness-eveningness abstract preference is a psychological time construct describing individual preferences regarding optimal functioning at various times of the day. Due to the robust manifestation in the timing of sleep, chronotype is one of the easiest for observation aspect of personality. People are typically categorized into three main chronotypes: morning, evening, and neither (predominating in the population), which are recognized in everyday language (e.g. larks, night owls). During the last two decades chronotype has attracted much attention of scientists and the present symposium aims to provide the most current state of knowledge and define new venues of research integrating various psychological time constructs. We will present the results of psychophysiological research using heart rate variability and neuroimaging paradigms to discuss physiological underpinnings of chronotype, and combine them with results regarding subjective and performance-based measures. We will also present applied topics, like links between chronotype and school performance or behavioral problems. Finally, we will provide detailed analysis of relationships between chronotype and the past-present-future time perspective. Keywords chronotype, morningness preference, time perspective, psychophysiology, adolescence

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Self-regulatory capacities and the associations between chronotype and time perspective Taciano L. MILFONT, School of Psychology Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand taciano.milfont@vuw.ac.nz Recent research has started to examine the associations among different psychological time constructs. In particular, studies from at least five countries have linked chronotype (morning-types or evening-types) and future time perspective, showing that morning-types are more future-oriented while evening-types are more presentoriented. In the present talk I will summarise our ongoing research program on the mechanism that could explain the chronotype–time perspective relationships. In an initial study we found that self-control mediates the influence of morningness on both future time perspective and delay of gratification. Our recent work has used a longitudinal design with both subjective (selfreport questionnaire) and objective indicators (physiological measures of heart rate variability and salivary cortisol) to unpack the associations between morningness and future orientation. Drawing from our correlational findings and extant literature, we speculate that self-control and self-regulatory capacities underlie morningness and future focus. This line of research offers some contribution about how self-control may lead to future orientation, and the psychological and physiological underpinnings of chronotype. chronotype, future orientation, self-control, selfregulation

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Abstracts: Invited Symposia – July 30th Title

Sensation seeking and circadian typology

Authors

Anna MURO, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Montserrat GOMÀ-I-FREIXANET, Department of Health Psychology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain; Ana ADAN, Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain. Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C), Barcelona, Spain. anna.muro@uab.cat Sensation seeking (Zuckerman et al., 1978) is a personality trait defined by “the seeking of varied, novel, complex, and intense sensations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical, social, legal, and financial risks for the sake of such experience”. The relationship between sensation seeking and circadian typology was first studied in an adult sample (Tonetti et al., 2010), showing that evening type subjects obtained higher sensation seeking scores than morning types. The present study aimed to analyse the relationship between sensation seeking and circadian typology in an adolescent sample of 688 students from 12 to 16 years old. Results showed that evening-type adolescents of both sexes scored significantly higher than neither-types and morning types on sensation seeking total score. The implications of these results, also found in adults, suggest that evening-type adolescents have a greater desire for varied, new, complex, and intense sensations, they are ready for experiencing more risks and experiences that include seeking out a higher amount of variability in the level of stimulation and engaging in exploratory behaviours that modulate individuals’ arousal needs. Therefore, the implications of this study also suggest the need of being aware of individual differences in the SS trait in evening-type adolescents, as well as taking into

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account the wide variety of behaviours associated with it, either pro-social or antisocial, to design better preventive health and academic programs. Sensation seeking, circadian typology, adolescence. The Influence of chronotype, intelligence, conscientiousness, and motivation on academic achievement in primary school Talat ARBABI, Department of Biology, University of Education, Heidelberg, Christian VOLLMER, Institute of Psychology, University of Education Heidelberg Tobias DÖRFLER, Institute of Psychology, University of Education Heidelberg Christoph RANDLER, Institute of Science, Technology & Geography, University of Education Heidelberg arbabit@ph-heidelberg.de Individuals differ in timing of sleep (e.g., bedtimes and rise times) and preference in morning or evening hours. This study aims to investigate the relationship between chronotype and academic achievement in children with the average age of 10.22 (range: 8.17−12.17). Previous works had focused on secondary school students and this is the first research investigating primary school students in grade four. A total of 1125 children (536 girls, 584 boys and 5 sex unspecified) participated in this study. They filled in an intelligence test (CFT 20) and a paper-pencilquestionnaire. We implemented questions about wake times and bed times, academic achievement (measured by grades in Mathematics, German, English and Nature & Culture), conscientiousness (FFPI-C) and motivation (SELLMO). Results showed that boys and girls did not differ in chronotype. There were significant differences between girls and boys in academic performance but the direction was subject-specific: Girls did better in languages (German, English) and Nature & Culture, but

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boys had better scores in Mathematics. Overall, there were no gender differences in grades. There were significant gender differences in midpoint of sleep with girls sleeping later and showed higher social jetlag. Younger children were earlier chronotype and had better marks than older children. Morning orientation was positively related with better performance in the CFT, higher scores in conscientiousness and learning objectives. Intelligence, conscientiousness and motivation had the most important effects on better grades, respectively. Overall, better grades were inversely related to late midpoint of sleep, more social jetlag and older age. chronotype; morningness–eveningness; academic achievement; school performance; children; intelligence Can we trace chronotype with neuroimaging techniques? Halszka OGIŃSKA, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Ewa BELDZIK, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; 3 Department of Molecular Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Aleksandra DOMAGALIK, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Magdalena FAFROWICZ, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Invited Symposia – July 30th

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Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Tadeusz MAREK, Department of Neuroergonomics, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; Neurobiology Department, Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland mmoginsk@cyf-kr.edu.pl By “tracing” chronotype we mean looking for diurnal differences in the levels of brain activation and comparing morning- and evening-oriented individuals in this respect. The first experiment included eight morning- and eight evening-oriented female volunteers (mean age 23.4 ± 1.9 years) performing a spatial cueing task at four times of day (10:00, 14:00, 18:00, 22:00). This was an event-related fMRI study, where participants performed a series of leftwards and rightwards saccades to the targets preceded with congruent or incongruent cue. The activations of brain structures involved in correct saccadic reactions exhibited characteristic diurnal patterns – decreasing for morning types (LSD post-hoc, 22:00 vs. other times – p < 0.05) and stable for eveningoriented subjects (LSD post-hoc n.s.). The second experiment was prepared analogically, only here a dense-array EEG was recorded simultaneously with eyetracking in eleven morning- and eleven evening-oriented subjects (11 females; mean age 22.7 ± 1.6 years) at four times of day. An ERP analysis of the incongruent trials revealed strong P3a potential, which peaked 280 ms after target onset. This amplitude was sensitive to the chronotype × time-of-day interaction, showing similar pattern as the one observed in fMRI study, i.e. decreasing for morning types (LSD post-hoc, 22:00 vs. other times – p < 0.05) and stable for evening-oriented individuals (LSD post-hoc n.s). These converging results of fMRI and EEG experiments are consistent with the theoretical model of sleep/wake regulation by

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homeostatic and circadian factors in morning and evening types. The neurophysiological indicators may serve for validation of self-estimated behavioural chronotypes. morningness-eveningness, chronotype questionnaire, fMRI, dense-EEG Affective, cognitive, and physiological underpinnings of chronotype Konrad JANKOWSKI, Faculty of Psychology University of Warsaw, Poland konrad.jankowski@psych.uw.edu.pl Regarding subjective states of well-being and cognitive performance individuals with morning, neither, and evening chronotypes prefer, respectively, morning, afternoon, and evening hours. The presented studies aimed to test whether activity of autonomic nervous system could be considered as a physiological basis of the preferred times of day, and whether a pattern of its activity could be treated as a psychophysiological characteristic differentiating individuals with various chronotypes. In study 1 university students were categorized as morning, neither, or evening types and underwent repeated measures at three times of day, morning, afternoon, and evening hours. During each testing session they completed simple reaction time task, filled in mood questionnaire, and their heart rate was continuously recorded to allow for spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Overall, subjective energy and reaction time corresponded to the preferred times of day, but not the activity of autonomic nervous system. However, analysis of daily levels of heart rate variability revealed morning and evening types showing greater sympathetic dominance as compared to neither types. Particularly, in evening types this sympathetic dominance resulted from parasympathetic withdrawal. In study 2 IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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cardiac patients were tested for chronotype and time of day when heart attack occurred (indirect measure of autonomic nervous system activity). Heart attack occurrence differed according to time of day, but its timing was not related to chronotype. However, cardiac patients exhibited greater eveningness compared to noncardiac individuals. Eveningness seems related to increased sympathetic dominance due to parasympathetic withdrawal, what is reflected in increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in evening chronotypes. chronotype, heart rate variability, mood, reaction time, time of day

Time perspective as a cognitive-motivational variable Chairperson

Symposium abstract

Toshiaki SHIRAI, Faculty of Education, Osaka Kyoiku University, shirai@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp; Manabu TSUZUKI, Department of Psychology, Chuo University, manabu@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp This symposium is based on the future time perspective (FTP) theory (Lens, 1986; Nuttin & Lens, 1985). The FTP theory defines the concept of FTP as a cognitivemotivational construct. By setting goals in the near or more distant future, human beings develop their individual FTPs. It can be characterized by their content (i.e., what people are striving for) and extension or depth (i.e., how far into the future individuals set their goals). Individual differences in the content and extension of FTP have motivational consequences. The empirical evidences support the theory by indicating that future time perspective plays a significant role in educational and career development in adolescence and emerging adulthood (e.g., Hilpert, Husman, Stump, Kim, Chung, &

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Duggan, 2012; Lens, Paixão, Herrera, & Grobler, 2012; Lens & Tsuzuki, 2007; Peetsma, Schuitema, & Van der Veen, 2012). As the theory argues mainly in the educational settings and in the Western countries, this symposium strengthens the body of the theory, based on longitudinal studies, cross-cultural examination, and expanding the perspective of theory towards the past. We will suggest that the core of the theory indicating time integration between the future and present can provide also a basis of better understanding of internal process such as internal regulation, mindfulness, self-value, consciousness to the past, present and future and a theoretical foundation of promoting well-being in contemporary precarious society. Through discussion, we will share basic ideas of the concept of time perspectives with participants in the conference. time perspective, FTP theory, connectedness, motivation, development, culture

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Developmental change of time perspective during the transition from junior high school to high school Manabu TSUZUKI, Department of Psychology, Chuo University, manabu@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp This study investigated the individual difference in trajectories of hope during the transition from junior high school to high school. The participants of this study were recruited at school when they were 9th grade (15 years old) of junior high school. A sheet of questionnaire was conducted at classroom. Students who offered to attend a follow-up survey were asked to write their postal address in the questionnaire. Finally, 733 of students participated second times of longitudinal survey. Using these informations, the second survey by postal mail was conducted when they were 10th grade (16 years old) of high school. Cluster analysis using four sub-scale of selfconsciousness (self-value, existence of significant others, self-denial, feeling of self-satisfaction) found six different types of self-consciousness; (a) constant self-value group, (b) self-denial group, (c) self-affirmative group, (d) construction of human relations group, (e) self-conflict group, and (f) loss of human relations group. Selfaffirmative group and construction of human relations group showed a significant increment of hope of the future. On the contrary, self-denial group, loss of human relations group, and constant self-value group showed a significant decline of hope of the future. In addition, construction of human relations group and selfaffirmative group showed a significant decline of emptiness. On the contrary, self-denial group, loss of human relations group, and constant self-value group showed a significant increment of emptiness. It is suggested that constructions of a new network of human relations had positive effects on development of time

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perspective during the school transition. time perspective, school transition, construction of human relations Development of early adolescents’ time perspective and self-regulation of learning Thea PEETSMA, Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Jaap SCHUITEMA, Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam; Ineke VAN DER VEEN, Kohnstamm Institute, University of Amsterdam t.t.d.peetsma@uva.nl Developments of young adolescents’ time perspectives have been found predictors of a decrease in school motivation in the first years of secondary education. From the self-determination theory is known that more internal controlled regulation will lead to better motivation for school. That is why a study of the developments of young adolescents’ time perspectives, their self-regulation of learning and achievement at school can be interesting in an apparently problematic period for adolescents’ learning motivation. Some students foresee the consequences of their behavior for their future and their appraisal of future goals makes them put effort into the attainment of their future goals (Nuttin & Lens, 1985). This seems already to include a relation between time perspective and the internalization of goals. Indeed, a study with high school and university students showed positive associations between future time perspective and identified regulation. Using another concept time perspective, in which someone’s affect, cognition, and behavioral intentions, towards a certain life domain on a term in the future is combined, the longitudinal relation of developments of time perspective with selfdetermination in learning and achievement is tested with IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


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young adolescents. 700 students in the first two years of secondary school (age 12-14) in the Netherlands participated in this study. They filled in a self-report questionnaire on short- and long-term time perspectives and on self-regulation five times in a period of two years. The relationships between the developments of perspectives, self-regulation and achievements were analyzed, using multivariate Latent Growth Curve Analyses (LGCA) with Mplus. time perspective, self-determination, self-regulation, motivation, learning, young adolescents The Influence of reconstruction of the past, present and future on their changes in undergraduates Akane ISHIKAWA, Doctoral Program in Psychology Course, Graduate School of Letters, Chuo University, akanei125c@gmail.com Although future time perspective is important for undergraduates, it is also important to think about their past and integrate with the future in the present (Tsuzuki, 1999). This study examined the influence of reconstruction of the past, present and future on changes of time perspective in undergraduates, using a short longitudinal design. Twenty nine Japanese undergraduates were asked to take part in a workshop where making “Cognitive Map of Time Perspective” (Sonoda, 2011), which is useful for constructing time perspective, and to participate interviews based on the map. The interviews were individually conducted another day after the work. Before and after the work and interviews, participants were asked to answer a questionnaire that was composed of the scales which measured one’s view on the past, goal consciousness and emptiness. They were classified into two groups, group 1 (N = 20) with connecting their past, present and future positively and group 2 (N = 9) with connecting their past,

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present and future negatively, according to the way in which participants connect their past, present, and future in the interviews. By experiencing the work and interviews, group 1 increased in the scores of consciousness to their past, present, and future. In contrast, group 2 increased in the score of consciousness to only their past. The results revealed the importance of reconstructing the past, present and future positively and meaningfully in creating positive time perspective. time perspective, time integration, undergraduate, intervention Mindfulness and Identity Formation in Emerging Adulthood: Long-Term Longitudinal Dynamics of Time Perspectives Toshiaki SHIRAI, Faculty of Education, Osaka Kyoiku University, Tomoyasu NAKAMURA, Kyushu University, Japan Kumiko KATSUMA, Naragakuen Career Development Center, Japan shirai@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp Mindfulness as the state of being attentive and aware of what was taking place in the present might relate to wellbeing (Brown & Ryan, 2003) and the previous researches on time perspective have also proposed balancing time perspective (Boniwell & Zimbardo, 2004; Shirai, Nakamura & Katsuma, 2012). This study explores whether mindfulness can relate with identity formation, using a long-term longitudinal design. Participants (N = 187) were followed from age 20 to 31. They were asked to answer a questionnaire that was composed of the Time Beliefs Scale (Shirai, 1985) and the Identity Status Scale (Kato, 1983). Time beliefs, which refer to a belief system about relations between the future and the present, consisted of 3 components: delay of gratification, unconcern for future and mindful-present; Identity consisted of 3 IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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components: identity commitment, exploration and crisis. Bivariate latent growth models showed that, first, future orientation as predominately future oriented in terms of delay of gratification and concern to the future predicted positively both identity commitment and exploration; Second, mindful-present predicted negatively commitment but positively exploration. These results indicate the importance of future orientation in identity formation, which confirms the findings of previous studies (Luyckx, Goossens, Lens, & Soenens, 2010; Seginer & Noyman, 2005), and also the possibility that mindfulness can produce a regression in identity cycle (Marcia, 2002) through weakening commitment and arousing exploration, which leads to the construction of a new identity that can be fit to a new life state during a transitional period. mindfulness, time orientation, identity, value, emerging adulthood, longitudinal study The content and extension of Future time perspective (FTP) and their relation to career planning in a sample of Portuguese and Brazilian adolescents Maria Paula PAIXÃO, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Hilda BAYMA, UNIDERC, Brazil mppaixao@fpce.uc.pt Adolescence and emergent adulthood are critical periods for development of present and future identity and by then students’ mental representation of the future influences their academic motivation and career planning behavior. FTP that can be characterized by its content (i.e., what are people striving for) and extension or depth (i.e. how far into the future do individuals set their goals) and it strongly influences instrumental motivation (utility of present activities for the more or less distant future). In the academic and career realm, evidence shows that FTP

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contributes to the promotion of internal behavior regulation, fostering the individuals’ commitment to the successful achievement of their current academic tasks and duties. In this study we analyzed the relation between FTP content and extension to the adolescents’ perception of school instrumentality for future valued life goals and also to the adoption of adaptive study strategies. The participants were Portuguese (n=100) and Brazilian adolescents (n=250) attending secondary education in regular school contexts. The results will be discussed within the framework of .expectancy-value or instrumentality theories of motivation. instrumentality theories of motivation, FTP, career planning, transition to adulthood

31st July Out of sight, out of time? New perspectives on procrastination, future orientation, and well-being Chairperson Fuschia SIROIS, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, Canada fsirois@ubishops.ca Discussant Fuschia SIROIS, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, Canada Symposium Despite the growing body of evidence indicating the abstract importance of future orientation for health and wellbeing, certain individuals habitually neglect considering the future implications of their present choices. Procrastinators, those who fail to act on previously made intentions, are one such group of individuals. In this symposium we bring together diverse and new perspectives on the importance of future orientation for health and well-being, and the implications of and ways to address the lack of considering the future that characterizes procrastination. The first paper, examines 74

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the benefits of future orientation for health outcomes including non-procrastinating health behaviors among diverse medical samples. In examining the role of future self perceptions for explaining the link between procrastination and health behaviours and well-being, the second paper highlights the disjunction between the present and future self that characterizes procrastination and its negative health consequences. The lack of considering the future may be especially problematic for student procrastinators because of their developmental stage as illustrated in the third paper which examines the mental health implications of unnecessary delay for Greek students. The final paper provides a critical review of the effectiveness of the three key interventions for reducing procrastination, highlighting important research directions to better understand the type or combination of intervention that may be most effect for combating the temporal self-regulation failure we know as procrastination. We end with a discussion of the value of addressing procrastination and its consequences for health and well-being from a temporal framework. future orientation; procrastination; health; well-being Procrastination, mental health and life-satisfaction: The vicious cycles of a fatal relationship Maria- Ioanna ARGIROPOULOU, Department of Psychology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Andreas SIATIS, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Anastasia KALANTZI-AZIZI, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece gmargirop@gmail.com Procrastination is related to a present fatalistic view of time aiming to protect well-being in the short term. Procrastinators, as “present- focused” individuals, also

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put emphasis on novelty and sensation seeking and do not plan for future goals. This tendency is expected to be even stronger among undergraduate university students due to the special characteristics of their developmental stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between general and academic procrastination with mental health and life satisfaction. A total of 182 Greek university students completed the procrastination Assessment Scale-Students(Solomon & Rothblum, 1984), General Procrastination Scale (Lay, 1986), Life Satisfaction Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), Mental Health Inventory (Veit & Ware, 1983) and Beck’s Anxiety Inventory (Beck & Steer,1993). Results revealed that students who had the tendency to procrastinate in general, or their academic obligations, in particular, reported less psychological well-being, more anxiety, more psychological distress, less emotional ties, less general positive affect, more loss of behavioral and emotional control, more depressive symptoms and less life satisfaction. Discussion will focus on the mechanisms explaining the relationship between procrastination and mental health as well as maintaining factors and therapeutic approaches to the above problems. In conclusion difficulty to meet deadlines within a specific time-frame is related to worse mental health and overall life satisfaction. Early diagnosis and effective treatment of procrastination or underlying psychological disorders such as anxiety or depression is thus crucial to diminish the suffering and to increase overall well –being of students. Academic procrastination, general procrastination, anxiety, depression, mental health, life satisfaction

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Interventions to overcome procrastination: A review and a research agenda Wendelien VAN EERDE, Business School, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands w.vaneerde@uva.nl Procrastination â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the avoidance of the implementation of an intention, resulting in delay - is a problem that many people struggle with. Although procrastination is traitlike, many also suggest that it can be overcome, or at least be diminished. What are effective ways to do so? I approach this question by reviewing the research conducted on procrastination interventions. Roughly, there are three types of interventions. First, planning or related cognitive-motivational structuring interventions to affect time perspective and to decrease delays. Second, building confidence and emotional skills needed for self-control in implementing plans. Third, social support, or receiving control from others to sustain the efforts needed in overcoming procrastination. Many interventions have combined the types mentioned above. This makes it difficult to establish which of the three types is most effective and whether all are needed. Second, it is unknown whether all people need the same intervention or whether custom-tailored interventions should be used. Third, a problem in the research is that many of the studies did not use research designs that allow causal inference. Based upon this review, I set a research agenda to address these issues in future research on procrastination. Procrastination; planning; self-efficacy; social support; intervention studies.

