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D OT E MAG AZINE . a well-styled and meaningful life issue two

spring 2015


table of contents FEATURES THE LOST ART OF HANDWRITING

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THROUGH THE AGES

52

AMANDA LINDHOUT :: TO BE A SURVIVOR

66

THE URBAN FARMER

82

A SENSE OF WONDER

96

Roasted Beet Salad Chartreuse Lemonade

IN EVERY ISSUE A NOTE FROM THE CO-FOUNDERS :: LIVE WHAT YOU LOVE

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A STYLED HOME :: LET THE SUNSHINE IN

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THE DIY HOME :: THE GREAT MANTLESCAPE

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ENTERTAIN :: BE OUR GUEST

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BEAUTY & BLOOMS :: STOP AND SMELL THE POSIES

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YOUR DREAM JOB :: THE BUSINESS OF PLANNING

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MARKET COLLECTIVE :: MELANIE LAURENE

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HEALTH & BEAUTY :: SUMMER BEAUTY TUTORIALS

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GIVING BACK :: LITTLE HIPPIES AT HEART

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SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT :: BREWS BROTHERS

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A MAN WITH A PASSION :: I AM SPIDER-MAN

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BAKED :: EVERYONE LOVES A LOAF!

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Olive Oil Grapefruit Loaf The Abigail

THE DOTE BOOK CLUB

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EMMA’S DOTEABLES :: GET ME OUTSIDE!

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creators and co-founders

KATE KLASSEN

JENNY FLAMAN

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR

staff

ALEXANDRA WIG

VICKI MANNESS

BLAIR INKSTER

SHANNON AYCOCK

STYLE EDITOR

FOOD EDITOR

RESIDENT

EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

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D OT E M AG A Z I NE . COPY EDITORS Cheryl Manness Heidi Brown Chantelle Andrukow Reilly Whittaker

CREATIVITY EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENT SIDES OF CHEF DUNCAN LY, GOLD MEDALIST, AWARD WINNING CHEF

COORDINATOR Heidi Brown

COVER PHOTO Model - Ella Jagrelius Photo - Sarah Vaughan Hair and makeup - RedBloom Salon

TABLE OF CONTENTS PHOTO Model - Rebecca Bruhjell Photo - Sarah Vaughan All content and images are used by express consent of the contributing authors and photographers and was created for Dote Magazine. Printed by Transcontinental Printing Advertising opportunities email :: ads@dotemagazine.com check out our website :: dotemagazine.com Dote Magazine will be published twice in 2015 and quarterly thereafter. Mailing address :: #242, 5126 126 AVE, SE Calgary, AB T2Z 0H2 Physical address :: #234, 5126 126 AVE, SE For more copies :: www.etsy.com/shop/dotemagazine

PUBLISHED BY Impact Group impactgr.com 403-279-0967 Contents copyright Š 2015 by Dote Magazine; may not be reprinted without express written permission from Dote Magazine. Dote Magazine will not be liable for any damages or losses as a result of the use of the reader and any information, opinions, or products expressed, advertised, or otherwise stated.

HOTEL ARTS | KENSINGTON RIVERSIDE INN


îŒ˛ShoesToLiveBy

POPPY BARLEY

Custom footwear. Ethically made.

PoppyBarley.com/Dote


contributors

AMANDA HOWARD

ANGEL GUERRA

ANNE TRANHOLM

CARA HOWLETT

DAVID HEIDRICH

ELIZABETH CHORNEY-BOOTH

EMMA KLASSEN

ERICA COOK

ERIKKA NIEMI & MICHAELA HOWIE

GENEVIEVE RENEE

JAMIE HYATT

JILL MAYER

KAIHLA TONAI

KAIT KUCY

LIDY DIPERT

MORGAN CHAPMAN NICOLE HUDSON

REBECCA BRUHJELL

RYAN GARTNER

COLUMNIST

COLUMNIST

COLUMNIST

WRITER

PHOTOGRAPHER

COLUMNIST

SARAH VAUGHAN PHOTOGRAPHER

ILLUSTRATOR

ILLUSTRATOR

LEAD INTERIOR STYLIST/ COLUMNIST

JOSEFA CAMERON WRITER

WRITER

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

HAIR AND MAKEUP ARTISTS/COLUMNISTS

PHOTOGRAPHER

COLUMNIST

COLUMNIST/WRITER

COLUMNIST

SHANNON YAU

Special thanks to Leanne Wood, Justine Ma, Margot Coben, Elaine Kupser, Michelle Doucette, Makena Doucette, Candace Wheeler, Harlo Patrick, Shayle Patrick, Dayna Ellen, Ella Jagrelius, Heather Jagrelius, Heather Row, Mike Klassen, Vintage Loved, Anthropologie, Plenty, Blue Hydrangea Floral Boutique, Sophia Models International, Mode Models International, The Chapman families.

PHOTOGRAPHER

LEAD FLORAL DESIGNER

COLUMNIST

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and welcome to Issue 2 of Dote Magazine. First and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who picked up our first issue, and we would especially like to thank those of you who sent us comments, wished us well, and showed your love for Dote. We are so appreciative of all the support. We thought an appropriate message for this issue would be “Live what you love,” because Dote Magazine is allowing us to live what we love, and Dote would be nothing without you! Everyone is different. There are trends, fads, and popular topics, but everyone has a style, personality, and passion of their own that determines what they love. We live in a time when every individual’s thoughts and opinions can be heard, when everyone can stand out if they choose. Some might argue that this can be a bad thing, but this is the time to be yourself, to take what you love and let it shine for the whole world to see. This is a time when creative people are thriving because everyone is so easily accessible and connected and people are appreciative and accepting of individuals. This is a time when we can truly live what we love. Late last year we had a tragedy in our family. Our Granny died suddenly of a heart attack and none of us were prepared for such a loss. She was our youngest grandparent, the caretaker, the one who would be around to meet all of her great grandchildren. In Issue 1, our Granny helped us create a moment to share with our readers that highlighted the importance of tradition. That story seems so much more important now. We couldn’t be happier that we were able to capture that moment and keep it alive forever. This issue’s motto fits our Granny perfectly because she loved her family and lived that with every second of every day. We would like to dedicate this issue to our Granny, Clara Nellie Pitura, the originator of our perogy recipe, our treasured traditions, and most importantly our values.

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Calligraphy by Jill Mayer, line illustrations drawn by Anne Tranholm. See more of Anne's Illustrations on the table of contents and pages 66-71.

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A Styled Home

Let the Sunshine In Written and styled by Erica Cook Photographed by Shannon Yau

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Some call it spring fever, some refer to it as the winter blahs… Whatever it is we all seem to hit the same seasonally influenced wall, yearly. There’s no need to get stuck in a rut at this time of year. Dressing our interiors with springlike touches can help us to forget just how cold it is outside, even if just temporarily, and gives us something to focus on before the warmer weather arrives.  

that had blackened over the winter months with soot and smoke. 

Historically and culturally, people around the world do a thorough cleaning in the spring. In the times  before furnaces and  vacuums the first spring  months were typically the earliest possible time to open up windows and doors, let the wind carry away dust (without the fear of insects invading) and air out the looming smell from an open fire or hearth. At this time it was also common to white wash (a thin paint-like mixture consisting of lime and chalk) interiors to freshen up and cover walls

There are many ways to freshen up your interior while winter storms on outside. Taking the time to edit winter interiors and incorporate spring elements is much easier than one might think. It’s as simple as swapping out heavier accessories for those with a lighter, airier, fresh aesthetic. 

Even today a thorough cleaning and refresh of our interiors can significantly alter our moods. The winter months are long, and breathing a bit of spring into our living spaces can trick us into believing that warmer weather is right around the corner and that it’s time to come out of hibernation. 

One of my favourite ways to create a sense of spring, and perhaps the most literal, is with the introduction


of live elements, such as fresh flowers or bulbs. Fresh flowers are a lovely indulgence and needn’t always be an expensive bouquet. Grocer’s tulips are cheerful and abundant. Forcing bulbs is also an inexpensive and thoroughly enjoyable way to breathe spring into a space. Bulbs are typically quite aromatic and can last for much longer than cut flowers and add a pop of colour to otherwise dull interiors.  Scents have a tremendous impact as well. A spicy rich candle can create a homey, cozy feel when our days are incredibly short. Treating yourself to  a bright, fresh, or citrusy scented candle will trick the nose into believing that a spring breeze is blowing outside.   Another quick change is to edit out heavy textures and dark elements like faux furs, velvets, and woolly throws in favour of brighter, lighter-weight textiles. Switching

cushion covers and blankets is perhaps one of the easiest ways to lighten up a space. Seasonal area rugs are a consideration too. Something thick, warm, and plush brings comfort underfoot when it’s first cold outside. I look forward to rolling up the winter area rug in favour of a sisal or sea grass one every year. It feels reminiscent of the beach and more tropical interiors. Many of my favourite winter accessories are constructed of heavy and opaque porcelains and metals… things such as vases, candle holders, etc. Incorporating  elements such as clear glass vases and lighter semi opaque glass touches will also lighten a space. It all works together when there’s a common tying  visual cue like the layering of gold elements.  9


Sources from top left:

Artwork :: Painted by Erica Cook. Lamp :: Pottery Barn. Brass Pineapple Candle :: Anthropologie. Large wooden tray :: HomeSense. Glass ball :: Similar at Crate and Barrel. Succulent vessel :: Indigo. Fig tree :: The Home Depot. Throw pillows :: HomeSense. Vases with gold lip :: H&M Home. Gold candy dish :: Paris. 10


4 tips for a spring transition

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2 3

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Make organization of seasonal accessories easy by storing outof-use elements in a labelled plastic bin. This will aid in the ease of switching décor up when the seasons change.

Keep a photo journal of your favourite décor set-ups stored on your phone or iPad. Recreating vignettes will be easy with a visual prompt. 

Always properly clean and repair décor elements before storing. There’s nothing worse than going to get your favourite throw blanket and realizing that it still has a hole in it from last spring. 

A deep clean is invigorating. Wipe down walls, baseboards and light switches. Vacuum room corners both on the floors and at the ceiling to remove cob webs or stray dust bunnies. Don’t forget the crevices under sofa cushions as well. It’s surprising what accumulates there.  

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The DIY Home

Th e G r ea t Ma n tl esca p e Written and styled by Lidy Dipert Photographed by Blair Inkster

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Ha ve no thing in y o ur ho use tha t yo u d o no t kno w t o be us ef ul, o r b eliev e t o b e be aut iful. -W i l lia m Morris

When a city like Calgary is growing at an exponential rate, buying a home can be daunting. You throw all your expectations out the window and rely solely on necessity and reality. Which can often means moving into a “cookiecutter” home. Although many suburban homes are stunning, there are certain common design dilemmas. That awkward space above the fireplace, which most often collects a lot of “stuff,” making the overall space feel a bit cluttered, is one key example. Perhaps the builders envisioned your standard television going there, but not all of us want our televisions to be the focal point in our family rooms. 

We came up with a simple solution that truly gave this space a new and fresh look! We closed off the opening above the fireplace and created a wall made of slat wood. We painted the entire room, including the new wall, white, allowing the area to flow. The slats brought a great texture by breaking up the flatness of the walls that surrounded the fireplace. We also painted the mantle (same as the wall colour, Behr Swiss Coffee, YL-W5) to help pull the fireplace together and make it look like one solid piece. The space certainly feels a lot more modern and minimal. Best part is, this home now has a lovely new mantle to be styled and decorated.

H e re' s what we did:

EEK!

Clear out and clean up the area.

Frame in a simple wall leaving the desired mantle depth. (We left 12")

Install slats using a nail gun. Fill in nail holes with paintable wood filler.

Paint the entire area. When painting your mantle, make sure to sand off the existing stain before painting. 13


VASE, CANDLE, AND BOX FROM INDIGO

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"SMILES" PRINT BY CAMALA THE ELEPHANT, FROM THE CALGARY ZOO

VINTAGE BRASS DEER FOUND AT A GARAGE SALE

PLANT FROM PLANT TERRARIUMS, POT FROM SUPERSTORE


PAINTING FOUND AT AN ESTATE SALE

PRINT FROM RIFLE PAPER CO.

GLASS PYRAMID FROM URBAN OUTFITTERS

PLANT AND POT FROM THE HOME DEPOT 15


G o n e a r e t h e da ys o f cl u tter ! Now that we have the fireplace makeover out of the way, let’s talk mantles because anyone who knows me knows that I love to design a good mantle! It might be a small surface area, but you can really make a room pop if you know how to create that perfect look. I’ve created a simple formula to help you navigate where to begin and how to go about creating a great design for your mantle:

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1. Introduce at least one unique piece of art or décor that will act as that conversational piece. It can

be something you picked up from your travels overseas, a thrifted item, or even a family heirloom passed down to you. The point is, it’s one-of-a-kind and everyone is going to want to know where you found it!

2. Keep a consistent colour palette by bringing in art prints, photographs, vases, florals, books, knickknacks, and candles. This will help the mantle feel light and flow easily, rather than being chopped up and feeling out of sorts. Think colour and texture— whether it’s bling from some brass or texture from a great painting — it’s all good.

3. This last one is my favourite! If you haven’t heard the term “Mantlescape,” then you’re welcome.

Basically, you want to think of a landscape when decorating your mantle. This will allow the eye to flow up and down in a more natural way. It won’t feel forced, but rather it will feel a bit more relaxed and comfortable.

I hope you find these tips helpful the next time you approach your mantle. Most of all, have fun and experiment. You can’t go wrong! FIND LIDY ON INSTAGRAM @HELLOLIDY

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Entertain

B e Our G uest Written and styled by Alexandra Wig Photographed by Genevieve Renee

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PRETTY DETAILS TO MAKE YOUR WEEKEND VISITORS FEEL RIGHT AT HOME Whether it's your college roommate, your in-laws, or your Airbnb-ers, as out-of-town guests come and go, we want to inspire you to create a beautiful space to welcome each and every one of them. We’ve put together some simple ideas to help you treat your overnight visitors to a comfortable and lovely stay. All it takes is some thoughtful touches and pretty details to create an experience nothing short of a boutique hotel. We’ve divided things up into three parts to ease you through amping up your place for the next time you host overnighters. Here are some tips to prep your guest bedroom, to stock your bathroom, and to awaken your guests with a fresh and easy breakfast. Happy hosting!

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T h e g uest bedro o m Have a refreshing beverage and chocolate treats ready upon arrival of your travellers. Present a little posy of flowers as the ultimate welcome and added freshness in the space. Offer hangers and storage baskets for temporary organizing, as well as an iron or steamer. Jot your Wi-Fi password down for easy access to the Internet. Provide plenty of pillows and throw blankets to ensure everyone’s sleeping preferences are met.

+ T h e g uest ba t hro o m Stock a variety of towels and an extra basket for laundry. Hang a robe for your guests to use during their stay. Compile a tray of bathroom amenities including toothbrushes, shower and bath products, cotton essentials, and a water carafe. Keep a lightly scented candle and matches out for use in the bedroom or bathroom.

+

A g oo d mo rni ng Leave a simple continental breakfast of seasonal fruit and fresh pastries out to greet your guests in the morning. Write down directions to a local coffee shop or farmer’s market in the area if you have to take off before your visitors are awake. Provide a key or any other household instructions so guests can come and go comfortably.

Cr i s p , c l ea n, a nd whi t e Nothing beats the crisp white sheets and fluffy towels, at a beautiful hotel. Stock your linen closet with a set of all-white sheets and towels that are reserved only for guests and give them a truly luxurious stay.

