July 2021 INTOUCH Magazine

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spa facilities that will help you look and feel your best. If you’re looking for long-term lease properties with a full range of services in convenient locations around Tokyo, it’s time to upgrade to MORI LIVING.

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JULY 2021

INTOUCH

at one of the city’s hottest restaurants. On-site gym and

TOKYO AMERIC AN CLUB

An English-speaking concierge who helps you book a table

毎月一回一日発行 第四十七巻六七五号 トウキョウアメリカンクラブ インタッチマガジン二〇二一年七月一日発行 平成三年十二月二十日第三種郵便物許可定価八00円 本体七四一円

Time for an upgrade Time for MORI LIVING

TOKYO AMERIC AN CLUB

Games On Sports agency chief Koji Murofushi looks ahead to an Olympics like no other J U LY 2021

THRILL OF THE CROWD + MEDAL MEMORIES + HIGH-TECH RO UNDS


Welcome Home Brand New HOMAT SHARON Located in the exclusive neighborhood of Minami-Azabu, HOMAT SHARON offers spacious units that harmoniously blend Western and Japanese aesthetics.

www.nskre.co.jp/english/business/lease

Each unit has been designed with the utmost comfort in mind, and property amenities include a fitness room with state-of-the-art equipment and bilingual concierge service that is available 24 hours a day.


Contents 20

KAYO YAMAWAKI

Ahead of the start of this month’s Tokyo Olympics, two sports chiefs pull back the curtain on postponements, preparations and the Games’ potential success.

5

LE ADER SHIP

6

DIGE ST

10

AGENDA

YUUKI IDE

INDEPTH

17 COURSE CORRECTION

GY M N A ST I C S

17

GOLF

19

S P O RT S

20

FO CU S

L ANDING OLYMPIC SUCCE SS

Club instructor and former Olympian Kazuhito Tanaka discusses his medal moment at the 2012 Summer Games and ponders Japan’s chances for 2020 gold.

COMMUNITY

25

WELLNE SS

27

REGISTER

29

VOICE

31

HIGHLIGHTS

32

PURSUIT

YUUKI IDE

With the Club set to unveil an upgraded golf simulator and a new team of pros this month, what can golfers expect from the overhauled 19th Hole?

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15

COVER IMAGE OF KOJI MUROFUSHI BY KAYO YAMAWAKI

JULY  | 1

FOLLOW US

THE ROAD TO TOKYO


TOKYO AMERIC AN CLUB

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

INTOUCH

Representative Governor Michael Benner (2022)

Editor Nick Jones

First Vice President Sam Rogan (2022)

editor@tac-club.org

Second Vice President Trista Bridges Bivens (2022)

Assistant Editor Owen Ziegler

Secretar y Jeffrey Behr (2021)

Designer Kohji Shiiki

Treasurer Kenji Ota (2021)

Designer Clara Garcia

Governors Michael Alfant (2021), John Flanagan (2021), Anthony Moore (2022),

Production Administrator Yuko Shiroki

Tetsutaro Muraki (2022), Catherine Ohura (2021), Alok Rakyan (2021)

GENERAL MANAGER

Heidi Regent (2021), Dean R Rogers (2022), Christina Siegel (2022)

Anthony L Cala

Statutor y Auditors Koichi Komoda (2022), Paul Kuo (2021) Parentheses denote term limit.

ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS Business Operations Wayne Hunter

CLUB COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Business Suppor t Lian Chang

Compensation Anthony Moore Culture, Community & Enter tainment Miki Ohyama (Jeffrey Behr)

DIRECTORS

Finance Joe Moscato (Kenji Ota)

Recreation Susanna Yung

Food & Beverage Kristina Wright (Sam Rogan)

Member Services Jonathan Allen

House Douglas Hymas (Catherine Ohura)

Membership Mari Hori

Human Resources John Y Sasaki (Tetsutaro Muraki)

Food & Beverage Suranga Hettige Don

Membership Risa Dimacali (Trista Bridges Bivens)

Finance Naoto Okutsu

Nominating Ray Klein

Facilities Toby Lauer

Recreation Nils Plett (Christina Siegel)

Communications Shane Busato

Risk Control Justin Keyes (John Flanagan)

Nihonbashi Managing Director

TAC Digital Member-Engagement Task Force Jeffrey Daggett

Noriaki Yamazaki

TAC Nihonbashi Task Force Ginger Griggs (Alok Rakyan)

CONTRIBUTORS

TAC Sustainability Task Force Trista Bridges Bivens

Writers

Tokyo 2020 Olympic David Hackett (Dean R Rogers)

Shizuo Daigoh

Parentheses denote Board liaison.

Karim Hakam

SUBCOMMITTEES

Koichi Komoda

Community Relations Hideki Endo

David McElhinney

Frederick Harris Gallery JoAnn Yoneyama

Photographers

Golf Charles Postles

Jeff Goldberg

Squash Richard Kenny

Yuuki Ide

Swim Agnes Ouellette

Nacása & Partners

TAC Talk Simon Farrell

Kayo Yamawaki Illustrator

Wine & Beverage Michael Van Zandt

Tania Vicedo

ADVERTISING IN INTOUCH

JOINING TOKYO AMERICAN CLUB

Explore the Club’s range of advertising possibilities by talking to

To arrange a tour of the facilities,

the Club’s exclusive advertising agency, Custom Media.

contact the Membership Office.

Custom Media President Robert Heldt

Tokyo American Club

Custom Media Publisher Simon Farrell

2-1-2 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8649

adver tising@tac-club.org

membership@tac-club.org

03-4540-7730 | www.custom-media.com

03-4588-0687 | www.tokyoamericanclub.org

All prices referenced in INTOUCH include consumption tax.

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We design for ONE’S life and dreams.

Interior Design and Renovation in Tokyo

TOKYO OFFICE Ryoshin Onarimon Bldg. 7F 6-17-15 Shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: +81 (0)3 6758 3535 For more information, please email: post-onesd@koyou.co.jp

www.koyou-onesd.co.jp/en


LEADERSHIP

I Embracing Our Diversity WORDS KOICHI KOMODA IMAGE KAYO YAMAWAKI

n his 1996 book Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk, Peter Bernstein explored the history of risk and its role in society. “The word ‘risk’ derives from the early Italian risicare, which means ‘to dare.’ In this sense, risk is a choice rather than a fate,” the late economist and educator wrote. Throughout its 93-year history, the Club has faced numerous challenges, from the effects of global financial crises to natural disasters. It has also dared to take risks in order to evolve and stay relevant to its membership. The Club has faced one of its biggest tests over the last year. But through the dedication, careful planning, teamwork and courage of so many Members and staff, we opened the Club’s very first satellite facility in Nihonbashi back in March. Despite the challenges of the pandemic, the Club has remained a place where Members can relax with family, meet friends and enjoy life in a safe and truly cosmopolitan environment. We are privileged to have such a wonderful home. American values have always been at the heart of the Club. The fundamentals of democracy, diversity, tolerance, innovation and hard work are what have made the United States the global power that it is today. It’s no surprise that so many of the world’s largest companies are American. America’s economic and social success has a great deal to do with the wisdom, dedication and power of women as well. As Sheryl Sandberg, the COO of Facebook, explains in her bestselling book Lean In, having more women in leadership roles is good for business as well as society. Research, she says, suggests that companies with more women in leadership roles have better work-life policies, smaller gender gaps in executive compensation and more female midlevel managers. It’s encouraging to see women in leadership roles at the Club, both on the Board of Governors and as chairs of committees. The task force that oversaw the Nihonbashi Club project was ably led by Ginger Griggs. Of course, there is always room for improvement, and I believe having more women in such roles at the Club would be hugely beneficial. With a membership comprising so many highly qualified women, it is incumbent on us to encourage more women to contribute their skills for the betterment of our community. Doing so will ensure that the Club is fully prepared to take on whatever challenges and opportunities the future holds.