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Procrastination and Perceptions of the Future Self: Implications for Health and Well-being Fuschia SIROIS, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, Canada Hannah SHUCARD, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, Canada Jameson K. HIRSCH, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, USA fsirois@ubishops.ca As a temporally bound behaviour, procrastination involves a breakdown in self-regulation that has consequences not only for the present self, but also the future self. Yet evidence indicates that procrastinators are less concerned with the future than with the present, despite the considerable consequences of this short sightedness for their health and well-being. Not being able to empathetically identify with or consider the future self may explain why procrastination is associated with poor health and well-being outcomes. We examined this proposition in a community sample (N = 657) that completed an online survey. Procrastination was negatively associated with concerns and thoughts about the future self, perceived emotional and psychological closeness to the future self, and perceived tangibleness of the future self. Consistent with previous research, procrastination was also linked to lower life satisfaction and fewer health-promoting behaviours. Bootstrapping analyses of the indirect effects of procrastination on health and well-being outcomes revealed that less concern and thoughts about the future self, greater perceived emotional and psychological distance to the future self, and less tangibleness of the future self each partially mediated the links between procrastination and the health and well-being outcomes. Multiple mediator analyses revealed that less emotional closeness and fewer thoughts about the future self were the key IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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explanatory factors. These findings underscore the temporal disjunction between the present and future self that characterizes procrastination and its consequences for health and well-being. The potential benefits of interventions that increase empathy for the future self for reducing procrastination are discussed. procrastination; future self; health behaviours; wellbeing; life satisfaction

Research on the Consideration of Future Consequences: Measurement and Applied Issues Chairperson Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Republic, avasquez@psico.edu.uy Discussant Fuschia SIROIS, Department of Psychology, Bishop's University, fsirois@ubishops.ca Symposium The concept of consideration of future consequences abstract refers to an individual difference variable that captures variability in the extent to which people consider distant versus immediate outcomes of behavior and how this consideration influences current behavior. The Consideration of Future Consequences Scale is the instrument introduced by Strathman et al. (1994) to measure that construct. In recent years, there have been several important developments in the measurement and applied implications of the CFC construct. With regard to measurement, there has been an increase in the number of international validations of the CFC Scale. The most relevant finding of these studies is that they provide initial evidence for the trans-cultural validity of a two-factor solution of the CFC scale, with Immediate-CFC and FutureCFC sub-scales. In addition, a revised 14-item scale has been introduced which more reliably assesses the FutureCFC sub-scale. The CFC has also shown applied implications across various domains of behavior. For example, lower CFC scores have been associated with Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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more drug use, more impulsive behaviors and aggression, and higher CFC scores have been associated with more health prevention concerns and more pro-environmental concerns and behaviors. However, the measurement innovations in the CFC Scale have an impact on how researchers study the relation between CFC and other constructs in the applied field. In this sense, the two factor solution refines the interpretation of the results as compared to the one overall score from the unified score of CFC scale. Only recently have researchers applied this approach and these initial studies have shown promise. Furthermore, the improvement of the psychometrics indicators of the CFC-Future sub-scale provides a finer statistical ground to compare sub-scales when modeling. In this symposium, we will present research employing the CFC Scale to further validate cross-culturally the two factor solution and how this two factor solution can explain other relevant psychosocial phenomena such as dental consultation and environmental concerns and actions. Consideration of future consequences, validation, health outcomes, agression, pro-environmental behaviours. Smoking, Dental Attendance, and the CFC-14 in Homeless Youth Trilby COOLIDGE, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington, Jacqueline PICKRELL, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington, USA Maysha RAYKHMAN, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, USA Christopher TRIPPEL, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, USA Christine A. RIEDY, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, USA tcoolidg@u.washington.edu IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Invited Symposia â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Abstract

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Background: Future time perspective is often associated with positive health behaviors. While homeless youth may be more driven by immediate needs, little is known about the relationships between time perspective and health behaviors in this population. Aims: The aim of these studies was to examine the relationships between consideration of immediate/future consequences and smoking and dental attendance in this population. Methods: We administered the CFC-14, a measure of preference for delay, questions about smoking and dental attendance, and messages about the future consequences of these behaviors to homeless youth. Results: The Immediate and Future subscales were independent of one another. Higher scores on the Future subscale were associated with greater preferences to receive delayed, greater rewards, while higher scores on the Immediate subscale were associated with greater preferences to receive smaller, immediate rewards. Higher scores on the Immediate subscale were associated with smoking more cigarettes per day, smoking for more years, daily smoking, and less desire/readiness to quit. Higher scores on the Immediate subscale were also associated with going to a dentist because of a dental problem, rather than for check-ups, and more selfreported negative impacts related to dental problems. After reading messages about the future consequences of dental attendance/avoidance, participants who do not go to the dentist but scored higher on the CFC-Future subscale developed higher intentions to go to a dentist. Conclusions: The CFC-14 appears to operate as predicted in homeless youth, and is related to smoking and dental attendance in this population. Supported by NIH/NIDCR K23DE016952. CFC-14, Homeless youth, Cigarette smoking, Dental attendance, Delay discounting, Behavior change

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Future-Oriented Women will Pay to Reduce Global Warming Jeff JOIREMAN, Department of Marketing, Washington State University, USA Richie LIU, Department of Marketing, Washington State University, USA joireman@wsu.edu Background: Research has linked future time perspective and consideration of future consequences (CFC) with proenvironmental attitudes and behaviors (Milfont & Gouveia, 2006). Studies also show that CFC is a stronger predictor among those who believe their actions have a (delayed) impact on the environment (e.g., Joireman, Van Lange, & Van Vugt, 2004), supporting a CFC x concern framework. Aims: We extend this literature by testing the hypothesis that CFC interacts with sex to predict (liberal) political orientation, environmental values, belief in global warming (GW), and willingness to pay to reduce GW. Because women report higher environmental concern than men (Zelezny, Chua, & Aldrich, 2000), we expected the relationship between CFC and the model variables to be stronger among women (vs. men). Methods: Respondents in the U.S. (N = 301) completed scales assessing the model constructs, including the CFC-14 scale containing two, seven-item subscales: CFC-Future and CFC-Immediate (Joireman, Shaffer, Balliet, & Strathman, 2012). Results: Consistent with predictions, a CFC-Future x sex interaction emerged on all model variables. Follow-up spotlight analyses indicated that the relationship between CFC-Future and the model variables was always strong and significant among women, but weak (environmental values, WTP) or non-significant among men (political orientation, belief in GW). Follow-up floodlight analyses revealed that women scored higher than men on the model variables only when CFC-Future was relatively high IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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(above 5, on a 7-point scale). Conclusions and Implications: Findings support a CFC x sex interaction framework on approaches to solving GW. consideration of future consequences; environmental values; global warming; political orientation; sex differences

Testing the validity of version in Spanish of the CFC-14 in general Uruguay Sample Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Republic, Portugal avasquez@psico.edu.uy Background. Recent research using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses have suggested that the CFC Scale is composed of two dimensions, CFC-Future and CFC-Immediate. This finding implies that psychometric properties of both sub-scales should be analyzed independently. Low reliability of the CFC-Future motivated Joireman et al. (2012) to develop two new CFCFuture items, resulting in a revised CFC-14 Scale. Aims. The objective of this article is to explore the validity and factor structure of a Spanish version of the CFC-14 and compare it to a recently validated CFC-12 scale. Method. We administered the CFC-14 Scale and socio-demographic data questionnaire to 168 participants from two neighborhoods of the City of Montevideo. The CFC-14 was completed at the home of the participants (random survey house selection). Mean age of participants was 43 years old. Results. Exploratory factor analyses suggest a two factor solution as the best for the model. Item 5 show low loadings and reduces the Cronbach’s alpha as does Item 2. Discussion. Our data gives new cross-cultural evidence for the distinction between CFC-Immediate and CFC-Future. Our data also show that the recently incorporated CFC-Future items improve the psychometric

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indicators of that sub-scale, while item 5 (as in previous Portuguese and Spanish CFC validations) should be excluded in Iberoamerican languages. validation, CFC-14, factor structure

Title

Consideration of future consequences and crime.

Authors

Cristina ESTEVES, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal Victor ORTUÑO, University of Coimbra, Portugal Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, University of the Republic & University of Porto, Portugal cristina.m.esteves@gmail.com Background. The consideration of future consequences was found to be predictive of many psychological and social phenomena. For instance, CFCwas related to aggression and impulse behavior. More impulsive or aggressive people have less consideration for the consequences of their actions. Nevertheless, to date, no systematic study has been done to explore how the CFC influences transgressions of the law. Aims. The objective of this paper was to compare scores in consideration of future consequences between young and adult offenders in prison, when compared to a population not involved in problems with justice. Method. We compared a group of adolescent offenders (in probation) to a group of matched in age and SES status adolescents, and a group of adult offenders (in prison) with an adult sample of university students. Sixty Portuguese participants took part in each group. Results. Groups of adolescents (either on probation or not) were the less concerned about the future consequences of their actions and also more concerned about immediate results of their actions than adult sample. Between adolescents groups, no statistical significance was found on sub-scales scores. Adult participants in prison were more concerned with the

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future consequences of their actions than their student counterparts. Discussion. Our results suggest that adolescents are more oriented towards the immediate consequences of their actions, but the absence of differences between groups of adolescents suggest that CFC is not a key factor in explaining the early initiation on illegal behaviors. Concerning the results between adults, we found that adults in prison show higher level of CFCFuture. This could be due to the effect of imprisonment and sentence, which makes offenders to expect a change in their life situation and consequently, to be more concerned about the consequences of behavior in the distant future. offending behavior, CFC-12,

The Future of Therapy: Time Travel and Change Chairperson Sarah CLARKE, The TactileCBT Foundation, UK, sclarke@tactilecbt.com Symposium This symposium discusses a new and innovative approach abstract to therapy called Tactile Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. The presenters use a combination of talk, imagery and video excerpts to produce an engaging discussion about therapeutic change, time perspective and the future of psychological therapies. Dr Sarah Clarke, a chartered psychologist, will open the symposium by outlining the escalating interest in Time Perspective Theory within the field of psychological therapies, summarising the evidence that is emerging to support its efficacy, and introducing TactileCBT and the role of time perspective in the process of change. Martin Shirran of Elite Clinics in Spain will describe the emergence of TactileCBT within the context of clinical work and discuss how Time Perspective and CBT-based techniques were integrated into one brief therapeutic approach. He will describe a Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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range of case studies, using them to illustrate and explain the process of change in TactileCBT. Marion Shirran of Elite Clinics will focus on the application of TactileCBT within the field of weight loss. She will discuss the success of TactileCBT in this challenging field, emphasising how improved Time Perspective (particularly future-oriented thinking) is central to effective change. She will outline preliminary research evaluating the efficacy of TactileCBT and the promising findings that are emerging. The symposium will close with all three speakers outlining the future of TactileCBT. They will introduce the TactileCBT Foundation, outline its research and development strategy and describe its long term aim to secure a robust evidence base for TactileCBT and establish its place in the field of CBT-based therapies. Time Perspective, TactileCBT, Therapy, Change, Future TactileCBT: The new Time Perspective Therapy Sarah CLARKE, The TactileCBT Foundation, UK, sclarke@tactilecbt.com There is a growing body of robust research evidence indicating that time perspective is central to good mental health. Therapies that promote and enhance balanced and positive time perspective therefore have the potential to revolutionise the field of mental health. A promising example of this new generation of therapy is TactileCBT, a brief CBT-based approach that centralises time perspective in the process of change. This is the first of four presentations that introduces and discusses TactileCBT. It will begin with a review of the literature supporting the inclusion of time perspective theory within effective brief therapies. It will then introduce TactileCBT, describing its origins in clinical practice and outlining how the approach uses a small tactile object, the size and shape of a credit card, to facilitate a psychological and emotional journey of mental IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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time travel. It explains how the client develops new patterns of thinking that inform judgement, problem solving, choices and actions. The presentation will highlight how TactileCBT has taken the robust but cumbersome traditional CBT-based strategies (e.g. problem solving, guided imagery, negative automatic thoughts) and refined them to produce a single, focused and effective technique. It explains how TactileCBT transforms passive clinical techniques into an active, engaging and motivational approach that is easily learnt, highly versatile and very effective. The presentation concludes by summarising the clinical applications of TactileCBT and the research evidence base that supports its efficacy. TactileCBT; Time Perspective Theory; Therapy; Change; CBT TactileCBT: Time Perspective in Clinical Practice Martin SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation, mail@gmband.com The second of the four presentations begins by describing the emergence of TactileCBT within the clinical work of Martin and his wife in Spain. Martin will explain how the approach was developed and refined through its application to a wide range of treatment cases, all of which contributed to the simple but effective approach that is used today. Martin draws on a number of case study examples to explain how TactileCBT is delivered and how it facilitates and influences change. These include the case of a young man who exhibited severe and debilitating anxiety and who underwent a series of TactileCBT sessions. Within the first two sessions the man organised and attended a social drink with friends (a significant and symbolic event for him), and after a handful of sessions his thinking, behaviour, mood and

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lifestyle were transformed. Martin will also describe his work with substance abuse, with anger management, with relationships and marital problems, with eating disorders, with children (behavioural and emotional problems), and more. He will explain the central role that Time Perspective has had in the process of change for all of his clients. Martin will conclude his presentation by emphasising that the focus on changing, building and enhancing Time Perspective has led to unusually high success rates in his treatment. He will highlight the importance of this field of theory and research for the future development of psychological therapies. TactileCBT; Time Perspective Theory; Therapy; Change; Case Studies Weight Loss with TactileCBT: Brief and effective intervention Marion SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation, mail@gmband.com The third of four presentations on TactileCBT will focus on the application of TactileCBT within the field of weight loss. Marion will begin by describing the growing need to address overweight and obesity on a global scale, and the struggle to find effective weight loss and weight management treatments. She will summarise the stark statistics relating to obesity and health, and emphasise the need to find effective and safe interventions. Marion will discuss her extensive and revolutionary work in the field of weight loss and management. She will describe the various treatment approaches that she uses, all of which integrate and utilise TactileCBT in some form. She will draw on case study examples to illustrate the significant therapeutic advantages of balanced and positive time perspective for this client group, explaining how the inclusion of TactileCBT in her treatment greatly IInd Conference on Time Perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Warsaw 2014


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improved its long-term efficacy. Marion will conclude her presentation by outlining preliminary case study research that is being completed by the TactileCBT Foundation to evaluate the efficacy of TactileCBT as a treatment for weight loss. TactileCBT; Time Perspective Theory; Therapy; Change; Weight Loss; Case Studies.

Future-oriented thinking: What next for TactileCBT? Sarah CLARKE, The TactileCBT Foundation, UK, Marion SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation Martin SHIRRAN, Elite Clinics, Spain, and Co-Founder and Director of TactileCBT Foundation sclarke@tactilecbt.com This is the fourth and final presentation on TactileCBT. It will be delivered by all three speakers and will outline the future development of TactileCBT as a psychological therapy based on Time Perspective. The speakers will draw together and discuss the various avenues of research that are currently being conducted in the field of TactileCBT, the ongoing development of the approach and the importance of continued research in the wider field of Time Perspective. They will introduce the TactileCBT Foundation and its research and development strategy, and outline its long term aim to secure a robust evidence base for the approach and establish its place in the field of CBT-based therapies. The presentation, and symposium, will conclude by highlighting the central role that Time Perspective is likely to hold in the future development of effective psychological therapies. TactileCBT; Time Perspective Theory; TactileCBT Foundation; Research and Development; Therapy

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th

Oral Communications July 30th Session 1A Cross-cultural comparison perspective and personality

on

the

relation

between time

Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Małgorzata SZCZEŚNIAK, Institute of Psychology, University of Szczecin, Poland Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, University of Szczecin, Poland Nicolson YAT FAN SIU, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Jacqueline JIAYING LE, Department of Counselling and Psychology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Mónica PINO MUÑOZ, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chile aneta.przepiorka@gmail.com Time perspective describes how people tend to perceive their past, present, and future. Time perspective exerts a strong impact on human activity, motivation, and planning. The objective of the present study was twofold. Firstly, it was aimed to examine the relationship between time perspective and personality characteristics. Secondly, it was to verify the stability of this relation across different cultures. The participants were university students from different countries: Poland, Hong Kong, Chile (mean age 20 years) who completed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI) and Positive Orientation Scale. A Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI) contains following personality characteristics: Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Openness to Experiences. Positive orientation Scale corresponds to three psychological constructs namely: self-esteem, life satisfaction. and optimism. We posed following questions how these constructs are related to

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th temporal dimensions and whether there are any cultural differences. We hypothesized that positive orientation will be positively related to following dimensions of time perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201C; past positive, future, and negatively with such dimensions as present fatalistic and past negative. Our preliminary research shows that there is a relationship between time perspective and personality dimensions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings will be discussed Keywords: time perspective; positive orientation; personality; crosscultural study Time perspective and well-being: some reverse engineering Antanas KAIRYS, Vilnius University, Lithuania, Department of General Psychology, Lithuania Audrone LINIAUSKAITE, Department of Psychology, Klaipeda University, Lithuania. Albinas BAGDONAS, Laboratory of Special Psychology, Vilnius University, Lithuania. Vilmante PAKALNISKIENE, Department of General Psychology, Vilnius University, Lithuania antanas.kairys@fsf.vu.lt Links between the time perspective and the well-being has recently become a popular research trend. Many studies are trying to identify the features of a balanced time perspective and its relationships with the well-being. The present study has implemented a reverse approach: to analyse the differences in time perspective in the groups formed by the well-being scores. The sample included 1200 subjects that represent the structure of the Lithuanian population (aged 16-89; 45% males). The well-being was evaluated using the Lithuanian Well-being Scale for Adults (LPGS-S), that measures an overall well-being score as well as its eight subcomponents (optimism, work satisfaction and others). The scale included 59 items; the internal consistency of LPGS-S was high (>0.8). Time perspective was measured using 15 items version of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), the items were included according to their psychometric characteristics as Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th well as their meaning. Cronbach`s α varied from 0,55 to 0,76, apart from the present hedonistic scale (α = 0,35), presumably because of the short scale (3 items) or the meaning differences among items. The groups were formed using the 10th(very low) and 90th(very high) percentiles of the total score. Groups with a very high well-being score were characterized by high scores of future, past positive, present hedonistic and low scores of past negative and present fatalistic time perspective. Three clusters of the well-being as well as differences in time perspective within them were identified using the two-steps cluster analysis. Results support the other authors’ findings, established using alternative methods. Keywords: Well-being, time perspective, cluster analysis Optimism, pessimism and their relation to Time Perspectives Csilla JESZENSZKY, Medical Psychology, Technical University Dresden, , Germany Annamária KÁDÁR, Babes-Bolyai University, Tg-Mures, Romania jcsilla@hotmail.com Since both optimism and pessimism inherit per definition a time criteria (the positive respectively negative view of the future) it seems an interesting question how these two contructs relate to certain Time Perspectives. We hypothetisized that optimism might have a positive relation to Past Positive and Present Hedonistic and a negative relation to Past Negative and Present Fatalistic, while pessimism might act vice versa. Further we expected optimism to correlate positively and pessimism negatively with Future. Data was collected online based using the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and the Life Orientation Test. 1570 participants filled out our survey, 91.8% being female and the most frequent age category with 35.7% being the one between 26 and 35 years. Our results show a partially incongruent picture with our hypotheses. Optimism is positively related to the TP's Present Hedonistic and Future while being negatively correlated to Past Negative and Present Fatalistic. Pessimism shows a somewhat reverse scheme, staying in a negative relation 92

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th with the TP Present Hedonistic and in positive relation with Past Negative, Present Fatalistic and - unexpectedly - with Past Positive. Optimism does not show any relation to Past Positive and the TP Future has no significance for pessimism. A limitation to our results representthe homogenous sample (all participants were Hungarians). Hence a culturally more heterogeneous data collection should be the next step for further investigation of the present issue. Implications for meta-theory within positive psychology are presumable. Keywords: optimism, pessimism, time perspectives Balanced time perspective and its relations to well-being, optimism, and subjective health: Introducing an alternative measure Nipat PICHAYAYOTHIN, Life-Span Developmental Psychology, West Virginia University, Department of Psychology, United States JoNell STROUGH, Life-Span Developmental Psychology, West Virginia University npichaya@mix.wvu.edu The current study compared the utility of two measures of balanced time perspective (BTP) for understanding individual differences in well-being and perceived health across the life span. A life-span sample of adults (N = 309, 19-82 years, M = 46.18 years, 50.08% males) was recruited via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Participants completed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI; Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999), which assesses past positive, past negative, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future, and Mello and Worrell’s (2012) Time Attitude Scale (TAS), which assesses positive and negative evaluations of the past, present, and future. Using the ZTPI, in line with Boniwell et al., 2010, BTP was defined as having above average evaluations of past positive and future, below average evaluations of present hedonistic, and lower evaluations of past negative and present fatalistic. Using the TAS, BTP was defined as having higher positive evaluations of the past, present, and future, and lower negative evaluations of the past, present, and future. A cluster analysis showed that 46%

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th adults had a BTP using the TAS. Those with a BTP had significantly higher scores on subjective well-being, optimism, and subjective health compared to other profiles. Using the ZTPI, only 26% of adults had a BTP. Those with the BTP had significantly higher scores on subjective well-being but relatively equal scores on optimism and subjective health compared to other profiles. The relative advantages and disadvantages of using the two measures to identify individuals with BTP will be discussed. Keywords: Balanced time perspective, Subjective well-being, Optimism, Subjective Health

Session 1B Time and health in old people Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS, Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Laetitia TEIXEIRA, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal mjoao@unifai.eu Time perspective is an important construct to old age. Zimbardo Time Perspective has been mostly studied in younger samples, contrarily to Cartensen’s Future Time Perspective (FTP) that has been tested with older people. Both models have been associated, among other outcomes, with health correlates and life satisfaction. This study aims to explore time perspective in Portuguese older people, according to both time perspective models and to test if time dimensions are predictors of health. 207 Portuguese 65+ years (Mean = 77.17, SD = 7.53) living in the community constituted the sample. Results showed that older people are higher oriented towards the future, followed by past-positive, past-negative, present-fatalistic and present-hedonistic. In what regards FTP, 33.7% of the participants are limited disengaged, 28.2% are expansive engaged, 23.8% are limited engaged, and 14.4% are expansive disengaged. Both models of time perspective have potential explanatory power of health outcomes. After adjustment, depression was predicted by FTP, Future and Past94

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th negative; subjective health was predicted by past-positive and present-fatalistic; and life satisfaction was predicted by presentfatalistic, present-hedonistic, future and FTP. Anxiety was not predicted by any time dimension. When working with older people, clinicians must keep in mind that their subjective sense of time left in life, and that their focus on temporal frames (past, present and future) account for that persons beliefs, decisions and actions. Which may also influence people’s motivation to engage in healthy and health preventive behaviors. Time perspective is one of the variables to have into account when working with older people. Keywords: Time perspective; Health; Aging Time Perspective and Anxiety in Centenarians: A Chance for Life Review Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS, Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Natália DUARTE, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Rosa Marina AFONSO, Universidade da Beira Interior, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Oscar RIBEIRO, ISSSP, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal mjoao@unifai.eu Background: Time perspective is a relevant psychological construct that plays a fundamental role in several outcomes like health, satisfaction with life, depression or anxiety, or even in the process of decision making. Zimbardo’s conceptual framework of time perspective has been widely studied across different age groups but less relevance has been given to the older population, particularly to centenarians. Aims: Explore time perspective and its association with anxiety in centenarians. Outcomes & Results: A total of 70 centenarians with no cognitive impairment were selected from two Portuguese studies on centenarians. Main measures considered include a set of representative items from Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory – Short Form (GAI-SF). Main findings revealed that centenarians seem to be more focused in the future, followed

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th by past-positive, present-fatalistic, past-negative, and less focused on present hedonistic. Anxiety was identified in 46,5% of the centenarians. Only past positive was significantly associated with anxiety (p=0.036), with centenarians not having anxiety being more focused on this time frame. Conclusions & Pratical Implications: Clinically significant anxiety was found to be quite prevalent and a deeper knowledge on the time perspective associated to its expression may provide new insights on the potential paths to help decrease such an emotional state. Knowing that past-positive is associated with not having anxiety raises interesting questions about the potential value of life review and reminiscence interventions in extreme longevity. Keywords: Zimbardo Time perspective; Anxiety; Centenarians The relevance of time perspective for attitudes toward technologies in old age. Manuela ZAMBIANCHI, University, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Italy; Department of Psychology, Univertsity of Umeå, Sweden, Italy Maria Grazia CARELLI, Department of Psychology, University of Umeå, Sweden manuela.zambianchi@unibo.it Introduction: A positive attitude toward the integration of technology into daily life may be seen as emergent resource for successful aging. Elderly people with a positive view of the future may be regarded as having a positive influence on technologies attitudes because they appreciate the future with hope, projects and planning behaviors. They could be more motivated in exploring new areas of knowledge and acquiring new competencies. A negative or fatalistic time perspective view in old age, on the contrary, might be assumed to be detrimental for new technologies attitudes, because it might be related to negative past life experiences, lack of control over present life, and belief that future will be a threatening time lacking of interest. Aims and Method: Aim of the study is to evaluate the attitudes toward technologies, the influence of time perspective and preference for 96

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th monochronic versus polychronic time use in a sample of elderly people. Three questionnaires were completed by 245 participants (mean age: 70.03): the six dimensions Time Perspective Inventory (S-ZTPI, Carelli et al., 2011); A purpose-built questionnaire, Attitude toward Technologies Questionnaire (ATTQ, Zambianchi, Carelli, 2013) and Polychronic–Monochronic Tendency Scale (PTM, Lindquist, Kaufman-Scarborough, 2007). Results and Conclusions: A Multiple regression model highlighted age, PTM and Fatalistic present as significant predictors of ATTQ. The results are in line with our predictions and confirm that exploring the relationship between time dimensions and old people attitudes toward technologies represents a new interesting line of inquiry Keywords: time perspective; technologies; old people; monochronicpolychronic time use; attitudes

Session 1C Validation of the “Aspiration Index” in a Portuguese secondary education students’ sample Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal mppaixao@fpce.uc.pt The recent qualitative approach of motivation in research based on the Self Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000; 2002; Lens & Vansteenkiste, 2006) shows that the quality of motivation depends on the content or type of future goals (i.e., intrinsic versus extrinsic goals). In fact, intrinsic future goals seem to create a much better type of motivation, higher well-being and vitality than extrinsic future goals do, mainly because they satisfy the innate psychological needs, whereas extrinsic goals can sometimes frustrate the satisfaction of these same needs, or lead to an overestimation of the positive affective impact of anticipated external rewards. The goal of this study is to analyze the dimensionality and the validity estimates of the “Aspiration Index"

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th (Kasser & Ryan, 1996), a measure of future both intrinsic and extrinsic aspirations, via a Confirmatory Factor Analysis and the examination of its correlations with well being, namely the vitality construct, assessed via the “Vitality Trait and State Scales” (Ryan & Frederick, 1997), and subject well being (Satisfaction with Life Scale, Diener et al., 1985). The results obtained will be interpreted in light of previous international research data using both the SDT and the expectancy-value theories framework. Keywords: Future goals, intrinsinc/extrinsic aspirations, SDT. expectancyvalue theories, vitality, satisfaction with life Conceptualizing and measuring time perspective in adolescence: international implications Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, Psychology, USA zmello@sfsu.edu In this paper, I present a theoretical model and corresponding instrument that measures time perspective (TP) in adolescence (Mello, in press; Mello & Worrell, 2007). TP comprises several dimensions including the meaning, orientation, and, attitude with which individuals’ think and feel about the past, the present, and the future. It is argued that each dimension is valuable in understanding individual variation in TP, and that this individual variation predicts academic achievement, risky-behavior, and selfesteem. Adolescence represents a particularly fruitful period to study TP because of the identity formation (Erikson, 1968), cognitive, (Piaget, 1955), and neurological changes (Casey et al., 2008) that occur at this age. It is argued, with age, individuals will develop more complex TPs, and that these changes will be most noticeable between late childhood and early adolescence. The Adolescent Time Inventory (ATI-English, Mello & Worrell, 2007) is described and data are presented to show that it is a useful instrument to assess TP’s multiple dimensions among individuals aged 10 to 18. Cross-cultural implications are discussed that draw from research suggesting differences in TP between cultures (Jones, 1988; Lake, 1991; Nuñez & Sweetser, 2006). Evidence is presented that shows the reliability and validity of the ATI-English 98

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th in America, New Zealand, and Nigeria, the ATI-German in Germany, and the ATI-Italian in Italy. Pending ATIs in Farsi and Mandarin are also described. Preliminary evidence is shown indicating American youth think less about the future than Nigerians, and that American and German adolescents report generally similar attitudes toward the time periods. Keywords: Adolescents, Adolescent Time Inventory, psychological time theory, measurement, international Back to 'the future': Evidence for a bifactor solution to the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale, and implications for the study of time perspective Michael MCKAY, Liverpool John Moores University, Centre For Public Health, England Frank WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, USA Grant MORGAN, Baylor University, USA Job VAN EXEL, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands m.t.mckay@ljmu.ac.uk Despite its widespread use, disagreement remains regarding the structure of the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFCS). In particular there is disagreement regarding the degree to which the scale assesses future orientation as a unidimensional or multidimensional (immediate and future) construct. Using two large samples of high school students in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, five models, based on the extant literature were tested. The totality of results including item loadings, goodness of fit indices, and reliability estimates all supported the bifactor model, suggesting that the two hypothesized factors are better understood as ‘grouping’ factors rather than as representative of latent constructs. Accordingly the present study supports the unidimensionality of the CFCS and the scoring of all twelve items to produce a global future orientation score. Data will be presented on the relationship between a one and two-factor solution for the scale and alcohol use, smoking and BMI, and implications for the use of the scale and its value in the development of the study of time perspective will be discussed.

