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®

Contents

VOL. 7 • ISSUE 5

POLK COUNTY

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831-9005

Feature Story

OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Marty Higgenbotham

President - Charles Clark

Page 34 Cover Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

Master Gardener

Page 10 Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

Page 14 Florida Panther

Page 16 Polk County Sheriff’s Office

Page 18 Rocking Chair Chatter

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(863) 528-8537 cclark@expoco.com Vice President - Dave Tomkow (863) 665-5088 cattlemanslivetock@earthlink.net Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch (863) 425-1121 jbunch@agriumretail.com Al Bellotto - (863) 581-5515 Ray Clark - (863) 683-8196 rclark@tampabay.rr.com L.B. Flanders, DVM - (863) 644-5974 Dewey Fussell - (863) 984-3782 Mike Fussell - (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@verizon.net David McCullers - (863) 528-1195 Moby Persing - (863) 528-4379 Ned Waters - (863) 698-1597 watersn@doacs.state.fl.us J.B. Wynn - (863) 581-3255 jbwynn29@gmail.com Alternate - Mike Facente - (863) 697-9419

Florida Landscaping

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Standing Committee Chairs: Membership - J.B. Wynn

Home Grown 4-H

Events - Kevin Fussell (863) 412-5876

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Rodeo - Fred Waters (863) 559-7808 watersf@doacs.state.fl.us

Recipes

Page 32 Making Jewel Candy

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Cattlewomen - President Marjorie Wood (863) 660-4137 onnie397@aol.com Extension - Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. - Sgt. Howard Martin

Grapefruit Drug Interactions

Page 41 Jewel Caterpillar

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry

Index of Advertisers Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ........................25

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt

Andy Thornal ............................27 Arrington Body Shop, Inc ............7 Art’s Golf Cars, Inc....................39 Astin Farms Strawberry Distance Challenge ...................................17 Broke and Poor..........................21

I love fairs. And believe it or not, it has nothing to do with the variety of fried foods made available at every turn, although that certainly helps. I eat healthy most of the time. I can indulge in fried Oreos and cotton candy once a year, right? Oh and kettle korn. Definitely kettle korn. But I digress. I love the agricultural aspect of fairs. I love going to the livestock and horticulture events to see the youth of today with their projects. The cornerstone of these agriculture projects is 4H and FFA programs. These programs take the youth of today and mold them into the leaders that will direct the future of agriculture in the sunshine state. Today’s fairs have events for youth in 4H and FFA that range beyond livestock and horticulture projects. These students are learning the values of leadership, as well as life skills. When you visit the various fairs please take time to visit the agriculture areas and congratulate the exhibitors on a job well done. According to a USA Today article, enrollment at many colleges of agriculture is booming! The article states: Ag-related college majors appeal to both the heart and mind of a student, university officials say, as a booming agriculture industry and practical skills taught at the colleges can help develop a career that addresses issues such as global hunger and obesity in the U.S. This is welcomed news considering agriculture production will have to increase exponentially to feed the growing population of the world. The next time you sit down to a meal, thank your farmers and ranchers. They have worked hard to ensure that we have the safest, most abundant food supply in the world. Remember, No Farmers No Food!

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Polk County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association & Florida Citrus Mutual. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com, or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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EDITOR Patsy Berry OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton

Carlton & Carlton, PA ..............41 Cecil Breeding Farms .................20 Darn Grills and Ranch Supply .....7 Discount Metals.........................42 Ellison RBM Inc. .......................33 Fancy Farms, Inc........................25 Farm Credit ...............................27 Field’s Equipment.......................42

SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Calli Jo Parker CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson

Florida Farm & Ranch Supply.............................33 Florida Dept. of Agriculture.........2 Florida State Fair .......................31 Fred’s Market...............................9 Grove Equipment.......................28 Gulf Coast Turf & Tractor ........48 Helena Chemical-Tampa............21

PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey Lacey Waters STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Calli Jo Parker Lindsey English

Hinton Farms Produce, Inc. .......19 International Market World.......23 Key Plex.....................................45 Lightsey Cattle Co. ......................7 Martin Law Office.......................9 Mosaic .......................................17 Parkesdale..................................13 Pathway .....................................43 Polk County Cattlemen’s Association ...............4 PCSO ...........................................3 Polk Equine, PL .........................15 Repair Solutions.........................15 Seedway .......................................9 Southeastern Septic, LLC ...........19

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Stephanie Humphrey..................12 Stingray Chevrolet .....................47 The Bug Man.............................18

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You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

InTheField速 Magazine P.O. Box 5377 Plant City, FL 33566-0042

Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

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Christmas and New Year's are over. Looking back, the year was good for the cattle business, even though it was hard to make plans for the coming year, not knowing what the tax situation would be going forward. While we face uncertainty every day in the weather, prices and new rules and regulations, this year has been stressful not knowing what lay ahead politically and economically. It finally looks like Congress has settled on a plan to avert some of the financial problems facing our country. However it may be short lived as the current settlement pushed some of the major issues down the road for another round of negotiations. Some certainty would make the future a lot easier to plan for.

One issue I don't understand is the estate tax. Under the old plan, $3.5 million per person was the cut off point in 2012 and in 2013 it was going to be reduced to one million per person. When the final negotiations were over it was raised to $5 million dollars per person. While this increase is good it underscores the need for some stability in tax laws. The building of an estate takes years, sometimes spanning generations. Without planning, nearly half will go to the government. Planning is a long term proposition and at any time the estate tax exemption could be eliminated, making it impossible to pass on to the next generation what a family has worked so hard to put together. Some permanency should be introduced into the estate laws or, better yet, eliminate the estate tax all together.