“IT’S ENCOURAGING TO SEE WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP ROLES AT THE CLUB, BOTH ON THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND AS CHAIRS OF COMMITTEES.”

Koichi Komoda is a Club statutory auditor.

JULY | 5


D I G E ST E D I TO R

Shots in the Arm

Dashed Dreams

JEFF GOLDBERG

COMMUNIT Y

The Club is set to play its part in Japan’s nationwide effort to accelerate the rollout of Covid-19 vaccinations. From July 5, the Club’s B2 event space will serve as a public vaccination center for Minato Ward. “We are extremely proud for Tokyo American Club to be able to play a role in this essential vaccination drive,” says Michael Benner, the Club’s representative governor. “Community support has been a core value of the Club since its founding, and this latest initiative represents a continuation of that tradition.” The Club venue is one of a number of temporary vaccination sites in the ward overseen by Minato Public Health Center. NJ GOLF

Virtual Rounds

Club golfers will soon be able to tee off on courses they always dreamed of playing. With the unveiling of the upgraded 19th Hole golf simulator on July 10, Members will have access to more than 130 courses, including St Andrews and Royal Troon. The brand-new Trackman simulator system uses radar technology and topof-the-range software that packs a powerful 3D graphics engine and applies ball trajectory and collision physics. “It doesn’t matter how good or bad the player is,” says Trackman Japan’s Yuki Endo. “We have systems for every golfer and every player, so anyone can enjoy the Trackman simulator.” Learn more about July 11’s all-day golf event on page 17. NJ

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Craig Beardsley had one thing on his mind. A freshman at the University of Florida, the star swimmer had the 1980 Moscow Olympics in his sights. Having won a gold medal in the 200-meter butterfly at the 1979 Pan American Games, he was hoping to repeat that success the following summer. Then the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. In protest, US President Jimmy Carter announced that the United States would boycott the Moscow Games. Beardsley was floored. “I was like, ‘Why would they ever do something like that?’” Beardsley said in a 2020 interview with NPR. “Don’t people care about the importance of the Olympics and what it stands for? What it means to all these athletes around the world?” After Beardsley failed to qualify for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, he retired from the sport. While falling victim to geopolitics seems a particularly cruel way to have your Olympic dreams quashed, an athlete’s preparations for sport’s biggest spectacle can be derailed in any number of ways. When organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics were forced to postpone the Games for a year in the midst of a global pandemic last March, it became clear that some athletes were not going to be competing in 2021. The likes of badminton’s twotime Olympic gold medalist Lin Dan, Olympic silver medalist Pieter Timmers and Japanese rugby’s Kenki Fukuoka had all planned swan songs for the summer of 2020. In this month’s cover story, “The Road to Tokyo,” sports chiefs Koji Murofushi and Sebastian Coe discuss their efforts over the last year to keep the Olympic dreams of so many alive.


L I B R A RY

From the Shelves

KAYO YAMAWAKI

er people are doing in different parts of the world. I also routinely browse the bestseller lists for new books, and I love a good mystery.

Kaaren Kunze

The summer always inspires lists of recommended vacation reads. Whatever the season, Members can glean suggestions from the staff at the Library—a valued resource for voracious readers like Member Kaaren Kunze. What was your favorite childhood book? As a child, I don’t recall having a favorite book, but I do recall loving biographies. I remember going into the children’s section of the library and checking out as many biographies as they would allow each time.

What inspired your love of books? For me, reading has always been a way to relax. It’s a part of my daily routine and has been so for most of my life. Also, from a young age, I enjoyed reading to learn about what people were doing in different parts of the world. What genre do you most enjoy? My passion is reading fiction and, within that genre, I enjoy reading literature, especially literature in translation. I guess even as an adult I still love reading about what oth-

What are you reading now? I love reading several books at one time and now is no exception. I am reading Lonely Castle in the Mirror by Mizuki Tsujimura, which is a fantastical story grounded in human connections, and I am listening to the audiobook of a new, Dennis Washburn translation of the classic The Tale of Genji. Also, I’m exploring manga—a bit late I know—and started reading the Demon Slayer and Attack on Titan series. When were you last unable to put down a book? Recently, I was reading two books that couldn’t have been more different, but I was captivated by both. The first book, A Man by Keiichiro Hirano, is a wonderfully well-constructed story that had me pulling for the protagonist from the f irst chapter until the end. The second book was Coin Locker Babies by Ryu Murakami, which felt like a fever dream that Quentin Tarantino should direct one day. Both were great reads.

S PA

Beauty Boost

KAYO YAMAWAKI

Beauty might very well be in the eye of the beholder, but it never hurts to go the extra mile when it comes to your personal style. This month at The Spa, double up on treatments guaranteed to give you back your natural glow. Members who book a one-hour or 90-minute rejuvenating treatment or aromatherapy session also receive a complimentary, 15-minute exfoliating back therapy designed to relieve clogged pores and renew skin just in time for beach season. Perfect for those who can’t decide between relaxation and reinvigoration, this deal promises the best of both worlds—as well as delivering the best-looking you. OZ

JULY | 7



D I G E ST NIHONBASHI

BEER

Up and Running

Summer Brews WORDS KARIM HAKAM

NACÁSA & PARTNERS

IMAGE KAYO YAMAWAKI

To reach their physical peak, the athletes set to appear on the Olympic stage this month have spent years training with teammates, working with coaches, poring over performance data with analysts and testing themselves against the very best in their respective disciplines. So why struggle alone in pursuit of your own fitness goals? Qualified in everything from nutrition to weightlifting, new Nihonbashi Club Fitness Center personal trainers Kenny Adeleke, Ayano Kimura, Takuma Shutou and Satoshi Nagae are now available for 60- and 90-minute private and pair sessions to help you achieve new bests in and outside the gym. With sessions starting from just ¥8,800, embrace the Olympic spirit with a personal trainer today. OZ CHARIT Y