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W h a t i s t her e mo r e ki n dl y t h a n t h e f eel i ng between h o s t a nd guest? -Aesch yl us

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Special thanks to Blue Hydrangea Floral Boutique for the sweet little flower arrangement used in this story. Follow Blue Hydrangea on Instagram @bluehydrangeafloral


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Beauty & Blooms

St o p a n d Sm el l th e Po si es Written by Rebecca Bruhjell Photographed by Sarah Vaughan Having fresh flowers in my home is one of my guilty pleasures. Using natural decor is a quick and easy way to add life to any room and the organic beauty of flowers has made my space a bright and happy home. Although floral arranging can be intimidating and at times expensive, you don't have to miss out on the beauty of a fresh bouquet because of the cost. Your local supermarket is an excellent source for very reasonably priced, fresh flowers all year long. My favourite bloom is the universal, inexpensive tulip, available almost all year round and found at most grocery stores. By mixing supermarket flowers with unexpected containers, you can fill your home with an elegant and natural style. I encourage you to be bold with colour and texture and inventive with your containers. Also, bring lovely blooms and foliage that are growing in your own yard inside to add to your arrangements. Flower arranging doesn’t have to be complicated so don’t worry about following rules or needing special skills. All you need is a little imagination, an eagerness to experiment, and an ability to see beyond the norm. With that said, here are some of the things that you can do to get started!

B u y ing flo wers When shopping for flowers, you want fresh blooms that will enjoy a long vase life. Watch for firm petals, leaves, stems, and flowers with a good number of buds that haven’t opened yet. There are also some telltale signs that blooms are past their best; wilted, soft, and yellowing leaves or stems are an indication that flowers are old and tired and may have been left out of water for some time. With roses, peonies, or other large-petaled flowers, study the petals. If their veins are prominent, the flowers are dehydrated and not worth purchasing. Examine the base of the stems, if they are black or discoloured, they haven’t been cut for a while and are probably on their way out. Whenever possible source local blooms or purchase sustainable, ethically-sourced flowers.

C o n d itioning and Rev iv in g Whatever the flower, as soon as you purchase it, remove the cellophane and release the flowers from any bindings so air can circulate freely between the blooms. When you get the flowers home, it is important to recut the stems before arranging them. Stems dry out quickly, leaving a surface that will not absorb water. Cut the stems at an angle to enlarge the surface area and enable more water to be taken up. Next, remove any foliage from the lower part of the stem. This will help keep the water clean. Often you will find a little sachet of flower food attached to your flowers. Use it - it works. Flower food will help keep a vase clean and bacteria-free, prolonging the life of your flowers as well as helping buds and flowers open. 24


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Tool K it

P r u n er s - These are key for

cutting woody-stemmed flowers and branches.

C l ear f lo ra l ta p e - Used for creating a grid on vases to keep stems where you want them (substitute with regular scotch tape).

F l o ral k n i f e - For trimming stems and removing thorns.

F l o ral s h ea r s - For clipping

stem ends (regular shears have thicker blades that tend to compress stems).

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Selec ti n g th e perfe c t v e s s e l

One of my favourite design tips is to use unique, opaque containers. The benefit to using opaque vessels is that you don't need to worry about wrapping a leaf inside the vase or seeing murky water.  By choosing a bold coloured vase or cool shape, you have instant style. Stores like HomeSense and Crate and Barrel are perfect for finding sharp looking vessels that don't break the bank. Additionally, shop at vintage, antique, and consignment boutiques for chic containers, tea cups, and vases that have loads of character. Lastly, look with fresh eyes at the containers you have at home— pitchers, bowls, and mugs are all fabulous containers for flowers.

S tep 1 :

Create a grid of clear cellophane tape spanning the wide mouth of the vase. Cut the tape so that you can’t see the edges when you are looking straight on at your arrangement. This is an easy way to create stability and help you create simple sculptural arrangements.


S t ep 2 :

Create a foundation with foliage. This is the framework for the arrangement. Build a pleasing, asymmetrical shape that leans on the lip of the vase and has a high point in back. Make sure it’s not too thick, so there’s room for the flowers. Foliage has a tendency to move around; therefore, you will have to re-adjust the foliage throughout construction.

St ep 3:

Add large statement flowers, cutting stems at different lengths so some blooms nestle low and others extend. The crisscrossed fern stems in the vase work like webbing to hold flowers where you want them. Take your time, view your arrangement as a whole, experimenting until it looks good.

S te p 4 :

Weave in accent flowers in three strategic spots: up high on one side, down low (spilling out of the vase), and in the middle, as if they’ve pushed their way through a cluster of larger blooms.

S te p 5 :

When finished, adjust the lengths, tucking some flowers deeper and pulling others long. It really is all about creating height and texture to create a beautiful vignette.

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HYACINTH

MARTRICARIA

GARDEN ROSE SWORD FERN PEONY

NERINE

PEONY

CORAL FERN

RANUNCULUS GARDEN ROSE

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Rebe c c a's Rec i p e Statement Flower s 4 to 5 peonies 4 to 5 garden roses

Accent Flower s 4 to 5 hyacinths 7 cream ranunculuses 2 stems white martricaria (multi blooms per stem) 1 white nerine

Folia ge 8 sword fern stems 2 coral fern stems

1. 2. 3. 4.

4 t ips f or arran g i n g f r es h f l o w e r s Look outside for inspiration: Clip backyard plants to make arrangements more interesting. Shrubbery or garden foliage, like forsythia, herbs, and begonia leaves can add depth to a display. And don’t dismiss beautiful weeds, such as Queen Anne’s lace. A slender-necked vessel can do a lot of the work for you. Vases with smaller mouths hold flowers artfully without letting them droop, so even the most basic display looks gorgeous. Flowers should show their natural gestures, so embrace uniquely curved stems ̶ they will provide interest and dimension. Think asymmetry and varied depth and height when arranging; don’t be afraid to cut tall flowers very short.

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Written by Cara Howlett Calligraphy by Justine Ma

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I

n a world of instant messages, real-time status updates, and news spread within seconds, Justine Ma has chosen a slower pace.

Breanne Schroeder, a grade four and music teacher in Alberta, believes that cursive handwriting is becoming a lost art.

A designer and calligrapher based in Edmonton, Alberta, Justine spends her days hand lettering – a rare career in an age of smart phones, computers, and tablets.

“It makes me sad, not because the upcoming generation won’t be writing letters and grocery lists in cursive, but because the discipline of cursive writing, and printing to an extent, seems to be falling to the wayside,” says Breanne.

“I count my lucky stars every day that I can do something that I love and something that is becoming fairly lost in school programs today,” says Justine.

Grade three and four curriculums in Alberta have cursive writing embedded as a learning outcome, says Breanne, but the need for students to learn cursive runs alongside learning outcomes such as keyboarding, and printing legibly – both important skills in their own right.

“We are often glued to the digital world and it’s just lovely to be able to hand over a project to a client and say, ‘This was entirely done by hand.’ What I love about calligraphy and hand lettering is that it is unique to the artist. You control your letters, your spaces, and your swashes when you draw letterforms. The freedom to be able to put your own personality into lettering makes it a type of signature.” Justine’s work is just that – her own unique signature style. Beautifully scribed letters across everyday items, making them special. From USB drives, to websites, posters, menu boards, and even clothing hangers, you can find Justine’s hand lettering on almost anything. Having a career in hand lettering seems to be Justine’s destiny. Growing up with a creative mother shaped her future into what it is today – being able to have a career doing something that she loves. “I call my mother the original Pinterest because every time I see something cool on there, my mom did it in the 80s. My mother is an artist of many things, and she definitely supported my creative mind,” says Justine. “In school I wanted to be the best at handwriting. I entered handwriting competitions,” says Justine. “I needed the perfect loops and the most even letters. I was a type nerd even as a child. In a way, thinking back on that, it definitely foreshadowed my career now.” “Working hard full time and freelancing on top of that for years has led me to the stage where I am now. I’m so happy. I’m able to work while having a tiny baby at home with me. It’s the best of both worlds, really,” says Justine. Throughout Canada and other western countries, the practice of cursive handwriting is becoming a rare practice. With the infiltration of technology weaving itself through our everyday lives, the tradition of using cursive, and even printing, is slowly becoming archaic. Those who use it were taught it when they attended school, but nowadays, young people aren’t using cursive the way that it once was used.

Teaching cursive does happen in schools in Alberta, says Breanne, but some schools and teachers put a more focused emphasis on developing students in being responsible digital citizens, which in our world of online presence and a spectrum of privacy settings, is also a vital skill that our kids need to be developing so they can make smart, safe, and innovative choices when it comes to their online and technological interactions. Despite the need for children to learn the digital world of communication, Breanne says that in a fast-paced, instant everything, technology driven world, she feels like the act of writing teaches us about communication. “For students, the use of a pen and paper requires fine motor skills and teaches focus on a task that does not involve a screen,” says Breanne. “I think that as society moves away from tangible interaction with each other, it will play a part in the isolated feeling of being disconnected from relationships with each other.” “I value the art of connecting tangibly. And it is an art, because it is not as commonplace as it once was. It makes us slow down. It makes us think. It makes us communicate and connect.” As Justine reflects on the possibility of handwriting being lost as a form of communication, the thought makes her sad. “Handwriting is many things; it’s history, personality, and communication. I wonder if people will be able to read handwriting, or if it will become obsolete. I’m hoping there will be a resurgence of basic skills like handwriting.” Although we live in a digital age, Justine says that until we eliminate paper cheques and important documents, we have to have handwriting. It’s your name. The weight of your pen stroke is unique only to you. “It’s an art form. It’s easily read. There is a flow and delicateness to it that I love. It’s our history.” 31


DOWNLOAD THIS WORKSHEET AS WELL AS A BLANK CALLIGRAPHY WORKSHEET AT DOTEMAGAZINE.COM/BITS-PIECES/DOWNLOADS 32

CALLIGRAPHY BY JUSTINE MA FIND JUSTINE ON INSTAGRAM @JUSTINEMADESIGN


ART | FURNITURE | DESIGN | LIFESTYLE


T h e l e t t er we a l l l o ve to r ec ei ve i s o n e th a t ca r r i es s o m u c h o f th e wr i ter ' s p e r s o n a l i t y th a t sh e seem s to b e s i t t i n g b esi de us, l o o ki n g a t u s d i r ec t ly a n d ta l ki n g j ust a s s h e r e a l l y wo ul d, co ul d sh e h ave c o m e on a ma g i c ca r pet, in st ea d o f s e n di ng her pr oxy i n in k-m a d e c ha r a cter s o n mer e pa p er. - Emi l y Po st

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Just right.

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Your Dream Job

T h e B u s i n ess o f P l a n ni ng Written by Nicole Hudson Photographed by Blair Inkster

On December 17, 2012 I posted a video to YouTube in hopes of getting the attention of my hero, Mrs. Ellen Degeneres. It failed. But, let’s go back to the beginning because who wants to read a story about a career that drops the f-bomb right at the start? And yes, I’m referring to failure. I graduated from film school in the spring of 2012 and after working in the land of film and television for six months pulling long days watching the craft table or monitoring continuity from the backseat of a van, following a certain cash cab around the streets of Toronto, I was starting to feel like maybe it wasn’t for me. I quickly learned that the bigger the production, the smaller the role I’d have. In film school, I was busy all the time, but on the bigger sets there was a lot of waiting around. I’m not very good at waiting around. I decided that it was time to make my biggest dream come true. After all, if I’m being honest, there was really one reason I went into film in the first place. I figured, since there was no university program called Bachelor in Ellen Degeneres Producing, film would be the next best thing. So, instead of plugging away at the bottom rung of the production ladder, hoping I’d make the right career leaps as they came around, until I landed in Burbank, California, I decided I would make things happen for myself. I would produce a killer video to get Ellen’s attention. I contacted old guests, danced with strangers on the street, wrote some hilarious (in my opinion) songs and gave a painfully earnest plea to Ellen herself. It was fool proof, or so I thought. I posted the video. In the first few hours it got over 2,000 views - not "David at the Dentist" level virality, but for a nine-minute Nicole Show, I was flabbergasted. I had well over 100 of my friends sharing it on their networks and sending it to the Ellen Show. I was so confident something was going to happen, I genuinely wasn’t prepared for it not to.

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Not every goal is so public. Saving more money, reading more classics, or eating healthy are things that are done, for the most part, on your own. If you fail at those, you only have yourself to answer to. But when your 2,000 Facebook friends know about your dreams it’s a different story. For months after the video was shared I couldn’t bump into anyone without them bringing it up, and while everyone was super optimistic and hopeful, it only made me feel like I was letting everyone down. It’s now been just over two years and Ellen still hasn’t called. The whole experience was pretty heartbreaking, but despite those hard moments, I couldn’t stop thinking about the supportive community I had online. Reading all of the messages of encouragement and kindness was truly humbling; I felt like I could accomplish anything with the support of a community like this. It’s the beginning of the day and I’m standing in front of a group of eager ̶ yet quiet ̶ individuals, sharing the ups and downs of starting a business, hoping to help people learn from my mistakes. I try my best to make them laugh, both to enjoy the day and to remind them that learning to laugh at ourselves is a wonderful thing. I can’t help but feel warm and happy for creating a safe place where people can share those early, vulnerable steps in starting a business. Bot Communications is my own boutique marketing firm focusing on providing entrepreneurs with the skills and tools required to start their small businesses. The biggest part of my business is brand[ED], a one-day workshop teaching branding, social media, photo styling, and business planning, but I also do custom tailored workshops, private consulting, and community management for bigger businesses. I have never worked so hard and had so much fun since starting my business. I really feel like I’m living my best life when I’m empowering individuals with the tools to take a big step in achieving their dreams. I didn’t wake up one morning and start teaching workshops, and I’m the first to say that starting a business is tough. I spent many years starting different projects and exciting family and friends before changing my mind and having ideas and plans fizzle out. I call it having a case of the Big Dreamer Syndrome. Thankfully, if you suffer from this like I do, you are destined for success when you finally lock down that idea and focus all of your energy. So until then, just be patient with yourself. The first step in creating your dream life is getting back to your roots and figuring out what you're best at, what you love doing, and what people will pay you for. It took me a long time to admit what I was good at, and I still sometimes have trouble accepting that money is good and important. Afterall, you still need to pay your bills and eat yummy food. I’ve created a guide on the next page which will help you to figure out who you are and what you want to achieve as an individual or small business owner. Who knows where your entrepreneurial journey will take you, but if it lands you a spot on Ellen, call me! FIND NICOLE ON INSTAGRAM @BOTCOMM

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Worksheet

G e t t i n g D o wn to B u si n ess W i t h B o t Commun ic a tion s Your core values are like a navigation system for your brand. They guide and lead you into every decision you make. They are unspoken terms and rules that define the way you choose to live your life. They are essential for every person and brand to have and live by. And remember to make every single future decision on whether or not it aligns with your core values. WRITE DOWN 6 WORDS THAT EXEMPLIFY WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN: 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

A mission statement outlines your motivations, goals, and values to tell your audience why your business exists. Here are some questions to ask yourself while preparing your mission statement: What is the purpose of your business? What are your values? Who is your customer? What image do you want to portray? How do you differ from your competitors?