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th Moreover we will recommend that researchers intending to use the CFCS, and those with existing data examine a bifactor solution for the scale. Keywords: Bifactor solution, Consideration of Future Consequences Scale, Discriminant validity Content Validity of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory culturally adapted for Puerto Rico (ZTPI-PR) Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Gladys J. JIMENEZ-TORRES, Yale University School of Medicine, USA Alisha NOBLE, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Nanet M. LOPEZ-CORDOVA, Carlos Albizu University, USA lening.olivera-figueroa@yale.edu Rationale: Time Perspective (TP) is the unconscious, cognitive representation of time, where humans perceive life experiences according to their time orientations (i.e.: focus on the past, the present, or the future). To measure this construct, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) was developed, which categorizes time perspective across five domains: Past-Negative (PN), Past-Positive (PP), Present-Fatalistic (PF), Present-Hedonistic (PH), and Future (F). Adaptations of the ZTPI have previously been made in 24 countries, including Spain, Mexico and Chile. However, to this day the ZTPI has not been adapted to the Spanish language spoken in Puerto Rico (PR). Objectives: 1) To develop a version of the ZTPI that can be culturally adapted for the Spanish language spoken in PR (ZTPI-PR). 2) To examine the content validity of the ZTPI-PR. Method: A Bilingual Committee of 15 experienced psychologists, researchers, evaluators, and healthcare professionals was assembled to review the translation made of the original ZTPI to the Spanish language spoken in PR. Results: Content Validity analyses of the responses provided by the 15 Bilingual Committee members revealed that the ZTPI-PR indeed possesses good Content Validity (0.91). Moreover, each subscale of the ZTPI also reflected adequate Content Validity (0.87 for PN; 0.86 for PP; 0.84 for PF; 0.97 for PH; and 0.95 for F). Conclusion: 100

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th The ZTPI-PR presents the Content Validity necessary to measure the specific TP characteristics of Puerto Ricans. Thus, this adaptation could allow for cross-cultural analyses of the TP-profile of Puerto Ricans, in comparison to the TP-profile of individuals from other cultures. Keywords: Time Perspective, Cultural Adaptation, Puerto Rico, Content Validity, Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, Translation

Session 2A Using the present to predict the future and the past: Time perspectives and psychological functioning of New Zealand emerging adults Magdalena KIELPIKOWSKI, Victoria Universityof Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, Psychology, New Zealand Paul E. JOSE, School of Psychology, Victoria University , Wellington, New Zealand magdalena.kielpikowski@vuw.ac.nz Human experiences and cognitions are imbued with affect. Inevitably, therefore, people behold not only their past, but also their present and future through affectively coloured lenses with varying degrees of positivity and negativity. The present study employed our new psychometric instrument the Affectively Balanced Time Perspective Scale (ABTPS), which focuses on the assessment of the affective dimensions of Time Perspectives (TPs). The scale builds on Zimbardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conceptualisation and measurement of Past Positive and Past Negative (encapsulated by the subscales of the ZTPI) by creating affectively balanced sets of items representing the Present and Future TPs. Focusing on the role of the relatively under-researched Present TPs in psychological functioning, we hypothesised that: 1) the Present Positive TP would be positively related to optimism and happiness and negatively related to pessimism, anxiety and depression; whereas these relationships would be reversed for the Present Negative TP; and 2) the affective valence of the Present TPs would predict the evaluations of the Past and the Future. Finally, as the

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th awareness and evaluation of the present occur less prominently than the routine cognitions and affective evaluations of the past and future, we hypothesised that: 3) mindfulness would act to bolster the Present Positive TP, resulting in improved psychological functioning. Data were obtained from 280 psychology undergraduates who completed online surveys. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesised relationships. Our hypotheses were generally supported, demonstrating a significant role of the Present TPs. We discuss the implications of the findings for research and practice. Keywords: time perspective; emerging adults; present time perspective; affect; psychological functioning Psychometric analysis of the Portuguese version of the “Future Time Perspective Scale” José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal jtsilva@fpce.uc.pt Adolescence is a critical period for development of present and future identity and by late adolescence students’ mental representation of the future influence their academic motivation, as well as their overall behaviour – physical, career, social, health, environmental. FTP that can be characterized by its content (i.e., what are people striving for) and extension or depth (i.e. how far into the future do individuals set their goals). Adolescents attending secondary education in Portugal face critical career issues that require both exploration of career options and commitment to a major or an occupational field, and these processes revolve around their representation of the future. This presentation has two main goals. The first is to examine the internal structure (dimensionality) of the Future Time Perspective Scale (Husman & Shell, 2008), a measure of four aspects of subjects’ overall time perspective via Confirmatory Facto Analysis. The second goal is to study the pattern of relationships among FTP 102

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th and a measure to assess the degree of exploration and commitment to career choice in a sample of secondary education students. Finally, the results will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding the role played by FTP in the adolescents’ career development. Keywords: future time perspective (FTP), career exploration and commitment, psychometric analysis, secondary education Time Perspective and Political Orientation in Adolescence Monika BUHL, Heidelberg University, Institute of Educational Science, Germany Zena R. MELLO, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA Hans-Peter KUHN, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA buhl@ibw.uni-heidelberg.de Adolescence is a salient developmental period to investigate time perspective; however, little is known about the parameters moderating this process. In this study, we sought to understand how political orientations and experiences – which also have a crucial developmental meaning during adolescence – and democratic experience are associated with time perspective. First, we examined the stability and change of time perspective profiles across a one-year period. In a second step we analyzed the correlation of time profiles with political orientations and their impact on changes in time perspective. Data came from the longitudinal study BIO. The first two waves included 535 adolescents (51% female) from a German comprehensive school. Measures included the time attitude subscales of the Adolescent Time Inventory - German (ATI; Mello, Worrell, & Buhl, 2008) with six different dimensions (past/present/future each with positive/negative specification) and various aspects of political orientations (discussion intensity, self-concept) and democratic experiences (open-classroom-climate) adopted from the IEA CIVED studies. Using Latent Profile Analyses, five different time perspective profiles were identified, which replicates prior research (Buhl, 2014). Profiles show different patterns of political Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th orientations and experiences. Specifically, the experience of an open-classroom-climate shows strong correlations with a positive evaluation of the three time periods, whereas slight correlations with discussion intensity occur. Self-concept of political competence only interrelates with evaluations of the future. Our discussion will focus on the role political experiences can have regarding the development of time perspective during adolescence and the ways in which schools might promote positive development by offering democratic experiences. Keywords: time attitude, political orientation, adolescence, longitudinal analyses, development within schools Promotion of students’ perspectives concerning the future career: implementing and assessing practices in school context Renato CARVALHO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal renatoggc@gmail.com In this paper we present a quasi-experimental study that involved the implementation of a program that intended to promote adolescents’ ability to put the future in perspective and make decisions in the transition from middle to high school. Participants were 106 Portuguese students aged 14 to 17 years (MAge = 15 years), which were distributed by the experimental group (EG), which in turn was divided into 4 subgroups, and the control group, whether they respectively participated or not in the intervention program. The assessment of the program effectiveness, through a pre vs post-test comparison, and performed with the Career Decision Making Questionnaire, showed significant differences between the groups in favor of GE. The results are discussed considering the importance and the challenges to career education practices in schools, as a relevant tool to promote more adaptive and satisfaction generating paths among adolescents. Keywords: career education; intervention programs; psychological intervention in schools; school transitions; adolescents

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th Balanced eudaimonistic-hedonistic approach in intervention for youth Agnieszka WILCZYŃSKA, PARTNER Biuro Szkoleń, Pośrednictwa i Marketingu, Polska agniwilczynska@gmail.com Social exclusion is perceived as the effect of depriving a human being of one of their most fundamental needs i.e. the sense of belonging. Social exclusion manifested in increasing aggression, decreasing in empathic behaviour and altered perception of time. Excluded youngsters are strongly concentrated on “here and now” treating future as meaningless.The scientific objective of the project was to obtain empirical data enabling the verification of selected assumptions of the motivation theory of the need to belong and concept of time . The longitudinal experimental tests in natural clinical conditions involve a group of youth at risk of social exclusion (aged between 14 and 16, n = 60; one control and two experimental groups: hedonistic “H”, eudaimonistic “E”). Keywords: eudaimonistic-hedonistic approach, intervention, youth, social exclusion

Session 3A The rewriting of history in view of the change of perspectives throughout time Friedrich VON PETERSDORFF, Germany petersdorff@gmail.com It is a significant peculiarity of historiography that any historical account is bound to be rewritten at some time in the future. This is due to several reasons, such as new questions being asked or new sources becoming accessible. However, as pointed out by Danto (1962), a further reason for the rewriting of history is caused by the specific temporal structure of historical research and historiography, namely by the fact that the historians’ narrative sentences describe a past event by relating this event to events occurring at some later date, as it is, for instance, not possible to speak of 1618 as the year the Thirty Years War began, without Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th having the peace treaties of 1648 in mind. Accordingly, there exists an unavoidable ongoing change of perspective when looking at past events as the perspectives of the following generations (their experiences and expectations) will be shaped not only by the events in question (e.g. 1618) but as well by future events not having yet occurred at the time of the event in question (e.g. 1648). In my paper I shall present a detailed analysis of this temporal aspect of historical research. Furthermore, I shall outline and discuss the question of how to define the notion of historical truth in view of the fact that historiography in general, and the rewriting of history in particular, is dependent upon the ongoing change of perspectives throughout the course of time. Keywords: epistemology of history, historical truthfulness, narration, temporality, theory of history Coloring the past: The effects of colorizing black & white photos on time perception, psychological distance and feelings Arik CHESHIN, University of Amsterdam, Psychology Department, The Netherlands Michael L. W. VLIEK, University of Amsterdam, Psychology Department, The Netherlands a.cheshin@uva.nl Our research investigates different effects of viewing historical photos in color or in black & white. Based on the Construal Level Theory (Trope & Liberman, 2003) we argue that black & white photos are likely to be seen as more distant, both in time (i.e., older) and in terms of psychological and emotional closeness. Consistent with this, participants in our study assigned older dates to photos that were viewed in black & white as opposed to the same photos viewed in color. This was tested both with photos originally taken in black & white, and then colored; and with photos that were in color originally, but were turned into black & white. In another study we found that color photos of orphans evoked more intense emotional reactions than did black & white photos. We also demonstrated that students who viewed color photos of orphans donated more generous sums of money to an 106

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th organization assisting orphans, than did students who viewed photos of the same orphans in black & white. If indeed colorized photos have greater affective impact, as well as increasing perceptions of closeness (as opposed to distancing) of viewers, the effects that historical museums and history books have could be enhanced using this technology. The way people remember the past, the feelings and maybe even the lessons learned from the past might be enhanced by colorization of photos. Keywords: construal level theory, psychological distance, photos, black & white, color Framing time and timing in protest: Kairos in social movement rhetoric Eithan ORKIBI, Ariel University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Israel orkibi@gmail.com Within rhetorical theory, the concept of Kairos is widely understood as the “appropriate timing” for the rhetorical act. In order to be persuasive, the speaker should consider the opportune moment for the delivery of a rhetorical message. But the rhetorical agency goes far beyond than “seizing opportunities”: it also features the ability to shift public perceptions of preestablished situations and the capacity to create the “right moment to speak”. This paper draws on the rhetorical concept of Kairos in order to explore social movement framing of time. It compares the rhetoric(s) of two movements: the French 2006 youth protest against the First Employment Contract (CPE) and the 2011 Israeli social justice protest. The analysis uncovers two distinct time frames. The French movement demonstrates a “homochronos” time frame, in which Kairos is subordinated to the dominant time perception and mobilizes its symbolic meanings: the form and content of the rhetorical message follow the political process and transforms its scheduled stages into dramatic deadlines in order to inspire an ambiance of urgency and to frame the protest as a “duel” between the Government and the opposition. The Israeli movement represents a “heterochronos”

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th time frame, which aims at creating an alternative time perception. This rhetorically constituted “time break” forms a collective action experience based on the perception of the protest as an historical turning point, a mythic event in which “time stands still” in order to give way to a new chapter in the national history. Keywords: Kairos, rhetoric, social movement, protest, framing, timing,

Session 3B Time sanctuaries: The sociology of time in gambling sites Moshe LEVY, Ariel University, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Israel moshele@ariel.ac.il Since the end of the 19th century various sociological theories have examined the social significance of time in modern society. Many of these theories describe rationalization processes of modern society that relies on and is dependent on the standardization of time. This standardization imposes a uniform and objective time that enables social control as well as coordination and synchronization between institutions, groups and individuals. Objective and uniform time is depicted in these theories as a human invention that underwent reification to become a social institution perceived by human beings as an external objective phenomenon that enslaves them, is imposed on them and cannot be changed. This dismal description portrays human agency as passive and lacking the ability to oppose and avoid standardized time. This paper attempts to argue that in certain social contexts people can escape the all-embracing power of time. In these sites, which I call “time sanctuaries”, individuals can engage in activities that seemingly are not subject to the coercion of time in everyday life. This paper will focus on one type of “time sanctuaries” - gambling sites. The aim of this paper is to explore why these sites ostensibly operate without measuring and publicly displaying time; how the “absence of time” affects the gamblers’ experiences while in these sites; whether these time sanctuaries are indeed immune from rationalization and time 108

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th standardization process; and finally, whether these sites provide a real temporal sanctuary from everyday life. Keywords: sociology, gambling, chance, luck, rationalization Slovenian youth and health-related behaviours – does time perspective matter? Urška ŽIVKOVIČ, University of Maribor, Faculty of Arts, Department of Psychology, Slovenia Bojan MUSIL, University of Maribor, Faculty of Arts, Department of Psychology; Faculty of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Information Technologies, University of Primorska zivkovic.urska@gmail.com Time perspective combines individual and sociocultural factors in individually specific cognitive frames of past, present and future. Health and health-related concepts are our primary focus among the various aspects of human life where time perspective is often applied. In the context of empirical research we focused on the relation between time perspectives and different health-related behaviours, motivated by the findings from previous national studies of Slovenian youth (e.g., Mladina 2010 study). For the purpose of the present study we adapted and evaluated the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and Consideration of Future Consequences Scale on Slovenian sample of youth aged between 15 and 29. Among health-related behaviours, alcohol consumption was of our special interest. It is one of the most evident public health issues in Slovenia. The results of the study correspond with previous empirical findings, confirm time perspective’s relations to health-related behaviours, provide empirical support for the inclusion of time perspective among the significant predictors of health, and consequently highlight the concept as the one that should be addressed in public health promotion and prevention programs. Keywords: Time perspective, Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, Consideration of Future Consequences Scale, health-related behaviour, alcohol consumption

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th Is it Beer O'Clock? Time Perspective, drinking motives & hazardous alcohol use. Liz TEMPLE, Federation University Australia, School of Health Sciences, Australia Nicole RIDGEWAY, Australia Claire IAGOE, Australia e.temple@federation.edu.au BACKGROUND: Past studies have found that high Present Hedonism and low Future time perspectives are associated with problematic alcohol use. Little is known about such associations for the other time perspectives or how these relate to motives for drinking. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to investigate these relationships to gain a clearer understanding of the associations between time perspective and problematic alcohol use. METHOD: Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire containing the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) and the Drinking Motives Questionnaire-Revised (DMQR). RESULTS: Preliminary analyses indicate that Present Hedonism and Past Negative are positively associated with problematic alcohol use, while Present Fatalism and Past Negative are positively associated with coping and conformity motives for drinking. Future time perspective was found to moderate the effects of Present Hedonism on alcohol use, but did not moderate the effects of Past Negative on alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: These results suggest that it may be beneficial if strategies and interventions aimed at reducing or preventing problematic alcohol use include efforts to decrease individuals’ degree of Present Hedonism and Past Negative time perspectives and to increase their degree of Future time perspective. Keywords: Time perspective; alcohol use; drinking motives

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Session 3C Dimensional time attitude: a case of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory validation Umbelina LEITE, Rio Verde University – UniRV, Brasilia University - UnB, Psychology, Brazil Luiz PASQUALI, Brasilia University – UnB, Brazil umbelinarl@gmail.com, umbelina@unirv.edu.br The Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) (Leite & Pasquali, 2008, Leite & Pasquali, 2012) was validated, with a sample of 1,965 participants, ages 12 to 86 years (M=24.93, SD=14.4), 60,2% females, Brazilian residents, using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with structural equation modeling (SEM) and analysis of item response theory (IRT). First we realized analysis separately for each dimension (past, present, future). This enabled the calibration of the instrument that revealed a structure with 52 items divided into eight factors: past-negative (α=.81), pastpositive (α=.62) present-hedonistic-enjoyment (α=.61) presenthedonistic-excitement (α=.62) (r=.48), present-fatalistic, futurepunctuality (α=.58) and future-responsibility (α=.65). Secondly, a SEM with the eight factors showed that they didn´t grouped into three time frame: past, present and future, but into three dimensional attitudes in relation to time: hedonism, engagement and despair (CFI=.93, RMSEA=.083). Hedonism attitude was positively explained by present-hedonistic-enjoyment (α=.61), present-hedonistic-excitement (α=.53), and negatively by futureresponsibility (α= -.35). Engagement atitude was positively explained by future-responsibility (α=.81), future-punctuality (α=.66), past-positive (α=.33), and negatively by presenthedonistic-excitement (α= -.33). The despair attitude was positively explained by past-negative-misfortune (α=.67), pastnegative-remorse (α=.65) and present-fatalistic (α=.53). It seems that the way people cognitively experience time orientation doesn’t follow time zone continuity but exhibit other pattern. This result points for the importance of others time perspective concepts. For example, the relation of past-positive and future Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th confirms a personal continuity of past and future. The despair attitude was composed with more negative TPs and hedonism and engagement more positive as proposed by balanced time perspective concept. Keywords: Time orientation, Psychometric, validation, IRT, SEM, ZTPI Flourishing in the now: initial validation of a Present-Eudaimonic Time Perspective Scale Jonte VOWINCKEL, University of Twente, Psychology, Health and Technology, Netherlands Gerben J. WESTERHOF, Department of Psychology, Health and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Ernst T. BOHLMEIJER, Department of Psychology, Health and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Jeffrey D. WEBSTER, Department of Psychology, Langara College, Vancouver, Canada j.c.vowinckel@student.utwente.nl Introduction: A positive focus on the present, the only time zone which we experience directly and permanently, is at least as relevant as perspectives on the past and future in a balanced time perspective (BTP) and its relation to well-being. Yet, few instruments examining a positive present time perspective exist. Two present-directed concepts, mindfulness and flow, that are intrinsically linked to mental well-being were analyzed and used to formulate a Present-Eudaimonic Scale that complements the past and future scales of the Balanced Time Perspective Scale. The present study addresses the psychometric properties of the Present-Eudaimonic Scale and the modified Balanced Time Perspective Scale. Method: 131 participants filled out the PresentEudaimonic Scale, the Balanced Time Perspective Scale, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire – Short Form, the Swedish Flow Proneness Questionnaire and the Mental Health Continuum – Short Form. BTP was operationalized using the Deviation from a Balanced Time Perspective coefficient. Results: The Present-Eudaimonic Scale showed good psychometric properties including internal 112

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th consistency, factor structure, and convergent validity. The Present-Eudaimonic Scale explained an additional ten percent of variance in mental health beyond the other time perspective scales. BTP as measured with the modified Balanced Time Perspective Scale correlated significantly stronger with mental health than BTP measured with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory. Conclusions: The Present-Eudaimonic Scale fills a gap in the assessment of time perspective and the modified Balanced Time Perspective Scale is a promising way to study balanced time perspective. Keywords: Time Perspective, Present Time Perspective, Balanced Time Perspective, Scale Development, Mindfulness, Flow Zimbardo Time Perspective , carpe diem and positive orientation Małgorzata SOBOL-KWAPIŃSKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland sobol@kul.pl Background: Time perspective is a fundamental dimension of psychological time, referring to attitudes toward the past, present and future. Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory includes five scales: positive past perspective (Past Positive), negative past perspective (Past Negative), future perspective (Future) , hedonistic present perspective (Hedonism) and fatalistic present perspective (Fatalism). Hedonism and Fatalism, however, do not exhaust all possibilities to respond to the present. The recent studies revealed another kind of present time perspective: active present perspective "carpe diem". The “carpe diem” perspective is the full concentration on the present moment, combined with the awareness of the importance, uniqueness and reality of "here and now ". Aims: The main purpose of this paper is to present the structure of Zimbardo Time Perspective, enriched with a new dimension: the "carpe diem" perspective . The relationship between the “carpe diem” perspective and positive orientation, involvement in life and extraversion , neuroticism , psychoticism and need for social approval are analyzed. Participants are 186 adults (not students) aged 17-82 years. Results: The “carpe dime” perspective creates a separate sixth factor in the structure of the Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 30th Zimbardo Time Perspective . Correlations of carpe diem, selected personality characteristics and other dimensions of time perspective, indicate the specific nature of the “carpe diem” perspective, different from nature of hedonism and fatalism. A significant relationship between the “carpe diem” and future time perspective indicates that the “carpe diem” perspective, inter alia , means the commitment to the objectives in the present, focusing on the responsibilities and tasks. Keywords: time perspective, carpe diem, present time perspective, ZTPI

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July 31st Session 4A Crossroads of time perspective research and clinical practice: Psychotherapy through the temporal lens. Elena KAZAKINA, Licensed clinical psychologist in independent practice, USA ekazakina@comcast.net As time perspective research matures and becomes a part of mainstream psychology, applying its theory and findings in clinical practice remains a novel and challenging task. I examine the interaction of research and practice with the goal to enhance clinicians' awareness that time perspective research exists and can enrich their work. I define time perspective therapy as psychotherapy through the temporal lens that is conducted with a keen awareness of psychological concepts of past, present and future, and their interaction in the individual experience of time. Temporal focus of clinical strategies originated in the multidimensional approach to time perspective employed in my research is integrated with psychodynamic, cognitive- behavioral and existential treatment modalities. Developmental tasks of young, middle aged and older adults are considered through the temporal lens to help them cope with psychological distress and life transitions. Clinical vignettes point out not only the reduction of symptoms but also the increase in my patients overall positive functioning (self-actualization, interpersonal effectiveness, wellbeing). Clinical discoveries informing further time perspective research are discussed. They include a notion of optimal time perspective evolved in my clinical practice; a construct of time competence (Abraham Maslow) extended to include mastery over time related phenomena such as understanding of interpersonal temporal differences. Time competence counseling combining time management and optimal time perspective may develop as a