Crisis Support

Members once again showed their philanthropic side during the Club’s Salvation Army charity drive in May. Donated items at the annual, Connections-organized initiative filled four trucks (pictured), the largest haul since the Tohoku disaster in 2011. Donations will go to help raise funds to support those hit hard by the ongoing pandemic. In addition, Connections donated ¥1 million to the Salvation Army last month. According to Grace Lee, Connections’ director of charities, the funds will be used to build a facility to accommodate children unable to live with their families. A previous Connections contribution was used to furnish a newly constructed home for vulnerable children. NJ

As a follow-up to last year’s column on summer wine recommendations, I have selected three craft beers well worth trying this summer. While a number of Baird’s on-tap beers are available on a rotating basis at Traders’ Bar, the Shizuoka-based brewery’s bottled Traders’ Session IPA (¥520) is a must for your fridge. With a reasonable 5.5 percent alcohol level, balanced bitterness and a gentle aftertaste, this IPA should appeal to connoisseurs and casual beer drinkers alike. Also available at Club restaurants. A favorite among craft beer lovers is Stone Brewing’s Stone IPA (¥600) from California. Sometimes available on tap at Traders’, this well-balanced IPA packs hoppiness, a bitter aftertaste and a 6.9 percent alcohol level. A good intermediate craft brew. If you’re looking for something with a little more kick, try Lagunitas’ Super Cluster (¥590). This imperial or double IPA from the premier California brewery is full-bodied with hoppy aromas and a citrusy flavor. That kick comes from its 8 percent alcohol level. Available at The Cellar and through the Club website, all three beers should make Tokyo’s summer humidity much easier to bear. Karim Hakam is a member of the Club’s Wine & Beverage Committee. For the month of July, receive a 10 percent discount on purchases of at least six of any of these recommended Cellar beers.

JULY | 9


AG E N DA

Events in July Since some events may be postponed or cancelled due to the ongoing coronavirus crisis, please check the Club website for the most up-to-date information.

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Summer Suds The Club has just the antidote to Tokyo’s summer heat. Kick back with a chilled Suntory The Premium Malt’s for just ¥800 a pint at all Club outlets.  Through October 30  Details online

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Camp Discovery Get your fill of crafts, games, dance, sports and the summer sun at the Club’s kids-only day camp.  One-week sessions through August 27  Preschool Camp (ages 3–5): ¥49,500; Big Kids Camp (ages 5–8 & 9–10): ¥55,000  Members only  Sign up online

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New IWA 5 Sake Former Dom Pérignon chef de cave Richard Geoffroy’s second release of his Toyama-brewed sake delivers more well-balanced flavor and complexity. Order your bottle through The Cellar.  The Cellar  ¥14,300  Details online

1–31

Summer Sale Spruce up your summer wardrobe with 50 percent off Club-branded T-shirts, polos, sunglasses and bags from The Cellar’s extensive collection.  The Cellar  Details online

3–4

Independence Day Feast Club-catered spreads of American classics for July Fourth weekend celebrations at home. For pickup or delivery.  Pickup: The Cellar

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Farm Box No more scouring supermarket produce for organic labels or paying sky-high prices at out-of-the-way natural food stores. Thanks to a new partnership between the Club and organic label and supplier Ecoloupe, Members can register for weekly deliveries of locally sourced, allnatural products. Member Simon Grunberger set up Ecoloupe in 2020 after his own battles to find clearly labeled organic items. “As a consumer, it is very hard to know what or whom to trust,” he says. “I was facing this issue every time I shopped, and I was constantly second-guessing my choices, not knowing if what was labeled as organic truly was.” It is a far cry from the situation in North America and Europe, including Grunberger’s home country of Belgium, where demand for organic food is booming. According to market research firm Ecovia Intelligence, the global market for organic food is worth more than $100 billion, with the United States, Germany and France the biggest markets.

“The growth of organic products in Japan is 0.8 percent yearly, compared to the rest of Asia where the average is 13 percent,” Grunberger says. In an effort to narrow this gap, Grunberger has established a system of transparenc y (all local organic farmers’ fruit and vegetables are tested to ensure they are free of pesticides and synthetic fertilizers) and traceability. “We find our farmers through the Internet and word of mouth,” he says. “Once we establish contact, we like to visit them at their farm to see how they work.” Subscribers to the service have the choice of receiving a farm box weekly or every two weeks. Each box contains seven types of seasonal vegetable, two kinds of fruit and one dry item, such as rice. And with a newsletter of recipes arriving each month, Members can experiment with local cooking as well. NJ  Farm box: ¥4,000 a week (plus delivery)  Register through the Club website


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Gallery Exhibition: Daisuke Hashimoto The decaying legacy of Japan’s bubble economy is visible in every corner of the country. It’s there in the crumbling rural hotels, rusting theme parks and abandoned ski resorts. But these haikyo ruins aren’t without their admirers. Artist Daisuke Hashimoto is one. Fascinated by the interplay between light and space in dilapidated buildings, he moved on to depict structures reclaimed by nature. Drawn back further in time, Hashimoto began to paint primeval landscapes and, more recently, giant trees. As part the Frederick Harris Gallery’s series of summer shows by emerging artists, Hashimoto

exhibits his exquisitely detailed paintings of moss-covered gingko and camphor trees and other sentinels of the forest through July 28. Born in Ibaraki Prefecture in 1992, Hashimoto earned his doctorate in art education from Tokyo University of the Arts. NJ Moment I realized I wanted to become an artist. When I saw a wonderful painting of a beach by an artist—who is now my wife—and was in awe of each pebble on the canvas. What I would tell my 20-year-old self. To feel gratitude.

My perfect creative environment. A place where I can produce. Artist, living or dead, I’d most like to share a meal with. The creator of the [centuries-old] Scrolls of Frolicking Animals and Humans, because it would be fun to hear about the religious significance of the scrolls while eating Buddhist vegetarian food.  Through July 28  Frederick Harris Gallery  Artworks available for purchase through The Cellar  Details online

JULY  | 1 1


AG E N DA

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Social Squash Partner Looking to up your squash game or improve your stamina on the court? Sign up for 20-minute practice sessions for beginners and intermediate-level players with Club pro Rico Cheung.  4:30–6:30pm  Squash Court III  Free  Ages 16 & above  Members only  Sign up online

5

Culture Connections Mingle with friends and new acquaintances while learning about the culture, cuisine and history of one another’s home countries.  10am  Connections members only  Details online

5–6

Terrace Tipples

 3–6pm  American Bar & Grill  Details online

5–9

All-Star Sports Youngsters burn calories and make fast friends at weekly sessions of tennis, basketball, soccer and more.  Through August 27  3:30–4:30pm (Thursdays: 4:30–5:30pm)  Gymnasium & Activity Room  ¥14,580  Ages 5–10  Details online

7 & 21

YUUKI IDE

Embrace the summer at American Bar & Grill’s Beer Terrace and its rotating domestic drafts and craft brews, seasonal standbys like highballs and lemon sours and menu of bites. Every Monday and Tuesday through the summer.