USING DAZZLING WORDS, WRITE DOWN A POTENTIAL MISSION STATEMENT BELOW:

_____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________ WHAT’S YOUR DREAM JOB? AND HOW CAN YOU MAKE IT HAPPEN? WRITE DOWN 3 ACTIONABLE GOALS FOR 2015:

1. THINGS I AM BEST AT

THINGS I LOVE DOING

DREAM JOB

SWEET SPOT

___________________________ _____________________________

SWEET SPOT

_____________________________ 2.

___________________________ _____________________________

SWEET SPOT

_____________________________

THINGS PEOPLE WILL PAY ME FOR

3.

___________________________ _____________________________

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_____________________________


The details are not the details. They make the design. -Charles Eames

www.pinkandhoney.com

alphacomics.ca 403.453.0187 9- 7005 18 ST SE


Market Collective

M e l a ni e La u r en e The Free Bird Written by Angel Guerra Photographed by Kaihla Tonai

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It was a moderate October, and the weather was temperate. Chilly, yet refreshing. Market Collective was getting prepared for a mini outdoor market that we had planned in East Village, and we had received many more artist submissions than we had space for. We were only able to choose 25 from the 100+ applications we had received, and we had to make some difficult decisions. After carefully reviewing all of the applications, we knew that there was something about new applicant Melanie Laurene that would complete the roster nicely. Melanie’s presence was warm and refreshing, which complimented the feel of the day nicely. Her bubbly personality, desire to connect with the community, and thoughtful display was a beautiful touch on the autumn backdrop. On that day, I knew that I had met someone special, and I knew that Melanie would quickly become integrated into the Market Collective family. Now, almost a year and a half later, Melanie is an MC staple. I had the opportunity to chat with Melanie Laurene about her budding jewelry business, her online presence, her entrepreneurial spirit, and about how she successfully sustains a work/life/school balance.

MC :: Something that has always really stuck out to me

is that you are both creative and entrepreneurial. In your life, which do you think came first?

ML ::

Without a doubt, my entrepreneurial spirit has been with me since I was a young child. Before I even knew what a lemonade stand was, I set up a table at the end of my driveway and sold neat looking rocks that I found in my backyard. Shout out to my mom for being my first loyal customer! My creativity was something that I discovered much later in life. Joining Market Collective pushed me to explore that creativity and find my artistic identity.

MC :: How does one drive the other? ML :: I think that a lot of people struggle with promoting

their own work. Putting yourself out there as a creative is impossibly scary and requires some vulnerability. From a business standpoint, it’s important to be entrepreneurial about your work. You could be an extremely talented artist, but if no one sees your work, no one will buy it. It’s as simple as that.

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M C : : I have watched your creative business grow over the last couple of years, and the use of social media seems very integral to your growth. How important do you think it is for artists to connect to their audience using social media?

M L : : Our generation is online. Thus, I believe that it is in every small business’s interest to have a strong online presence. Instagram is blowing up right now. Instagram is a place to share your work, to allow a glimpse into your life, and ultimately to connect with your community. If Instagram doesn’t work for you, find another platform, say Twitter or Facebook, and focus on that.

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MC ::

What sort of pitfalls do you see in regards to the use of social media?

ML : :

Social media is incredibly powerful, but it’s important to recognize that connecting offline, face to face, is equally important. Another pitfall would be a lack of privacy in some aspects, but that can be easily managed by filtering what you choose to share.

MC ::

At each market that you attend your social media presence comes to life, and you are given a space to connect with people face to face. How does this change your perspective and propel your creative spirit?

ML : :

The most valuable thing I have taken away from being involved in Market Collective has been connecting with the community. I was born and raised in Calgary, and it is incredible to see how far the arts and culture scene has come in the past five to ten years. Market Collective is a hub of creative minds that gather together to create something bigger than themselves. Being around likeminded individuals, vendors, and MC attendees alike, is truly inspiring.

MC :: What are some ways that you are able to balance work, life, and school and stay creative in your journey?

ML : :

It can be crazy and overwhelming, but keeping a clear perspective on the bigger picture is what drives me to balance it all. It’s also taken me a while to realize that I don’t have to do it all. When I have the time, my yoga practice helps me keep it together.

MC :: What are some of the adventures that you embark on that help drive your creativity?

ML : : I find that inspiration comes to me at unpredictable

times. But one thing that always brings me back is to go out to the mountains. Something about the fresh air and being in nature makes for a clear, inspired mind.

MC ::

Lastly, where do you see your jewelry business going in the future?

ML : :

Over the past couple of years, I have learned through much trial and error. I’m all about always learning and growing. I can’t say for sure where my business will go from here, but I am welcoming changes with open arms.

FIND MELANIE ON INSTAGRAM @MELANIELAURENE FIND MARKET COLLECTIVE ON INSTAGRAM @MARKETCOLLECTIVE

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Health & Beauty

S u m m e r Bea uty Tuto r i a l s Hair, makeup, and tutorials by SimplyMe Styled by Alexandra Wig Photographed by David Heidrich

F es t iva l F ierce

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With spring right around the corner, we are looking forward to getting out and enjoying the sunshine and fresh air. We asked hair and makeup artists, Erikka and Michaela of SimplyMe in Canmore, Alberta to put together three unique looks to get you through festival season, evening weddings, and all of the parties that spring and summer will throw your way.

Eve nin g G l amo u r

Ga rden Pa rt y

SPECIAL THANKS TO ANTHROPOLOGIE FOR PROVIDING WARDROBE FOR THIS STORY. FOLLOW THE GIRLS FROM SIMPLYME ON INTSAGRAM @SIMPLYMECANMORE

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1

2

3

4

5

What you ’ll need for this look :

6

7

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 46

Heat protectant - Kevin Murphy’s Anti Gravity Large wand curling iron (1½ inch barrel) Comb or teasing brush Bobbi pins Clear elastic

The hair Spray heat protectant evenly throughout your hair. Create a rectangle on top of your head. Visually divide hair into three or four sections starting at the top front and moving back. Holding the wand horizontally above your head, take the section closest to your face and wrap around the wand away from your face. Slide wand out when hair is too hot to touch, leaving a barrel shape on top of your head. Hold a finger at the base of the barrel along the scalp and use a pin to secure. Using the same technique as steps two and three, create two sections on each temple. Holding the wand vertically this time, wrap hair away from your face. Pin and repeat. Curl the rest of the hair holding the wand horizontally. Remove pins and brush out curls with a wide-toothed comb. Tease hair around the crown and at the top of your head to create volume. Gather the top half of your hair to the back and off to one side (which ever side you want the braid to fall on). Make an “X” with your pins to secure. Gather all of your hair to one side and begin to French braid your hair. When braiding, twist each section as you go to keep layers intact. Secure with a clear elastic. Using both hands, tug at each side of the braid to gently pull it apart. This will make it appear more full.


The m akeu p

1. Prep the skin with a primer. Our favourite is Clarins Beauty Flash Balm.

2. Use a foundation with a blending brush to get an

airbrush effect. We love the Laura Mercier Silk Foundation and the Real Techniques Buffing Brush.

an eye primer to the 3. Apply lid of your eye and blend

outwards using a fluffy brush. We used the MAC Eye Primer in Groundwork.

4. Lightly press a dark brown shadow against the lashes using an angled brush. Don’t worry about creating a straight line, the smokier the better.

5. Curl and apply lots of mascara to the lashes.

Tip: curl and apply mascara one eye at a time to ensure that the curl lasts.

6. For a fun pop of colour, use a berry coloured stain on the lips building intensity with multiple applications.

the same stain to 7. Apply cheeks for a fresh dewy effect.

8. Make sure to define brows for this look. Using an angled

brush, gently apply powder along the natural shape of the brow.

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1

2

3

4

5

Wh at yo u’l l need f o r t h i s l o o k: Heat protectant – Kevin Murphy’s Anti Gravity Dry Shampoo – Kevin Murphy’s Fresh Hair ¾ inch tapered wand curling iron Wide-toothed comb Sea salt spray (see recipe below) Head piece Texturing cream - Kevin Murphy's Easy-Rider

The hair

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Embrace your messy hair! Unwashed, second day hair will make for the best results. Evenly spray heat protectant throughout your hair. Tip: To keep your hair healthy, make sure to always use a protectant. Spray dry shampoo at roots, holding the bottle at about 6 inches from your head. Massage into scalp. Hold your wand horizontally and take a 1-inch section of hair. Point the wand toward the mirror. Starting at eye level, wrap your section around the wand leaving 1 inch of the end out. Heat hair until it is too hot to touch. Hold the wand horizontally pointed to the back of the room and wrap the section around the wand. Continue alternating direction of wand until all hair is curled. Take different sizes of sections for a more textured look. Using a wide-tooth comb, brush out curls. Scrunch in a texturing cream at the ends and spray sea salt spray throughout hair and place your headpiece at the crown.

S ea Salt Spray Rec ipe:

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1 cup warm water 1 tbsp sea salt 1 tsp coconut oil 1 tsp gel Mix all in a spray bottle


The m akeu p

1. Prep the skin with an SPF of 20 or greater. 2. Mix illuminator and tinted moisturizer together on the back of your palm. Apply the tint onto the face with a buffing brush in circular motions. We love the Real Techniques Buffing Brush.

a concealer, cover 3. With up any red areas (around

the nose, under the eyes, blemishes etc.).

the high points of your 4. Bronze face, where the sun would

naturally hit (the nose, chin, temple, and cheekbones).

5. Use the illuminator as a base for eye shadow focusing on the inner portion of the eye.

bronzer into the crease 6. Apply of the eye with a fluffy blending brush and finish the eye by curling the lashes and applying lots of mascara.

7. Add a tiny bit of illuminator to the cupid’s bow and finish with lip balm.

in brows where they are 8. Fillsparse. Tip: hold the brush

near the end to get a softer, more natural look.

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1

2

3

4

5

Wh at yo u’l l need f o r t h i s l o o k: Hair brush Hair tie Clear elastic Bobbi pins

The hair

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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This style works great on day-old hair or when you need a quick polished look. Flip head upside down, gather hair at the top of your head and secure with the hair tie. Take a section from the side of the ponytail. Divide the section into three pieces and backcomb each piece. Braid these pieces together. Secure with a clear elastic. Twist ponytail into bun, hold and secure with four bobbi pins, one at each side. Make sure you can feel pins along your scalp as you’re placing them. Wrap braid around the bun and secure with a pin.


The m akeu p

1. Using a concealer, cover any blemishes and redness. Our favourite way to achieve a perfectly dewy look is using a fluffy brush, lightly blend the pigment until it looks natural and soft.

2. Apply a matte light taupe eye shadow (MAC Shroom)

all over the lid. Use a fluffy brush and a darker taupe to define the crease of the eye.

3. Curl and apply mascara to the top and bottom lashes.

4. Apply a shimmery, pale pink blush to the apples of the cheeks and blend upward.

5. For the lips, apply a nude lipstick with pink undertones

and finish the look with a gloss.

6. Set your t-zone with loose powder.

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Through the Ages Photographed by Sarah Vaughan Styled by Alexandra Wig Hair & Makeup by RedBloom Salon

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When we’re young there is so much ahead of us. The possibilities are endless. But life doesn’t usually turn out the way we imagine when we’re young. Life tends to throw us curveballs, and those curveballs are what shape us into who we are. The stories and perspectives of nine women from the ages of 3 to 59 have given us a snapshot of how our dreams evolve into real life. In an in-person interview we asked each one what they want/wanted to be when they grow/grew up and (for those it applied to) how their lives have turned out.

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MAKENA , AGE 9 When I was younger I wanted to be a hair stylist. Now, when I grow up, I want to work at a pet shop because I really like animals and I like taking care of them. When I’m older I think I will mostly be dancing. I would like to dance professionally. I think I would like to be a dancer a little bit more than working at a pet shop. When I’m in my 30s I think I’ll be finishing dance, and I think I will get married much later when I’m done dancing. Right now the most important things in my life are my family, school, and dance.

SHAYLE , AGE 3 I want to be Rapunzel when I grow up. I want to be a princess.

HAR LO , AGE 5 I want to be a nurse when I grow up because I want to be like my mom.

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ELLA , AGE 16 When I was younger I wanted to be a spy or a princess. I thought it was fun to sneak around and listen to people when they didn’t know I was there. Right now, I don’t know what career path I want to take. I know that I want to be busy and consistently doing something, and I want a job where I can interact with other people. I don’t know what that job will be or could be. I want to go to university, but I don’t know where or what to study. At this point, I only know a couple of people who know what they want to be and they’ve known since they were kids. I think it will become clearer as I get older. In my 20s I want to travel. I want to go to school and take maybe general studies to figure out what I want. But I know that in my 20s I want to be travelling. Hopefully by my 30s I would have a career. I would have everything figured out and I would know what I want to do. If I get married and have kids I would want that in my 30s, not too young because I want to be able to experience everything and travel. Before I’m 30 I would like to have lived in a different country, graduate university, and get a degree in something. Before I’m 40 I would like to have a family and an established career that I like. Right now I value most my family, my friends, and school.

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DAYNA, AGE 25 When I was five I wanted to be a country singer. I wanted to be Shania Twain. When I was in my teens I knew I wanted to be in the arts. I just couldn’t conceive it could be a reality. I went through a phase where I thought I had to do something practical, so I wanted to be a nurse. But then my perspective changed and I thought, No, I have to do what I’ve been created to do. I have to make art. So since then I’ve been trying to figure out exactly what that would look like. I ended up going to the Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD). I would always joke that if I wanted to make money I would go into graphic design, but I went into fine arts. Now I’m thinking it would be nice to buy a house. So I pursued the dream of my teens, which is pretty cool. When you’re young it’s nice to think that you can do whatever you dreamt of. Once I got into to ACAD my artistic direction kind of changed. I thought I would go into drawing since I used to do a lot of portraiture and illustration, but sometimes the universe just throws you a loop. Some of the classes I was taking didn’t line up with the prerequisites for the department, so I ended up being in the fibre department. Everyone asks, “What is fibre?” It’s primarily textiles. I was probably the worst Fibre major ever, but I loved my experience for the chance to explore, try new things, fail, and rise to a challenge. I think the direction I did not expect to change was my perspective on feeling free to discuss difficult subjects like Christian spirituality or feminism. I love that fibre can be disarming, comfortable, and an access point to discuss the friction that exists. Now, I still do a lot of drawing, but I incorporate it into my textiles practice through the use of a digital printer to make installation sculptures and fashion-related pieces. It’s kind of cool to use your photography or drawings and get them turned into fabric. I certainly wouldn’t have the ability or the patience to screen print such detailed images. I imagine that my 20s are a time to figure myself out, so I hope that in my 30s I just get to enjoy knowing who I am. I would like to be settled, which is ironic because all I want right now is to be a traveling gypsy. I would love to have my own proper studio and a couple of kids by the time I’m 30. Two of my biggest values are beauty and community. I think they combat the darkness well, so I hope to fill my life with both. My husband, Rob, and I really value our church community. I would like to be really invested in that. We really love Calgary, so being a bigger part of it is an important thing to us. Rob has been a key person in giving my dreams a reality, so I can see us collaborating in the future. I can’t even imagine being 40 yet. It would be nice to be established. An art career takes a long time to build. Most of my favourite female artists didn’t come into the peak of their career until their 40s, so there’s hope for me. I think there is a lot of shame for artists if they are not successful early on in their career. I don’t want my identity to be defined by that. When I’m in my 40s and 50s I want to value my family and spiritual beliefs most. I just really want to live after Jesus, so hopefully when I’m 40 I have that figured out a little bit better than I have now. I get stuck on how other people see me now. It would be nice not to live that way. My mom just turned 50, so if I could be like her, I would still like to be madly in love with my husband, my Jesus, and be doing lots of traveling. Maybe I still can be a gypsy.