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st result of further interaction of time perspective research and clinical practice. A model of TP scientist-practitioner is suggested. Keywords: Time perspective, Time perspective psychotherapy, Well-being, TP scientist-practitioner, Optimal time perspective (OTP), Time competence The self in time: is our sense of self associated with our time perspective biases? Liz TEMPLE, Federation University Australia, School of Health Sciences, Australia e.temple@federation.edu.au BACKGROUND: The ZTPI time perspectives (TPs) explain individual differences in attitudes and values, and the behaviours that stem from these, yet they tell us little about how people actually feel about themselves. Core beliefs, on the other hand, are indicative of how a person views them self, being central to their sense of self. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore possible associations between core beliefs and TPs. METHOD: 240 participants (65% female; aged 18-80 years) completed an online questionnaire assessing both TPs and core beliefs. RESULTS: Preliminary analyses indicated that the core belief of security was most strongly, and negatively, associated with past negative TP (r =-.53, p<001), suggesting that a belief that “I am not safe” may be a central feature of people with a high past negative bias. In contrast, the core belief of love was most strongly, and positively, associated with past positive TP (r =.38, p<001), suggesting that people with a past positive bias tend to hold the belief “I am loved”. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: This study’s findings indicate that core beliefs are differentially associated with the five ZTPI TPs. Understanding the associations between core beliefs and TPs may further the utility of TP theory within therapeutic settings and may shed further light on the developmental processes underlying an individual’s TP orientation. Keywords: Time perspective, Core beliefs, Psychosocial wellbeing

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st The self-concept of drug addicts in the time perspective Mikhail BUDNIKOV, The Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, The department of clinical psychology and psychological aid, Russia m.y.budnikov@gmail.com The self-concept of the personality is being formed in the context of our perception of events and attitudes in the past, present and future. The purpose of this research was to examine the attitudes and the self-concept of drug addicts in time perspective. We studied 148 drug addicts, carrying out the program of inpatient rehabilitation in the medical center «Behterev» (the experimental group) and 123 healthy university students (the control group) aged between 18 and 25 using the Life line method (Vasilenko T.D., 2011). The addicts noted 18% fewer events than the control group. However, they allocated 25% more past events and interpreted them primarily as negative. The present was also estimated as less positive and characterized with emotional lability and unstable motivation for rehabilitation. The addicts marked 52% fewer future events than the control group. Moreover, the perspectives of addicts were incoherent and unrealistic. The social attitudes and self-realization were weakly represented in the events allocated by patients. The results of the study indicate the temporal disintegration of self-concept and the loss of a sense of self-continuity in drug addicts. Three contradictory self-concepts appear: «past me» (perceived as negative), «present me» (recovering) and «future me» (ideal). The interruption of selfcontinuity leads to inability to use previous experience and present opportunities for achieving the objectives and activation of stereotypical, impulsive behavior. The findings of the current study can be used to increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy for drug addiction. Keywords: self-concept, drug addiction, Life line, time perspective

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st Can perceived unstability in life be considered as a mediator in the link between socioeconomic status and time perspective? Frédéric MERSON, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon. General council of Puy-de-Dôme, Health Interventions Service, France Nicolas FIEULAINE, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon, France Marie PREAU, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology Research Group, University of Lyon, France Jean PERRIOT, General Council Of Puy-de-Dôme, Health Interventions Service, France frederic.merson@cg63.fr Background: Time Perspective (TP) is a relatively stable but situationally determined construct. If several studies have shown a link with socioeconomic status (SES), only a few investigated how and why TP is influenced by SES. This study aims to interpret the socioeconomic differences in TP from the way people find their life precarious. Method: TP was measured by a short form of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory to which we added the Future Negative dimension (Carelli & Al., 2011). SES was evaluated using a validated index of multiple deprivation (EPICES score), household income, level of education, socio-professional category and two subjective social status scales. An index of perceived unstability in life was used (5 items, α=.74). Results: 326 smokers consulting in smoking cessation centers participated in this study. Epices score appeared significantly related to income (F(7,289)=27,4; p<0,0001), education (F(6,296)=8,6; p<0,0001), socio-professional category (F(9,289)=8,6; p<0,0001) and subjective social status scales (society: r=-0,56; p<0,0001; neighborhood: r=-0,45; p<0,0001). It was also correlated to almost all ZTPI subscales (Present Positive: r=-0,17, p<0,01 ; Present Negative: r=0,37, p<0,01 ; Present Hedonistic: NS ; Present Fatalistic: r=0,27, p<0,01 ; Future: NS ; Future Negative: r=0,19, p<0,01). Most importantly, analyses suggested complete or partial mediation in the effect of SES on TP by the perception of unstability. Conclusion: The perception of unstability experienced 118

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st from social context can contribute to explain how and why SES impacts TP. We will discuss how additional research, longitudinal and/or experimental could clarify how and why the relation of SES to TP occurs. Keywords: Time Perspective, Socioeconomic status, Unstability

Session 4B Perception of the threat of global warming: The effect of temporal distance as a dimension of psychological distance Nurit CARMI, Tel Hai Academic College, Environmental Sciences, Israel nuritcar@telhai.ac.il There is consensus among scientists that global warming poses a certain threat with the potential for unprecedented damage, and requires immediate attention. However, the public response and personal behavior do not reflect the severity and immediacy of a threat of these proportions. Research has shown that people perceive events as more threatening in correspondence with their immediacy, certainty, or personal implications. According to Liberman & Trope’s (2008) construal level theory, more immediate events can be seen as “closer in time,” more certain events as “closer in probability,” and events with greater potential for personal injury as “socially closer.”The purpose of the research was to examine the hypothesis of a strong positive relationship between perception of the severity of the global warming threat and all dimensions of psychological distance – temporal, social, and probability-based. The lecture will focus on the contribution of the temporal distance dimension to psychological distance, its interrelationship with the other dimensions, and its unique effect on perception of the environmental threat. The main findings were: (a) temporal distance is an important and significant dimension of psychological distance; (b) there is a strong and significant relationship between temporal distance and the other dimensions, especially probability; (c) although the bivariate analysis indicated a statistically significant (perceived) effect of

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st temporal distance, the unique effect on perception of the global warming threat was small relative to the other two dimensions. I will discuss the theoretical and practical implications for environmental education and communication in the lecture. Keywords: Psychological distance, temporal distance, threat perception, global warming Climate change and society’s future: A cross-cultural examination of how future consequences are related to intentions to act on climate change. Paul BAIN, University of Queensland, School of Psychology, Australia Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Yoshihisa KASHIMA, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia and Members of the Collective Futures and Climate Change Project p.bain@psy.uq.edu.au The psychological role of time in explaining attitudes and actions may rest both on the “who” (individual differences in time perspective) and the “what” (the content of people’s beliefs about the past and future). The present research linked these two elements to understand people’s motivations to act on climate change across cultures. The “who” was measured using the Consideration of Future Consequences–Future subscale (CFCFuture). The “what” focused on beliefs about society if climate change was mitigated, measured using a recently-validated model (“Collective Futures”). This model measures projections about changes in society, including people’s traits and values, along with societal-level development (economic, technological) and dysfunction (e.g., crime, disease). Here we focused on the best predictor of climate change actions from collective futures research – projections about people’s warmth/morality (“benevolence”) traits. Participants completed these measures and their intentions to take political action to address climate change (“environmental citizenship”, e.g., voting, donating). Based on data collected to date (N>3000 from 19 countries), metaanalyses showed that CFC-Future and Benevolence projections independently predicted environmental citizenship. The effect

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st sizes for CFC-Future did not vary across cultures, whereas the effect sizes for Benevolence did vary and were predicted by income inequality (GINI). The interactive effect of benevolence and CFC-Future was not significant overall, but the size of the interaction varied across cultures and was also predicted by income inequality. Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beliefs about what their future society will be like, and differences in how they think about the future, give distinct insights into how future-oriented thought motivates behavior. Keywords: consideration of future consequences, collective futures, climate change, cross-cultural comparisons, meta-analysis Future thinking and experimental study

pro-environmental

engagement:

An

Samantha WATSON, Victoria University of Wellington, Psychology, New Zealand Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand samanthajane.watson@gmail.com To address environmental problems caused or exacerbated by human behaviour, it is important to understand what motivates people to act pro-environmentally. Correlational studies have found future time perspective to be positively associated with proenvironmental engagement, but experimental studies are scarce. Contributing to this expanding research area, we have experimentally examined whether priming future-thinking would lead to greater pro-environmental orientations. In a betweengroups design using a prospect-concept prime, participants (51 first-year psychology students; 70.6% female; Mage = 19yrs, SD = 2.6yrs) either envisioned their everyday life circumstances on a typical day at present, or four years in the future. After the manipulation, participants completed self-report measures relating to pro-environmentalism and time perspective. Independent-samples t-tests showed that, while time perspective scores did not significantly differ between groups (all pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s > .05), participants primed with a future-oriented mind-set reported higher environmental intentions (n = 26; M = 4.70, SD = 1.07) than Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st those primed with a present-oriented mind-set (n = 25; M = 4.12, SD = .75; t(49) = 2.24, p = .03). Albeit non-statistically significant, participants in the future-prime condition also reported higher levels of environmental concern (M = 3.19, SD = .94) compared to those in the present-prime condition (M = 2.80, SD = .76; t(49) = 1.63, p = .11). These findings support the role of future-thinking in understanding and fostering pro-environmental engagement. By priming future-orientation, it is possible to increase an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pro-environmental orientations. Implications of these findings for tackling environmental issues will be discussed. Keywords: Time perspective; Environmentalism; Priming Consideration of future consequences as a predictor of environmentally responsible behavior. Evidence from a general population study Heidi BRUDERER ENZLER, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Sociology, Switzerland bruderer@soz.gess.ethz.ch Many behaviors relevant to the environment involve a conflict between short-term and long-term benefits. For example, in the long run lowering thermostat settings in winter results in lower energy costs and helps protect the environment, although in the short term it leads to a loss of comfort. The present study tackles this temporal dimension by analyzing the relationship between a shortened version of the Consideration of Future Consequences scale (CFC; Strathman, Gleicher, Boninger, & Edwards, 1994) and environmentally friendly behavior in a large general population survey (n = 1945). As there is considerable debate about whether the scale captures concern with future consequences only, or with both future and immediate consequences, preliminary factor analyses were conducted. These support differentiation into two subscales: CFC-Future and CFC-Immediate. Another recent debate is centered on the question whether the impact of future orientation on behavior may be indirect. Therefore this study examines effects mediated by environmental concern (by following both the causal steps approach and bootstrapping).

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st Overall, the results reveal that CFC is a significant predictor of proenvironmental behavior and that this relationship is partially mediated by environmental concern. However, there was only limited support for a pair of additional hypotheses that suggested that CFC-Immediate may be more closely related to curtailment behavior whereas CFC-Future would be related efficiencyenhancing behavior. Keywords: Consideration of Future Consequences, pro-environmental behavior, environmental concern, mediation analysis, factor analysis

Session 4C To know thy (future) self: How interacting with one’s older self reduces delinquency Jean-Louis VAN GELDER, Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement, The Netherlands Hal HERSHFIELD, New York University, USA Loren NORDGREN, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, USA jlvangelder@nscr.nl The idea that delinquents tend to live in the here and now and fail to consider the longer-term consequences of their actions is a popular stereotype that is also empirically grounded. We argue that this failure may result from a limited ability to imagine one’s self in the future, which leads people to opt for immediate gratification. Increasing the vividness of the future self is therefore expected to motivate individuals to act in a more future-oriented way and hence to reduce delinquent involvement. We tested this hypothesis in two studies. In Study 1, to increase vividness, respondents wrote a letter to their 20-year older self. Subsequently, they were presented a series of vignettes describing delinquent choice dilemmas. These respondents were significantly less likely to make delinquent choices compared to respondents in the control condition who had written a letter to their present self. In Study 2, respondents either interacted with age-progressed renderings of their future self or with their current, i.e., not age-

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st progressed, avatar in an immersive virtual reality environment. Those who had interacted with their future self were significantly less likely than control participants to cheat on a subsequent task. It is, finally, argued that because analogous problem behaviors, such as gambling, speeding, smoking, and excessive drinking, are—like delinquency—characterized by immediate benefits and long-term costs, increasing the vividness of the future self may also prove effective for countering these other types of selfdefeating behaviors. Keywords: future self, vividness, delinquency PPC as a factor in protecting youth from risky behavior Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland katra@psych.uw.edu.pl Risky behaviors are associated with obtaining a negative effect, in the form of loss of health or life, material loss, harm or injury to others. Adolescence is the time of escalation of risky behaviors, named the developmental risk for two reasons. On one hand, they are important features of development; on the other they carry risks to physical and mental development. It seems that it is difficult to eliminate them, but they can be steered towards a socially approved behavior, where they would provide a strong stimulation, but objectively carry less risk to the health and life of a person. Those are positive risky behaviors. One should therefore seek to protect individuals from taking risky behaviors or induce young people toward positive ones. In my research I have proven the theory that such functions can be used as a forward-looking prospect of temporary. The results of the previous research support this statement in most. The issue of psychological mechanisms of this phenomenon is remained to be resolved. It is possible, that PPC developed protection against risky behavior, as it is associated with one’s tendency to consider the consequences of their own actions. Another possible explanation assumes that PPC is associated with having lifelong goals, which may be impeded or nullified by the effects of risky behaviors. Achieving long-term objectives absorbs adolescents so deeply that they do 124

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st not feel the need for trying risky behavior and that plays an important role in their development. Keywords: adolescence, risky behavior, time orientation, time perspective A present-hedonistic time perspective predicts risk-taking preferences Lukasz JOCHEMCZYK, University of Warsaw, Departament of Psychology, Poland Rafał BUCZKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Łukasz MARKIEWICZ, Kozminski University, Department of Economic Psychology, Poland Janina PIETRZAK, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland lwj@psych.uw.edu.pl Risk is a fact of life: we make decisions and undertake activities that we know are risky every day. However, not all of us do so to the same extent. Common wisdom, and some research, suggests that risk preference is a stable personality trait: some individuals consistently tend to undertake risky actions across a variety of situations, while others avoid them. Risk-taking has been linked to other stable personality traits, such as impulsivity and extraversion We propose that time perspective (Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999) is an individual characteristic that affects risk-taking preference. Specifically, we hypothesized that a habitual focus on the hedonic aspects of the present would lead people to take more risks in a variety of domains, and that this focus would be a more significant predictor than personality traits. We conducted a study in which 514 participants, aged 16 to 48, recruited online though a variety of social media sites, filled out a number of scales, including the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (Wiberg et al. 2012), the DOSPERT (Blais & Weber, 2006), and the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (Gosling, Rentfrow & Swann, 2003). Using regression analyses, we observed that time perspective in general explained more variance in risk-taking preference than did personality traits. More specifically, a present-hedonistic time perspective was more strongly (positively) linked to risk-taking than was any other Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st predictor. This relationship was observed in all studied risk-taking domains. Keywords: time perspective, risk-taking preference, personality presenthedonistic time perspective

Session 5A Measuring Time Perspective in Work Settings: Japanese Data Analysis Kiyoshi TAKAHASHI, Kobe University, School of Business Administration, Japan Kotoe KONISHI, Kobe University, School of Business Administration ktakahas@kobe-u.ac.jp Referring to the seminal study made by Zimbardo and Boyd (1999), this study constructed the scales for measuring individual time perspective in work settings. The Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) categorized the cognitive framework for time into five domains: Past-Negative, Present-Hedonistic, Future, PastPositive, and Present-Fatalistic. These five categories seemed to be universal because similar dimensional structures were found by a number of studies that analyzed data collected from wide nations by diverse languages. Prior studies focused on the measurement of time perspective in general. While, scant research has made for understanding the cognitive framework of time that is specific to work life and career. This study aimed to expand the scope of time perspective from daily life to work life. To this end, the present study piled 56 questions that dealt with five universal time domains and modified them to be applicable to job settings. Data were collected from 524 Japanese employees. Factor analytic result found that ZTPI’s five factor model was reproduced in work life among Japanese employees. Similar to the universal ZTPI, items were successfully categorized into five meaningful domains of work time cognitions. Implication and limitation for the scale of work time perspective will be discussed. In addition, this study will discuss how to practice employee time cognition to manage work behavior and career in organizations.

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Keywords: work time perspective inventory, factor structure, career management, human resource management Time investment approach and time mental accounting based on time constraint: modeled on project management Mohammadreza SADR, Warsaw International Studies In Psychology, Universitz of Warsaw, Poland s.sadr@student.uw.edu.pl Our perception toward the time affects how we treat it in each circumstance. This theory presents a novel approach about time perception, time mental accounting and also time constraint effect which all influence our behaviors. One of prominent areas where the impact of time is quit important is project management. Time as one of important factors in project management triangle has an influence on other sources. Hence adopting an efficient approach in time forecasting phase and execution part is quite important. We could treat time materialistically like money. If we have certain amount of time for project and be confident about that, then we would consume it differently in comparison to when we are given even the same amount of time but in different parts and under uncertain condition. Moreover our valuation of the time is altered when we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all amount of time in advance. The first attitude is investment approach while the latter is like to buy the time from the employer. On the other hand this theory brings time mental accounting which develops late student syndrome and mental accounting process. It influences on time forecasting and task execution. Critical chain project management, critical path method and PERT are techniques which conduct time mental processing in other ways. Investor or buyer approach will influence our time accounting and changes the time buffers. The third factor which makes the tasks progress better is time constraint which leads our project to be dynamic and also finishes sooner. Keywords: time investment, time mental accounting, time constraint, project management, time management

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st Time in project, an approach through management situations. Daniel LEROY, Laboratoire Vallorem, IAE de Tours, Faculté de Droit, Economie et Sciences Sociales, France Lucy VELASCO, Member of Laboratory Vallorem, France lucyvel18@hotmail.com; lucy.velasco@univ-tours.fr Time in project relates to the concept of situation, the "whole contextual" (Dewey, 1938) and Girin. The management situation in project is characterized by a collective action, in a specified time, leading to a result submitted to an external judgement. Aim: explore alls types of time in project management situations, and their effect on project actors' management maturity. Data base gathers 20000 management situations (Leroy 2006). We will select 22 of them, characterized by: emergency degree, stake, unpredictability, mastery and learning and by : the phase of the project path in which they appear (emergence, feasibility, conception, implementation, completion). Results: project actors reveal a built-time to be distinguished from an undergone time. New question : 1. In project groups dealing whith management situations, "temporal dilation" pehnomena exist. Hypotheses: Management situations are: a. In "projective time" (phases of emergence, feasibility, conception) foreseeable, less urgent and better mastered. b. In "reactive time" (phase of implementation, unforseeable, urgent and less mastered. c. In "retrospective time" (phase of completion) foreseeable, less urgent and mastered. 2. In project groups, the considered state of the situation increases with the irreversibility degree of the project. 3. Which sort of time, previously characterized, boosts individual learning? Discussion: we will refine these global results by examining the specific nature of the 22 management situations? Conclusion : the project environment contributes to the growth of management maturity, which could be characterized by an ability to simultaneously manage the 3 types of time, b) an ability to deal with changes linked to the types of time, in the part of the project. Keywords: Time-project; management situation; management maturity; unpredictability; emergency

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st Time perspective and job search attitude in unemployed Andreja LES, Slovenia Boštjan BAJEC, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana les.andreja@gmail.com The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between time perspective, measured with Zimbardo time perspective inventory, and the attitude toward job search, measured with Job search attitude inventory, among unemployed people. The study included 203 unemployed persons, registered at the Employment service of Slovenia. Results indicate, that only present-hedonism dimension is not related to job search attitudes. Past-positive and future dimension are positively related to all Job search attitude inventory, while past-negative and present-fatalistic dimensions are negatively related to them. Time perspective predicted job search attitudes beyond the explanation of age, gender and time of unemployment. Keywords: Time perspective, Job search attitudes, Unemployed

Session 5B Time production under time pressure Pauline MATHA, Université de Toulouse, Clle-LTC, Psychology, France A.-C., RATTAT, Université de Toulouse, Octogone, France J. CEGARRA, Université de Toulouse, France M.-F. VALAX, Université de Toulouse, France matha.pauline@gmail.com Time pressure implies that available time is perceived to be insufficient to fulfill a task: we all know the complaint “I have no time!”. Despite its ubiquity in our modern societies, in both professional and personal activities, few studies try to understand time pressure’s implications and consequences. Our research studies aim at filling this gap by exploring the effect of time pressure on time perception. A large field of the literature on psychological time postulates the existence of an internal clock Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st mechanism at the basis of time perception. According to the prominent time-processing model, the internal clock has three components: a pacemaker-like system that emits pulses, which transit through an attention-controlled switch and are accumulated in a counter. The accumulated units in the counter determine the interval duration. In our experimental study, participants have to solve a computerized maze by moving a small character with keyboard keys. Concurrently, they have to produce intervals of 30, 60 or 90 seconds by pressing a specific key of the keyboard. Furthermore, they experience each interval in two conditions: with or without time pressure. Time pressure consists in a computer-controlled character solving the maze and trying to “eat” the player. Results presentation will focus on time production’s accuracy and variability depending on whether participants were under time pressure condition or not. We consider that under time pressure condition, temporal production will be longer than under no time pressure condition, thus reflecting an overestimation of their time judgments. We also suppose that time judgment’s variability could be an expression of using different strategies depending on time pressure condition. Results will provide a better understanding of time pressure effects on time perception. Keywords: Time perception, time production, time pressure, internal clock Psychological time dilation: An explanation based on general relativity and Bayesian statistical reasoning Lachlan KENT, Federation University, School of Health Sciences, Australia Elizabeth C. TEMPLE, School of Health Sciences, Federation University Australia Terry CAELLI, Victoria Research Laboratory, National ICT Australia Mark F. BENNETT, School of Physics, University of Melbourne Australia lachlankent@students.federation.edu.au Time perception has two parts, judgment of objective time and experience of subjective time, whose relationship is not well understood. We will propose the first known quantifiable link between the two based on a combination of Bayesian statistics 130

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st and the geometry of time dilation (or slowing down) as described by the general theory of relativity, i.e., the physics of gravity. Subjective time dilation is the tendency to experience time as passing more slowly than expected and we show, by analyzing three studiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; published data within a Bayesian framework, how time can slow down as a result of uncertainty around judgments of objective duration. Psychological time dilation is concluded to arise from a Bayesian-style regression of time judgments due to poor processing of temporal information. This explanatory and computational model spans neurological, information processing, cognitive and mood-related effects on time perception, while also breaking new ground in bringing physical principles of gravitational time dilation to bear upon psychological time experience. These findings will be discussed in terms of the relationship between time perception and time perspective, specifically in relation to notions of past and future as experienced during episodes of clinical depression. Keywords: Time perception, time dilation, Bayesian statistics, general relativity, depression Sources of individual differences in the cognitive arrow of time: Examining the role of fluid intelligence, time perspective and chronotype Taciano L. MILFONT, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Psychology, New Zealand Jan RIES, University of Potsdam, Germany Annika DIX, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany Elke VAN DER MEER, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany taciano.milfont@vuw.ac.nz Mental representations of events have a temporal dimension directed towards the future, referred to as the cognitive arrow of time. Recent research has shown that both future time perspective and eveningness impacts the processing of temporal information of script knowledge, but the findings do not discard the possibility that this impact is due to general cognitive abilities. The study presented in this talk expands previous research by

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – July 31st examining whether fluid intelligence would weaken the impact of chronotype and time perspective on the processing of scripts. Participants (63 first-year psychology students; 78% female; Mage = 18.8 yrs, SD = 1.9 yrs) completed self-report measures relating to fluid intelligence, time perspective and chronotype, and a temporal judgement task. In this task participants had to judge which of two event components (e.g., get new batteries and set right time on alarm clock) occurs earlier or later within a given event sequence (e.g., changing the batteries in an alarm clock). Both behavioural measures (reaction time, error rates) and psychophysiological measures (pupillary response as indicative of how hard the cognitive system works) were gathered. Results show that present-orientation was generally associated with a faster and more efficient processing of scripts, and that the correlation between eveningness and pupil dilation remained even after controlling for fluid intelligence. Implications for an overarching theory of psychological time will be elaborated, and the effects of expectancy formation and motoric response on the findings will be discussed. Keywords: arrow of time, time perspective, chronotype, fluid intelligence, pupillometry Different times: the influence of locus of control on the representation of time in native speakers of english and dutch Annemijn LOERMANS, VU University Amsterdam, Educational Neuroscience, The Netherlands Björn DE KONING, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands Lydia KRABBENDAM, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands a.c.loermans@vu.nl Worldwide, people rely on concrete spatial experiences to talk and think about the abstract concept of time. Research shows that the way these two are mapped onto one another depends on the language being spoken. Interestingly however, different mappings exist within languages as well, suggesting that time representation might also be driven by non-linguistic factors. This study is a first attempt to explore such a non-linguistic casual factor and 132