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Independence Day Celebration You don’t make it 245 years in this world without making some sort of a name for yourself, and there aren’t many who would accuse the United States of America of flying under the radar. Whether you identify with the brash optimism, the exuberant sociability or simply the ravenous appetites that make America and its citizens famous

Toastmasters Luncheon Discover presentations that engage and podium confidence at these peer-supported meetups.  12–1:30pm  Washington & Lincoln rooms  ¥2,420 (online: ¥550)  Sign up online

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Summer Spreads

FOURTH FACTS

• July 2 Date the Continental Congress officially voted for independence from Great Britain.

July 4, 1778. • 1931 Year “The StarSpangled Banner” was adopted as the national anthem.

Olympic watch party or lazy weekend with the family, the Club’s selection of four summer catering packages is sure to satisfy.

• Double rum rations General George Washington’s gift to soldiers under his command on

 Through September 26  Details online

 10am–10pm  Details online

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the world over, the Fourth of July comes but once a year as a day for all Americans (or simply the American at heart) to celebrate the birth of a nation. Not to be outdone by any Stateside celebrations, the Club has a packed day of festivities, from Sky Pool and Gymnasium games to holiday picnics to evening entertainment to cap a birthday bash like no other. OZ

• $1 billion Amount Americans spend on fireworks

for Fourth of July celebrations. • 12,000 Calories consumed in less than 10 minutes by top eaters during the Nathan’s International Hot Dog Eating Contest in Coney Island.


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Youth Toastmasters Club Youngsters pick up tips on public speaking, debating and how to keep an audience’s attention from members of the Club’s own Toastmasters group.  2–3pm  Washington & Lincoln rooms  ¥1,100  Ages 10–18  Details online

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Grand Slam Golf The Club hosts a festival of golf with demonstrations of its Trackmanupgraded simulator, club fittings, golf products and a chance to meet the new team of golf pros. Find out more about the simulator renovation on page 17.  10am–4pm  19th Hole & Gymnasium  Free  Members only  Details online

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Cocktail Connections Mask up and mingle with friends over happy-hour drinks during this monthly mixer.  5–7pm  Connections members only  Details online KAYO YAMAWAKI

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Outdoor Adventure Camp Q&A Club kids head to the mountains of Niigata Prefecture for a five-day, four-night, American-style summer camp. Learn more about this August program at an in-person and virtual information session.  4:30–6pm  Manhattan I & online  Free  Details online

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Show & Tell Jamboree Ages 6 to 9 learn how to share ideas at this afternoon of games, music and confidence-boosting activities.  2–3pm  Brooklyn rooms  ¥1,100  Sign up online

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Coffee Connections Set yourself up for a summer of new friendships at this monthly gettogether of Connections members.  10am  Connections members only  Details online

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30-Day Fitness Challenge Twenty-three-time Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps had a simple routine in his amateur days. According to his equally legendary coach Bob Bowman, the 11-yearold Phelps began each day with four hours of drills and exercises in the pool. Phelps wouldn’t miss a single morning for the next five years. Olympic hopeful or not, you don’t need to commit yourself to months of training just to see an improvement in your physical fitness. If you can manage just 30 days, it might be just what you need for a leaner, meaner you. At this new Fitness Center contest,

reps-loving Members go head-tohead in a monthlong attempt to best not only one another but their personal limits as well. Participants choose two exercises a day from a selection of bodyweight workouts that includes pull-ups, push-ups, wall sits and planks. With Fitness Center staff timing each Member’s efforts, the challenger with the highest times in each of the male and female categories will walk away with a Spa voucher and a newly toned physique. OZ  Through August 3  Fitness Center  ¥1,650  Members only  Ages 16 & above  Details online

JULY  | 13


A DV E RTO R I A L

Gold Standard Wellendorff’s jewelry is born of love and tradition

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hen a business stays in the family, certain things are passed down from generation to generation that go beyond a company culture. There’s a commitment to quality and a deep understanding of the key values of the business that children learn from their parents and grandparents as they grow up around it, informing everything they do when the time comes for them to lead. IN A WORD, LUXURY Such is the case of the Wellendorff family, which has been making gold jewelry for four generations since 1893. The familyowned company and its manufactory are based in Pforzheim, a town in southwest Germany that became known as the “golden city” during the 19th century thanks to its thriving watchmaking and jewelry industries. The tradition of crafting fine jewelry from 18-karat gold, diamonds and other high-quality materials that Ernst Alexander Wellendorff began have carried on for more than 125 years. In Germany, the name has become synonymous with luxury: according to a 2018 survey of industry experts that was published in

Germany’s Manager Magazin, Wellendorff was ranked among the top 10 luxury brands in the country, alongside Porsche and A. Lange & Söhne watches. But the brand’s fame extends beyond its native land. In fact, from the beginning, Wellendorff found favor among discerning customers throughout Europe, including members of royal families on the continent. Around the world now, Wellendorff’s signature feature—the Diamond W, a gold W topped by a genuine full-cut diamond—is recognized as a symbol of the finest German craftsmanship. PRECISION AND BEAUTY The brand offers a number of marvelous pieces, but perhaps two stand out among them as representative of Wellendorff’s commitment to precision and loving attention to detail: their silk rope necklace and spinning ring. The necklace, which has been dubbed “the softest necklace in the world,” is fashioned from nearly 160 meters of gold wire that is no thinner than a human hair. So demanding is the process required to make these necklaces that they only produce a few of them a day. But their quality is unmistakable. As fine and soft to the touch

as silk, they embody one of the brand’s key values: creating jewelry that you can recognize with your eyes closed. Meanwhile, the spinning rings are made of four separate parts that feature gold, diamonds and enamel. They have been precisely crafted so that the middle band can be rotated dynamically. The rings are an embodiment of Wellendorff’s aim to create jewelry that goes beyond material value while representing a centuries-old tradition and brings genuine delight to wearers. Yet, not to be satisfied with their already impressive creations, the brand has recently added another item to their lineup: the EMBRACE ME bracelet. Seventeen years in the making, these technical wonders are made with “flexible gold,” which is twice as supple as standard gold. The goldsmiths who developed the bracelet were able to redesign the gold rope’s interior, also known as its core, to give the bracelet unparalleled flexibility and resilience. True to its name, the EMBRACE ME offers a truly tactile experience, and brings to life the company’s slogan: From Love. The Best. Wellendorff’s pieces are elaborately handcrafted by goldsmiths and set a standard for rarity and luxury in the international jewelry world. They are pieces that people choose to commemorate moments of happiness, love and success. And like the business itself, the items that Wellendorff creates are meant to be handed down with pride to the next generation.

www.wellendorff.com/en

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I N D E P T H | GY M N A ST I C S

Landing Olympic Success Ahead of the Tokyo Games, Club instructor Kazuhito Tanaka reflects on his own Olympic moment. WORDS DAVID McELHINNEY IMAGE YUUKI IDE

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hat goes through the mind of an athlete when they step onto the Olympic podium to receive a medal? Heart-pumping pride? Dizzying euphoria? The satisfaction of a lifelong goal realized? For gymnast Kazuhito Tanaka, it was relief. Tanaka competed at the 2012 London Olympics as part of Japan’s five-member men’s gymnastics team. Staged at the North Greenwich Arena, the final of the competition was marred by controversy. Japan contested star gymnast Kohei Uchimura’s final score on the pommel horse (one of six events in the men’s competition). Ten tense minutes of gesticulating and calculating behind the judges’ table followed before the scores were revised. Japan leapfrogged into second place behind China, nudging the despondent Ukrainian quintet off the podium. “Thinking about the Ukrainian team, I couldn’t smile,” Tanaka says of his medal ceremony moment. This says as much about the man as it does about the competitive spirit that has defined his life. Ever since Olympic sports began to embrace professionalism in the 1980s, athletes have committed themselves to all-consuming training regimens. With that comes empathy for those who make the same sacrifices—and especially for those who fall just short. Gymnastics is in Tanaka’s blood. Born to gymnast parents in Wakayama Prefecture, Tanaka and his two siblings all became Olympians.