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CANDACE, AGE 30 When I was five I wanted to be a ballerina, actually. I was never in dance so I don’t know how that came to be. But I liked the idea of the pink tutu. In my teens, I liked science a lot. So I wanted to work with animals and either be a veterinarian or a marine biologist. In high school, I didn’t think of going to university. I’m not a big planner. The career that I chose wasn’t a big decision for me. I saw someone else go into nursing, and I thought, Well that seems like a good career, so I’m going to try it too. I started nursing school when I was 18 or 19. It’s not a huge stretch from the veterinarian or marine biologist that I wanted to be a few years earlier, just a different species. I think the pursuit of happiness is what drove my 20s and I think that will carry through to my 30s. I don’t have any big plans. Career wise, in my 30s I want to become more focused instead of jumping around from here to there. In my 40s I see myself in the job I want to be in, at a higher level of nursing and I’ll be successful. My kids will be getting ready to graduate by then, so my life will change drastically. Right now my life is based around my kids, so I think I will have more time to myself to develop hobbies that I don’t really have a chance to pursue right now. It’s so hard to even know what my life would be like when it isn’t consumed by kids and kid stuff. They are almost my identity, so it’s hard to foresee what my identity will become when they don’t need me as much anymore. In my 40s I want to be content. I want to be happy with where I’m at and not seeking out things anymore, just living with what I have. Looking back at myself from my youth, I think I’m a little less free spirited than I was. I think I would be proud of where I’ve come to and how much I’ve done so far. Right now I value my family the most. I’ve become less focused on myself than when I was in my 20s. In my 40s I would like to have a good balance of valuing myself and my family. My early 20s was all about me. My later 20s and the beginning of my 30s is all about them. By my 40s I would like a good combination of the two. In my early 20s I didn’t even think I was going to have kids. Then I had Harlo when I was 25 and it drastically changed my life, as it would anyone’s. It just goes to show that I am not a planner. Planning doesn’t tend to work out and I don’t want to set myself up for failure, so I just ride the wave and see what happens. I’m not sure if it’s a good way to do it, but I see other people planning their lives out and I think it’s good to have an idea of where you want to go, but it can also limit you, so I just want to be open to what comes.

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M I CHELLE, AGE 42 When I was five I probably wanted to be a figure skater because that’s what I was doing at the time. I always wanted to be whatever I was doing at the moment. If you asked me when I was at school I probably would have said a teacher. When I was in my teens I was undecided as to what career path I wanted to follow. I know I wanted to go away to university and maybe take Education or do something with kids, but at that age I couldn’t tell you exactly what I wanted to do. I wanted to go to university, I had the grades to get in, but where I wanted to go was still undecided. I’m from Estevan, Saskatchewan and most people from there wanted to go to Saskatoon or Minot, North Dakota. When I graduated high school I had had a knee injury, so I was out of sports. Sports for me were my stress release, my social aspect. So I started hanging out with different people who weren’t as focused on school. Then my mom got sick with cancer. So I could have gone away to school, but I didn’t want to go too far. I ended up staying in Estevan and getting a job at a day care. So I got my chance to work with kids, but I never did go away to school. I eventually took evening classes to hopefully get into Education, but then my mom passed away and I never went back. It is my one regret that I never went back to school. Before I turned 30 I wanted to have a family. I wanted to get married and have two kids. Because Education was kind of out the window and I had been working at the Royal Bank in my 20s, I decided to take a career path through the bank, which was totally not working with kids. But I looked at it as helping people. Helping people buy their first home and set up their investments and budgeting. Eventually I took a job offer from the Royal Bank in Calgary. I didn’t know a soul in Calgary, so I had a fresh start. I ended up meeting my husband at the bank, even though I used to say I would never marry a banker. I got married and had my first child, Cole when I was 27. I had Makena when I was 32 and didn’t go back to work after. I was a stay-at-home mom for most of my 30s, which is not something I ever thought I would do. I thought I would crave a little more than that. But I look back now and I’m so thankful that I stayed at home. I spent my 30s really focusing on my family. This was the time when my husband was really building his career, as well, and now because of that he has more flexibility and can be at home more, so from that perspective it was good that I was at home. I sacrificed my career, but I think it turned out to benefit our family in the long run. My mom was 41 when she passed away, so for me, 41 was a big year. When I turned 41 it made me realize how young my mom was when she died, how much life she had ahead of her, so many things she missed out on. So that was the age that made me start thinking that I need to do something for myself. My husband always said that I should do something in sports or athletics because I loved fitness so much. So I did. I’m taking personal training courses and I hope to train young hockey players or athletes. I’m going back to my passion of working with kids but also in doing something that I’m quite passionate about, which is fitness and healthy and active living. For my 50s, I hope I’m full force into my personal training career. And I hope we will travel more. For my 60s, I see retirement. My husband and I talk about this all the time because we would like to retire and go south part time. Whether we’re in Canada for six months and the States for six months, I don’t know. A lot of it depends on where the kids are, too. I don’t ever want to be too far away from my kids. I want to be an active grandparent in my grandkids lives. But travel is a big part of it. We had the opportunity to go to Europe last year and I had never been oversees, and it really opened my eyes to what a big world it is and that I have not experienced enough. I want to be able to experience these things with my kids, too. I always remember my dad saying that he and my mom never did anything because they were waiting for retirement. My mom never got to experience these things and travel the world because she didn’t make it to retirement. So I have realized that life is too short, and you have to do things you are waiting to achieve while you can.

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ELAINE, AGE 53 When I was five, I wanted to be an athlete. I think it was because I was following in the footsteps of two older brothers who were very much into sports, so I wanted to be like them. I didn’t have a particular sport, I just signed up for everything at school and also started figure skating at a young age. When I was 15 I was still very much into sports, so I wanted to pursue something in this area but not necessarily fitness, which is where things progressed in later years. I also considered doing something in music. I wanted to be a singer, but I was much too shy at that age. Interestingly enough, my daughter started singing seriously around this age and is now a jazz vocalist and composer with a degree in music. In my early 20s I had finished college and I landed a really great job in the fitness industry. It was a management position in a health club, which to this day was one of my favourite jobs ever. I loved it and all the people I met. So I had some good fortune there, and I confirmed then that I wanted to work in the fitness and sports industry. I also started teaching aerobics in the 80s, which I continued doing for over 20 years. I had that management position until I was 28, but I always knew there was more to come. Receiving a position with so much responsibility at a young age, I always felt like I had to prove myself a little bit more to be taken seriously. As much as I loved my job, I knew this was as far as I could go working in that industry unless I owned my own club one day, and I knew that was probably not the path I would take. So I didn’t really know what my 30s would bring. When I was 29 I started a magazine [IMPACT Magazine]. I was also expecting my daughter at the same age, so when I turned 30 we were only on our third issue of the magazine – and I had my baby. It was an exciting time! In my early 20s I knew I would be a mom one day, but I never would have thought I would be a magazine publisher. When I was working in the health club industry I loved the marketing aspect. I found it challenging and exciting putting marketing and advertising ideas together. However, I had a hard time finding places where we could market our industry as fitness professionals. We had so few venues to put our information out through, and nothing specific to our industry. I loved magazines and there were very few around at the time, so I put two and two together, did a year of research and development, and took the plunge and started my own business. I loved the magazine business when I first started out. I was younger and had a lot of energy and although it was hard, it was also easier in some ways because it was so new and exciting. I probably would have done a number of things differently, had I known what I know now, but I guess that’s part of the mystic and challenge ̶ to learn and experiment as you go. I had (and still have) a tremendous amount of passion for sport, fitness, and health and especially sharing the message. The publishing side of it came with time and experience. In my early 30s I also became a single mother. I never thought of it as difficult, it didn’t scare me; it was just something I wanted to make sure I did really well. It was my most important role. My main goal and priority in my 30s was to be a good mom, and to bring every opportunity for my daughter that I possibly could. I didn’t want her to miss out on anything, and I didn’t want to miss out either. During the early years of growing my business I worked extremely hard, and had a good work ethic. My parents taught me that. It was difficult in the early days for sure, starting a magazine, but I had a lot of support from friends and co-workers and family. It was tough, but always satisfying and fun to see the end result. In my 40s I certainly became more mature. I had learned my business better by this time; I honed the craft of running a magazine. With time and age you hopefully gain a little wisdom. I was also very involved in my daughter’s life and that was the most important thing to me, not to miss out on anything, and that’s sometimes the opportunity that being an entrepreneur can give you. Although you work very hard and spend a lot of your spare time working, you also have the flexibility to do those things and not miss a figure skating lesson, basketball game, or music audition. I recall doing a lot of driving during that decade! So in my 40s I also just wanted to continue doing what I loved, educating myself, continuously looking for ways to improve the magazine, and thinking a little more seriously about the future. For my 50s my goals definitely started focusing more around financial security, along with the future growth of the magazine. However, as I approached 50 I also sent my daughter to university for four years – in Boston, MA, and we all know the realities of American tuition fees. I’m like everyone else out there ̶ you want your children to have the best opportunities in life so you work hard every day to make them happen, and teach them a good work ethic by example. I’m not doing anything remotely close to what I thought I would be doing when I was younger. I don’t think you ever really know until you’re living it! You have dreams of pursuing things that you are passionate about, so I believe that I am simply fortunate to be doing something that I’m very passionate about, which involves sport, health and fitness, and magazine publishing all rolled into one – and most importantly sharing that message with the rest of the community. Of course, there are always challenges, but I still love what I do, and I’m fortunate to be surrounded by excellent people. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve learned to value time with family so much more, especially because we all live in different cities. I so appreciate my parents and what they taught me about life, about being a good person, about working hard, always doing your best, and being kind to others. This has become more important and precious as the years have gone by. At this point in my life I really appreciate any good fortune that may have come my way, but mostly I truly value my family, friends, personal and business relationships, and health. 60


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MAR GOT , AGE 59 I wanted to be like my mom. I had a great mom. I was the oldest with three younger brothers at the time and a total of six younger brothers later on. My mom was a nurse, and she was a lovely and wonderful person. I don’t think nursing came into my mind at that time, but I just admired my mom so much that I wanted to be like her, be a mom and have children. When I was in my teens I wanted to be a nurse. I did candy striping at the hospital, and I really got involved in the medical field. I don’t know if it was because of my mom, I just felt deep in my heart that I wanted to go into nursing. So I trained at the Royal Alex Hospital in Edmonton and started working as a nurse in my 20s. I really wanted to be married and have children before I turned 30. But that didn’t happen, so my 30th birthday was kind of a tough one. So after that I just kind of thought, well this is my life, so I went on and had fun and travelled and things like that. Then out of the blue, I met my husband when I was 31. I knew right away and we were engaged after three dates. Before I turned 40 I really wanted to have children. I’m a Type 1 diabetic and I was a bit older, so I knew it was going to be difficult, but I was really determined to have children. When I was 34 I had my first son and then I had twins, a boy and a girl, when I was 36. I was told it would be difficult because of my diabetes. I had to have perfect diabetic control, and even when I was pregnant with the twins I was told not to count on them surviving, but I just knew deep in my soul that I would have these twins. They were born right at term and totally healthy. My 40s were very busy with kids and I just wanted to be a mom to them, I wanted to be like my mom. It was kind of a whirlwind. You feel like you’re at your prime and you’ve got these kids and you’re trying to guide them in the right way of life, and this is the one time you really have an impact on their life. Once they hit their teen years you lose that a little bit, so it’s a really challenging job to

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H ere 's what RedBloom Salon di d to help to e nhance the natu ral beaut y of ou r ladies . guide them in the right way while you have them. You want them to be individuals, but you want them to find their place and you want to be their background support always. We also moved to the U.S. when I was in my early 40s, and I didn’t go into nursing there because I would have had to do all of my exams and board certifications again, so I stayed home. When we came back to Canada, I was going to take a job at Rockyview. A few days before I was supposed to start, I decided that I couldn’t do it. I just couldn’t leave my kids. So that was when I gave up nursing. At the time I didn’t regret doing that at all. Now that my kids are out of the house, I think it might be nice to have my career back, but I didn’t regret it. For my 50s I wanted my kids to be settled in their lives and to be happy in their career choices, to find the right partners in life. I wanted to hopefully enjoy some grandchildren, which hasn’t happened yet, but it will. For myself, I wanted to travel. I came from a very musical family, so I always wanted to do something in music, and the closest I’ve come is to sing in the choir at church, which I just love! As my kids move along, it kind of scares me that I don’t know what I want for myself, but it’s because I’m very content. I have a great marriage, a great husband, and I’m just so blessed. I don’t know what more I could want. Looking back, in your 20s you just don’t have a clue about anything. I’m very grateful that I didn’t follow some of the instincts that I had in my 20s, but sometimes there is just something deep inside that holds you to a certain path, and I look back thinking I’m so glad I went this way. My life has turned out much better than anything I dreamed of in my youth. The person I was in my youth would be shocked and surprised at who I am today. I’m a completely different person than I was then. All of the thoughts and values you have growing up become more refined and come together to create a solace in one direction so that your values can really govern your life. Faith and family are what I value most, now.

Ella A large curling iron was used to give big loose waves—Ella’s hair was wrapped around a vertically angled iron, then we used our fingers to comb through the curls to create a softer, tousled look. Aveda Air Control Hairspray finishes with a light hold without feeling sticky or weighing the hair down. On Ella’s amazing features we focused on her piercing eyes and nice full brow by using Aveda Copper Haze eye shadow trio and a heavier eyeliner and mascara.

Dayna Get fun waves by alternating the directions of the curls. At RedBloom we love the new curling rods and it’s perfect on Dayna to bring out her pretty hair colour. To compliment her beautiful hazel eyes we used a heavier, smoky liner and filled her flawless brows to really accentuate them. Aveda Uruku Bronzer in Amazonia was used as a subtle contour on her cheeks and eye shadow Illumination highlights her cheekbone and brow area.

Candace For Candace we went for soft, loose curls to show off her highlights and add movement to her straight hair. Using a large 1½ inch curling iron, we curled the front sections away from the face for a more natural, voluminous look. Using larger sections and leaving the ends out creates a wearable, everyday look. Makeup was kept soft and neutral, using a warm eye shadow in Aveda Golden Cypress and only a little mascara.  We chose a flushed look for her cheeks and lips complimenting her natural colouring.

Michelle To define and intensify Michelle’s gorgeous curls we used the Aveda Be Curly Curl Enhancer, one of our favourite products for our curlyhaired guests at RedBloom! Aveda Humectant Pomade was used to finish and add smoothness and shine. Warm browns and neutral shadows compliment Michelle’s eyes while Aveda Lip Definer helps keep her lip colour from feathering and gives definition while NourishMint Lip Glaze in Mango Juice, gives a luscious, warm peach tone.

Elaine Elaine has soft, fine hair. We used Aveda Volumizing Tonic on dry hair then blow-dried with a large round brush to smooth it out while giving some volume and a slight bend on the ends. For Elaine’s make-up, we created a fresh look by highlighting her strong cheekbones and her brow using soft, warm tones including Aveda Petal Essence eye shadow in Illumination.