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st investigates whether Locus of Control (LoC), the extent to which persons believe they can control the outcome of events themselves, is related to time representation. We studied this in American and Dutch samples by inducing high or low LoC and subsequently providing them with ambiguous time questions. Importantly, these samples differ in the way they prefer to conceptualize time. An ego-moving representation, whereby the self moves along a stationary timeline, appears dominant in America whereas a time-moving representation, whereby a moving timeline passes a stationary observer, appears dominant in Dutch. Results showed that, as expected, in the American sample, inducing high LoC triggered an ego-moving representation where movement is assigned to the self and inducing low LoC triggered a time-moving representation where movement is assigned to the external factor, namely time. The Dutch sample showed the opposite pattern: inducing feelings of high LoC led to a time-moving representation rather than an ego-moving representation. These findings thus show that experiential factors like LoC are implicated in time representation but that linguistic convention can play a role in shaping how they are linked. Keywords: Time, Locus of Control, embodiment, language and cognitive metaphors

Session 5C Self-induced goals in varied temporary horizons Dmitry LEONTIEV, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia Elena RASSKAZOVA, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia Dmitry ZAMYATIN, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia dmleont@gmail.com Every goal is localized in a definite future time perspective. J. Nuttin and his colleagues studied the differences in temporal location of goals of different types. We aimed to investigate the differences in goal content and in the impact of individual differences depending on the fixed temporal horizon proposed for goal setting. Sixty-four participants were asked each to formulate Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st three goals they would set for themselves for each of the three temporal horizons: for 3 weeks (short-term), for 6 months (middle-term) and for 5 years (long-term), and briefly explicate a reason for each of them . Then 3 professional experts evaluated each of the goals on some formal scales and content categories from J. Nuttinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list of motivational categories. Multiple results reveal the interaction of goals set for varied temporal horizons with age, sex, and meaning in life (measured as an additional variable). The results for short- and middle-term goals were very similar, while for long-term ones substantially differed. In particular, the latter were significantly more elaborated, the share of self-realization goals, contact goals, transcendent goals, goals of change and goals of a useful activity was also bigger among longterm goals. Older participants set more elaborated goals, more often they were related to change and to self-development. The goals of change were also more typical of older participant and males. These results confirm that we set goals always in a temporary frame that influences to a substantial degree their parameters and motivational basis. Keywords: goals, temporary horizons, motivational categories

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 1st

August 1st Session 6A Back to the future: goal stocktaking, future time perspective, and well-being Fuschia SIROIS, Bishop's University, Psychology, Canada Benjamin GIGUĂ&#x2C6;RE, Dept. of Psychology, Unviersity of Guelph, Ontario, Canada Claude CHARPENTIER, Dept. of Psychology, Bishop's Unviersity, Quebec, Canada Kelsea BEADMAN, Dept. of Psychology, Bishop's Unviersity, Quebec, Canada fsirois@ubishops.ca Although future time perspective is well known to be linked to successful goal pursuit and well-being, broadening the temporal lens to include other time orientations may be particularly important when goal obstacles are encountered. We propose that reflecting upon past important goal steps or goal stocktaking may be one strategy that can enhance well-being during goal pursuit as well as increase positive expectations for the future. In this paper we introduce the novel concept of goal stocktaking as a journeyfocused goal strategy that can address the threats to well-being during goal pursuit by promoting a focus on the goal journey rather than just the destination. Goal stocktaking involves taking an inventory of past positive events and choices that contributed to the current state of goal progress. We propose that goal stocktaking can foster self-efficacy, meaning-making, and motivation. Evidence from a community sample of people (N = 152; 75 percent female; Mean age = 32.7, SD = 16.9) engaged in making health behavior changes demonstrates the potential benefits of goal stocktaking for promoting positive future expectations. Goal stocktaking was associated with higher life satisfaction, less stress, and more hopefulness for future goal success. It also mediated the relationship between future time perspective and hopefulness

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st regarding the future of the healthy change. The role of goal stocktaking in setting the foundation for other temporal goal strategies to promote well-being and a more temporally holistic view of goals is discussed. Keywords: future time perspective; temporal holism; health; goals; wellbeing; future expectations Time perspective and the persistence in action: the modifying role of temperament Magdalena MARSZAŁ-WIŚNIEWSKA, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Department of Psychology Warsaw, Poland mmarszal@swps.edu.pl The present study was conducted in the light of inconclusive data regarding the effect of individual attitudes to time on the persistence in pursuing a goal. After assessing individual differences in time perspective and temperament, subjects (N=120), randomly assigned to one of two experimental conditions (easy vs. difficult), were required to keep the mouse cursor as long and as closely as possible on a moving square in a computerized "Sisyphus" task. The results showed that the transcendentalfuture time perspective influences the persistence in action. Subjects with low level of this time perspective are more persistent. Moreover, it was revealed that the future time perspective favors persistence in action, but mainly for individuals with high temperamental Endurance (= high stimulation processing capabilities). The results are discussed in the context of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Theory, the Strelau Regulative Theory of Temperament and the past research in persistence in action. Keywords: time perspective, persistence in action, motivation, temperament

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st Personality traits, future time perspective, and adaptation to school life in adolescence Renato CARVALHO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal Rosa NOVO, Center for Research in Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal renatoggc@gmail.com Several studies provide evidence of the importance of future time perspective (FTP) for adolescent adaptation. However, little research addresses the relationship between FTP and personality and psychopathology, particularly if FTP can mediate their influence on behaviour. It is within this framework that we analyse the mediating role FTP has in the influence of personality traits on the way adolescents live their life at school. Participants were 351 students (ages 14-18 years) and instruments were the Portuguese version of the MMPI-A, particularly the Personality and Psychopathology Five dimensions (Aggressiveness, Psychoticism, Disconstraint, Neuroticism, Introversion); a questionnaire addressing student’s FTP; and a survey on school life involving several indicators of achievement, social integration, and overall satisfaction. Results show several significant mediation effects of FTP on most relationships between PSY-5 dimensions and school life, and are discussed considering the importance of future orientation and planning in the promotion of individual well-being and in the moderation of the impact of personality characteristics in students’ behaviour at school. Keywords: Personality; Psychopathology; Future time perspective; School life; Adolescents

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 1st Who looks forward to better health? Personality factors and future self-rated health in the context of chronic illness Fuschia SIROIS, Bishop's University, Psychology, Canada fsirois@ubishops.ca Although research indicates that personality contours self-rated health (SRH), there has been less attention on understanding the contributions of personality to the temporal framing of SRH and the contextual factors that play a role in shaping these effects, despite the potential implications of future self-rated health (FSRH) for understanding health practices and outcomes. The aim of the present study was to extend theory and research by exploring the contributions of personality traits, current SRH, and physical symptoms to FSRH in the context of chronic illness, and to test the potential mediating role of optimism for explaining these effects. In two chronic illness samples (arthritis, N = 365, and inflammatory bowel disease, N = 290) a hierarchical regression model with age, education, current SRH, and fatigue entered in the first two steps, and traits entered last, tested the effects of personality on FSRH. Mediation analyses controlling for contextual variables tested the explanatory role of optimism. Fatigue was a significant contributor to FSRH accounting for 11 % of the variance in the arthritis sample and 17 % in the IBD sample over the other contextual variables. Both Agreeableness and Neuroticism accounted for additional and significant variance in FSRH, with Agreeableness associated with higher FSRH whereas Neuroticism was associated with lower FSRH. For both traits, optimism fully explained the associations with FSRH. The findings indicated that those who score high on Agreeableness and low on Neuroticism have higher FSRH even while living with a chronic illness, perhaps due to an optimistic bias. Keywords: future orientation; self-rated health; personality; optimism; chronic illness

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 1st The role of Time Perspective tendencies on the acculturative stress of treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans living in the Unites States Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Gladys J. JIMENEZ-TORRES, Yale University School of Medicine, USA Alisha NOBLE, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Alexis RODRIGUEZ, Yale University, USA Raysa BONILLA-FLORENTINO, Southern Connecticut State University, USA Nanet M. LOPEZ-CORDOVA, Carlos Albizu University, USA lening.olivera-figueroa@yale.edu Rationale: Acculturative stress is the type of stress that occurs when an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adaptive resources result insufficient to assertively adjust to a novel cultural environment, rending them vulnerable to develop physical and mental illness. One psychological construct previously shown to influence stress, physical and mental health is Time Perspective. Time Perspective refers to the cognitive processes whereby humans assign experiences according to five temporal tendencies: Past-Negative, Past-Positive, Present-Fatalistic, Present-Hedonistic, and Future. However, the relationship between Time Perspective tendencies and acculturative stress has never been studied before. Objective: For this project we aim to study the predictability of Time Perspective tendencies on the acculturative stress of treatmentseeking and healthy Puerto Ricans immigrants living in the United States, in comparison to both treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans who live at the island of Puerto Rico. Method: Questionnaires that assess Time Perspective and acculturative stress will be administered to treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans immigrants living in the Unites States, as well as to treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans who live at the island of Puerto Rico. These questionnaires include the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Scale for Acculturative Stress, and the Hispanic Stress Inventory. Working hypotheses and expected results: I. High scores of maladaptive TP tendencies (Past-Negative and Present-Fatalistic) will be positively associated to increased Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st levels of acculturative stress across treatment-seeking and healthy Puerto Ricans. II. High scores of balanced TP tendencies (Future, Past-Positive and Present-Hedonistic) will be negatively associated to increased levels of acculturative stress across treatmentseeking and healthy Puerto Ricans. Keywords: Time Perspective; Acculturative stress; Treatment-seeking; Puerto Ricans; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory; Hispanic Stress Inventory Time perception deficits in impulsivity disorders: a systematic review Diana MOREIRA, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Porto, Laboratory of Neuropsychophysiology, Portugal Marta PINTO, Maia University Institute, Portugal Fernando ALMEIDA, Maia University Institute, Portugal Fernando BARBOSA, University of Porto, Portugal dianapmoreira@gmail.com With this review we intend to identify evidence of distortions in time perception in people with impulsivity disorders or other conditions having impulsivity traits, namely certain personality disorders, eating and neuroendocrine disorders, additive behavior disorders, traumatic brain injuries. The systematic review was informed by the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Studies related to time perception deficits and impulsivity disorders were retrieved from multiple literature databases in EBSCOhost, including PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, MEDLINE with Full Text, PsycArticles, PsycBOOKS, Education Source, SocINDEX with Full Text, SPORTDiscus with Full Text, through rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of 49 documents, 16 were extracted for further analysis and a final 12 studies were deemed eligible for inclusion. Additional 21 studies resulting from the analyses of the references of the previous documents were supplementary included. Data were extracted from each study regarding methodological aspects (experimental/control sample – n, type, inclusion and exclusion criteria) and main conclusions, taken together the existing data suggest that there are changes in time 140

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st perception associated with impulsivity. Impulsive individuals tend to execute more premature responses, produce significantly less time, overestimate the passage of time, and overproduce time lengths. This is the first systematic review to organize the evidences of distortions in time perception in impulsivity. Keywords: Time perception, impulsivity traits, distortions, systematic review A time to be stressed? Time perspectives and stress reactive cortisol dynamics in healthy men and women Lening OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut, USA Marie-France MARIN, Harvard University, USA Julie Katia MORIN-MAJOR, Université de Montréal, Canada Robert-Paul JUSTER, McGill University, Canada Sonia J. LUPIEN, Université de Montréal, Canada lening.olivera-figueroa@yale.edu The stress hormone cortisol has helped humans survive and stand the test of time. Evolutionary pressures that have shaped stress physiology may have also modulated our ability to contextualize events. In accordance, Time Perspective (TP) refers to the cognitive processes whereby humans assign experiences according to five temporal tendencies: Past-Negative, Past-Positive, PresentFatalistic, Present-Hedonistic, and Future. In this study, we explored the associations of each TP on stress reactive cortisol in response to a psychosocial stress paradigm. Thirty-one healthy men and thirty healthy women (mean age + SEM: 22.8 + 3.9 years) participated. Eight salivary cortisol samples were collected within the frame of exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and then transformed into three phases: (1) anticipation, (2) reactivity, and (3) recovery. Multiple regressions were executed with TP entered as predictors. During anticipation to the TSST women with increased Future TP secreted higher cortisol concentrations (p = 0.03). In contrast, lower cortisol concentrations were manifested during anticipation across men with increased Present-Hedonistic TP (p = 0.002) and Past-Positive TP (p = 0.056). During reactivity to Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st the TSST, women with increased Present-Fatalistic TP secreted elevated cortisol (p = 0.03). No significant associations were found between any of the TPs and cortisol during recovery to the TSST. Global analysis of area under the curve with respect to ground (AUCg) revealed that the Past-Negative TP predicted lower cortisol concentrations (p = 0.042). These novel findings support the notion that TPs are associated with stress reactivity dynamics in healthy men and women. Keywords: Time Perspective; Stress; Cortisol; Trier Social Stress Test; Sex Differences; Area under the curve with respect to ground (AUCg)

Session 6B Time perception and delay aversion Alejandro VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Andres MENDEZ, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Ana PIRES, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Fernando GONZALEZ, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Ana MARTIN, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Alejandro MAICHE, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay Alejandra CARBONI, Center of Basic Research in Psychology, University of the Republic, Uruguay avasquez@psico.edu.uy Background. One issue that is recently receiving more attention in the psychology of time relates to how the different processes involving time and time perception act together. For instance, one related question is how the perception of brief durations influences other longer-term temporal processes like temporal discounting, delay of gratification or delay aversion. In fact, impulsiveness has been recurrently associated with distortions in 142

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 1st time perception of brief durations, which are perceived as longer than they are, producing higher present-orientation. However, there is no empirical evidence to support how these different mechanisms act together in humans. Aims. The objective of this paper is to analyze the relations between time perception variables and a delay aversion variable in a group of impulsive children and in a group of typically developing children. Method. Thirty-eight children aged 7-10 participated in the experimental session. They completed two tapping tasks, one time reproduction task, one temporal discrimination task and one delay aversion task. Results. Partial correlations controlling for age in month were performed. Concerning accuracy, correlations between tasks are weak to moderate and statistically significant. Delay aversion is highly correlated to the tapping and reproduction tasks with smaller time stimuli. Concerning intra-individual variability between task, correlations range from very-weak to moderate and statistically significant. Discussion. Results show that the intertemporal processes, such as the ability to wait for a bigger reward are differentially correlated with time perception measures. This may suggest that not all timing abilities underlie long-term temporal processes such as delay aversion. Keywords: Time perception, delay aversion, ADHD Positive time-perspective as an alternative defense from death concerns Ksenia CHISTOPOLSKAYA, Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Suicidology, Russia S.N. ENIKOLOPOV, Mental Health Research Center of RAMS, G.I. SEMYKIN, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, E.V. NIKOLAEV, Uljanov Chuvash State University, L.P. PONOMARENKO, Mechnikov Odessa National University, V.N. KAZANCEVA, Mechnikov Odessa National University ktchist@gmail.com Positive time-perspective is commonly regarded as the factor of well-being and is known to play a protective role against the fears of death. We decided to check if professional and regional Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st affiliations influence the pattern of defenses and proneness to suicide. We analyzed 2 samples from Cheboksary, region with high suicide rates, of medical (n=195) and non-medical (law and engineering) students (n=126); Moscow social sciences students (n=156) and engineering students (n=283), who successfully passed the test for reserve-officer training department; Odessa economics students (n=151) and people after recent suicidal attempt (n=188). Comparative analysis (Mann-Whitney U-Test) showed that the highest rates of negative time-perspective and fears of death were characteristic for suicidal patients, but medical students from Cheboksary, though being high on Future and Past Positive, were the lowest (after suicidals) in Hardiness. The most benign results showed Moscow engineering students. In correlation analysis within the samples we observed 2 somewhat overlapping coping strategies with death attitudes – through fears and avoidance and through death acceptance. Suppression of escape acceptance of death and fear of being forgotten was a purely Moscow engineers’ defense, to some instance –Cheboksary meds’ and also an overt expression of low well-being in suicidal patients. Odessa economists and Cheboksary non-medical students relied mostly on fears. Moscow social sciences students were in the middle. It is viable that positive time-perspective may substitute hardiness, keeping people, who deal with death threats on daily basis, afloat. Further research in medical students from different regions is needed to test this hypothesis. Keywords: time-perspective, wellbeing, death attitudes, death fears, hardiness Zimbardo and Carstensen Time Perspectives, Do They Match? Maria João AZEVEDO, ICBAS - Universidade do Porto, UNIFAI, Portugal Laetitia TEIXEIRA, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal Constança PAÚL, UNIFAI, ICBAS.UP, Portugal mjoao@unifai.eu Background: Zimbardo’s time perspective explores how people relate with time, considering 3 major time frames, past, present and future. The focus and affect endorsed to past experiences and 144

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st future expectations play a major role in decisions and behaviors in the present moment. The subjective time left in life also seems to have implications in several domains. In old people, when subjective time left in life normally becomes shorter and focusing on future, present or past may have different implications than for younger people. Aims: Explore the association between Future Time Perspective and Zimbardo’s Time Perspective in older people. Outcomes & Results: 207 Portuguese 65+ years living in the community completed the ZTPI and the FTPS. The adjusted correlation model (controlling for sex, age and number of diagnosis) showed that Present-hedonistic and Future were positively correlated with FTP (R=.222, p=.002; R=.147, p=.043, respectively), and Presentfatalistic negatively correlated (R=-.211, p=.003). Conclusions & Pratical Implications: People more oriented to Future and Presente-hedonistic seems to have a more open-ended FTP. As people oriented to Future are concerned about future consequences and rewards of their present behavior it is expected that they might have a longer future. Present-hedonistic in old people may not have the some meaning as for young people, probably configuring an adaptive mechanism in face of perceived time left in life and wisdom valuation of pleasant things that worth living in opposition to imprudent attitude of younger people that could endanger the future. Keywords: Zimbardo Time perspective; Future Time Perspective; Aging

Session 6C Consciousness of time perspective leads to human development Thelma RANI, St. Christopher's College of Education, Department of Computer Education, India U. Deborah SHARON, Ethiraj College, India ukthelma@gmail.com Time factors are the most important features in every human’s life. The development and progress of a person depends on the way he/she deals with his time, whether his/her past experiences Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st influence his/her decisions at the present and whether he/she could foresee his/her future for better perspectives. Every decision taken at present influences the future experiences. Hence every individual needs to have time conscious. As time factors namely past, present and future has no meaning by itself, the worthwhile experiences decide the performance and development of an individual. It is the greater responsibility of the teachers to mould the young minds and tune them to have time consciousness from the school age. The paper reports the study on the “time perspectives and achievement among the teacher trainees”. The sample for the study is 100 pre-service graduate teacher trainees from 4 different teacher training colleges in Chennai, India. A modified version of “ Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory” with 40 items constitute the tool for the study. The score attained through the inventory and the first semester marks are considered for data manipulation. It is found that in general the pres – service teacher trainees are conscious of time perspectives. Also trainees who have consciousness on time perspectives have achieved better in their academic performance. There is significant difference in “consciousness to time perspective” among the following categorise of sample: 1. Male and female 2. Ethnicity 3. Post graduate and undergraduate 4 .Married and unmarried 5. Subjects of specialisation Keywords: Teacher Trainees, Time Perspectives, development, achivement Future-oriented adult students in Spain: cultural aspects and performance regarding Game Based Learning Mireia USART, Open University of Catalonia (UOC), eLearn Center, Spain Margarida ROMERO, Université Laval, Canada Elena BARBERÀ, eLearn Center, Open University of Catalonia (UOC), Spain musart@uoc.edu

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Abstracts: Oral Communications – August 1st Research in face-to-face learning contexts shows that students’ Time Perspective (TP) is a cultural trait positively related to learning performance. In particular, results show that students with a high future TP show higher motivation for study, selfregulation and academic performance. Besides, present oriented students tend to engage in instant-reward activities such as videogames. The use of games for educational purposes, known as Game-based Learning (GBL), could be an adequate methodology for present oriented students to engage in learning activities. Upto-date, little studies have focused on and the relation between students’ TP and online GBL. We aim to study the factorial validity of the FTP subscale of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) among adult Spanish students engaged in an online course with a GBL activity, and its relation with performance. A sample of 67 students engaged in a quasi-experimental study using a classification game, MetaVals. Performance in the game and semester are studied in relation to their FTP. Results show differences in 7 items of the FTP subscale, related both to the Spanish cultural context and to the online learners’ profile. Semistructured interviews were conducted to better understand these differences among items. Furthermore, although FTP students show a higher course performance, these profiles do not show higher performance in the GBL activity; it could be related to the fact that games leverage performance of different students. This study might be useful for designers and teachers to better adapt learning activities in online contexts to learners’ needs, according to their TP. Keywords: time perspective, future time perspective, performance, game based learning, online learning, culture Measuring time perspective of the prison inmates Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Bozena GULLA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Przemyslaw PIOTROWSKI, Jagiellonian University, Poland Malgorzata WYSOCKA-PLECZYK, Jagiellonian University, Poland kinga.tucholska@uj.edu.pl Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Oral Communications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 1st One of the aspects of the nuisance isolation penalty is its time dimension. The time assumes the labeled and counted dimension for the convicted. An excess of the fre e time makes it necessary to fill it, which causes actions subjectively accelerating its expiration. These actions can be either adaptive and disadaptive. The matter in how the convicted can deal with temporal aspect of the isolation penalty is related to their time perspective. For rehabilitation after the penalty, the balanced temporal perspective seems to be the most advantageous. Focusing on the present with a clear projection of self into the future fosters creating realistic plans and taking actions to address them already during the period of penalty. Escape from the past makes it difficult to maintain a sense of continuity, and cut off from what happened before putting in prison does not facilitate the excitation of a healthy sense of guilt and willingness to make reparations, is therefore detrimental to post-penitentiary readaptation. The focus of this research was to determine the time perspective profiles of the prison inmates. The Polish version of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) was administered to the group of 60 male prisoners (age 21-55; mean age 30,29; SD=9,31) and obtained data were compared to the control group. The differences in five temporal orientations as measured by ZTPI are discuss. The methodological problems which emerged during administration ZTPI to the group of prison inmates are pointed out and the usefulness of the ZTPI assessment in the penitentiary diagnosis are displayed. Keywords: time perspective, ZTPI, prisoner, isolation penalty

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th

Posters July 30th Consistency and correlation between flow theory and time perspective approach. Optimal experience (flow) frequency is related to the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory's dimensions? Massimo AGNOLETTI, Centro Benessere Psicologico, Italy info@massimoagnoletti.it This project is intended to explore if there is consistency between Flow theory and Time Perspective Approach. In the theoretical construct of Time Perspective Approach optimal or ideal wellbeing condition is identified by a specific configuration of ZTPI (Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory) dimensions that include low values of "Present Fatalistic" and medium/high values of "Present Hedonism" and "Future". Optimal Experience (called also as Flow) is a eudaimonic factor that consists not just of a “present” component but also of a “future” dimension because it requires planning in order to replicate next Flow experience. In this perspective it should be a consistency between some time dimensions described by the ZTPI test and Flow frequency. In particular hypothesis should test if there is a correlation between ZTPI dimensions (negative in the case of the "Present Fatalistic" and positive toward "Present Hedonism" and "Future") and Optimal Experience frequency. Keywords: Flow, Optimal Experience, Time Perspective, Present, Future, ZTPI

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Exploring the links between time perspective, anxiety, rumination and aspects of cognitive control Elisabeth ÅSTRÖM, Umeå University, Sweden Maria Grazia CARELLI, Umeå University, Sweden Britt WIBERG, Umeå University, Sweden elisabeth.astrom@psy.umu.se The relationship between anxiety and a negative future time perspective is well documented. Several studies have shown that anxiety is commonly associated with negative ruminative thoughts with a temporal component consisting of worry and uncertainties about the future. This study aimed to further investigate the psychological mechanisms involved in this relationship. The specific hypothesis was that the temporal bias towards the future is associated with ruminative thoughts (worry) and that this in turn reflects dysfunction in aspects of cognitive control. The current study included a non-clinical sample of 65 participants (44 females) between the ages of 19 to 40 years old (Mage = 25.90, SD = 4.48). Participants completed inventories of time perspective (Swedish Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory: S-ZTPI), worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory) and one task measuring inhibition (stroop). A linear regression model with anxiety symptoms as outcome variable and the subscales of S-ZTPI as predictors showed that the Future Negative subscale best predicted anxiety. Furthermore, a linear regression model with Future Negative as outcome variable and stroop performance, worry and anxiety symptoms as predictors, revealed worry as the only significant predictor of Future Negative. In conclusion, our results partly supported our hypothesis. The relationship between Future Negative and anxiety seems to be mediated by worry in non-clinical cases. Future research should investigate this relationship in clinical samples. Keywords: Future time perspective, anxiety, worry, cognition, S-ZTPI