Kazuhito Tanaka

“I came to love gymnastics. It was a huge part of my life growing up,” he says. “It also taught me to challenge myself and how to persevere. But, above all, it strengthened my love for my family.” Tanaka was 8 years old when he started to compete. By 22, the Olympics were in his sights. After making his major international competition debut at the 2009 World Championships, Tanaka returned to London three years later to compete for gymnastics’ biggest prize. “That was the moment when my dream came true,” he says of the 2012 Summer Games. “At the same time, I felt the pressure of representing my country.” But Tanaka resists having his career defined by a single Olympics. Ever the purist, the 36-year-old’s personal highlight reel is made of up twists, turns, pivots, saults and landings. “When I was able to give the performance I had envisioned before the

event—and land on my feet—those were the best moments of my career,” he says. While Tanaka’s competition days are behind him, he now helps children “expand their potential” by introducing them to the basics of gymnastics through the Club’s Active Kids Fit program. Naturally, he will be keeping a close eye on Tokyo’s Ariake Gymnastics Center when the Olympics get underway. Tanaka says the younger generation of Japanese athletes is growing in strength. But he knows that they will need to be fully focused to succeed this summer. “They need to block out all distractions and unnecessary thoughts,” he says. Sage words from someone who gave his all on sport’s biggest stage. For details of the Club’s Active Kids Fit program, turn to page 32.

JULY  | 15


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INDEPTH | GOLF

New Club pro Keiko Inoue

Course Correction

If practice makes perfect, then the Club’s upgraded golf simulator promises the ideal environment in which to transform bogeys into birdies. WORDS OWEN ZIEGLER

A

golfer has to train his swing on the practice tee,” once quipped renowned sports psychologist Bob Rotella, “then trust it on the course.” Easier said than done, thought a million golfers in unison, but since the 19th Hole opened more than a decade ago, the second-floor golf simulator has helped innumerable Members work the kinks out of their swings without having to travel hours outside the city to a course. Now, thanks to a serious upgrade with best-in-class ball-tracking tech, the 19th Hole is set to help another generation of Members shave strokes off their game. Equipped with dual-radar technology that monitors everything from club speed and direction to ball trajectory and carry, the Trackman system has been the choice of professionals, club manufacturers and a handful of dedicated amateurs since it was launched in 2003.

IMAGE YUUKI IDE

“It’s got to be about two years ago that we started looking at different manufacturers [to upgrade the 19th Hole],” recalls Member and avid golfer Jerry Rosenberg, who spearheaded the search for a new simulator. “We went through a whole process and came out with the decision that Trackman was the best choice.” Now in its fourth iteration, the orange and silver tracker no bigger than a briefcase is capable of analyzing dozens of parameters from a single swing while the underlying software comes chockful of simulated ranges and world-class courses perfect for rounds alone or with friends. “Our Trackman simulator is based on outdoor data and the outdoor experience,” explains Yuki Endo of Trackman Japan. As impressive as the Trackman system may be, it’s not the only impending upgrade to the Club’s golf offerings. Following the unveiling of the renovated 19th Hole on July 10, Members can

meet the other two at the Grand Slam Golf event on July 11. “I’m looking forward to teaching at the Club with the new simulator,” says incoming Club pro Tomoaki Kibamoto. “I think I could help a lot of people here.” “Of course, there’s a difference between how men and women like to practice,” adds fellow new instructor Keiko Inoue, the Club’s first-ever female pro. “Men tend to want to hit as many balls as possible, but I see a lot of women taking notes instead. Sometimes I think they can learn a little from the other.” Two new instructors and a stateof-the-art makeover for the simulator. For veteran Club pro Tom Fielding, it’s much more than par for the course. “The 19th Hole,” he says, “will be a hub more so than ever before.” GRAND SLAM GOLF  July 11  10am–4pm  19th Hole & Gymnasium  Free  Members only  Sign up online

JULY  | 17


Your serene Hokkaido retreat Discover modern Japanese luxury in historical Jozankei Onsen Relax at our traditional ryokan-style hotel, where you can appreciate the rich and beautiful nature of Japan. All of our 26 rooms include a private river-view bath, where you can take in the scenery while you soak in warm onsen water anytime you want. Delicious contemporary Japanese cuisine is served at our restaurant, ZUI. We guarantee that your stay with us will be the experience of a lifetime.

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I N D E P T H | S P O RT S

People Power After more than a year of empty seats in stadiums and arenas, what have we learned about live sports and spectators? WORDS NICK JONES

I

t was a huge occasion. One of the biggest for any professional rugby player, let alone one making his international debut. Having dispatched Wales, Italy and Scotland over the previous weeks of 2001’s Six Nations championship, England were about to take on rivals France. Steve Borthwick, in his crisp, white England jersey, stood in the tunnel leading to the immaculate turf of Twickenham Stadium in southwest London. “As you walk out, you see the massive first tier, then you see the next tier and then the tier on top of that. It just seems to go on to the heavens,” Borthwick, 41, recalls of that April day two decades ago. “I remember everybody just waving flags and the cacophony of noise.” While the collective din of 75,000 spectators helps to create what sports commentators call an “electric atmosphere,” it has the power to unsettle those on the field. The key, Borthwick says, is to shut out those “distractions.” “But to keep everything blocked out for that length of time is absolutely exhausting,” says the former forwards coach of Japan and England. “The ad-

Steve Borthwick

vice I was given as a young player was to have different levels of focus.” As a former United States national team gymnast, Member Jon Omori, 57, understands the pressures of performing at the highest level. “When you f irst go into coliseum-type venues with 5,000 or 10,000 spectators, it’s overwhelming,” he says. “When you’re starting out, that kind of distraction can impact your performance negatively. As you develop as an athlete, you learn how to control that mental aspect and use it to your advantage.” As the pandemic forced professional sports across the world to be played behind closed doors or in front of vastly reduced crowds, organizers scrabbled to fill the atmosphere vacuum with everything from cardboard cutout fans to fake crowd noise. “It’s very clear that the live sport atmosphere and experience is diminished without spectators,” says Member Brendan Delahunty, president of sports travel and hospitality provider STH Japan. “The lack of energy and atmosphere transfers through to the TV-viewing experience and lacks that

buzz that is there when spectators are cheering on their teams.” Athletes and coaches, too, had to adjust to performing without the roar, applause and singing of transfixed fans. “It was a really strange experience where you could suddenly hear everything around the sidelines and on the pitch,” says Borthwick, who is now head coach of English club Leicester Tigers. “We talk about supporters being the 16th man. They certainly add to a team.” With the prospect of athletes performing in near-empty venues when the postponed Tokyo Olympics start on July 23, what will it mean for the quadrennial spectacle? “While the atmosphere may be more subdued,” says Delahunty, 53, “the opportunity to witness top-level athletes perform to the best of their ability is still a thrilling sight, whether live or on TV.” For Member Borthwick, the Games will be the ultimate test of adaptability. “It will be about how the athletes deal with this unique scenario, what they have done to prepare and who will pull out their best performance when it really matters.”