Margot

SPECIAL THANKS TO PLENTY FOR PROVIDING THE WARDROBE FOR THIS STORY FOLLOW REDBLOOM SALON @REDBLOOMSALON

Margot has beautiful eyes with a great shape for contouring. We used a mid-tone copper all over her lid and a soft, blendable brown on her outer corners and crease. For added emphasis, her lighter brows were defined using eye shadow and an angle brush. To give lift to Margot’s fine hair, we blow-dried using a large round brush, Aveda Volumizing Tonic, and Air Control Hairspray.   63


Giving Back

L i t t l e H i pp i es a t Hea r t Written by Amanda Howard Photographed by Blair Inkster

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Little H ippie: An i n fan t , chi l d , o r teen who has a zes t for exp loring, c reating, m ov i ng, and s hak ing!Â


Little Hippies Kids Yoga is a local Calgary organization that offers free yoga to children in need. Little Hippies operates under the buy-one-give-one structure. For every yoga class purchased through Little Hippies one is donated to different children around Calgary through the Yoga to Every Child Foundation. Jenna Galloway and Chloe Dusser pride themselves on helping kids experience the benefits, both physically and mentally, that yoga has to offer. “Our main goal is to encourage every child to explore their creativity, express their unique personalities through physical movement, and build an awesome little yoga community where kids feel supported.” Before Little Hippies, Jenna spent her free time donating yoga classes to children, but she felt like she wanted more. This was the beginning of Little Hippies Kids Yoga. In September 2013, Chloe saw Jenna’s ad for Little Hippies at a local studio after recently moving to Calgary. After leaving her project coordinator position and knowing she wanted to work with children she contacted Jenna to see how she could help out. Jenna and Chloe hit it off right away and travelled to Mexico together for their advanced teacher training to become certified yoga teachers, “Right from the get go we wanted to make the biggest impact we could.” Jenna and Chloe both grew up with anxiety and stress and wanted to provide a place for children to relax and focus on themselves. “When I was growing up, I was never taught to just breathe,” Chloe says. Little Hippies gives the children a place to be creative. A non-competitive, non-performance based activity, just for them. “The thing that makes it so worth it is when a two-year-old comes out of a meditation and says how good she feels or the childrens’ faces when they come out of savasana, just knowing that it will all be fine.” Jenna and Chloe base the Little Hippies business under the motto, “Take as much as you need, give as much as you can.” Little Hippies not only provides children with a comfortable community to practice in, but they also donate free yoga classes through the Yoga for Every Child Foundation to kids that may be in need, running programs at organizations such as Inn from the Cold. This foundation allows children to learn how to help others early in age, something Jenna and Chloe call “Kids helping kids,” hoping to foster a larger movement through today’s youth. After a year and a half, Little Hippies opened their own studio in Bridgeland. They offer drop-in classes, registered programs, and birthday parties. All of their class offerings will continue to be part of the Yoga for Every Child Foundation by donating a free class to those in need. If you would like to be part of the Little Hippies movement visit their website at www.littlehippieskidsyoga.com or stop in at their studio at 121 9A Street North East, Calgary.

Ge t in tou ch with J e nna and Chloe throu gh their websi te littlehippies k ids yoga.co m and find them on Ins ta gram @littlehippies yoga

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TO B E A SUR V IVO R Written by Josefa Cameron Photographed by Blair Inkster Illustrations by Anne Tranholm

What is the difference between a victim and a survivor? What does it mean to survive trauma? Questions such as these have rarely passed through my mind, if ever. This is due to the fact that I have been sheltered in a first world and fortunate enough not to have had to push through any form of trauma. When speaking of trauma in these terms, I’m not talking about bullying, or divorce, or death in the family; nor am I making light of these matters. However, I am speaking about trauma, as it might be defined by citizens of what we call the third world, or as expressed by those in war-torn regions. It is trauma caused by animalistic and inhumane hatred. The majority of people in our country do not know the meaning of this kind of trauma. We tend to detach ourselves from it, disregarding it as something foreign, something forlorn, but never something we will encounter. If I’ve ever met a hero in person, it was on November 26, 2014, her name is Amanda Lindhout and she has encountered this kind of trauma. After reading her best seller, A House in the Sky, I learned that she was born in Red Deer, Alberta, before moving to Calgary to work as a waitress to fund her passion for traveling, writing, and photography. In 2008 she flew to Somalia for a journalism assignment with her photographer coworker, Nigel Brennan. It was here that the course of her life capsized and would eventually turn her into an inspirational hero. A few days into Amanda and Nigel’s visit into the war-torn Somalia, they were abducted by Islamic insurgents for ransom. They would later find out that their kidnapping was an accident, that their captors were not expecting a woman, but instead intending to capture two National Geographic workers who had been staying at the same hotel as Amanda and Nigel and had even befriended them earlier in their stay. Amanda and Nigel happened to exit the hotel minutes before the National Geographic gentlemen, and this had kickstarted a long fifteen months of captivity. Anyone who follows the news knows that throughout history Somalia has had its fair share of volatile authority,

brutal occupations, and constant war between extremists and government forces. By the time Amanda had seen Somalian soil, in the peak of its civil war, the country was left tattered, impoverished, and exhausted. It was in this climate that Amanda was thrown into the eye of brutality and reckless antipathy. Amanda commenced writing A House in the Sky about six months after her release and detailed her experience. Upon reading it, the audience is opened to a world asunder from their own, yet almost living the experience alongside her, gulping at every turn of the page, tearing up as each chapter blends into the next. Throughout her story, Amanda makes it clear to us that she knows what starvation is, what hatred is, what real gender inequality entails, what religious fanaticism involves, what solitary confinement is, what a war zone looks like, what true loneliness feels like. She knows what these words mean, not because she sat in a classroom and studied their concepts but because she experienced them first hand. To start a conversation with someone who embodies this extent of knowledge and profundity and who has pushed past barriers unknown to most of us, is needless to say, a rather trying task. To my sister, Paulette, and my surprise, when we were welcomed into Amanda’s warm house in Canmore on a misty and early morning, we fell naturally into fluid conversation. We discussed the book's contents and our personal curiosities with Amanda sitting among the neatly decorated objects and photos from her world travels. We began by discussing the elephant in the room, the movie starring Rooney Mara as Amanda, which is in production and set to be released in 2016. Amanda not only approves of Mara playing herself, but believes she is a perfect choice, “I’m getting to know her, she is so cool. She feels like she was born for the role. The production company will be crafting it as a starring vehicle for Rooney for the awards!” Seeing that the movie will be replaying on screen the suffering she endured, Amanda attempts to focus on the exciting aspects of the production, “Most of the time I

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am just excited. But of course, the movie is portraying something that was very difficult for me and will no doubt be resurfaced during production, but that is the reality of it.” Unfortunately, movies have a way of dilapidating beautifully written and amazingly inspirational stories, which could potentially occur with A House in the Sky, but Amanda seems hopeful that this will not be the case. “I am not really worried about how it will depict me or the story. Everybody on board with the production, including Rooney, who is not only acting but helping produce, is on pointe. No one wants to stray away from the page.” Journeying from the exciting chatter of Hollywood related gossip and delving into some deeper questions, we posed what it meant for Amanda to move forward after such an experience. “Resiliency is something that I think is inside all of us. When we are faced with challenges in life, we either harness that resiliency or grab onto the opposite of that, which is despair. I went through something that was very long and very traumatic that required me to find and hold onto with my dear life the resiliency within myself. I think anyone would do that, but some people give up, that wasn’t my path.” Like everybody, Amanda sees both good and bad days. She continues to travel, viewing it as a means to move forward. “When I’m having a bad day, I need to move out into the world, continue to travel, and sometimes I just need to plant my feet on the ground and do yoga.” But how can one simply move on after an exploit like this? How can one see good in humanity after facing its horrors? She speaks of moving forward as if it were an effortless exercise. Conquering the concept of optimism and through her calm demeanor, she doesn’t consider the anger she could fester towards her captors. She suggests that her life “has really moved forward in all kinds of amazing ways. Yesterday [November 25] was my Freedom Day, as I call it. This year was the anniversary that marks five years since I was released from captivity. So of course I’ve been thinking a lot about my life and what I’ve been through and what I’ve gone on to do after captivity. I just feel so blessed, my life feels like a beautiful dream most days. I am surrounded by solid people at my publishing house who have brought me all over the world to share my story. I also started a non-profit organization, Global Enrichment Foundation (GEF), which has legs of its own now.” She goes on to say that GEF plans to stay in Somalia, where it is most needed, with no intention on expanding elsewhere for the time being. During the fifteen months she spent in captivity, she made a promise to herself that if she were to survive, she would dedicate her freedom to create an avenue to better the future for people, especially women, in Somalia. She saw the need for education among her captors, most of whom were teenage boys, believing that they may have had very different lives if their sisters,

mothers, and themselves had been educated. GEF was launched in 2011, igniting female leadership through education and empowerment programs. In efforts to relieve the famine, GEF also raised millions of dollars to aid and support over 175,000 people. Most young journalists target their energy towards inflating their portfolios and searching for meaty stories to cover. Amanda was of a similar outlook before 2008; she had no direct intention of educating women in Somalia at the time. Her life after captivity has taken on new meaning, she feels less inclined towards writing these days, “I was out in the world as a traveler before I was out in the world as a journalist. I was always motivated by people’s lives and stories. I loved learning about cultures as I travelled. When I met Nigel Brennan, I was inspired by what he was doing as a photographer; he was sharing with his community back home what he was encountering while traveling.” As she developed this more altruistic mindset, she began to feel inclined to make a difference in the world somehow. “I guess I always wanted to make meaning out of my travels and of course, as a young person I wanted to make meaning out of my life. And back then, I thought, Journalism, of course!” She had a routine of moving back and forth between Calgary, where she would earn travel money, and hot spots, like Afghanistan and Iraq, where she would write. Realizing now that she had little training and experience with such high-risk endeavors, she laughs, “Looking back, I was ballsy as heck! I can’t believe the confidence and the nerve of young Amanda, just flying by the seat of her pants into war zones!” She can’t help but wonder where her career would have ultimately gone if her life hadn’t taken the course it had. Her budding journalism career was gaining success while she traveled throughout the Middle East and Africa, “Journalism isn’t something that calls me anymore.” As of late, she has been focusing on the Global Enrichment Foundation, the movie production, and a degree in psychology. “When things slow down for me, I will be going back to university. I am part of the Psychology Program at the University of Calgary.” Had her life not steered in this direction, Amanda may not have had the opportunity to aid those in Somalia in such a magnanimous way. Her story has reached a vast audience with A House in the Sky and will reach an even broader audience with the movie production. “I always believed in destiny and that life has a way of always guiding us to where we need to be for our next step in our growth. If I believe this, it means that everything that happened to me, including the pain and suffering, was meant to happen to me. That can be hard to make sense of because I suffered so much while in captivity at the hands of 69


Th e w e a k c a n n e ve r for give . F or give n e ss is th e a ttr ibute of th e str on g. - Ghandi the young men. And yet, I believe this to be the truth, and my life is so different and much better now than it was before. I appreciate it, and it came as a result of the suffering I endured. I can’t imagine my life any other way at this point.” The experience, regardless of how traumatic it had been, has enriched her life and became her greatest gift to others. “I feel like I have something to share with people about the strength of the human spirit as I encountered it. People are looking for inspiration right now and I happened to have this remarkable story, and I am happy to share it. Talking about it feels like I am making meaning of what happened to me and sharing it helps people heighten their awareness of the world’s problems.” Gandhi once said, “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” It is individuals like Amanda that he was speaking of as strong. Although Amanda may be a pro at this seldompracticed undertaking, it remains an ongoing process and a daily effort. “I have a practice of forgiveness. Every morning before I get out of bed, I choose forgiveness. Some days, I honestly feel like I’ve forgiven and it feels tremendously liberating. But other days, I don’t necessarily get there. The important thing is that I want it and try each day.” Although the pain lingers, she feels more and more free through forgiveness as time progresses. “It is something that’s capacity increases as you engage it.” Surviving captivity involved a great deal of mental strength as her body declined in health. She admits to making it through by choosing gratitude over despair, forgiveness over anger, and understanding that although her body was lacking sustenance, her spirit and mind endured. Quotes like that of C.S. Lewis would replay in her mind during her darkest moments, “You don’t have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body.” It was this attitude that nourished her survival. Coming back to ordinary life after experiencing fifteen months of isolation and physical brutality in a war-torn country would be difficult, to say the least. Adjusting

to the rhythm of life in Canada, to people’s first-world concerns with sour memories trickling into daily life would possibly detach one from those around them. However, Amanda does not look for pity, she does not set herself aside from those around her, or think of herself as more enlightened and wise for what she has been through. “People’s perspectives are only what they know and what they do. It is all relative. I can’t expect people to have the same perspective that I have because they haven’t been through what I’ve been through. They have been through their own form of suffering that I don’t know.” Relationships with other people have become like a nurturing wellspring in her life. “During the last five years, I have become very much inspired by people that I encounter through the Global Enrichment Foundation. I met so many women who, due to war, have lost everything: their children, their husbands, their limbs, and have been remarkably hopeful about their future. It is incredible, when you travel and see the problems of the world, it puts everything into perspective.” Amanda began to travel at a young age and usually by herself, so understanding and being aware of the world and its problems became second nature to her. In India she worked with Mother Teresa’s order at a home for the dying and recalls how her perspective on the world was especially electrified there. “It was amazing, definitely something I’d want to do again. It was quite the intense experience to have. It really opened my eyes and made me want to be of service to the world in some way. Back then, I just didn’t know what that looked like, now I know.” If being of service to the world is what Amanda has been looking for throughout her travels, she has definitely found the meaning of her life. She has gone above and beyond what this meaning has been prying her to do. Through others’ hatred, where she could have despaired, she chose to discover the elevated human qualities within herself, such as forgiveness, gratitude, and the decision to move forward. That is the difference between a victim and a survivor.

FOLLOW AMANDA ON INSTAGRAM @AMANDALINDHOUT 70

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Small Business Spotlight

B r e ws B r o th er s Written by Kait Kucy Photographed by Blair Inkster

A tr i f ecta o f e n t r e p r e n e u r ia l c a ffe in e -fue le d ta le n ts h a s ta ken to Cal g ar y s tr e e t s– a r m e d w i t h a pop -up ba r, loc a lly r oa ste d beans, an d a d e s i r e t o m a ke r e a lly good c offe e –for you.