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th Development of a japanese version of the adolescent time attitude scale: a preliminary study of college students. Yuta CHISHIMA, University of Tsukuba, Japan Tatsuya MURAKAMI, University of Tsukuba, Japan Takuma NISHIMURA, University of Tsukuba, Japan chishima@human.tsukuba.ac.jp The purpose of this study was to develop a Japanese version of the Adolescent Time Attitude Scale (ATAS-J). The ATAS was originally developed by Worrel, Mello, & Buhl (2011) and consists of six subscales assessing Past Positive, Past Negative, Present Positive, Present Negative, Future Positive, and Future Negative time attitudes. Moreover, this scale has been translated into German, Italian, and Spanish, and administered to various demographic groups (Andretta et al, 2013). In this study, the ATAS was translated into Japanese (ATAS-J), and its reliability was confirmed with a sample of 192 Japanese college students (mean age = 21.04, SD = 0.93). Internal consistency estimates of the ATAS-J ranged from .88 to .92. However, confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the six-factor structure for the original 30 items showed inadequate fit indices. For structural validity, 2 items with high factor loadings were omitted from each subscale. A comparison of the two-factor (valence), three-factor (time periods), six-factor (30 items), and six-factor (18 items) models indicated that a six-factor structure with 18 items yielded the best fit (χ2 = 232.00, df = 120.00, NNFI = .944, CFI = .956, SRMR = .055, RMSEA = .070). A comparison of the results with those of Worrel et al. (2011) showed that Japanese participants tend to perceive all the time periods more negatively as compared to U.S. and German. Thus, to identify whether these results were due to the participants’ age or cultural background, further studies are needed. Keywords: adolescent, time attitude, Japanese, reliability, validity, preliminary study

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Temporal types in Polish samples: A cluster analytic approach Natalia CYBIS, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Poland Tomasz ROWIŃSKI, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Poland n.cybis@uksw.edu.pl When describing Individual differences, researchers usually refer to particular traits and analyze their relationships with other psychological constructs and observable behavior. Over the last decade, trait psychology began to use cluster analysis to identify personality types, described as a specific organization of traits within the individual. This person-oriented approach is also used in temporal psychology (Boniwell, Osin, Linley & Ivanchenko, 2010). This study applies two-step cluster analysis (Ward’s method followed by k-means analysis) with double cross-validation procedure, as proposed by Asendorpf et al. (2001), to identify the number of temporal types from studies using Polish adaptation of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory. Sample consisted of 1326 participants (57,2% women, 41,3% men, 1,6% did not indicate their gender) aged 16-79 (M=33,01, SD=12,36). During the analysis, solutions of 2 to 5 clusters were examined with Kappa Coefficient as a measure of inter-rater agreement. Results of the study are discussed in the presentation. Keywords: ZTPI, cluster analysis, typology, temporal types The relation between trauma exposure, PTSD and posttraumatic growth (PTG): the mediating role of time perspective among motor vehicle accident (MVA) survivors Maria CYNIAK, University of Warsaw, Poland Barbara BIAŁECKA, University of Warsaw, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Poland mariacyniak@onet.eu Research suggest that even in a short time after the trauma a change in one’s way of thinking and approaching life events occur, which is called a PTG. It may be manifested in mental change, life appreciation, change of life priorities, better relations with people and higher self-esteem. As different time perspectives were found 152

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th to foresee PTSD, we assumed that they may also help to predict PTG and that in fact the positive relation between PTSD and PTG exists because of common substructure: exposure to trauma and taken time perspective. The research was done on a group of 280 MVA survivors who were assessed during a two-year period after the trauma with a number of inventories: short version of PTSD questionnaire designed by Zawadzki, Strelau, Sobolewski and Oniszczenko, Posttraumatic Growth Inventory developed by Tedeschi and Calhoun, Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory created by Zimbardo. The measure of trauma exposure was a sum of different questions included in a demographic questionnaire which referred to life and health threat, peritraumatic emotions, dissociation and loss. Results of regression analysis suggest that only one type of time perspective - Present Fatalistic - is a predictor of both PTSD symptoms severity and PTG. Path analysis proves that Present Fatalistic perspective partially mediates the relation between trauma exposure, PTSD and PTG respectively. The correlation between PTSD and PTG is a result of a common background. Both variables may be predicted by trauma exposure and a higher level of fatalistic view on current life situation. Keywords: Trauma exposure, PTSD, posttraumatic growth, time perspective Daydreaming and life goals’ characteristics among high school students Michał CZAKON, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland michalczakon@gmail.com Common thinking and literature (eg. Singer, 1980; Klinger 1990) link daydreaming with life goals’ characteristics and underline its importance in late adolescence. However literature does not describe this connection in detail. In order to examine connections between these two psychological phenomena one questionnaire was constructed: Questionnaire of Daydreaming (measuring daydreaming characteristics’ described by literature) and two Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st scales of Zaleski were modified: KCEL (1991) measuring life goals’ characteristics and Scale of Attitudes Toward Future (1987), measuring future anxiety. Reliability measuring conducted among 394 high school students in Poland showed sufficient psychometric goodness. Empirical research was conducted among 413 other high school students in Poland. Canonical analysis showed that daydreaming and life goals’ characteristics are connected in two independent ways, which is possible to interpret as: realistic daydreaming and escape daydreaming. Realistic daydreaming is correlated with good attentional control of daydreaming, positive-constructive daydreaming, goal clarification, perceived goal’s importance, low conflict between goals, long span of goals and high motivation to realization. Escape daydreaming are correlated with poor attentional control, contents linked to social approval need and goal’s conflict parallel with their perceived importance. The most interesting discovery of thesis is independence of these two daydreaming patterns. The study also distinguished four clusters differing in characteristics of life goal and daydreaming. These clusters also differ in future anxiety, life satisfaction and achievement motivation. In clusters distinguished and described realistic daydreaming and escape daydreaming are distributed in quadripolar value distribution (low-low, high-low, low-high, highhigh). Keywords: daydreaming, life goals’ characteristics, high school students Vocational aspirations in childhood: a longitudinal study Rute DAVID, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal Maria Paula PAIXÃO, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal José Tomás DA SILVA, University of Coimbra, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Portugal rute.david@fpce.uc.pt

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th Career development has been conceived as a process that goes through the entire life of the subject and has its onset in childhood. Several authors argue that in the first years of life there are processes that influence the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perception of career aspirations that are more appropriate or affordable, which can lead to early decisions that affect the future education and career choices of children. Despite the importance of childhood, recognized by many, most research still focuses on studies with adolescents and adults, which has led many authors to warn of the need to develop studies in this age group. We are developing a longitudinal study with middle school children (2nd, 4th and 6th grades) whose main purpose is to clarify the relationship between these variables and more specifically: get a deeper knowledge of vocational aspirations of middle school children; understanding the importance of background aspects such as gender, socioeconomic status and prestige to the formation of vocational aspirations and early elimination of professionals aims; draw implications for the implementation of educational practices directed to parents and teachers as key agents in the construction of the career aspirations of children. Keywords: childhood, career aspirations, early career development

Examining the connection of the past, present and future in undergraduates Akane ISHIKAWA, Chuo University, Japan akanei125c@gmail.com Most of research on time perspective in undergraduates has focused on the relation between their consciousness to the future and their behavior in the present. However, it is also important for understanding their behavior to investigate their past and the connection of the past, present and future. This study examined how do students with high fulfillment in the present differ from students with low fulfillment in the ways in which they connect past, present and future. Twenty nine Japanese undergraduates Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st were asked to take part in a workshop where making “Cognitive Map of Time Perspective” (Sonoda, 2011) and to participate interviews based on the map. Participants were also asked to answer a questionnaire that was composed of the scales which measured one’s view on the past, goal consciousness and emptiness. Participants assigned two groups based on emptiness score and the response to a question about a sense of fulfillment in their life in the interviews (High fulfillment students, N = 20 ; Low fulfillment students, N = 9). In the result of interviews, both groups had consciousness to the change of environment between past and present, present and future. High fulfillment students connected their past and present positively and meaningfully. In contrast, Low fulfillment students connected their past as reason that they have changed negatively. Additionally, High fulfillment students connected the present and future more positive than Low fulfillment students. The qualitative data offered rich insight into how undergraduates connect the past, present and future in their life. Keywords: time perspective, time integration, undergraduate, interview study The relationship between time perspective, identity and crosscultural adjustment of Chinese international students in Japan Liang JINHENG, Chuo University, Japan kevin7125639@gmail.com By now, the number of international students who come to Japan presents an ascendant trend every year. According to the Japan Student Services Organization, there were about 135,519 international students in Japan. And about 60% international students came from China (JSSO, 2013). The present study set out to examine whether time perspective and self-identity is effect to cross-cultural adjustment. Participants were 217 Chinese international students of Japanese language school in Tokyo. They completed a questionnaire containing Time Perspective Scale (TPS; Tsuzuki, 1996), Identity Status Scale (ISS; Kato, 1983), CrossCultural Adjustment Scale (CAS; Liang, 2011), residence time in 156

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th Japan and the language level of Japanese. Compared short residence international students with long residence international students, longer residence students show lower scores of crossculture adjustment. Besides, Analysis of two-way ANOVA identified that: (1) high level of time perspective scores students showed good cross-culture adjustment, (2) high level of identity scores students showed good cross-culture adjustment, (3) language level could not find any significant effect at cross-culture adjustment. This study suggested that time perspective and identity as individual factors could affect cross-cultural adjustment, and in the future longitudinal study about international students’ time perspective change, identity formation and cross-cultural adjustment are suggested. Keywords: time perspective, cross-culture adjustment, identity, Chinese international student The influence of positive temporal perspective on risky behaviors Grażyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Poland Bożena BURZYŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland katra@psych.uw.edu.pl This paper was undertaken in recognition of the mounting public health and social problems associated with adolescent risky behavior. Existing theories on avoiding risk behaviors among adolescents tend to focus on elements such as time perspective which refers to goals setting and personal projects (Ziółkowska, 2005, Zaleski 1995). Evidence seems to suggest that human existence is enhanced when individuals are engaged in a sustainable pursuit of core projects. Personal projects can illuminate and enhance human existence, from a psychological well being to physical health (Little, 2007). In this paper, the results of a personal study are discussed. A review of the recent literature pertaining to the correlates of adolescent risk-taking, positive temporal perspective and Personal Projects, organized the findings into a multisystemic perspective is taken. Later, the method is described: data from 120 high school students was collected. The analyses are still conducted. As a result, we aim to Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st discover if there is a correlation between the activated positive temporal perspective and a perception that safer solutions are preferred more than risky behaviors. What is more, we want to search if long positive temporal perspective influences significantly more on the low risk preference among students than short temporal perspective. We conclude the presentation with a discussion of the implications of the research for youth workers engaged in the reduction of risk behavior among adolescents so that meaningful prevention and intervention programs might be developed. Keywords: adolescence, risky behavioe, life plans, time perspective Sensation Seeking, educational environment, time orientation and risky behavior on adolescents Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Poland Zuzanna WLODARCZYK, University of Warsaw, Poland katra@psych.uw.edu.pl The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the sensation seeking, educational environment, the time perspective and positive and negative risky behavior in adolescents. Expected significant relationship between these psychological phenomena. Studies have been conducted on 126 adolescent between the ages of 16 to 19 years. Young people taking part in the study came from two socialization environments: a family of complete and consistent vs. orphanage. For testing we used four measurement tools: Test Your Interests and Preferences, The Time Perspective Inventory Zimbardo, Risky behavior Questionnaire, the scale of the "S" of the questionnaire Faces III. Educational environment, the strength of the present hedonistic and future time perspective allows you to predict the occurrence of risky behavior. Search for experience and strength of the present hedonistic time perspective enable to anticipate positive behavior risky youth. Keywords: adolescence, time orientation, socialization environment, positive and negative risk behavior

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th Hearing impairment in the context of time perspective and its personal correlates Joanna KOSSEWSKA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland Michał GACEK, Department of Psychology, Pedagogical University of Krakow joanna.kossewska@up.krakow.pl Deafness has historically been viewed as a physical impairment associated with such disabilities. On the other hand, views on deafness as a culture have recently emerged and consider deafness as a personal trait, not as disability (Lane, 1997). Hearing impairment is the factor influencing individual experience and development (Marschark, 2002). However, as it influences the cognitive as well as socio-emotional development, it might also impact the time perspective. Presented study was aimed to find out (1) the influence of hearing impairment on the time perspective in young adults; as well as (2) the relationship between the time perspective and self-esteem, self-efficacy and attitudes towards money. Subjects, young adults aged between 20 and 23, were divided into experimental and control groups (10 males and 10 females each). The experimental group consisted of 20 deaf and hard-hearing university students. The control group consisted of hearing students paired with the experimental group by age and gender. Subjects were tested individually by filling out the written form of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory – ZTPI; Transcendental-Future Time Perspective Inventory – TFTPS; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale – RSES; Gąsiorowska Money Attitude Questionnaire. The results showed that hearing impairment influence the time perspective. Deaf students are more presentoriented in comparison to hearing. The findings will be discussed in the context of specific developmental path as well as the practical therapeutic implications. Keywords: Time perspective, self-esteem, self-efficacy, money attitudes deafness

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st The Role of Achievement Motivation in a Choice of Maturity Exam Level Michał MEISNER, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Zbigniew ZALESKI, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland miszkasds@wp.pl The research question posed in the study refers to the relationship between the level of motivation of high school graduates taking the maturity exam and their subjective perception of the difficulty of the test as well as subjective probability of achieving success. According to the risk-taking model proposed by Atkinson (1957) it is assumed the existence of such relationship, namely that the level of achievement motivation of students taking up the challenge of maturity exam is the variable differentiating both the perception of the students’ chances of success as well as their subjective evaluation of the difficulty of the exam. In the study participated 308 people aged from 17 to 21 years. Results’ analysis allows us to make some conclusions about the application of Atkinson’s model in the education system. Highly motivated students and students with high hope of success and low fear of failure select maturity exam configuration which is subjectively perceived as moderately difficult. Students with low achievement motivation, low hope of success and high fear of failure choose the exam configuration more difficult than the group of highly motivated ones. Both groups of students - high and low motivated - overestimate their chances of success. Choices of students distincted by achievement motivation as well as the configuration of hope of success and fear of failure are similar in determining the perception of the subjective level of exam difficulty and determine the probabilistic judgment of success, what is closely related to the theoretical risk-taking model assumptions. Keywords: achievement motivation, education, maturity exam, hope of success, fear of failure

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory children adaptation Umbelina LEITE, Rio Verde University – UniRV, University of Brasilia- UnB, Brazil Magna MORAIS, Rio Verde University, USA Aquino GOMES, Rio Verde University, USA umbelinarl@gmail.com, umbelina@unirv.edu.br The aim of this study was to investigate the use of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) with children. The adaptation process was made using semantic item analyses. 30 Brazilian children, age 8 to 12 years (M=10.6, SD=1.2), 50% male, responded to ZTPI (Leite & Pasquali, 2008) individually. During the application, the items were presented fully and the children were stimulated to appoint out words, terms or phrase they didn’t understand. The words with more doubts were: life path, excitement, impulsively, destiny and boring, and the items were: 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 17, 20, 22, 28, 29, 31, 34, 36, 47 e 49. Also they needed to distinguish the use of the words: story and history. In the discussion with the children, some items were modified, others, giving examples during the application was sufficient for them to understand. Example of modification: item 2: Familiar childhood sights, sounds, smells often bring back a flood of wonderful memories, was changed to: Sights, sounds, smells of times when I was younger often bring wonderful memories. Also, the participants presented time perspective profiles with higher scores on past-positive (M=3.45, SD=.58) and future (M=3.30, SD=.46) and lower on pastnegative (M=2.82, SD=.69). We can conclude that the ZTPI is suitable to be used with eight years and older alphabetized children, doing some modification and giving out examples to facility the comprehension. Further research applying the recommend adaptation is suggested to continue the ZTPI validation and standardization for children. Keywords: Psychometric, validation, semantic item analyses, Developmental Psychology

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Validating Adolescent Time Attitude Scores (ATAS) in a sample of Iranian adolescents Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, USA Khosro RASHID, Bu-Ali Sina University, Iran Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley Fereshteh FATHI, Bu-Ali Sina University zmello@sfsu.edu The purpose of this study was to translate the Adolescent Time Inventory (ATI; Mello & Worrell, 2007) into Farsi and validate the time attitude scores (ATI-TA) in a sample of adolescents in Iran. We were also interested in examining Iranian adolescents’ profiles on time frequency (ATI-TF), time orientation (ATI-TO), and time relation (ATI-TR). Time meaning (ATI-TM), a qualitative subscale, was not examined in this study. Participants consisted of 1,200 students (50% male) ranging in age from 14 to 18 (M = 15) attending 6 high schools in Hamedan. Parent’s education levels ranged from no formal schooling to graduate degrees, with the modal education level for fathers and mothers being a high school diploma. Scores on the six ATI-TA subscales were generally reliable—Past Positive (.80), Past Negative (.83), Present Positive (.84), Present Negative (.84), Future Positive (.64), and Future Negative (.70)—and as in other countries, mean scores on positive attitudes were slightly higher than mean scores on negative attitudes and scores were neither skewed nor kurtotic. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded the best fit for the hypothesized six-factor structure: NNFI = .919, CFI = .927, SRMR = .052, and RMSEA = .043. The modal category for time relation was intercorrelated, and the modal category for time orientation was a dual focus on the present and future. With regard to time frequency, the mode for present and future was daily, but almost equal numbers of adolescents reported thinking about the past on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis. Keywords: Iran, time attitudes, adolescents, measurement, validity, reliability

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th A journey through time – children’s drawings of their time perspectives Thomas NEUBAUER, Heidelberg University, Institute for Educational Sciences, Germany neubauer@ibw.uni-heidelberg.de Little is known about time perspectives of primary school children. One reason might be the difficulty of investigating children’s attitudes towards their past, present and future. Generally it is assumed that children predominantly live in the present. Developmental psychology suggests a more differentiated view. From the first year of life human beings find themselves in a temporally structured world wherein they embody time related processes. Thus, their behavior is de facto time-related and time perspectives are meaningful, even when children's language skills lack the elaborateness of adults to describe them. Children objectify time perspectives more symbolically and behaviorally than verbally. In our explorative study we therefore decided to let children symbolize their time perspectives by drawing pictures and talking about them. The aim of our study was to find out about pre-linguistic time perspectives and their visualizations. We asked primary school children (n=15; age 7-10) to make drawings on a specific impulse-story. Additionally they had to explain and talk about their symbolized stories. First evaluations by content analysis indicate that children prefer the future in their drawings. Furthermore emotional validations of the time dimensions affect the picture configurations. There can also be found aspects of the relatedness of the three time dimensions. Results show that drawings can be applied in order to make time perspectives visible, especially those of primary school children. Discussion will focus on methodological approaches to non-linguistical objectifications of time perspectives as well as on methodically adequate categories in order to evaluate those time perspectives during childhood. Keywords: pre-linguistic time perspectives, qualitative design, drawings, primary school children, conent analysis

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st ‘‘I’ll do it tomorrow’ Polish adaptation of the Procrastination Scale Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Agata BŁACHNIO, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin aneta.przepiorka@gmail.com Procrastination is a common tendency to delay starting some activity or task. This behaviour is encountered in different countries regardless of cultural context. It has been associated with poor self-regulation and problems with motivation. A plethora of research shows that procrastination leads to higher level of stress, poor academic outcomes, it is negatively related to self-efficacy and self-esteem. The aim of this study is to explore the psychometric parameters of the method to measure tendency to procrastination – the Procrastination Scale by Lay (1986). The questionnaire is a self-report instrument. The participants are asked to describe themselves using a 5-point scale whether the given statements are uncharacteristic or characteristic for them. It consists of 20 items. A sample of over 400 students were recruited via snowball sampling procedure (their mean age 20 years old). The factor analysis supported a one-factor structure of the scale. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the scale. According to these results, the psychometric properties of the scale are promising. Further examination and broader validity of the questionnaire is suggested. Keywords: procrastination, questionnaires, validation The impact of Time Perspective on financial decision making depending on the experience of success and failure Katarzyna SEKŚCIŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Poland ks@psych.uw.edu.pl Previous psychological research has shown that people’s decision making can be influenced by their time perspective biases. Time Perspective refers to the temporal frames of reference of people’s experience. Across two studies, conducted among polish entrepreneurs and employees (N1=311, N2=259), I demonstrate 164

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th the role of Time Perspective in financial decision making, including consumer, saving and investing decisions. The first study showed a direct impact of Time Perspective on financial decision making. The second study confirmed the results of the first one and showed the role of Time Perspective in financial decision making after an experience of success or failure in a financial task. Keywords: time perspective, financial decision, experience of success or failure Time traveling and identity construction: Case study of a conversation about autobiographical memory Toshiaki SHIRAI, Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan Maika KITAMURA, Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan shirai@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp An adolescent constructs identity or a sense of continuity through the conversation (Bamberg, De Fina, & Schiffrin, 2011; Pasupathi & Mansour, 2006). This study explores how an adolescent construct a sense of continuity through the conversation where she or he shares significant autobiographical memory and rewrite story. First, we analysed a conversation between two female college students who were classmates consistently from a kindergarten to a senior high school. They met one month after the alumni meeting of secondary school. They talked for 26 minutes. The excerpt focused on the expression that one regretted that she refused it when a third person classmate asked to take a lunch together. Then, another person accepted her regret and asked her “If it were now”. Then, one responded “no problem.” Thus, a speaker and a listener played a reciprocal role in the conversation. It led to speaker’s changing her temporal position to viewing the event from the present rather than the past. Second, after the conversation, we asked if they had noticed something about how they had changed and not changed from the past, and how they noticed who they were. They labeled themselves in the past as “children” and interpreted a change as “grown up.” This causes detachment from the past and integrated it in the present. Thus, continuity is created by time travelling Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st (Shirai, 2011) through role exchanges during conversations around self-defined memory, based on maintaining close relationships. Keywords: time perspective, identity, continuity, narrative, autobiographical memory,emerging adulthood Some aspects the future time perspective in old age Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, Univeristy of Szczecin, Poland Beata BUGAJSKA, Univeristy of Szczecin, Poland c.timoszyk@wp.pl The aim of the research was the analysis of the range and context of future time perspective with its transcendental extension, that is the period which begins after death, in persons who are 65 and older in the context of their age, education and subjective assessment of their own health, material situation and personal objectives realization. In the studies participated 351persons, that is 119 men and 323 women in the age of 65 and older. Appropriately trained researchers conducted studies individually. The quota sampling process was made. In the experimental group, the proper percentile distribution (gender and age) for the population aged 65 and over was reproduced. The studies used: the survey to measure the future time perspective (the author's experimental version), W. Lens’ future time perspective questionnaire, the scale of generalized attitudes to the future (the author's experimental version). The analysis of collected data allowed to conclude that in the elderly the future time perspective is reduced. Younger people, better educated, evaluating positively the implementation of plans from the past, as well as their own health and finances have a longer future time perspective and more plans for achieving their long-term objectives. The shortterm goals of the elderly are associated with family, health, and the socio-ontological aspect, and the long –term objectives, apart from health and family, concern the implementation of overall values such as happiness, goodness, fairness, and substantive issues. The older the people are, the more often they think about death. Half of the respondents create plans for the time after death, for example, meeting with loved ones, salvation. The 166