JULY  | 19


I N D E P T H | FO CU S

THE

ROAD TO

KAYO YAMAWAKI

TOKYO

20 | INTOUCH

The Olympic rings outside the New National Stadium in Tokyo


“SPORTS HAVE THE POWER TO GIVE ENCOURAGEMENT TO PEOPLE BY WATCHING ATHLETES COMPETE IN DIFFICULT SITUATIONS.” —Koji Murofushi

KAYO YAMAWAKI

Koji Murofushi

With the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games finally getting underway later this month, two sports chiefs discuss their work to keep preparations on track. WORDS OWEN ZIEGLER

W

hen word came down last year that the Tokyo 2020 Olympics would be postponed, the first thing Koji Murofushi did was to look for similar incidents in the Games’ 124-year history. “In the past, when there were Olympic boycotts, first in 1976 over South Africa and in the ’80s, nobody knew what to do about it,” Murofushi says. “For athletes, we thought we only have one shot every four years.” While the Olympics have been cancelled on three occasions—during World War I (1916)

and World War II (1940 and 1944)—they had never been delayed. Until this pandemic-hit 32nd Olympiad. An Athens gold medalist in the hammer throw, Club Member Murofushi can’t help but sympathize with Olympic hopefuls who sacrifice so much in pursuit of Games glory. Murofushi now serves as commissioner of the Japan Sports Agency, where his athlete-centric mindset couldn’t come at a more crucial juncture. “At this time last year, nobody could even get into training venues,” says Murofushi, 46, who joined the agency last October after serving as

JULY | 21


I N D E P T H | FO CU S

“IT’S FUNDAMENTAL THAT ATHLETES [HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY] TO DO CONTINUOUS, ROUTINE TRAINING. THAT’S OUR JOB. THE MINIMUM WE CAN DO IS SUPPORT THEIR TRAINING SITES.” —Koji Murofushi

sports director with the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee. “Now we have vaccines and masks and can protect athletes better, but back then, we didn’t know much about it.” What a difference a year makes. Long gone are the shortages of everything from hand sanitizer to toilet paper. For all the progress made over the last year, it pays to remember just how potentially dangerous something as innocuous as going to the gym was viewed last spring. “The world was upended,” says Sebastian Coe, president of World Athletics, the international governing body of track and field and related disciplines. “So, the athletes, I sensed, were on a really emotional roller coaster, and they needed some clarity.” While there was the urgent business of adjusting schedules and competition calendars to address, the well-being of the athletes was never far from the mind of Coe, himself a twotime Olympic gold medalist in the 1,500 meters for Britain. With a mountain of tasks to complete at a time when it wasn’t clear if large-scale athletics events would even be feasible for the foreseeable future, what did Coe throw himself into? “Well, it was very simple,” says the 64-year-

old former head of the London 2012 Games. “The first thing was if you haven’t got the athletes in shape and you haven’t got them in training facilities, then you haven’t got events.” Coe began a flurry of correspondence with the myriad national associations under his purview. Back in Tokyo, Murofushi’s priority was remarkably similar: reopening access to Tokyo’s National Training Center for elite athletes. Just one month after the Tokyo government announced the end of its first state of emergency, on May 25, 2020, some of Japan’s top Olympians, including gymnast Kohei Uchimura and swimmer Daiya Seto, restarted training regimens. The fate of Tokyo 2020, however, still appeared to hang in the balance. “It’s fundamental that athletes [have the opportunity] to do continuous, routine training,” explains a masked Murofushi in his Kasumigaseki office at the Japan Sports Agency. “That’s our job. The minimum we can do is support their training sites.” For Coe, the new goal of the Olympics in 2021 meant a wholesale reshuffling of a year’s worth of events. The World Championships, scheduled for July 2021 in Oregon, were pushed

Koji Murofushi at the IAAF Hammer Throw Challenge at Kawasaki Todoroki Stadium in 2011

22 | INTOUCH


back, as were the Indoor Championships, to be held in Nanjing, China, and a plethora of regional and national competitions. “When the Olympic Games moved to 2021, it wasn’t simply about picking one piece out of the jigsaw and plugging it into a clear whiteboard next door,” Coe explains of the massive effort to make time and space for an Olympic opportunity that, for some athletes, comes only once in a lifetime. “Some athletes have had to retire [because of the postponement],” says Murofushi, who hung up his hammer after failing to qualify for the Rio 2016 Games. “One year can be quite brutal in sport, either in the way of the propensity for injury or that that one year is not going to be kind in the aging process,” adds Coe, who retired from competition in 1989 at the age of 32. For those athletes with youth, raw ability or tenacity on their side, administrators like Murofushi and Coe have been working for months to ensure their path to the Games is as smooth as possible. While former competitors on sport’s grandest stage might be forgiven for empathizing with those athletes now striving toward that same goal, Murofushi and Coe are, likewise, not blind to the criticism swirling around the decision to hold the Games during an as-yet uncontained health crisis within Japan’s borders. According to an Asahi Shimbun poll in early May, 83 percent of respondents wished the Games would be postponed again or cancelled outright. Such concerns are founded in pragmatism, with more than 11,000 athletes scheduled to compete across 339 events in 33 unique sports at 42 venues from Sapporo to Tokyo. Of course, those numbers pale in comparison to the 79,000 officials and support staff expected to arrive ahead of the Games. However, with vaccination efforts finally gaining steam in Tokyo, Osaka and other population centers, a June Yomiuri Shimbun survey found just 48 percent of those polled wanted the Olympics cancelled. What’s behind the softening of attitudes? It may be impossible to say, but once the 12 days of Olympic action gets underway on July 23 and the first medals are awarded, the uncertainty and anxiety of the previous nearly 18 months may fall away. “Sports have the power to give encouragement to people by watching athletes compete in difficult situations,” Murofushi says of the Games’ global appeal. For the athletes, the rewards of Olympic competition can be career-defining. For the millions around the world who will watch this summer’s

Sebastian Coe

“WHY WOULD YOU NOT GO THAT EXTRA MILE TO MAKE SURE THAT THE BIGGEST SPORTING EVENT OF THEM ALL HAS THE CHANCE TO DELIVER WHAT WE KNOW IT CAN DELIVER IN A TROUBLED AND UNCERTAIN WORLD?” —Sebastian Coe

display of extraordinary athleticism and determination, the Games might offer some respite from an unprecedented period in history. “The Games don’t come alive in a playbook or in a quarantine zone,” Coe says. “They come alive on the field of play. They come alive in the dojo, the track, the court. Why would you not go that extra mile to make sure that the biggest sporting event of them all has the chance to deliver what we know it can deliver in a troubled and uncertain world?”