Just when you thought coffee in Calgary couldn’t get any better, it did. Our baristas are top notch and we have our pick of several locally roasted coffee brands. Our inner city streets are littered with new cafes opening up – our choices haven’t been more sophisticated. And now we have even more reason to celebrate: Meet Ben Put, Jeremy Ho, and Justin Eyford. Between the three of them they have over 20 years of experience in sourcing, roasting, and serving. Enter Monogram Coffee. After working for other local companies for years, these

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three joined forces to visualize and create a new kind of café experience. However, before they got started working on their brick + mortar space, they delved into the world of pop-up coffee bars to tap into Calgary’s coffee community, first and foremost. “All three of us had been working in the specialty coffee industry over the past ten years and we realized we all shared a vision for something that didn’t exist yet,” says Jeremy. “We feel that coffee should inspire wonder and warmth. We want to create a personal experience for everyone who enters the shop. Getting


people to learn about great coffee so that they discover the same passion for coffee as we do – that is what Monogram is all about.” With a focus on educating the consumer in an approachable way, the Monogram team really finds that including this component in their retail and service plan serves to engage further with the customer as well as other businesses. “To use our expertise to create training programs that cater to everyone, from the home brewer to the café owner, is one of the best ways we can share our passion for coffee,” says Justin. “We’ve put a lot of emphasis on educating our customer. Part of the wonder and warmth that Jeremy described involves inspiring our customer to ask questions about the coffee. While we won’t force it on them, we really want education to be a component of your experience with Monogram.” Starting small and staying local, we got to see Monogram appear in the Inglewood design shop, DaDe Art & Design Lab in late 2014 with great success. On paper the gallery (one part studio and one part retail shop) might have seemed like an interesting choice for their first location, but upon entering the Lab, it just feels like Monogram should have been there all along. “We started with a two-day pop-up at DaDe and grew to spending a lot more time in there. We served not only traditional coffee drinks but also a drink that I created at a regional barista competition. Essentially, we wanted to provide the comfort and familiarity for customers but also offer a new experience for them to try,” Ben shares. Another pop-up for those seeking warmth and wonder, sprung up at Rogue Cycle Shop in Calgary’s Beltline community. Ben again says that the experience was incredibly positive: “I don’t know the origins but it is obvious that people who love to cycle also love coffee.” In terms of other places Monogram popped up in 2014, that list included two barista competitions – both of which Ben was fortunate to win. Thanks to those wins, Monogram will be competing in April at the world competition in Seattle, meaning for the first time Ben will be representing his own company in a competition at this level.

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Being a part of these competitions requires a lot of work. The Monogram team explains how one of the most important components to the competition is bringing your own coffee and making sure it is very good. Involving a lot of experimenting and tasting pre-competition, they give feedback to their roaster and work on improving it before the big day. Monogram is currently working with Transcend Coffee based out of Edmonton to create their beautiful drinks. “That feedback process takes time, so you want to make sure you start executing your plan well in advance. After we’ve gotten the coffee to where we want it to be, I start working on creating a presentation based on that coffee. An important element is making sure the story behind the coffee is just as captivating as the drink itself. You need to 74

know where it was grown, how it was sold, the roasting methods – everything. You can’t just name the country that the coffee came from. Even before you start getting into the nitty gritty aspects of brewing your coffee, you need to do your research,” Ben enthusiastically shares. Creating both traditional and signature drinks for the competition, the judges rate you on more than just taste – technical skill and creativity both play a big role as well. Incorporating both an interesting ingredient and an interesting technique into the presentation ensure you will wow judges. “This year I used quince as my interesting ingredient,” says Ben. “It actually pairs really well with Eastern African coffees – they have a lot of similar notes in terms of orchard


J u st in E y for d, Be n P ut, Je r e my Ho

and citrus flavours you will taste. In terms of an interesting technique I wanted to use orange in my drink but oranges are very acidic. If you added it straight to coffee it would taste awful. Instead, I took orange oil and misted it over my drink so it added a beautiful aroma that was perceived as flavour.” When you drop into Monogram for the first time, you might want to request one of their signature drinks as opposed to going with the usual latte or cappuccino. In fact, they would prefer it: “The name Monogram definitely speaks to creating something unique for our customer. We want to make drinks that combine unusual ingredients to make something delicious for customers and causes them to wonder about the potential of quality coffee,” says Justin.

Jeremy adds, “If you look at what a monogram usually is – it is a grouping of initials or letters that come together to create a personalized stamp or marking. Our monogram is more than just the three of us – it also includes the team that we will be building, our suppliers and collaborators, and most importantly, our customers. We all come together to create a unique experience and that is what is most important.” Monogram’s newest location is in Altadore at 4814 16 Street SW. A cozy and community-minded café, the Monogram team aim to create a space that serves as a gathering place for everyone. FIND MONOGRAM ON INSTAGRAM @MONOGRAMCO 75


A Man With a Passion

I A m Spi der - Ma n Written by Ryan Gartner Photographed by Blair Inkster

Stan Audette is a comic book. Sorry, a comic book collector. Scratch that… Stan is a comic book hunter. Aficionado. Encyclopedia. Enthusiast. Geek. I know, that might sound a little offensive, but Stan has no problem being referred to as a geek. In fact, that’s what he calls himself. Just don’t call Stan, or any other comic book collector for that matter, a nerd; those are fighting words. And who wants to pick a fight with someone who has spent the last 40 plus years of his life studying, obsessing over, and emulating the most elite, powerful, and superhuman beings who have ever existed in our universe? Not me. Ask Stan any comic book question and he might tell you the following: when that comic book and its characters were created; who created them; who the original artist was; what year new characters were introduced, and how many other comics were created as spinoffs from those characters; how much the movies grossed; how many dollars in damage were inflicted on any particular city had the events in that movie actually taken place; what planet the heroes and villains hail from; and how, if you ever have the opportunity, you might kill them. If you’re really lucky, as I was, Stan might even tell you who dies at the end of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 just days before you get to watch it for the first time! *Spoiler Alert*: Gwen Stacey dies in the end. Yes, I’m going to ruin it for everyone else. I’m that kind of a guy. If I was to attempt to write everything I learned from Stan in the three hours we hung out, I may need every page in this magazine, and there’s a great chance it would be fascinating from beginning to end. In fact, if it were up to Stan, this article would have nothing to do with him; rather, it would be more of a technical essay on the world of comic books themselves. But here at Dote, we are about people. So let’s find out a little more about Stan Audette, the name he goes by before the sun goes down and the crime fighting begins. Stan has lived in the world of super heroes and villains pretty much his entire life. When Stan was just a wiener (that’s a little guy) he was fascinated by the vibrancy of colours that exploded off the covers of comic books. Little Stan hadn’t quite developed a full interest in the characters 76

or stories held inside those pages but rather thought the covers would be great to rip off and paste up on his closet doors. They looked incredible. An act in which little Stan had no idea that one day future Stan would want to strangle him for. “When I was eight, nine, or ten I played sports. I was into school and everything, but I also painted. I actually have a couple originals in the garage. I went to art classes my parents had lined up. In the basement of a synagogue in Winnipeg, we would do painting, oil paintingz. He was an artist that taught a bunch of kids. So I started to have a bit of an eye for painting when I did those classes. So it was art. That’s what started it. If you want the actual trigger, it was art.” It wasn’t until Stan grew a little older and wiser in his years that he stopped tearing up his future retirement plan and really began to be captivated by what was going on inside the pages of these works of art. In the world of comics there are what you will call “key books.” These are the books that might contain the first appearances of new characters or the death of a hero or villain. Something major. Something significant. It was in September of 1974 when Stan, unbeknown to him at the time, stumbled upon what would later become a very important book in the world of comic books: The Incredible Hulk #181. “I grew up in Winnipeg and had a paper route in River Heights. The south part of River Heights, I think it was. So I do my papers and head back to the drug store with money in my pocket. The Rexall drug store on Grant Ave. That was right at the time I was starting to buy comics at a faster pace. I’m 12 or 13 by now, so a little bit smarter right? I’m not ripping covers off anymore! So, I see this Incredible Hulk book, which has Wolverine on it, and it says ‘The Canadian Super Hero,’ 'cause Wolverine is from Canada, right? Weapon X and everything is in Canada. So, I see that, I see Hulk, and I had bought a few Hulks before, but you know, Spider-Man was always my guy. If I had 50 cents in my pocket, Spider-Man was number one. So it’s fall, probably in September. I’ve got this Hulk and it says The Canadian Super Hero, so I’m like, ‘What!? That’s pretty cool.’ So I throw it


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in my newspaper bag and away I go home. Now this was a time where I either had some premonitions or I was getting smart enough that I put it into a plastic wrapper. So I have that book from 1974. I paid 25 cents for it and today, the quality I have, I could go to a comic book convention and sell it to a dude for $1,000. That, in all the years is a 40,000 percent gain! Imagine if I would have grabbed ten of them!” It was around that age, 12 or 13, that Stan really started to accumulate a bit of a collection. As the years move forward, however, our childhood interests and hobbies wane and life’s grownup, long-fingered, strangling hands take hold of our throats and slowly start squeezing out any glimmer of… Sorry, writing an article about comic books tends to remind one of their own childhood passions. The hope and wonder. The freedom. Life. I digress. Let’s catch up with our hero. Where were we? “So now, when I get into my teens, before university I was very limited in buying comic books. I was working on the farm, working in school. It was a bit of a black period if you will. When I went to university, again, poor student, had a little bit of money, so I bought a little bit here and there.” It wasn’t until Stan was out of university and married— before they decided to start a family—that he would get back into collecting. “There was a period of time when I said, I’ve got this collection of comics, they’ve always been in my mind. So I thought, well, maybe I’ll get back into it. I started to go every Saturday and buy a dozen comics. And I’d go again the next Saturday and buy another dozen. In that time, I’ll call it ’80 to ’85, I amassed about 3,000 comics.” “If we fast-forward to literally the last four years, I walk into Another Dimension one day in Kensington.” (Another Dimension is one of the main comic book shops in Calgary, although, I do believe after meeting Stan that he may in fact enter other dimensions.) “They had 30 or so Spider-Mans that were around the 500 number, and they had all these comics and it was like a light bulb went off. Ding! You know, I’ve got a lot of the early Spider-Mans. “Spider-Man was always my guy. I was not Hulk. I was not Superman or Batman. I was Spider-Man. This was all before the hoopla. All before the movies and the merchandising. With comic book guys you associate with a certain character. Some guys were Superman. Some guys were Batman. I was Spider-Man. I am Spider-Man. Maybe what Spider-Man had for me more so than Batman or Superman was that he was a normal guy. He wasn’t big and green. He wasn’t from another planet. He was always running into problems in his real life. He was bullied at school, society didn’t like him, or the press didn’t like him, but he kept going. Spider-Man just kept going, trying to do well against the threats that were out there. You want to connect with 78

the good guy. You want to connect with the guy who’s down on his luck, but he perseveres. When I think about myself, I think, What would Spider-Man do? And he’s had a lot of cases where it’s hopeless, right? Spider-Man's going to get crushed or squished and he says, 'I can’t let down Aunt May, I can’t let down Mary Jane, I can’t let down the world because I have to be strong and try to beat the odds.' You want to be like Spider-Man. You want to be there for people. You want to make sure you’re doing the right thing. Spider-Man never let anybody down and that’s helped me build as I’ve gone on. I’ve always followed him, even through my 30s and 40s. Now that the movies have come out and Spider-Man is everywhere, for me it’s the validation that I picked the right guy. When the first Spider-Man movie came out, we took the kids, and when he first appeared on the screen, I openly wept. Because of what it was, it was all the years...all the years of the comics and me being a Spider-Man guy. “So I bought the 30 Spider-Mans. It was like #540 to #570 or something. I plunk down my $50, and that was the trigger. That started me back into the comics. “I had nine white boxes with my original collection. They went from Winnipeg to Edmonton to Camrose. Then we moved to Red Deer, then Saskatoon, then Calgary. So picture these nine comic book boxes going to all those places. And I never put them in the moving truck with our stuff. They would go in our van and go to the next house. These were always coveted. “In August we went up to Invermere, BC and bought 6,000 comics. They cost me $5,000 but there were key books in there and all kinds of interesting things. We’ve been up to Stony Plain where I bought 1,800 comics from a guy. I’ve bought comics on Kijiji where I’ve gone to visit a guy in a dark alley under a light. We’ll negotiate the price, look at the condition, swap some lies, and away we go. Now my collection has expanded to 16,000 comics over the last three years.” So one might ask, has this Stan fellow read all these comics? So I asked Stan, have you read all these comics? “Haha. When I bring people here they ask me first if I’m out of my mind? And then they ask if I’ve read them all? With Spider-Man, there’s a ton of books in there I’ve never ever looked at. I was just going to conventions and buying up books. The 3,000 I mentioned earlier, I’ve read every one of them. All the new comics that have come out, all the Spider-Man, all the X-Men, I read all of those religiously. My happiest days are Wednesdays: comic book Wednesday. That’s when all the new comics come out. I’ll come home, read the new ones. Then have dinner. So I’m very much up-to-date every week with what’s going on with the characters. I know very clearly what’s going on with everybody.”


Sp id e r- Man ' s go i n g t o get crus hed or s quis h e d a nd he s ay s , ' I c an’ t let down Aunt Ma y, I can’t let d o w n M ar y J an e , I ca n’t let down t he wor l d be c a u s e I h av e t o be s t rong a nd t ry t o bea t th e o d d s . ' Yo u w an t t o be like S pider-Ma n. 23

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I was fortunate enough to hang out with Stan in the very room where these super beings, archenemies, and alternate worlds collide. What used to be his son’s bedroom is now home to a collection of comics that fill every inch of the Ikea shelf-lined walls, which struggle to contain them. They spill out into the bonus room around the corner and into the spare room down the hall (where his son will now have to stay when he returns home from university for holidays). Comic book lamps, masks, figurines, posters, and memorabilia adorn the shelf tops and walls, overlooking Stan’s coveted reading chair, which sits in the centre of it all. Of all the thousands of comics Stan has collected over the years there are two collections that are his most prized, Spider-Man and X-Men. These are the two series that Stan is working diligently to complete. “Tomorrow, with credit card in hand, I could go online and buy all of them. I need about 80

20 or 30 to complete each series. It would cost me about $40,000. The fun in this, though, is the hunt, the sport of it. Getting those will be a milestone for me.” When talking with Stan I began to understand that the comic books are just one part of a world and culture that has been growing with superhuman strength since Superman first appeared in Action Comics in 1938, a comic that recently sold for over $3 million! The latest Avengers movie grossed over $1.7 billion. Comic Con: San Diego can sell out over 130,000 tickets in less than an hour. Comic books, which used to cost as little as 10 cents, have become a multibillion dollar, super freak industry that is taking over our universe one geek at a time. Slowly, crawling their way out of their moms’ basements and flooding our streets, geeks are bringing their heroes to the masses and salvation to our planet.


downtown #109, 638 11th ave sw 403.266.8708

bridgeland 837 - 1 ave ne 403.289.0870

www.redbloom.ca

west 85th #2106, 8561 8a ave sw 403.719.9818


The Urb a n F a r m er Written by Elizabeth Chorney-Booth Photographed by Blair Inkster 82