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th attitudes towards the future of older people are changing, the older the people are, the more they present transcendental and less realistic attitudes. Keywords: future time perspective, old age Forward via backward. Narrative foreclosure prevention. Urszula TOKARSKA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland urszula@tokarska.pl The presentation is based on the growing interest in `narrative foreclosure` concept, which belongs to the time perspective psychology as well as to the narrative psychology field. The narrative foreclosure is defined as a phenomenological closeness to the other then `here and now` position of experiencing Self, which evokes non-adaptive psychological consequences (including the depression). In terms of narrative psychology the person has got a strong feeling that, even if life as such continues on, any other chapters, new characters or turning-points to his life story could be added and the same old story should be enacted again and again. This premature hindering of identity development, mostly typical to older adults or terminally ill could be recognized and modify according to a variety of individual and social factors. The presentation will be devoted to the theoretical considerations about supporting the process of creating the strong and resilient enough life stories and to the illustration of practical solutions of dealing with this phenomena. A kind of work narrowed to intentional narrative influences inside preventing enterprises, especially this practiced via autobiographical workshops will be presented. Prevention activity of narrative openness will be presented as based on the notion about effective going forward as significantly tied to the backward movement of auto-reflection. The author` s model of the effective sequence of preventive work, starting from separate episodes counting and single storylines creating, via constructing a patchwork pattern - to the proposal of the Hypertextual rhizome journeying inside the life time and space. Keywords: narrative foreclosure, time openness, autobiographical workshops Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Psychological time in films Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Anna TYLIKOWSKA, Nowy Sacz School of Business - National-Louis University, Poland kinga.tucholska@uj.edu.pl Films are particularly well suited to depict psychological phenomena. The combination of images, music, dialogue, lighting, camera angles, and sound effects in a film mimic thoughts and feelings that occur in our consciousness. Characters in many popular films portray persons who more or less consciously experience time, sometimes in quite an unusual way. There are also some films which seems to be the form of a tribute to time phenomenon itself. The presented work provides a practical guideline for all interested in films that deals seriously with the time as an existential theme. All the depictions proposed offer a unique learning and teaching opportunity - might complement the text, lectures, and discussions with students. Watching them with conscious awareness might be also a form of therapy or self-help causing insight, emotional release or relief, inspirational thoughts, and natural change. Keywords: psychological time, film Ideas regarding a holistic assessment of TP and the creation of a transcendental TP scale Jonte VOWINCKEL, University of Twente, Netherlands j.c.vowinckel@student.utwente.nl Recent research indicates that mindful present orientation, which goes beyond hedonistic and fatalistic present focus, is an integral, although widely neglected, part of TP, as well as probably the strongest link between TP and well-being (Vowinckel, Westerhof, Bohlmeijer and Webster, in preparation; Seema and Sircova, in press). The newly developed 'present-eudaimonic' scale is a step toward a measurement of holistic present orientation. However, as stated by Zimbardo and Boyd (2008), holistic present orientation further presupposes the consideration of spiritual aspects of life. An instrument measuring transcendental TP should assess the individual frequency of transcendence-oriented cognitive functioning, as well as the associated emotional valence 168

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 30th (e.g., acceptance) of existentialist concerns, such as inevitability of individual death. The new measure would then provide information for two dimensions (exploration and acceptance) of the individual relation to transcendental time. To avoid reproducing shortcomings of the existing transcendental future scale, which measures personal beliefs, rather than emotional valence and frequency of transcendental views (Seema, Sircova and Baltin, 2014), further conceptualization of transcendental TP should be accomplished with caution and should be based on broad intercultural discourse of researchers with diverse spiritual/religious backgrounds. In this context, implications for the assessment of TP in general should be discussed. To investigate individual differences in TP orientation, not only the emotional valence, but also the frequency of psychological interference of past-, and future-related contents, is crucial to explore different types of TP-personalities, which probably suggests a change from the agreement-based into a frequencybased response-format for the ZTPI. Keywords: Holistic Present Perspective, Transcendental Time Perspective, Response-Format Time Perspective Test (TPT) scores of a depressed, middle-aged patient Junko WATANABE, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan Hiroki YAMADA, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan Shinichi SAKUMA, International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo Teruchika KATSUMATA, International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo dolphin-j@skm.bb4u.ne.jp [Purpose] The time perspective of a depressed, 40-year-old housewife was investigated for diagnostic purposes and for planning psychiatric and clinical psychological treatment during hospitalization, as well as for planning support after discharge. [Methods] The patient responded to the Time Perspective Test (TPT) developed by Katsumata (1973), and CES-D. TPT was Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st conducted through five steps: listing up her concerns, description of concerns, temporal orientation (classification of past, present, and future), and other evaluations (affective tone, importance, and possibility). [Results and Discussion] (1) The patient gave extremely few responses (ten items) compared to healthy people (25 items). (2) The rate of present time perspective that continued from past negative memories was considerably decreased at the time of discharge from the hospital. Moreover, future time perspective was neither observed at the time of admission, nor at the time of discharge. (3) The trend for dichotomous thinking, which had been remarkable at the time of admission, improved at the time of discharge. (4) The sore of CES-D decreased from 45 points (at the time of administration) to two points (at the time of discharge). These results suggested that providing positive feedback for thinking about the past and positive feedforward for the future could be beneficial for such patients. Keywords: depression, Time perspective test (TPT), past time perspective, present time perspective, future time perspective, CES-D Why angry people are depressed? Mediating effect of time perspective Anna ZAJENKOWSKA, Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Poland Marcin ZAJENKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland anna.wasiela@gmail.com Time perspectives were found to correlate with aggression. In the present study we wanted to explore the nature of this relationship and investigate psychological health of those individuals, who present high level anger. A sample of 260 university students completed the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9). Depression and anger share a mutually extensive relationship. On one side people higher in depression report higher experiences of anger, on the other - higher levels of anger seem to increase the likelihood of depression. There is also 170

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Abstracts: Posters – July 30th a notion that both expression and suppression of anger may lead to depression and that women are at a higher risk than men. Our study confirmed correlation between anger and depression, and also found that the Past Negative Perspective being a mediator is possibly one of the reasons for such relation. Namely, individuals that already have the disposition to feelings of anger seem to develop this maladaptive time frame, which in turn leads to depressive symptoms. Moreover, the study showed that this model is sex-specific. Keywords: aggression, anger, past negative perspective, sex differences Chronotype, sleep quality, anxiety and depressiveness among polish grammar school and secondary school students Kamila ZAPAŁOWICZ, Univeristy of Warsaw, Poland k.zapalowicz@student.uw.edu.pl Chronotype refers to person’s preference for a given time of day psychological (intellectual) and/or physical activities. Circadian preference can be viewed as a one of the most important aspect of personality and daily lifestyle. It has also many implications for well-being, performance, daytime functioning and health. Eveningoriented people prefer evening hours, while morning-oriented people prefer morning hours for both, intellectual and physical activity. It should be emphasized that differences between morning and evening people are not only connected with preferences but are also reflected in biological markers. The relationships between circadian preference, sleep quality and depressiveness among polish children and teenagers requires verification. In study participated 401 youth: 201 students of grammar school (aged 13-14, 115 girls) and 200 students of secondary school (aged 16-17, 104 girls). Chronotype was measured using polish version of MEQ, sleep quality by Life Rhythm Questionnaire, anxiety by STAI and depression by Krakow Depression Inventory. Life Rhythm Questionnaire consists of 8 scales: Sleep Sufficiency, Easiness of Falling Asleep, Continuity of Sleep, Morning Mood, Lack of Sleepiness, Sleep Effectiveness, Sleep Regularity and Morning Preference. Anxiety was measured Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st as state and as trait. In Krakow Depression Inventory there were distinguished 7 scales: lowered mood, anxiety, cognitive disturbances, activity disturbances, self-destruction, somatic symptoms and lie scale. It was expected that evening-oriented young will gain higher score on the scale of anxiety (as well as state as trait). Morning types were expected to be less depressive and have better sleep quality. Hypotheses were partly confirmed. Keywords: chronotype, anxiety, depressiveness, sleep

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st

July 31st Meta-analysis on Future time perspective across life domains Lucija ANDRE, University of Amsterdam, Child Development and Education; Psychology, The Netherlands Thea PEETSMA, Research Institute of Child Development and Education, The Netherlands Annelies VAN VIANEN, Psychology Research Institute, The Netherlands l.andre@uva.nl Future Time Perspective (FTP) – one’s focus/perspective towards future (goals) and awareness of the consequences of present actions – is an important driving force for people’s attitudes and behaviors in various life domains. The FTP motivational character has particularly sparked the research worldwide in life domains like education, work, and health. However, more than six decadeslong FTP research tradition has led to diversity of definitions, conceptualizations and methodological approaches (e.g., dozens of FTP definitions, more than 30 different FTP measures, different age groups, and study designs). Also, as researchers mostly approached the construct in relatively isolated life domains, FTP lacks interdisciplinary integration and little is known about the factors that may weaken or strengthen the FTP effects. This obvious empirical and theoretical ambiguity hampers the solid empirical and theoretical foundation on FTP construct, what calls for advance research synthesis. The aim of this study is to metaanalytically review extant FTP-research in education, work, and health by: (1) measuring the general effect size of relationships between FTP and attitudes and behaviours in learning, work, and health; and (2) testing which study-level characteristics moderate the effects (i.e., age; FTP operationalization; FTP measure type; study design; outcome type). The study design and preliminary results related to the relationships between FTP and learning and work attitudes and behaviours will be presented and discussed. Based on the meta-analysis findings we will aggregate the FTP

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st state of knowledge, develop a future research agenda, and aim to advance the FTP theory. Keywords: future time perspective, meta-analysis, learning, work, health Coping with unemployment: the consideration of the future consequences like antecedent of the transactional stress model. Gauthier CAMUS, University of Reims Champagne-Ardennes, Psychology, France Sophie BERJOT, University of Reims Champagne-Ardennes, Psychology, France gautcam@gmail.com Unemployment, if not chosen voluntary, has many negative psychological, social, and physical consequences and as such is a major source of stress. To better understand how people appraise and react to unemployment, we propose to use the transactional model of stress and in particular its application to identity which differentiates between threat and challenge to personal and social identity. Using this model, we propose to focus on the consideration of future consequences as a possible variable that can influence how employed people appraise their situation of being jobless in regard to their identity. Indeed, many studies showed that time perspective could be easily modified and restructured by employment. Moreover, the social and economical situation of employed people is such that priorities become more and more short-terms as time of employment increases. On the other hand, the consideration of future consequences has been linked to a better health and better adjusted health behaviors. So the aim of the study is to test the impact of the consideration of the future consequences (people consider present versus future consequences of their action before acting) on how unemployed people cognitively appraise this situation of unemployment in regard to their personal and social identities. Results, using structural equation modeling, showed that while present CFC was an antecedent of threat appraisals, future appraisal was an antecedent of challenge appraisals. Appraisals impact then perceived stress which impacts 174

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st suicidal risk. Those findings are discussed, thus laying the limitations of this research and the opportunities that it can bring. Keywords: Unemployment, consideration of future consequences, transactional model of stress, cognitive appraisal, identities. Changes in intention for self-change and self-esteem across the life span in Japanese samples. Yuta CHISHIMA, University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Japan chishima@human.tsukuba.ac.jp The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectories of intention for self-change and self-esteem across developmental stages in Japanese samples. It is well known that most adolescents are eager to change themselves. However, only few studies have examined empirically how self-change intentions transform across the life span. A total of 1868 Japanese participants aged 12 to 69 years responded to measures of intentions for self-change (Chishima, 2013), focus on self-change, and self-esteem (Rosenberg, 1965). Data from junior high school (12–15 yrs.), high school (15–17 yrs.), and college students (18–22 yrs.) were collected via questionnaires. Data from participants in the age group 22 years and above were collected using a web survey. An ANOVA indicated that the self-change intentions significantly increased (F (7, 1813) = 22.91, p < .001, η2 = .08), while selfesteem significantly decreased with age (F (7, 1840) = 25.08, p < .001, η2 = .09). Additionally, post-hoc comparisons revealed that high school students had the highest scores on items assessing the intentions for self-change and lowest scores on items assessing self-esteem as compared to the other age groups. College students scored the highest on focus on self-change (F (7, 1852) = 27.01, p < .001, η2 = .09). In sum, the self-change intentions peaked at adolescence and decreased with rise in self-esteem across the life span. These findings were confirmed and expanded the results in previous studies (e.g. Robins, Trzesniewski, Tracy, Gosling, & Potter, 2002).

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Keywords: intention for self-change, self-esteem, focus on selfchange, life span, Japanese Affective forecasting about future events: My friend better than me? Virginie CHRISTOPHE, University of Liège - ULG, Department of Psychology: Cognition and Behavior, Personality Psychology and Individual Differences Unit, Belgique v.christophe@student.ulg.ac.be Recent findings suggest that we neglect our personality to predict our future emotional reactions to specific events by focusing only on the events, inducing wrong forecasts. An interesting question to investigate is that our friends could predict better our affective states about future events because they take into account our personal dispositions. In the present study, sixty-nine pairs of students (participant/friend) were asked to predict their emotional reactions and those for a friend on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (very bad) to 7 (very good) two months before they will obtain their results for one examination. All the participants were contacted by SMS the day when the results were available, and were requested to rate their present affective states. Results showed that emotional predictions were different as compared to the current emotions for extreme results (upper than 8/10, and below 4/10) for the main participants but also for their friends, meaning that all the subjects predicted more positive emotions than current ones for very good results, and more negative emotions than current ones for very bad results. In contrast, the predictions were right for middle results (between 5/10 and 7/10) for both groups. These findings do not show that our friends are better predictors of our future emotional states than us. One possible explanation is that in present study, both participants and friends were concerned about the future event (i.e., academic results). So, our friends could be better forecasters only in the case of future events not shared. Keywords: affective forecasting, personality neglect, personal dispositions

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Time perspective and parenting stress in mothers of children with developmental disabilities aged 3 to 12 years Karolina GOCLOWSKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Ewa PISULA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland karola.goclowska@gmail.com A number of studies reported that parents of children with developmental disabilities, like autism or fragile X syndrome, declared higher levels of parental stress and depressive symptoms than parents of typically developing children (e.g. Abbeduto et al. 2004). However, there is no data on the relationship between the level of parental stress and time perspective in this group of parents. The purpose of the study was to explore this relationship. A sample of 36 mothers of children with developmental disabilities, aged 3 to 12 years, from Gdansk, Gdynia, Sopot, Lodz, Bialystok and Warsaw, completed the Polish version of the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) and the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI). We have studied the time perspective in mothers and the level of parental stress as well as we looked for correlation between the five ZTPI factors and 3 general scales of the PSI. The preliminary analysis of the results has shown that past negative time perspective in mothers was significantly related to all three main domains of PSI. The strongest positive correlation was found for past negative time perspective and total stress scale. Moreover, past negative time perspective has correlated positively both with Parent Domain and Child Domain. The data are still collected and complete results will be presented at the conference. Keywords: time perspective, ZTPI, mothers, parenting stress, PSI, developmental disorders

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Relation between adolescent’s time orientation toward present and effects of thinking about death on their attitude toward time Ryo ISHII, Nagoya University, Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan nxt001@gmail.com Previous studies revealed that thinking about death has effects on adolescent’s time attitude. Many factors, however, are easily predicted to influence the effects of thinking about death. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between adolescent’s time orientation and the effects of thinking about death on their attitude toward time. A total of 32 undergraduates answered 2 questionnaires assessing time orientation and attitude toward time before and after thinking about death. By means of individual time orientation score which measured before the thinking assignment, participants were divided into 2 groups; a strong time orientation group (n=16), and a weak time orientation group (n=16). The results of ANOVA showed that attitude toward time after thinking about death was more positive than before in the strong time orientation group. Meanwhile, in the weak time orientation group, attitude toward time after thinking about death was more negative than before. These results were showed only when time orientation groups were organized by using the scores assessing time orientation toward present. Especially, time orientation toward present has an influence on the effects of thinking about death on their sense of fulfillment in present time and aspiration for the goals. These results support suggestions that time orientation toward present is necessary for adolescents to have the sense of fulfillment in present time and aspiration for the goals when they think about death. The importance of time orientation toward present for death education was suggested. Keywords: death, attitude toward time, time orientation, adolescence

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Time for sex in chronotypes Konrad JANKOWSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland konrad.jankowski@psych.uw.edu.pl The study aimed at testing chronotype and gender differences in the time of day when humans feel the greatest need for sex and the time of day they actually undertake sexual activity. A Polish sample of 565 participants aged between 18 and 57 was tested. In females, regardless of chronotype, the greatest need for sex occurred between 18:00 and 24:00, but secondary peak appeared in morning types at 6:00-9:00. In males, the greatest need for sex occurred either in the morning or evening: in evening types at 9:00-12:00 and 18:00-3:00; in neither types at 6:00-9:00 and 18:00-24:00; in morning types at 6:00-12:00 and 18:00-24:00. Considering time of day when subjects were undertaking sexual activity most frequently, this appeared between 18:00-24:00 for all the participants, and prolonged until 3:00 at night in evening type males. Morningness preference was more strongly related to the timing of need for sex than to the timing of actual sexual activity (r = -.275 vs. r = -.174), while the timing of desire and the timing of sexual activity were positively, but moderately related (r = .320). Keywords: morningness-eveningness, time of day, sexual activity Time perspective and risky behaviour: cluster analysis approach Antanas KAIRYS, Vilnius University, Lithuania, Department of General Psychology, Lithuania Laima BULOTAITE, Vilnius University, Lithuania, Department of General Psychology antanas.kairys@fsf.vu.lt Cluster analysis has recently approved itself as a competitive method of analysis of complex time perspective profiles. Most analyses in the field of time perspective research are investigating the issue of balanced time perspective and the well-being (e.g. Boniwell, Osin, Linley, & Ivanchenko, 2010). However only few address the issue of time perspective profiles in other fields (e.g. Kairys & Liniauskaite, 2013; Ozcetin & Eren, 2010). The aim of the Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st present study is to identify the time perspective clusters in Lithuanian students sample and analyse the frequency of risky behaviours in the identified clusters. Sample: 664 students (23,8 % males; the mean age 20,44 years) from different universities of Lithuania. Measures: The Lithuanian version of ZTPI and a questionnaire concerning risky behaviours (such as the usage of narcotic substances as well as the involvement in extreme types of sport etc.) were used. Cluster analysis performed using Sleipner 2.1 (The Ward method was used) identified seven different time perspective clusters. The frequency of risky behaviour (such as being passenger in the car with a drunk driver, binge drinking behaviour as well as smoking) differed among the identified clusters. The highest frequency of several risky behaviours was reported within the cluster characterized with an elevated past negative, present fatalistic and present hedonistic time perspectives. The lowest frequency of risky behaviours was observed within the cluster characterized by predominant future time perspective. Keywords: risky behaviour, time perspective, cluster analysis Relation between time orientation and self-regulation in adolescents Grazyna KATRA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Anna MUCKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland katra@psych.uw.edu.pl The study focused on the correlation between self-regulation and time perspective according to the theory . Self-regulation is the ability to manage its current and complex activity, leading to achieve goals, away during the time. Based on the concept of selfregulation Zimmermann developed a questionnaire covering the four phases of self-regulation. Time perspectives described by Zimbardo and Boyd it's: passed negative time perspective, passed positive time perspective, present hedonistic time perspective, present fatalistic and future time perspective. Studied 103 people aged 16-20 years. Obtained a high positive correlation between self-regulation and the future time perspective (.3919) and 180

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st between self-regulation and passed negative time perspective (0.2368). The strongest correlation was observed between activity – the phase of self-regulation – and future orientation (0.415). Keywords: adolescence, time perspective, self-regulation An international comparison of confirmatory factorial structure and latent profiles regarding the construct of adolescent time perspective Svenja KONOWALCZYK, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany, Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Germany Rüdiger HEIM, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany Zena R. MELLO, San Francisco State University, USA Monika BUHL, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany svenja.konowalczyk@issw.uni-heidelberg.de Generally, personality development and identity formation can be seen as central topics in adolescent development (Oerter & Montada, 2008). Pinquart und Silbereisen (2000) discuss how time perspective is an important component of self-description. Adolescents identify themselves compared with children not only by the present, but also by the past and the future. Mello and Worrell (2007) developed the Adolescent Time Attitudes Scale (ATAS) to measure positive and negative attitudes toward the past, the present, and the future. The ATAS has been translated into several languages including German (Worrell, Mello, & Buhl, 2008, 2013) and Spanish (Mello, Worrell, Anguiano, & Mendoza-Denton, 2010). This study aims to examine the structure of the ATAS in samples of German, Luxembourgian and Spanish adolescents. Data were self-reported and included German (n = 999) Spanish (n = 830) and Luxembourgian (n = 723) adolescents. The ATAS comprised 24 items with 4 items each measuring the past, present and future positive and negative attitudes, respectively. The confirmatory factor analyses using Mplus produced in all three samples a good model-fit for the theoretically postulated sixfactorial structure (χ^2/df ratiomax = 3.63; RMSEAmax = .056;

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st CFImin = .938; TLImin = .928). The high covariances between the latent constructs of the past- and the present-perspective however indicated a four-factorial structure. In comparison of the two model-versions both the parsimony indices AIC and BIC and the remaining fit-indices assume the six-factorial structure. In conclusion, results are discussed a four- or six-factorial solution. Further examination will include latent profile analyses. Keywords: time perspective, adolescence, adolescent time attitudes scale, international commparison, validation Intrinsic motivation and time perspective in serbian students Aleksandra KOSTIC, University of Nis, Department of Psychology, Serbia Jasmina NEDELJKOVIC, Faculty of Legal and Business Studies Dr Lazar Vrkatic, Serbia aleksandrakost@gmail.com The main aim of this study was to investigate a relation between the time orientation and intrinsic motivation in student population. The main study question was whether the dominant time orientation could influence intrinsic motivation in student population. The predictor variables were the dimensions of time perspective (the affirmative and negative past, the hedonistic and fatalistic present and the future), whereas the criterion variable was the intrinsic motivation for studying. Sample: the respondents were 516 students of different departments of the Faculty of Philosophy – Niš. Instruments: Zimbardo’s inventory of time perspective, ZTPI (Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999), was used to measure the time perspective; Academic motivation scale, AMS (Pelletier, Blias, Briere, Senecal & Valleries, 1992), was used to determine the extent of inner motivation. The results show that we have achieved a statistically significant regressive model which accounts for 27% of the variance (R=0,52; R2=0,27). The affirmative past, the hedonistic present and the inclination towards the future stood out as important predictors of inner motivation. A feeling of happiness and current pleasure can, along with planning, influence the increase in students’ inner motivation. Keywords: intrinsic motivation, time perspective, Serbian students 182

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st The relationship between time perspective and perceived stress in temporal discounting among adolescents Marta MALESZA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland marta.malesza@psych.uw.edu.pl Temporal discounting is a behavioral measure of decision-making and describes a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preference for smaller, immediate rewards over larger, later payoffs. As the delay to receiving a reward increases, there is a decrease in value of the future reward. Previous research has studied the roles of time perspective and stress on decision-making separately, but very few have investigated both factors in relation to temporal discounting. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of time perspective and perception of stress on temporal discounting among adolescents. 118 adolescents participated in the experiment, ranging in age from 14 to 18 years. Individuals were recruited from a parent volunteer database. Data was collected using online versions of three questionnaires: Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, Kirby Monetary Choice Questionnaire, and Perceived Stress Scale. Results indicated a significant interaction between future time perspective and perceived stress in relation to the temporal discounting measure. Perceived stress became more relevant and important in decision making when individuals were more future oriented. More specifically, in highly future oriented individuals, perceived stress was a significant mediator and moderate predictor of temporal discounting performance. Moreover, structural modeling analysis indicated that the relation of perceived stress to time perspective measures was indirect, mediated through behavioral coping. Results are discussed with respect to epigenetic models and the role of executive functions in self-control ability. Keywords: time perspective, delay discounting, perceived stress, adolescents

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Time relation in American and Nigerian adolescents and young adults Zena MELLO, San Francisco State University, Psychology, USA Samuel OLADIPO, Tai Solarin University of Education, Nigeria Frank C. WORRELL, University of California, Berkeley, USA zmello@sfsu.edu In this study, we examined how American and Nigerian adolescents and young adults compared in time relation. This concept has been defined as the degree to which individuals’ perceive that the past, the present, and the future are related to one another, and is considered one element of the broader psychological construct of time perspective (Cottle, 1967; Mello, in press; Mello, Finan, & Worrell, 2013). Data were collected from a metropolitan area in Nigeria (n = 194) and Western and Mountain regions in the United States (n = 748). The primary measure included the Time Relation Instrument (Mello & Worrell, 2007), which comprises several figures of circles labeled the past, the present, and the future that vary in the degree to which they overlap. The overlapping circles indicate perceived relationships among the time periods. Results indicated that Americans reported more linear and less unrelated perspectives of the time periods than the Nigerians χ2(1, 910) = 71.69, p < .001. The association between time relation and country was moderately strong, as indicated by a Cramer’s V value of .28. The results of this study reflect an important direction of research that seeks to understand cultural variation in time relation. These findings are consistent with theoretical discussions suggesting that time perspective is both individually- and culturally-related (Jones, 1988). Future research should examine the association between variation in time relation and developmental outcomes, cultural differences in this association, and the psychosocial variables that may account for the differences. Keywords: Time relation, Nigeria, America, adolescents, Adolescent Time Inventory