JULY | 23


Creativity in Action Creativity is the freest form of self-expression, and children thrive when they have many opportunities for creative play and thinking. KPIS teachers understand this well, and thatʼs why they provide our students with ample time and space and support them to engage in spontaneous, self-directed activities. Whether itʼs playing with natural loose parts and making pizza with felt, paper and cardboard or dancing to music and telling stories with their friends, our studentsʼ varied experiences at school nurture their creative expression and process.

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C O M M U N I T Y | W E L L N E SS

Fitness Fix

A devotee of the Club’s fitness offerings, Masami Bailey explains why she can’t imagine a life without exercise. IMAGE KAYO YAMAWAKI

I

was an active child. I took ballet classes from 4 years old to about 14. When I entered junior high school, I did kendo and got my black belt. I actually saw stars after being hit [with a shinai practice sword] when I started. It was hard. I learned quickly and my instructor wanted me to continue, but I stopped after moving to high school. I have always enjoyed swimming. I like the quiet of the water where I can just concentrate on my breathing. It’s similar to running in that way. I used to run a lot. Now, it’s maybe once a week on the treadmill. I started running because some places I visited on holiday didn’t have a gym. This was about 33 or 34 years ago. With sports like tennis, you have to make arrangements, but you can run or swim whenever you feel like it.

Since I joined the Club, I have always gone to the Fitness Center to work out on my own. About five or six years ago, I was chatting with Wiwik [Hidayati], one of the personal trainers, and she said, “Why don’t you try my Boot Camp class?” That was my first group class. It was good fun and totally different from exercising by myself. I started doing it twice a week. I soon made plenty of friends who were into exercise as well. It was good because we talked about exercise and diet. It changed a lot of things for me. I’m quite a motivated person anyway, but if I know I have a class and I’m going to see friends, it’s easier to get motivated. I take Bodypump classes each week with a fun group of girls. It’s full-body training with weights for every part of the body. I feel fantastic afterwards.

Masami Bailey

Exercising motivates me to take on new challenges like the Tour de Tokyo, which I did recently. I had never done an [indoor cycling] class until last September. I was never a big fan of cycling, but I just thought I would try something different. Wiwik was the instructor. It was so hard, and I slept after the class. I was surprised because I do so much training. Maybe for the first two weeks, I slept after each session. But I really got into it. I love drinking wine, but I didn’t drink too much during the Tour de Tokyo. I wanted to stay fresh for the challenge. It was so much fun. Fitness has always been a part of my life. It makes me very happy, and I like the feeling of achieving something. If I start something, I always finish it. That’s the stubborn side of my character. If I set a goal on the treadmill, for example, I have to finish. I hate giving up. I can’t sit still for long and take one day off a week from fitness. If I don’t work out for two or three days, I feel unmotivated, guilty and down. Exercising keeps me mentally strong and positive. As told to INTOUCH’s Nick Jones.

JULY | 25


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C O M M U N I T Y | R EG I ST E R

Arrivals

Up Close

AZABUDAI US A

JA PA N

Dennis Jarvis & Kanae Tsunoda Bitcoin.com

Takaaki Ino

Antonio Millares III & Oribu Yokota Millares 3X9 Planning and Design

Meguru Izutsu

PricewaterhouseCoopers Aarata LLC

Izutsu Tokyo, Inc. Shun & Yuko Manabe

B E LG I U M

Goldman Sachs Japan Co., Ltd.

Dirk Ostijn & Muriel Duchesne MetLife Japan K.K.

Hideto & Ikue Onozawa

CHINA

Tomoaki & Mieko Ota

Min (Simon) Xiao & Lesley Wang Zeny Corporation

Regain Group, Inc.

Johoku Chemical Co., Ltd. Takeshi Tsujimura AIG General Insurance Co., Ltd.

H O N G KO N G

Nobutoshi Umeda

Tat Chi Kong & Vivian Nga Wai Lai Nissan Motor Company

Lekarka Co., Ltd.

UK

IRELAND

Robert Norris & Zinzile Togwe

Donal Tobin Xenon Partners

DAZN Japan Investment G.K.

Haruomi Tsunezumi

AZABUDAI JA PA N |

Haruomi Tsunezumi

Halsports Production Co., Ltd.

“I grew up in the United States, where I attended high school and college. I first visited the Club a few years ago for a charity event and was impressed. Hearing the Club staff speaking in English reminded me of my time in the US. I’m looking forward to using English more often, making new friends and using the Club for business meetings.”

NIHONBASHI US A

Rie & Yasunori Ito Mitsui Fudosan Co., Ltd.

Bryan Jacop Located G.K.

Shigetaka Kato Hokuetsu Corporation

Richard Johns Vega Project K.K.

Madoka Kimura The Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

CHINA

Noriko Nukui TGN Soleil Accounting Firm

AUST R A L I A

Xin Piao Giant Law Office

Koichi Takayanagi Transtructure Co., Ltd.

JA PA N Yurie Hatanaka Ecole de Protocole Monaco Yumesaku Ishigaki Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd. Yoshinobu Ishii Maritime Associates Ltd.

Hiroshi Tanaka Tanacho & Co., Ltd. Yosuke Yamamoto Showa Electric Mfg., Co. Ltd.

M A L AYS I A Jasmine Yap & Matthew McKeith Citigate Dewe Rogerson

Departures Paul & Akemi Brown

Ryunosuke & Rie Konishi

Sumedh & Gunjan Deo

Kyle & Tomomi Nakamura

Paul Flynn & Louisa Douglas

Christopher Roger

Dirk & Suphanne Hermans

Bruce Szczepanski

Hiroshi & Minori Kimura

Koichiro & Hiroko Yamaguchi

Kevin Ing and Yuriko Ishida

NIHONBASHI US A |

Kevin Ing & Yuriko Ishida

GlobalTreehouse, Inc.

“We are happy to join Tokyo American Club Nihonbashi as inaugural Members. Nihonbashi is very conveniently located for us, and we are already regulars at the gym and the restaurant. The staff are wonderful and welcoming, and we look forward to meeting more people in this wonderful community.”

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JULY | 27


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C O M M U N I T Y | VO I C E

Olympic City Memories WORDS SHIZUO DAIGOH ILLUSTRATION TANIA VICEDO

T

ickets for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics were incredibly hard to obtain. But I managed to secure two tickets for the final day of the track and field events through a colleague in the United States. October 21 was a regular working day, a Wednesday, so I had to make an excuse to my boss. I went to the National Stadium with my fiancée, who is now my wife (we got married the following year). We arrived at the stadium at about 2 in the afternoon. It was so crowded, but the atmosphere was fantastic. We watched a few event finals, including the high jump, which was won by Valeriy Brumel of the Soviet Union. The marathon was held that day, and we watched Ethiopia’s Abebe Bikila cross the finish line in first place and win his second consecutive Olympic marathon gold medal. Britain’s Basil Heatley outsprinted Japan’s Kokichi Tsuburaya on the final lap in the stadium to take silver. Sadly, Tsuburaya-san took his own life four years later, a few months before the Mexico City Olympics.