Michael Soucy doesn’t look like your stereotypical farmer (whatever that may be). Sitting in an inner-city coffee shop, with his neat clothes, stylish glasses, and mild manner of speaking, one may guess that Michael is a graphic designer, a writer, or some other young creative who makes his money sitting behind a computer. But no — Michael makes


his living working in the dirt and growing fresh produce as part of the urban farming movement that is slowly creeping into Calgary’s city limits. Urban farming, like urban beekeeping or urban homesteading, is a growing movement that is pretty much exactly what you’d think: farmers and gardeners are growing small food crops on plots of land within the city. Unlike traditional rural farming, urban farmers are severely limited by the amount of land they have to work with, which means they often have to be creative with what they grow and how they grow it. With more and more home cooks and restaurant chefs looking for locally-produced and often hard-to-find varietals, urban farmers fit right in with the farm-to-table food philosophies that many food professionals are beginning to embrace as much more than a foodie fad. Michael’s business, Seed+Soil, primarily grows produce on an approximately 5,000-square-foot plot of land in Calgary. Seed+Soil specializes in unique vegetables: everything from microgreens to rare lettuces and carrots that are unlikely to ever be seen in a mainstream grocery store. The idea is to not only offer something local but to also offer something different. As a result, Seed+Soil has gained a following from customers who visit their market stands at various farmers markets, as well as local chefs, including Andrew Winfield, who serves up Seed+Soil’s produce at River Café. Seed+Soil’s focus on unique chef-coveted varietals makes sense in that Michael’s own path to urban farming stems from a love of food rather than a background in agriculture. Michael himself trained in culinary school and spent considerable time working in the restaurant industry, and after realizing how much he enjoyed working in his own backyard garden with unique seeds, he decided to pursue the idea of urban farming more seriously. As a result, he was able to grow the kinds of plants that he wanted to cook with and eat and figured that others in the city would also be interested in his wares. “There was stuff that I wanted to grow that I maybe didn’t see a lot of,” Michael says. “I wanted to explore and find different things to cook with. A lot of the stuff that I grow a lot of people haven’t heard of — or I hadn’t even heard of. Or I’d see other chefs around the world using ingredients and I’d try to find the seeds.” Michael found some camaraderie with YYC Growers and Distributors, an organization that connects urban farmers in Calgary and also invites members to band together to

offer customers a community-supported agriculture (CSA) farm share. His involvement with that group helped him to grow as an urban farmer and before too long he realized that he needed some help to grow at the volume that he wanted to. So, last year he started working his plot of land for Seed+Soil’s first season. He grew a variety of products including lettuce, kale, onions, fennel, tomatoes, swiss chard, microgreens, and something called claytonia, also known as miner’s lettuce. Despite Calgary’s erratic climate, Michael says there are actually quite a few things urban farmers can grow here. “You just need to plan a lot ahead of time,” he says. “I was fortunate enough to have a greenhouse to get stuff started ahead of time, like tomatoes. But you do take a big risk in Calgary. If you want to grow slow maturing crops as an urban farmer, you’re using all of your space and keeping it occupied for the whole season. Stuff like winter squash that takes three or four months to ripen, you’re just praying that you don’t get hail that ends the whole thing. Depending on how much space you have, you need to calculate how you use the space and how much money you can make off of it.” This is where Michael stresses that anyone who wants to try to make a go as an urban farmer needs to really love the work and not just the final food products. Urban farmers often work independently, which means that they have to do all of the planting, harvesting, marketing, and selling on their own. Still, Michael says it’s a great career for young people who like to work with their hands and also have an interest in food and environmentalism. With the urban farmer movement picking up steam, especially in other provinces like B.C. and Quebec, Michael hopes to see more farmers on the scene in the coming seasons. “There is a growing thing that’s happening, though more so in B.C.,” he says. “There’s a group called the Young Agrarians, that’s also moving into Alberta, of young farmers and urban farmers that work with younger people both inside and outside of the cities. It’s growing. Some of the members are definitely more involved with the education part of it, and that’s also a growing thing where they’re going into schools and educating that way.” As for Seed+Soil, now that they’ve made it through their first season on their plot (and a tough one at that, considering last September’s pre-harvest snow storm), Michael is excited to take on season two and hopefully get his produce to more consumers, be it through more restaurant partnerships, increased presence at farmers’ markets, or possibly the launch of his own CSA. 83


For 2015, Seed+Soil will also be offering a 14-week, weekly food box from July to October. “We are striving to have the most unique and culinarily adventurous box in Calgary,” says Michael. While he recognizes that farming isn’t the easiest way for a young urban person like himself to make money, he’s committed to continuing to bring interesting and delicious produce to Calgary. Michael hopes more people follow suit, even if it’s just a small-scale backyard garden or a greenhouse full of sprouts and microgreens. “I think most people can do it,” he says. “To start, though, it’s definitely something you need to love doing because you realize quickly that it’s a lot of work for the amount of money you’re making. But, if you’re motivated I think most people can do it.” FIND SEED+SOIL ON INSTAGRAM @SEEDPLUSSOIL SEEDPLUSSOIL.COM 84


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Roasted Beet Salad with Crème Fraiche & Dill Vinaigrette Roas ted Beet Salad 6 SMALL TO MEDIUM SIZED BEETS (VARIOUS VARIETIES IF AVAILABLE) OLIVE OIL FOR COATING ½ OF 1 CUCUMBER SMALL BUNCH OF DILL AND SEASONAL HERBS 4-6 EDIBLE FLOWERS (NASTURTIUM, RADISH FLOWER, SUNFLOWER) SEA SALT AND PEPPER TO TASTE

Crème Fraiche & D ill Vinaigrette 1 SMALL GARLIC CLOVE 1 DILL PICKLE, FINELY CHOPPED 1 TBSP DILL PICKLE JUICE 1 LEMON, JUICED 4 TBSP CRÈME FRAICHE FRESH DILL, CHOPPED SALT AND PEPPER TO TASTE ½ OF 1 SMALL ROASTED BEET, GRATED FOR GARNISH

D ire c tions 1. PREHEAT OVEN TO 350° F. 2. ADD WASHED BEETS TO BAKING TRAY, COAT WITH OLIVE OIL, AND SPRINKLE WITH SEA SALT AND PEPPER. COVER WITH TINFOIL AND ROAST FOR 45 MINUTES TO AN HOUR, OR UNTIL FORK TENDER. 3. ONCE BEETS ARE TENDER, LET SIT UNTIL COOL ENOUGH TO HANDLE. PEEL OFF SKIN AND SLICE OR MANDOLIN TO DESIRED SIZE. TAKE HALF OF A BEET AND GRATE IT FOR GARNISHING. 4. QUARTER HALF OF ONE CUCUMBER AND SET ASIDE (WE USED CUCUMBER BUT ANY SEASONAL VEGETABLE WILL WORK INCLUDING CARROTS OR LEAFY GREENS). 5. TO MAKE VINAIGRETTE: PLACE ALL INGREDIENTS IN A JAR AND SHAKE UNTIL COMBINED. 6. PLACE DOLLOP OF VINAIGRETTE IN CENTRE OF PLATE AND ARRANGE SEASONAL VEGETABLES. TOP WITH DILL, SEASONAL HERBS, EDIBLE FLOWERS, AND GRATED BEET. PAIR WITH OUR CHARTREUSE LEMONADE (FLIP THE PAGE FOR THE RECIPE CREATED BY RAW BAR BY DUNCAN LY AT HOTEL ARTS).

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Chartreuse Lemonade Cocktail created by Christina Mah of Raw Bar by Duncan Ly Photographed by Sarah Vaughan Styled by Alexandra Wig

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C ha r t re u s e Lemonade ½ OZ GREEN CHARTREUSE ¾ OZ ROASTED LEMON SYRUP (RECIPE BELOW) 1 OZ FRESH SQUEEZED LEMON JUICE 3 DROPS THAI BITTERS (AVAILABLE AT VINE ARTS OR OTHER SPECIALTY LIQUOR STORES) SODA 1 STRAWBERRY (TO GARNISH) BUILD ALL INGREDIENTS IN A COLLINS GLASS, SWIZZLE, AND TOP WITH SODA. FAN A STRAWBERRY, AND GARNISH ON YOUR FINISHED DRINK.

Roasted Lemon Syrup 2 CUPS HONEY 2 CUPS WATER 10 LEMONS 20 BAY LEAVES PREHEAT OVEN TO 350° F. CUT LEMONS IN HALF LENGTHWISE AND SLIT IN THE MIDDLE LENGTHWISE. PLACE LEMON HALVES ON BAKING SHEET AND INSERT BAY LEAVES INTO SLITS MAKING SURE BAY LEAVES ARE ENVELOPED BY LEMONS. PLACE BAKING SHEET IN OVEN AND BAKE UNTIL THE LEMONS START TO BROWN. MEANWHILE, POUR HONEY AND WATER IN A POT, HEAT ON MED/HIGH UNTIL THE HONEY AND WATER ARE HEATED AND HAVE COME TOGETHER, DO NOT BOIL. TURN OFF HEAT AND LET COOL. PUT BAKED LEMONS AND HONEY SYRUP INTO A LARGE CONTAINER AND LET SIT OVERNIGHT. SQUEEZE LEMONS INTO HONEY SYRUP, STRAIN SYRUP. STORE IN AIR TIGHT CONTAINER IN THE REFRIGERATOR.

FOLLOW HOTEL ARTS ON INSTAGRAM @HOTELARTSYYC FOLLOW RAW BAR BY DUNCAN LY @RAWBARYYC

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Baked

Ever yo n e Lo ves a Lo a f! Written by Vicki Manness Photographed by Jamie Hyatt Loaf recipe by Vicki Manness Coffee recipe by Monogram Coffee 90


Is there anything better than a fresh loaf slice and a cup of coffee? In my opinion, there isn’t. Loaves may get a bad rep for being dry and outdated, but why not re-invent the loaf to be a moist and delicious staple in our new-school world of entertaining? We thought we should retire the old lemon and orange loaves to make way for a lesser used citrus: the grapefruit. Grapefruit has such a unique flavour that we decided to showcase it with this Olive Oil Grapefruit Loaf. Why olive oil you ask? Because why not! Olive oil can bring such an interesting essence to baking if paired with the right ingredients. In this case, we really made some magic. The olive oil and grapefruit flavours combined create such a subtle, well-rounded, and balanced character with a bottom note that you rarely taste in the average loaf. We decided to take it up one more level and top it off with a vanilla bean glaze. The glaze adds a sweet, creamy topper to compliment the tang and bitterness brought by the grapefruit. All these elements together create a beautiful and delicious loaf that we think will impress any guest. We worked together with Monogram Coffee to pair this loaf with a deliciously spiced iced coffee. We think you’ll love this perfect-for-spring pairing!

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O l ive O i l and Grap efru it Loaf w it h Vanilla Bean Glaze

Olive Oi l a n d G ra p ef ru i t Loaf ½ CUP BUTTER ⅓ CUP OLIVE OIL 1 ¼ CUP SUGAR ⅓ CUP HONEY 3 EGGS ¼ CUP GRAPEFRUIT ZEST 2 ¼ CUP FLOUR ¼ TSP BAKING POWDER ¼ TSP BAKING SODA ½ TSP SALT ¼ CUP FRESH GRAPEFRUIT JUICE ½ CUP BUTTERMILK ½ TSP VANILLA

PREHEAT YOUR OVEN TO 350° F. CREAM SOFTENED BUTTER WITH OLIVE OIL, SUGAR, AND HONEY. MIX ON MEDIUM SPEED UNTIL LIGHT AND FLUFFY. ADD GRAPEFRUIT ZEST. ADD EGGS ONE AT A TIME AND MIX THOROUGHLY. IN A SEPARATE BOWL MIX TOGETHER FLOUR, BAKING POWDER, BAKING SODA, AND SALT. IN ANOTHER SEPARATE BOWL MIX TOGETHER GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, BUTTERMILK, AND VANILLA. ALTERNATE ADDING THE DRY AND WET MIXTURES TO THE BUTTER AND EGG MIXTURE. STARTING AND ENDING WITH THE DRY INGREDIENTS AND FULLY INCORPORATING AND SCRAPING DOWN THE SIDES OF THE BOWL EACH TIME. BUTTER AND FLOUR YOUR LOAF PAN, AND POUR THE BATTER IN. ALL LOAF PANS ARE DIFFERENT SO MAKE SURE YOU DON’T FILL YOUR PAN MORE THAN ¾ FULL. PLACE IN THE OVEN AND BAKE FOR 30 TO 45 MINUTES, OR UNTIL A TOOTHPICK COMES OUT CLEAN. LET COOL COMPLETELY BEFORE GLAZING.

Van i lla B e a n G l a ze ½ ½ 1 ⅓ ¼

VANILLA POD TSP VANILLA CUP ICING SUGAR CUP HEAVY CREAM CUP FRESH GRAPEFRUIT JUICE

IN A BOWL, PLACE ICING SUGAR AND THE SEEDS OF HALF A VANILLA POD. ADD VANILLA, CREAM, AND GRAPEFRUIT JUICE TO THE BOWL. WHISK ALL INGREDIENTS TOGETHER UNTIL YOU HAVE A SMOOTH GLAZE. SPREAD OVER COOLED LOAF, AND WAIT AN HOUR OR SO FOR IT TO DRY. SLICE LOAF AND ENJOY!

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The Ab igail Cardamo m Crea m I ced Co f f ee

1

CUP HEAVY CREAM

2

GREEN CARDAMOM PODS, GROUND

2½ TBSP SUGAR FILTER COFFEE GROUNDS (AS FRESH AS POSSIBLE AND GROUND RIGHT BEFORE BREWING)

HEAT THE CREAM, SUGAR, AND CARDAMOM IN A SAUCEPAN. BRING TO A SIMMER THEN REMOVE FROM HEAT AND LET THE MIXTURE INFUSE FOR ONE HOUR IN THE REFRIGERATOR. USING A FRENCH PRESS OR POUR-OVER BREWER AND A KITCHEN SCALE, BREW 3 CUPS OF COFFEE AT A RATIO OF 10 GRAMS OF WATER FOR EVERY 1 GRAM OF COFFEE WITH A SLIGHTLY FINER GRIND THAN YOU REGULARLY USE. IF YOU DON’T HAVE A SCALE AT HOME, BREW THE COFFEE WITH 30% LESS WATER THAN YOU NORMALLY WOULD. STRAIN THE CREAM TO REMOVE THE LARGER PIECES OF CARDAMOM. MIX THE COFFEE AND THE CARDAMOM INFUSED CREAM AND POUR OVER ICE. SERVES 2

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A Sense of Wonder Written by Morgan Chapman Styled by Alexandra Wig Hair and Makeup by SimplyMe Photographed by David Heidrich

WHY SPENDING TIME IN NATURE IS VITAL TO FINDING TRANQUILITY IN OUR BUSY WORLD

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T h ose w h o c o ntempl a te th e bea uty of t h e Ea r t h f i n d r eser ves o f str en gth th at w i l l en d u r e a s l o n g a s l i fe l a sts . – Ra ch el C a r so n

I’ve always believed that the answer to any problem is a good book or time spent in nature. While books have the ability to challenge my perspective or allow me to escape into someone else’s world for a short while, nothing inspires gratitude, contentment, and joy in my heart like a contemplative walk in the forest. It’s something that most artists, authors, and thinkers strategically build into their creative day, but a practice that can get lost in the fast-paced modern life of city dwellers. Research suggests that as little as 20 minutes spent in nature daily can increase our energy levels, mood, and vitality. Just being in the presence of vegetation can reduce blood pressure and stress levels. Motherhood has been the catalyst to deepen my relationship to nature. I remember fondly a week where a friend of mine and I decided we would go for a walk at Fish Creek park each day. We had just come out of a long winter filled with nasty colds, cabin fever, and boredom (on our parts and our kids’) and we had a feeling a daily walk would be just what we needed to welcome spring. It was, by far, the best week ever. Of course, getting kids dressed and out the door, and packing a bag of snacks, drinks, and extra clothes for the inevitable river exploration was a chaos each morning, but once we were there, breathing in the smells of the forest, feeling the sun on our faces, and appreciating the beauty emerging from the snow, it was glorious.