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Attitudes toward future among managers in Russian companies Timofei NESTIK, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation nestik@gmail.com Two studies explored social-psychological factors of managers’ attitudes toward analysis of the future risks and possibilities for their organization. Study 1 examined the relationship between group reflexivity and managers’ representations of organizational future (N=168). The evaluation of the organizational future was found related to the strength of organizational identity, the leadership vision the team members adopt and the organizational mood. The time span of the organizational future that is discussed by managers turned out to be strongly related to the official planning horizon (i.e. to the length of business cycles). The group orientation for the analysis of future risks and possibilities during the meetings was positively related to the group reflexivity. The results imply that a higher level of group attention to the experience and the lessons learned can favorably influence the group proactiveness: no common future without acknowledging the common past. Study 2 (N=169) examined the organizational and psychological factors of the managerial team ability for foresight that was found mainly related to the social integration (shared vision of organizational long-term objectives, group trust and organizational commitment of managers, stability of managerial team membership). Three different psychological mechanisms of team members’ attitudes toward common future can be supposed: 1) group identification based on the common objectives; 2) interpersonal emotional contamination in informal talks forced by anxiety about near future and by escape to the idealized past; and 3) group reflection that imposes controllable and mainly rational discussion about near and distant future where the past is used for organizational learning. Possible directions for future research are discussed. Keywords: future attitudes, collective time perspective, corporate foresight, group reflexiveness, social integration

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Time is not only a treasure of scholars - the relationship between need for cognition openness to experience and Time Perspective Weronika PIKTEL, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland Maria LEDZIŃSKA, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland piktel.weronika@gmail.com Title of the poster refers to the G.C. Lichtenberg’s well-known saying that shows the meaning of time in the scientific research. Presented findings are inconsistent with Lichtenberg’s contention. The authors stay in opposition to this statement and emphasize universal nature of time. Time in this research was defined in terms of Time Perspectives and state of balance (Balanced Time Perspective) established by Zimbardo (1999). The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between Time Perspective and need for cognition. Need for cognition was described from two different theoretical points of view – the first captures motivational (needs) and the second personality (the Big Five model) aspects. A sample of 140 university students of both sexes aged between 20 and 38 filled three online questionnaires. The following questionnaires were used: the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), polish version of Need for Cognition Scale (KPP) and polish version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI – PL –R). The results obtained in this research suggest: a) Coincidence of need for cognition and openness to experience b) Positive correlation between Balanced Time Perspective operationalized as DBTP rate with dimensions of personality in the Big Five model c) Correlation between Balanced Time Perspective and Need for Cognition Our research confirmed the coexistence of relationships between need for active exploring and Balanced Time Perspective. Keywords: time perspective, need for cognition, personality

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Are we bored in our leisure time? Free-time management and boredom Aneta PRZEPIÓRKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Agata BŁACHNIO, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin aneta.przepiorka@gmail.com The present study has three aims. Firstly, it investigates the relations between free-time management and boredom during leisure time. Secondly, it shows the psychometric parameters of these scales on a Polish sample (Free-time Management Scale by Wang et al., and Leisure Boredom Scale by Chung al). Thirdly, it examines the relations between our attitude towards leisure time, life satisfaction, and self-esteem. In the study over 400 students took part. The scale to measure free-time management has five dimensions: goal setting and evaluating, technique, values, immediate response, and scheduling. It comprises 20-item. The Leisure Boredom Scale consisted of 16 items where responds are on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Time managements skills were negatively related to boredom. The Cronbach coefficients alpha of both scales were satisfactory. Keywords: time management, leisure time, boredom, life sastifaction, self-esteem Connection between time perspective and personal meaning of life orientations: longitudinal study Margaryta RUZHYTSKA, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, Psychology, Ukraine rugytska@gmail.com Our research was based on the concept of time perspective of F. Zimbardo, J. Boyd and existential personality theory of V. Frankl, S. Maddi, D. A. Leontiev. The aim of the presented initial part of the longitudinal study was to investigate the dynamics in connection between personal time perspective and meaning of life orientations. The questionnaire contained ZTPI (Zimbardo and Boyd, 1999) and Test of the Meaning of Life Orientations (D. A. Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Leontiev, 2006). The study was conducted over 2 years. Data were collected on 80 women, between the ages of 20-40 years. Reliabilities analysis, descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis were conducted. It was found that the most prevalent TP profile was Future time orientation, in both years of study. Balanced time profile was not presented among individuals. Moreover, changes in the most prominent meaning of life orientations were shown. Goals in life and Locus of control-Life were the prevalent orientations in the first year and Effectiveness of life - in the second year of study. Furthermore, there were found two-way connections between time perspective and meaning of life orientations. Likewise, changes in the revealed two-way connections could be associated with personal changes in meaning of life orientations. Thus, a more detailed study of changes in meaning of life orientations in the dynamic of relations between temporal and meaning of life orientations possibly could explain changes in personal time perspective. What could be confirmed or denied at later stages of a longitudinal study. Keywords: time perspective, future time perspective, meaning of life, personal meaning of life orientation Your time perspective reflects the history of your life Oksana SENYK, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Department of Psychology, Ukraine oksana.senyk85@gmail.com According to Professor Philip Zimbardo, time perspective is “a nonconscious process whereby the continual flows of personal and social experiences are assigned to temporal categories, or time frames, that help to give order, coherence, and meaning to those events” (Zimbardo, & Boyd, 1999, p. 1271). The first categorization models of one’s personal experiences are formed in the very childhood and are passed to a child from the parents or the nearest people. The usage of these models leads to their reinforcement or change depending on the result. Thus, time perspective of an individual undergoes changes and transformations throughout his life and should include the whole 188

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st of his past experience. The aim of the current study was to find out if an individual time perspective reflects one’s life history. Five hundred and eleven Ukrainian participants completed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and answered the questions about participants’ current place of residence and their place of residence in childhood. Answers to the questions made it possible to determine respondents’ change of residence and its relation to the current time perspective. The results have shown that certain facts from individual’s past or present life, represented by his residence in childhood and current residential place do not determine his time perspective. However, the content of time perspective is influenced by the current life situation of an individual that includes history of his life path represented by the changing different residential settlements. Keywords: time perspective, place of residence How do we feel and cope with the bank loan. The impact of future time perspective. Mirosław SMYL, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Zbigniew ZALESKI, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland m.smyl@chello.pl The bank loan is not without any influence on emotional and evaluative processes. On the one hand the loan enables realization of a concrete goal (e. g. starting own business, purchase of apartment, children education), while on the other hand becomes a psychological burden due to the dependence on the bank and leads to self-restrictions. Thus we test the question what emotions prevail – positive or negative and in what way and degree the personal FTP affects them. The assumption is that those with the long FTP having short term loan will experience rather positive emotions. Those with short FTP and long-term loan – rather negative emotions. The comparison of the outcomes with the results from Ss not indebted in a bank permits to indicate the intensity of emotions in loantakers. Keywords: bank loan, debt, time perspective, emotions, goals

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Selected aspects of time perspective and experience of pain. Review of research Małgorzata SOBOL-KWAPIŃSKA, Institute of Psychology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland Włodzimierz PŁOTEK, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland Marcin CYBULSKI, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland sobol@kul.pl Background: Pain is a complex phenomenon. The experience of the past, the perception of the current situation and attitudes towards the future are very important psychological factors in the experience of pain. Aims: The purpose of the poster is to present a review of research on the relationship between pain and selected aspects of temporal perspective. Points for the Discussion: Depressive thoughts concerning the past, regret for the past and their impact on the current experience of pain are analyzed. In the following, issues related to attitudes toward the future (fear of what will happen in the future, the expectation of pain perceived as a threat) and their importance in the perception of pain and coping with it are discussed. Then the research on the relationship between pain and focus on the present (mindfulness, flow) are considered. Conclusions: Negative past and future perspective are related to the high intensity of pain experience. The active present perspective limits anxiety and grief , increases an attitude of curiosity and involvement in the "here and now” and thus makes it easier to cope with pain. Practical implications: The results of these investigation can be useful in medicine or pain therapy in psychology. In order to reduce the pain feeling doctors , during the interview (or examination), should assist the patient to increase the focus on the present and reduce the negative past and future perspective. Keywords: time perspective, pain, grief, anxiety

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st In search for the roots of Time Perspective: The key role of closeness, autonomy, and parenting styles Maciej STOLARSKI, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Psychology, Poland mstolarski@psych.uw.edu.pl Most recent studies on Time Perspective (TP) concerns various consequences of temporal orientations, however research on its origins is scarce. The present study is focused on familial bases of TP. It was conducted on 300 young adults aged 18-30; self-report measures were applied to assess their TP profiles, perceived closeness and intimacy in families o origin, as well as perceived parenting styles of both their mothers and fathers. Regression analyses conducted for each TP as well for Balanced TP coefficient suggest that familial background remains crucial for the development o adaptive TP profile. In particular, a combination of high closeness and intimacy, and both parents' coherence in their parenting styles remain a key to developing higher Past Positive and Future TPs, as well as to obtaining temporal balance. Keywords: time perspective, family of origin, closeness, intimacy, parenting style Transcendental future in old age Celina TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, University of Szczecin, Institute of Psychology, Poland Beata BUGAJSKA, University of Szczecin, Institute of Pedagogy c.timoszyk@wp.pl Temporal future perspective seems to be objectively terminated by natural death. The man needs to transcend beyond one’s own limits as well as beyond one’s own life - time perspective. The perception and personal attitude toward death have regulative function of personal activity. This refers as well as to length of one’s life cycle and to death viewed as a personal experience every individual has to cope with. The main interest of the presented material is focused on various aspects of transcendental future of people in late adulthood. It was assumed that people consider death and some kind of life after death, and therefore they can formulate plans about it. Although the goals set for this Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st purpose are not identical to those connected with earthly life, they can be crucial and motivating for contemporary activity. It was also postulated that old people work out various approaches toward their termination of biological life, even if they do not believe in any after earthly life existence. The studied group consisted of 350 participants – 231 women and 119 men aged more than 65. The two experimental versions of research tools were used: a survey to measure temporal life perspective and a scale of general attitudes towards future. The obtained results revealed that eighty – year- old people more often think of death than sixty-year-old ones. It appeared that nearly half of the studied group possessed transcendental goals concerning “life” after death. The above-mentioned goals covered following contents: meeting close relatives, religious activity and fulfillment of universals values (for example happiness, peace of mind). The transcendental approaches increases in the group of older respondents. Keywords: transcendental future, old age, future time perspective Time perspective and values: a cross-cultural comparison Kinga TUCHOLSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland Józef MACIUSZEK, Jagiellonian University, Poland Anna KAWULA, Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland kinga.tucholska@uj.edu.pl Films are particularly well suited to depict psychological phenomena. The combination of images, music, dialogue, lighting, camera angles, and sound effects in a film mimic thoughts and feelings that occur in our consciousness. Characters in many popular films portray persons who more or less consciously experience time, sometimes in quite an unusual way. There are also some films which seems to be the form of a tribute to time phenomenon itself. The presented work provides a practical guideline for all interested in films that deals seriously with the time as an existential theme. All the depictions proposed offer a unique learning and teaching opportunity - might complement the text, lectures, and discussions with students. Watching them with conscious awareness

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IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st might be also a form of therapy or self-help causing insight, emotional release or relief, inspirational thoughts, and natural change. Keywords: psychological time, film Time perspectives at the work: engagement.

behaviors, satisfaction and

Katarzyna WOJTKOWSKA, Faculty of Psychology,University of Warsaw, Poland Maciej STOLARSKI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Poland katarzyna.wojtkowska@psych.uw.edu.pl This study investigated the relations between time perspectives and organizational citizenship behaviors/counterproductive work behaviors/job satisfaction/work engagement. This research was exploratory, because is the first in this domain. The participants were 200 office workers, who were recruited by snowball method from a lot of companies. This study found the following: First, Positive Future was positively related to OCB, job satisfaction and engagement. In contrast, Positive Future was negatively related to CWB. Second, Present Fatalist was positively related to CWB and negatively to OCB, work engagement. Third, DBTP was positively related to CWB and contrary to OCB. In conclusion, the results may be useful in human resource management to make employees more pro-organizational and less counterproductive. Keywords: time perspective, CWB, OCB, job satisfaction, work engagement

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Abstracts: Posters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 31st Gender differences in the relationship between temporal orientation and depression among employees Miku YOSHIDA, Nagoya University, Department of Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan Atsuko KANAI, Nagoya University, Department of Psychology and Human Developmental Sciences, Japan miku.y.0213@gmail.com The purpose of this study was to examine, quantitatively and qualitatively, gender differences in the relationship between temporal orientation and depression among employees. In study 1, a questionnaire survey was conducted. The participants were 96 employees. The results of one-way ANOVA showed that those who had negative temporal orientation had significantly higher depression than those who had positive one. Also, the results of two-way ANOVA showed that the relationship between negative temporal orientation and depression in females was stronger than that in males. In study 2, a semi-structured interview was conducted. The participants were 10 employees who consented to additional survey in the questionnaire of study 1. The verbatim transcription about their past, present and future events were classified into several categories by using KJ method. The results of chi-square test suggested gender differences as follows: (1) in regard to the recollecting past events, the males tended to have topics of their jobs mainly, while the females tended to have a large variety of topics; (2) in regard to the recognizing future events, the males tended to have concrete visions of the future, while the females tended to have their ambiguous visions. These findings suggested that the depression of male employees who have the negative temporal orientation was suppressed by having concrete visions for the future. The relationship between recollecting past events and depression was also discussed. Keywords: Temporal Orientation, Depression, Gender Difference

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Abstracts: Posters – July 31st Cognitive control and intelligence as predictors of time perspective: high level of cognitive ability reduces maladaptive time orientation Marcin ZAJENKOWSKI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Poland zajenkowski@psych.uw.edu.pl There is a growing interest in the study of the role of intellectual functioning, traditionally viewed as a ‘cool’ cognitive concept, in the regulation of ‘hot’ processes such as affective experiences. Especially, much research has explored the relationship between executive functioning (working memory, cognitive control) and the self-control and self-regulation of affect. Because the former is also highly correlated with intelligence, in the present studies we decided to examine how both variables predict time orientation, since many investigations devoted to time perspective (TP) show that Zimbardo’s dimensions are associated with various aspects of emotionality. In two studies TP (with ZTPI), intelligence (with Raven’s test), cognitive control and three stress states: task engagement, distress and worry were measured. It was found that participants with higher results on cognitive control task and intelligence test exhibit also lower level of past negative and present fatalistic TPs. Moreover, individuals with high fatalism generally experienced higher stress while solving the cognitive tasks. The results are discussed in terms of the cognitive control role in self-regulation. Keywords: intelligence, cognitive control, time perspective, stress

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Authors Index

Authors Index BURZYŃSKA, 25, 157

A

C

ADAN, 21, 62 AFONSO, 19, 95 AGNOLETTI, 24, 149 ALMEIDA, 44, 140 ANDRE, 37, 173 ARBABI, 21, 63 ARGIROPOULOU, 34, 75

Å ÅSTRÖM, 24, 150

A AZEVEDO, 6, 19, 46, 94, 95, 144

B BAGDONAS, 18, 91 BAIN, 32, 120 BAJEC, 42, 129 BARBERÀ, 46, 146 BARBOSA, 44, 140 BAYMA, 22, 73 BEADMAN, 43, 135 BELDZIK, 20, 64 BENNETT, 42, 130 BERJOT, 37, 174 BŁACHNIO, 26, 39, 164, 187 BOHLMEIJER, 29, 112 BONILLA-FLORENTINO, 45, 139 BONIWELL, 16, 49 BRUDERER ENZLER, 32, 122 BUCZKOWSKI, 33, 125 BUDNIKOV, 31, 117 BUGAJSKA, 26, 40, 166, 191 BUHL, 23, 38, 103, 181 BULOTAITE, 38, 179

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CAELLI, 42, 130 CAMUS, 37, 174 CARBONI, 45, 142 CARELLI, 18, 24, 96, 150 CARMI, 32, 119 CARVALHO, 23, 43, 104, 137 CEGARRA, 42, 129 CHARPENTIER, 43, 135 CHESHIN, 28, 106 CHISHIMA, 24, 37, 151, 175 CHISTOPOLSKAYA, 6, 46, 143 CHRISTOPHE, 37, 176 CLARKE, 36, 85, 86, 89 CLEMENTS, 30, 55 COOLIDGE, 35, 80 CYBIS, 6, 24, 152 CYBULSKI, 40, 190 CZAKON, 6, 24, 153

D DA SILVA, 19, 23, 25, 97, 102, 154 DAVID, 25, 154 DE KONING, 42, 132 DIX, 42, 131 DOMAGALIK, 21, 64 DÖRFLER, 21, 63 DUARTE, 19, 95

E ENIKOLOPOV, 46, 143 ESTEVES, 35, 84

F FAFROWICZ, 21, 64

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Authors Index FATHI, 26, 162 FIEULAINE, 5, 6, 31, 118

G GACEK, 25, 159 GIGUÈRE, 43, 135 GOCLOWSKA, 37, 177 GOMÀ-I-FREIXANET, 21, 62 GOMES, 25, 161 GONZALEZ, 45, 142 GULLA, 47, 147

H HEIM, 38, 181 HERSHFIELD, 33, 123 HIRSCH, 34, 78

I IAGOE, 29, 110 ISHII, 38, 178 ISHIKAWA, 22, 25, 71, 155

J JANKOWSKI, 6, 20, 38, 60, 66, 179 JESZENSZKY, 46, 92 JIAYING LE, 18, 90 JIMENEZ-TORRES, 20, 45, 100, 139 JINHENG, 25, 156 JOCHEMCZYK, 33, 125 JOIREMAN, 16, 30, 35, 50, 58, 82, 83 JONES, 17, 51 JOSE, 23, 101 JUSTER, 45, 141

K KÁDÁR, 46, 92 KAIRYS, 18, 38, 91, 179 KALANTZI-AZIZI, 34, 75 KANAI, 41, 194

Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

KASHIMA, 32, 120 KATRA, 25, 33, 38, 124, 157, 158, 180 KATSUMA, 22, 72 KATSUMATA, 27, 169 KAWULA, 40, 192 KAZAKINA, 31, 47, 59, 115 KAZANCEVA, 46, 143 KENT, 42, 130 KIELPIKOWSKI, 23, 101 KITAMURA, 26, 165 KONISHI, 41, 126 KONOWALCZYK, 38, 181 KOSSEWSKA, 25, 159 KOSTIC, 38, 182 KRABBENDAM, 42, 132 KUHN, 23, 103

L LEDZIŃSKA, 39, 186 LEITE, 25, 29, 111, 161 LEONTIEV, 43, 133 LEROY, 41, 128 LES, 42, 129 LEVASSEUR, 30, 57 LEVY, 28, 108 LINIAUSKAITE, 18, 91 LIU, 35, 82 LOERMANS, 42, 132 LOPEZ-CORDOVA, 20, 45, 100, 139 LUPIEN, 45, 141

M MACIUSZEK, 40, 192 MAICHE, 45, 142 MAISON, 30, 56 MALESZA, 39, 183 MAREK, 21, 64 MARIN, 44, 141 MARKIEWICZ, 33, 125 MARSZAŁ-WIŚNIEWSKA, 43, 136 MARTIN, 45, 142 MATHA, 42, 129

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Authors Index MCKAY, 19, 99 MEISNER, 26, 160 MELLO, 19, 23, 26, 38, 39, 98, 103, 162, 181, 184 MENDEZ, 45, 142 MERSON, 31, 118 MILFONT, 6, 21, 32, 42, 61, 120, 121, 131 MORAIS, 25, 161 MOREIRA, 44, 140 MORGAN, 19, 99 MORIN-MAJOR, 45, 141 MUCKA, 38, 180 MURAKAMI, 24, 151 MURO, 21, 62 MUSIL, 28, 109

R

N NAKAMURA, 22, 72 NEDELJKOVIC, 38, 182 NESTIK, 39, 185 NEUBAUER, 26, 163 NIKOLAEV, 46, 143 NISHIMURA, 24, 151 NOBLE, 20, 45, 100, 139 NORDGREN, 33, 123 NOVO, 43, 137

O OGIŃSKA, 20, 64 OLADIPO, 39, 184 OLIVERA-FIGUEROA, 20, 44, 45, 100, 139, 141 ORKIBI, 28, 107 ORTUÑO, 35, 84

P PAIXÃO, 19, 22, 23, 25, 73, 97, 102, 154 PAKALNISKIENE, 18, 91 PASQUALI, 29, 111 PAÚL, 19, 46, 94, 95, 144

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PEETSMA, 5, 22, 37, 70, 173 PERRIOT, 31, 118 PICHAYAYOTHIN, 18, 93 PICKRELL, 35, 80 PIETRZAK, 33, 125 PIKTEL, 39, 186 PINO MUÑOZ, 90 PINTO, 44, 140 PIOTROWSKI, 47, 147 PIRES, 45, 142 PISULA, 37, 177 PŁOTEK, 40, 190 PONOMARENKO, 46, 143 PREAU, 31, 118 PRZEPIÓRKA, 6, 17, 26, 39, 90, 164, 187

RANDLER, 21, 63 RANI, 46, 145 RASHID, 26, 162 RASSKAZOVA, 43, 133 RATTAT, 42, 129 RAYKHMAN, 35, 80 RIBEIRO, 19, 95 RIDGEWAY, 29, 110 RIEDY, 35, 80 RIES, 42, 131 RODRIGUEZ, 45, 139 ROMERO, 46, 146 ROWIŃSKI, 24, 152 RUZHYTSKA, 39, 187

S SADR, 41, 127 SAKUMA, 27, 169 SCHUITEMA, 22, 70 SEKŚCIŃSKA, 26, 30, 56, 164 SEMYKIN, 46, 143 SENYK, 39, 188 SHARON, 46, 145 SHIRAI, 5, 22, 26, 67, 72, 165 SHIRRAN Marion, 36, 88, 89

IInd Conference on Time Perspective – Warsaw 2014


Authors Index SHIRRAN Martin, 36, 87, 89 SHUCARD, 34, 78 SIATIS, 75 SIROIS, 34, 43, 44, 74, 78, 79, 135, 138 SMYL, 40, 189 SOBOL-KWAPIŃSKA, 29, 40, 113, 190 STOLARSKI, 6, 33, 40, 125, 191, 193 STROUGH, 18, 93 SZCZEŚNIAK, 17, 90

T TAKAHASHI, 41, 126 TEIXEIRA, 19, 46, 94, 144 TEMPLE, 6, 29, 31, 42, 110, 116, 130 TIMOSZYK-TOMCZAK, 17, 26, 40, 90, 166, 191 TOKARSKA, 27, 167 TRIPPEL, 35, 80 TSUZUKI, 5, 22, 67, 69 TUCHOLSKA, 27, 40, 47, 147, 168, 192 TYLIKOWSKA, 27, 168

U

VLIEK, 28, 106 VOLLMER, 21, 63 VON PETERSDORFF, 28, 105 VOWINCKEL, 27, 29, 112, 168

W WATANABE, 27, 169 WATSON, 32, 121 WEBSTER, 29, 112 WESTERHOF, 29, 112 WIBERG, 24, 150 WILCZYŃSKA, 23, 105 WLODARCZYK, 25, 158 WOJTKOWSKA, 6, 40, 193 WORRELL, 19, 23, 26, 39, 99, 103, 162, 184 WYSOCKA-PLECZYK, 47, 147

Y YAMADA, 27, 169 YAT FAN SIU, 18, 90 YOSHIDA, 41, 194

USART, 46, 146

Z V

VALAX, 42, 129 VAN DER MEER, 42, 131 VAN DER VEEN, 22, 70 VAN EERDE, 34, 77 VAN EXEL, 19, 99 VAN GELDER, 33, 123 VAN VIANEN, 37, 173 VÁSQUEZ ECHEVERRÍA, 6, 35, 45, 79, 83, 84, 142 VELASCO, 41, 128

Diversity of Approaches, Unity of Passion

ZAJENKOWSKA, 27, 170 ZAJENKOWSKI, 6, 27, 41, 170, 195 ZALESKI, 5, 17, 26, 40, 53, 160, 189 ZAMBIANCHI, 6, 18, 96 ZAMYATIN, 43, 133 ZAPAŁOWICZ, 27, 171 ZIMBARDO, 5, 44, 53

Ž ŽIVKOVIČ, 28, 109

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Book of Abstracts | 2nd International Conference on Time Perspective  

Warsaw, Poland - 2014

Book of Abstracts | 2nd International Conference on Time Perspective  

Warsaw, Poland - 2014

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