After Abebe Bikila won the marathon, I decided to leave the stadium to get back to the office. But I discovered that all the main roads were closed to traffic because the marathon was still going on. That meant I couldn’t cross the road to get to the subway station. It took me about 30 minutes to walk to another station to catch a train to Tokyo Station. By the time I arrived back at the office at 6:30 in the evening, everyone had left for the day. Unlike in recent years, there weren’t many foreign visitors to Japan at that time. There were very few international hotels and flights were expensive. When I traveled to the US on business, the airfare was between ¥400,000 and ¥500,000. In the years leading up to the Olympics, Tokyo changed a lot. Elevated highways and expressways started taking shape across the city, with Haneda Airport connected by expressway and monorail. The economy was booming. I remember my Danish boss went to pick up friends from Haneda in his car. On the way back, he ended up in

Shinjuku because he couldn’t find the exit for Ginza on the new expressway. He called me wondering where he was. The shinkansen bullet train also started running in 1964. As I used to go to Osaka on business quite a lot, I took the shinkansen. It was very fast but not as smooth and quiet as the trains now. The 1964 Games were the f irst ones to be broadcast live around the world. Color television broadcasts had started in 1960 in Japan, and there was a color TV sales boom before the Olympics. In my house, we had a black-and-white TV because color ones were so expensive—close to ¥200,000. My salary was ¥20,000 a month back then. The 1940 Tokyo Olympics were cancelled because of the war, so we felt excited to finally host the Games, the first in Asia. The Olympics opened our eyes and inspired us to travel and learn more about the world. Member Shizuo Daigoh joined the Club in 1970.

JULY | 29



COMMUNIT Y | HIGHLIGHTS

June 6 All-Comers Swim Meet

More than 60 Club swimmers of all ages battled it out for medals as well as bragging rights during a high-octane afternoon of Sky Pool competition. IMAGES KAYO YAMAWAKI

JULY | 31


COMMUNIT Y | PURSUIT

CLASS

Active Kids Fit

Every parent wants their child to grow up healthy and happy. This class, with its focus on developing motor and communication skills through high-energy activites, is designed to give youngsters a confidence-boosting head start in life. Or, as kids see it, a weekly session of good fun and laughter with friends.

INSTRUCTOR

Taro Itsumi

Born in Tokyo, Taro Itsumi grew up in the United States and graduated with a degree in speech from Emerson College in Boston. As well as working in the local entertainment industry, he teaches the basics of gymnastics at a kindergarten in Kawasaki and at the Club with former Olympic gymnast Kazuhito Tanaka.

STUDENT

Sophie (pictured left) & Sirius Chan-Lee

“The teachers are friendly and teach a combination of Japanese-style and American-style gymnastics. Besides doing different sporty games, students learn discipline and respect. We believe that physical activity can also boost children’s cognitive skills. My daughters enjoy the class very much.” So Jeong Lee

ACTIVE KIDS FIT  July 6–27  Every Tuesday  12:30–1pm (ages 1–2); 1:10–2:10pm (ages 3–4); 2:20–3:20pm (ages 5–6)  Sign up online

32 | INTOUCH

YUUKI IDE

Energy-Burning Blast


Artist rendering of future planned Victoria Ward Park

Introducing The Park Ward Village WARD VILLAGE’S NEWEST RESIDENTIAL OFFERING ADJACENT TO VICTORIA WARD PARK Bask in the surrounding lush gardens and parks, there to restore balance to city life. At The Park Ward Village, gorgeous green space serves as your new backyard, an ideal place for a leisurely stroll, a picnic, a workout, or really, whatever your heart desires. 緑豊かなガーデンや公園で輝く日を浴びて、都会の生活に潤いを。

ザ パーク ワード ビレッジでは、豊かなグリーンがあなたの新しいバックヤードとなります。

くつろぎながらの散歩やピクニック、 ワークアウトなどを心ゆくまで楽しむことができます。

STUDIO, ONE, TWO AND THREE BEDROOMS AVAILABLE INQUIRE THEPARKWARDVILLAGEHONOLULU.COM | +1 808 500 9081

Offered by Ward Village Properties, LLC RB-21701

PRICES ARE APPROXIMATE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT ANY TIME. THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE AN OFFERING OR SOLICITATION OF SALE IN ANY JURISDICTION WHERE THE PROJECT IS NOT REGISTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPLICABLE LAW OR WHERE SUCH OFFERING OR SOLICITATION WOULD OTHERWISE BE PROHIBITED BY LAW. WARD VILLAGE, A MASTER PLANNED DEVELOPMENT IN HONOLULU, HAWAII, IS STILL BEING CONSTRUCTED. ANY VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF WARD VILLAGE OR THE CONDOMINIUM PROJECTS THEREIN, INCLUDING THEIR LOCATION, UNITS, COMMON ELEMENTS AND AMENITIES, MAY NOT ACCURATELY PORTRAY THE MASTER PLANNED DEVELOPMENT OR ITS CONDOMINIUM PROJECTS. ALL VISUAL DEPICTIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT ARE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY. THE DEVELOPER MAKES NO GUARANTEE, REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY WHATSOEVER THAT THE DEVELOPMENTS, FACILITIES OR IMPROVEMENTS OR FURNISHINGS AND APPLIANCES DEPICTED WILL ULTIMATELY APPEAR AS SHOWN OR EVEN BE INCLUDED AS A PART OF WARD VILLAGE OR ANY CONDOMINIUM PROJECT THEREIN. WARD VILLAGE PROPERTIES, LLC, RB-21701. COPYRIGHT ©2020. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

WARNING: THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE HAS NOT INSPECTED, EXAMINED OR QUALIFIED THIS OFFERING.


spa facilities that will help you look and feel your best. If you’re looking for long-term lease properties with a full range of services in convenient locations around Tokyo, it’s time to upgrade to MORI LIVING.

www.moriliving.com

JULY 2021

INTOUCH

at one of the city’s hottest restaurants. On-site gym and

TOKYO AMERIC AN CLUB

An English-speaking concierge who helps you book a table

毎月一回一日発行 第四十七巻六七五号 トウキョウアメリカンクラブ インタッチマガジン二〇二一年七月一日発行 平成三年十二月二十日第三種郵便物許可定価八00円 本体七四一円

Time for an upgrade Time for MORI LIVING

TOKYO AMERIC AN CLUB

Games On Sports agency chief Koji Murofushi looks ahead to an Olympics like no other J U LY 2021

THRILL OF THE CROWD + MEDAL MEMORIES + HIGH-TECH RO UNDS