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A favourite author of mine, conservationist Rachel Carson was passionate about the role nature should play in our lives, but especially in the lives of children. Cultivating a sense of wonder, the appreciation of beauty in chaos, and the feeling of smallness that one gets in nature all work together to create pathways to inner contentment that will last throughout life. “If I had influence with the good fairy who is supposed to preside over the christening of all children, I should ask that her gift to each child in the world be a sense of wonder so indestructible that it would last throughout life, as an unfailing antidote against the boredom and disenchantments of later years, the sterile preoccupations with things that are artificial, the alienation from the sources of our strength. If a child is to keep alive this inborn sense of wonder, without any such gift from the fairies, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.” (The Sense of Wonder, Rachel Carson) Richard Louv, in his best-selling book Last Child in the Woods, describes a generation that has lost its connection to the natural world. The landscape of education is changing in response to this, and connecting with nature is becoming a vital part of the schoolday in many parts of the UK and Europe through Forest School programs, where children spend half or full days in nature, learning through an inquiry-


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based approach. I was thrilled to discover a forest school style preschool in our city for my son. When asked what inspired her to start a forest school, founder of Common Digs, Lisa Menzies replies; “My own children. It struck me one day that my kids were growing up in a cul-de-sac. I took them and some of their friends to a nearby woodland and quickly saw that playing in nature, as I had done as a child, did not come naturally to them. I realized we can’t download our own memories and experiences of playing in nature and the benefits that come with that to our

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children – we have to provide them opportunities to create their own.” To reap the benefits of time in nature and rediscover our own inborn sense of wonder, we need not go very far. We are so fortunate to live in a city teeming with greenspaces, parks, and sprawling natural areas. In any given community it is a short drive or walk to a space in which we can explore. Although the Rocky Mountains offer a multitude of beautiful spots, we don’t need a Banff Park Pass to find space and quiet in nature; in fact,


you would be surprised to find how far away from the hustle and bustle of the big city you can feel in some of our parks. When you are short on time, you don’t even have to leave your own backyard. Spending time outside birdwatching, cloud gazing or just sitting among the trees at home is a great way to connect with nature in your own space. One of our family’s favourite spots is Fish Creek Park. This provincial park within our city is home to a wide variety of wildlife, and a stunning variety of landscapes. From the

mountain feeling of the west end of Fish Creek in Shannon Terrace and Bebo Grove to the grassy paths at the Bow Valley Ranche, Fish Creek Park is truly an oasis in our city. Your family’s practice of spending time in nature will likely look different depending on the ages of the family members or the season in which you are exploring. Beyond being prepared with the proper clothing, footwear, water, and snacks (nobody enjoys themselves when they are uncomfortable, hungry, or cold!), here are seven ideas to make your time in nature more inspiring:

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1

Slow d o wn

It’s tempting to make every nature outing about covering a certain number of kilometres or reaching a certain destination. My aunt, an avid hiker and nature-lover shares the story of her preschooler halting their march on a family hike, crouching down and noticing five different types of lichen on a rock. I find that my own children are constantly teaching me that the journey is more important and that it is vital to practice presence in nature, stop and listen to the chorus of birds, breathe deep the soft smell of moss, appreciate the crunch of leaves and twigs underfoot, and rest in the soothing sound of the far-off flow of a creek.

2

Leave y o u r ph o n e at h o m e

3

Forage for interesting objects

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Exp eri en ce t h e golden ho ur

This one is admittedly very hard for me, an Instagram addict, but I do find that I engage more fully and practice presence when my phone is not in my pocket. I do sometimes regret when a few picture-perfect moments go uncaptured, but being in the moment with the people I am with and the natural area we are exploring is a gift to my family and to myself.

For Bruce Hendricks, Outdoor Education specialist at Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School, nature walks with his small children were highlighted by berry picking along the paths. Another game they really enjoyed was closing their eyes and feeling a texture in nature such as a leaf, bark, a rock, or a flower. Experiencing a place with all of our senses deepens the experience and our appreciation of the many elements to any given natural area. Though we always endeavour to leave nature in nature, I must admit that sometimes I can’t help but make a little wildflower bouquet when we are camping, or take home a heart-shaped rock that my child has found.

There is something so magical about dawn and dusk. The blink-and-you’ll-miss-it colours that change by the minute in the sky, the quiet movement of animals. There is something truly magical about the golden light that settles on the land and illuminates the trees and flowers with a special glow each morning and evening. It truly feels as though time slows down for a short while, creating a little extra space for contemplation and gratitude.

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Tr y E a r t h i n g

6

Ge t up w i t h t h e b i r d s

7

Tr y t h e 3 0 x 3 0 C h a l l e nge

We know that spending time in nature can greatly reduce our stress levels, but if you want to take it a step further, try Earthing. Earthing, also known as grounding, is based on research that shows that connecting the electrical frequencies of the human body with that of the Earth promotes physical well-being. Try gardening in your bare feet, or experience the connection to the springy forest floor. If you aren’t quite ready to shed your hiking boots, try leaning or sitting against a tree, which slows your heartbeat and brings a sense of calm.

Find out what time the sun rises, and then set your alarm a bit before that. Bring a blanket and a hot coffee or tea and snuggle up and watch the sunrise with someone you love, and listen to the first bird start her song. Summer mornings are perfect for this. And if you are more of a night owl, grab a flashlight and go on an insect hunt. Listen closely for the sounds of the night and use your beam to find the tiny creatures singing those twilight songs.

Who doesn’t feel the magnetic pull to get outside in the spring? After a long, long winter, we are absolutely twitterpated to see the buds on the trees and green poking through the soil. It’s the perfect time to take on David Suzuki’s 30x30 Challenge. During the month of May, Suzuki challenges Canadians to spend 30 minutes in nature every day for 30 days. Participants last year reported an increase in well-being during the challenge, including increased energy, and a feeling of peacefulness and calm. Feelings of stress, negativity, and sleep disturbances were all reduced.

Whether the wilderness into which we step is the park next door, or the summit of a mountain, we need only bring with us a bit of planning, a willingness to slow down and let things unfold, our breath and presence, and a sense of wonder. Every time we step out of the day-today structure of our lives and into nature, we leave with a renewed sense of calm, perspective, gratitude, and joy.

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In ever y w a lk wi th na tur e o n e r ec ei ves f ar mo r e th a n he seeks – J o hn Mui r

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F ur the r Re a d i n g Carson, Rachel. The Sense of Wonder. New York: HarperCollins Publishing, 1998. Louv, Richard. Last Child in the Woods – Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder. New York: Workman Publishing, 2005 Pianosi, Lynda. Take a Hike with Your Children, From Tots to Tweens in the Canadian Rockies. Calgary, Alberta: Pianosi Publishing, 2012 Ward, Jennifer. Let’s Go Outside! Boston: Trumpeter Books, 2009. Ward, Jennifer. I love Dirt! Boston: Trumpeter Books, 2008.

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I f I h ad

i n f luence

wit h t he good f a iry who is

s upposed to pre si d e

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o ve r the c hri s te n i n g o f all c h i l dren,

I should

ask t ha t her gif t t o ea ch child in t he world b e a s ens e of wonder so indes t ruct ible th at it would la st t hroughout lif e.

– Rachel Carson 107


Written and reviewed by Morgan Chapman Book cover illustrations by Jill Mayer of Art + Alexander

Fiction

Non-Fiction

Classic

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham

East of Eden by John Steinbeck

There is nothing I love more than learning about history through the lens of a story. Sue Monk Kidd has once again crafted a beautiful novel that deftly tells the story of strong women who were changemakers in the abolitionist and women’s rights movements of the 19th century. This epic saga left us feeling both horrified at the injustices towards people of colour and women in the not-so-far-off past yet empowered to work towards more justice and human rights in our world today.

Lena Dunham is, in a world of celebrities who are more or less the same, unapologetically herself. Her debut book, for which she was paid 3.5 million after a bidding war ensued over the 66-page preview, is reflective of her raw and honest persona. At times hilarious, and at other times heartbreaking, this collection of thoughts on love, sex, body, work, friendship, and big picture was a thought-provoking and unique read.

When a title appears on the Top 10 lists of many of your book-loving friends, you know that it is going to be a worthwhile read. East of Eden has earned its place in my top books of all time after I finished the epic saga in the span of one week. I could not put this classic down. The well-drawn characters, the battle between good and evil, themes of love, hate, and family kept me reading until late at night and has inspired me to pick up other Steinbeck novels. I am so pleased to hear that this will be made into a motion picture to be released this year!

Reader feedback for Not That Kind of Girl: “While reading this book I alternated between mourning the fact that it didn’t exist while I was in my teens/early adulthood and delighting in the fact that I’d found it now and it proved that I was not alone in all of the madness of those younger years. Sure Lena’s experiences are unique to her, but underlying that is the similar thread of what, I suspect, all young women slog through to varying degrees. Sense of camaraderie aside, Lena Dunham is also a fearless and ridiculously skilled writer; painting a raw and real picture of exactly how she sees it.” -Kael Klassen

Picture Book

Young Adult Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo

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How can you not love a novel in which a girl gives CPR to a squirrel in the first few pages? “If she were forced to describe it, she would say that it tasted exactly like a squirrel: fuzzy, damp, slightly nutty.” Kate DiCamillo is a master storyteller, and this illustrated novel about comic book-loving Flora Belle Buckman and Ulysses, a squirrel who receives superpowers after an unfortunate incident with a vacuum is DiCamillo at her best. She has crafted a unique story, layered with meaning that both kids and parents will love. I especially appreciated the deeper themes about family, turning toward the ones we love, and opening our hearts. This story bursts with hilarity and heart.

Virginia Wolf by Kyo McLear, Illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault Parents loved the nod to the famous author, and children loved the whimsical illustrations and messages about love, sisterhood, and the healing power of art and beauty in this gorgeous picture book. We always love a picture book that appeals to parents, and has equal interest to kids. The layered meaning and breathtaking art make this a book to visit again and again. Reader feedback: “I loved this sweet story about sisters, a wild imagination and being in a bad mood. The clever illustrations and descriptions of feeling ‘wolfish’ make this picture book a memorable and enjoyable read.” -Shannon Harte


Read along with the Dote Book Club and let us know what you think! Send your comments to hello@dotemagazine.com and we'll post them on our website. Use #dotebookclub on social media if you are reading along with us.

Non-Fiction

Fiction

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr Set in World War II, All the Light We Cannot See tells the parallel stories of Marie Laure, a blind French girl, and Werner, a German orphan, as they come of age in one of the darkest times in history. Their paths converge in the ancient walled port city of St. Malo in France, where Marie-Laure and her father flee after the Nazis occupy Paris, and where the curious and brilliant young Werner finds himself on assignment for the German Army, who exploit his innate intelligence and ability to build and fix radios. This is a novel to savour slowly, and a perfect pick for book club discussion.

Classic

Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Gretchen Rubin feels like an old friend to those who have read her Happiness Project and Happier at Home. I am eagerly anticipating the newest addition to her equally well-researched inspirational self-help books. Better than Before addresses the question: How can we make good habits and break bad ones? In her signature thoughtful and practical style, she outlines a number of strategies we can choose from to apply to our specific personality types. I already have a list going of habits I hope to start and break, and I am confident Rubin will deliver another life-changing book that will help people build the framework of habits to live happier and more successful lives. Release Date: March 17, 2015.

Picking up one of the most memorable books of my school career for a second read, I am confident that reading this classic as an adult and a parent will be even more inspiring and meaningful than the first time. I hope you will travel back with me to Maycomb, Alabama to revist Atticus (often named the best parent in literature), Jem, and Scout and this simple, brilliant, and deeply moving story.

Picture Book The Book With No Pictures by BJ Novak My personal criteria for awesome picture books is: Did the kids hang on my every word, and was there a request to read it again immediately after I finished the last page? When a book fulfills both of these, along with so much laughing I have to pause the class to calm everything down, I know I have a winner on my hands. You might be wondering what could possibly be so amazing about a book with no pictures, so run, don’t walk to pick this one up for the kids in your life.

You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it. - To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

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2.

1.

4. 3.

5.

1.

7.

6.

KEEP IT WILD PRINT :: NORTH BIRCH GROVE, NORTHBIRCHGROVE.MYSHOPIFY.COM - $20 I CHOSE THIS PRINT BECAUSE ALL I WANT TO DO IS GET OUTSIDE AND FEEL THE SUN ON MY SKIN — BUT THAT'S NOT ALWAYS AN OPTION HERE IN CALGARY, SO THIS PRINT MAKES ME HAPPY.

2. BURNT WOOD BADGE :: SMORE SOCIETY, ETSY.COM/CA/SHOP/SMORESOCIETY - $25 THIS IS SO COOL— THE GIRL THAT MAKES THIS BURNS THE WORDS AND PICTURES INTO THE WOOD, SO COOL.

3. VINTAGE BLANKET :: FLEET AND WANDER, FLEETANDWANDER.COM - $20 I GOT THIS PRETTY VINTAGE BLANKET BECAUSE I LOVE TO SIT OUTSIDE AND HAVE PICNICS.

4. TEEPEE HANGING ART :: BRANCH & OLIVE, ETSY.COM/SHOP/BRANCHANDOLIVE - $15 THE CUTEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN.

5. BURT'S BEES TINTED LIP BALM :: SHOPPER'S DRUG MART - $4 110

I'M NOT ALLOWED TO WEAR MAKEUP, BUT SINCE THIS IS CALLED "LIPBALM" MY MOM SAYS IT'S OK. (I PRETEND IT'S LIPSTICK, HEHE.)


8.

9.

EMMA’S DOTEABLES:: GET ME OUTSIDE! 10.

THE WELL-CURATED WISHLIST OF A TEN-YEAR-OLD Written by Emma Klassen

11.

6. FLASH KALEIDOSCOPE CAMERA :: INDIGO - $3 THIS THING IS REALLY AWESOME BECAUSE IF YOU LOOK THROUGH IT, IT MAKES ALL SORTS OF CRAZY PATTERNS AND THEY INSPIRE ME TO DO COOL DRAWINGS OF THE THINGS AROUND ME.

7. BOXED WATER :: CALGARY CO-OP - $1 BOXED WATER IS BETTER!

8. CAMP BRAND GOODS TOQUE :: CAMPBRANDGOODS.COM - $25 THIS IS THE BEST HAT EVER, AND SINCE IT SNOWS IN MAY SOMETIMES, IT'S AN ALL-YEAR-ROUND TOQUE!

9. GLOW-IN-THE-DARK STARS :: DISCOVERY HUT - $12 I PUT THESE STARS UP IN MY ROOM TO BRING THE SKY INSIDE.

10. PLASTIC BEADS :: MICHAELS - $12 ME AND MY MOM LOVE TO MAKE PATTERNS WITH THESE BEADS. MY MOM SAYS IT REMINDS HER OF GOING TO CAMP WHEN SHE WAS LITTLE, WHICH MAKES ME LIKE THEM EVEN MORE.

11. PEACOCK JOURNAL :: BRANCH & OLIVE, ETSY.COM/SHOP/BRANCHANDOLIVE - $10 I LOVE THIS LITTLE JOURNAL. I KEEP IT IN MY JACKET POCKET TO WRITE DOWN LITTLE NOTES AND DRAW ON THE BUS.

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THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO PARTICIPATED IN OUR ISSUE 1 #READINGDOTE! FOLLOW ALONG WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA TO SEE WHAT WE'RE WORKING ON, WHAT WE'RE UP TO BEHIND THE SCENES, AND HOW OUR READERS ARE ENJOYING DOTE. INSTAGRAM @DOTEMAGAZINE TWITTER @DOTEMAGAZINE FACEBOOK DOTE MAGAZINE WEBSITE DOTEMAGAZINE.COM HASHTAG PHOTOS OF YOU AND DOTE MAGAZINE #READINGDOTE AND #DOTEMAGAZINE AND HEAD OVER THERE TO SEE ALL OF THE PHOTOS.

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Dote Magazine Issue 2  

Spring 2015 - Live What You Love

Dote Magazine Issue 2  

Spring 2015 - Live What You Love