Charles Clark Charles Clark Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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• The telephone was not widely appreciated for the first 15 years because people did not see a use for it. In fact, in the British parliament it was mentioned there was no need for telephones because “we have enough messengers here.” Western Union believed that it could never replace the telegraph. In 1876, an internal memo read: “This telephone has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication.” Even Mark Twain, upon being invited by Alexander Graham Bell to invest $5,000 in the new invention, could not see a future in the telephone. • President McKinley said that, “everything that can be invented has already been invented.” • When Alexander Graham Bell passed away in 1922, every telephone served by the Bell system in the USA and Canada was silent for one minute. • Alexander Graham Bell never phoned his wife or mother because they were deaf.

• “Ahoy” was the original telephone greeting. Alexander Graham Bell suggested ʻahoyʼ (as used in ships), but was later superceded by Thomas Edison, who suggested ʻhelloʼ instead. • The concept of allocating telephone numbers to individual phone lines was invented by a doctor

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By Debra Howell

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ragrance, color, and plant form play pivotal roles in your selection of rose bushes for your yard. Roses continue to be popular universally as shrub roses, ramblers and climbers, and bush roses. Flower shapes include roses with less than eight petals and those with forty or more petals. The centerpiece of anyone's table, a large vase of roses in various forms and colors, is all the decoration you need. In addition to cut flowers from your dedicated rose bed, you may employ roses in hanging baskets, window boxes, large containers, as a patio focal point, for hedges, on walls and trellises. And then there are some roses raised strictly for their intoxicating scents. Native to the northern hemisphere, rose colors come in single, bi-color, multi-color, blended, hand-painted or striped. It may interest you to know that once the bloom is gone, a swelling called a "rose hip" will form and is sometimes used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. Wild roses, such as the Damask rose, are representative of the earliest forms and are still very popular. With the introduction to Europe of Chinese roses from 1792 to 1824 repeat-flowering roses and various colors began to emerge.

plant which you can afford. If you purchase a cheap, unhealthy or scrawny plant, you shall surely reap what you sow. When selecting a site for your potential rose garden, keep in mind that your plants will perform better in sunny spots with a little afternoon shade. Be sure not to plant them beneath trees where they are prone to remain damp by condensation from the tree. Your roses need time to dry completely before daylight hours to avoid problems with black spot. This fungal disease thrives in Florida due to our humid weather, causing leaf drop and the possible decline of the plant. This may be abated somewhat by using drip or micro-jet irrigation, keeping the foliage dry and putting the water on the part of the plant which will most benefit from irrigation. In addition, sanitation is important in ensuring success with your roses. Following winter pruning, make sure to rake all fallen and affected leaves to prevent spread of black spot. Reapplying mulch after raking sets up a barrier of protection between the fungal spores and the bush. Please mulch with a renewable resource mulch. When it comes to maintenance, roses may be classified as either low or high maintenance

depending on the level of care which they demand. If you want roses of minimal care then you need to look for old garden roses or the shrubby knockouts. At this point, I should tell you that no rose is maintenancefree. For that matter, few plants in general are maintenance-free. The low-maintenance roses have more informal, open blooms. Roses referred to as "florist type" are floribunda, polyantha, grandiflora and Hybrid Tea. When you plant aforementioned types, you get large, spectacular blooms. You also get chores of watering, spraying, fertilizing and general grooming. The best resources available to you, the potential rose grower, are the local rose society and the county extension office. Since they are region-specific, these resources can point you to the best performing roses for our area. For better looking roses, you'll need to "dead-head" your roses on a regular basis. This will allow the plant to push energy into the newly forming buds. Here in Central Florida, the florist-type roses need pruning in late February or early March. You should remove dead cones and twigs, availing your-

One application of roses of which I'm very fond, is the combination of roses with perennials and shrubs to achieve an "English Country garden" or cottage garden effect. Hedges and arbors are another way to accomplish this look. Roses look really nice in association with gazebos, lattice-work and brick pavers. If you've ever looked through a rose-specific catalog, you were no doubt awe-struck at the color palette available by mail. To better ascertain what your rose will look like, you may visit a nursery or rose garden where you may view potential rose selections. Be sure to inspect mail-order plants as soon as they arrive at your home. As with any plant, always buy the largest and most healthy 10

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self of this opportunity to inspect the plant for injuries or disease. This procedure will improve light penetration and air circulation and regulate the height of your plant. You may expect your rose to bloom eight or nine weeks following pruning. Also, remove leafy shoots from your plant along the rootstock. These suckers may be identified due to their appearance below the union of the graft, and due to their different leaf type. Today's roses take occasional to frequent applications of water, depending on the type. Ideally, you'll install micro-irrigation which puts the water where it's needed, keeps the foliage dry and may be equipped with a timer. If you use overhead sprinkling systems or hand watering, make sure you water early enough in the day that the foliage can dry out before sundown. Following the establishment period, water twice to three times a week. Remember that anything you grow in a container will need to be watered more frequently than those planted into the landscape. For fertilization purposes, roses are heavy feeders. They'll perform best if you fertilize with a good quality rose fertilizer immediately after planting. For shrub roses, fertilize three times per year in March, June and October. For florist roses, fertilize five times per year, repeating each time the roses produces a flush of blooms. If you opt to grow your roses in containers, they may be planted at any time of year. Containerizing enables you to better protect plants by moving them during threats of very cold weather. One text lists rose hardiness in Zones 4-10b. Now that's a pretty hardy example of plant material. In fact, in central Florida cold injury to mature established rose wood rarely occurs; however, roses produce more flowers during summer than winter.

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To hold in moisture around your roses, and hopefully thwart the proliferation of weeds, an organic mulch is recommended. As it decomposes, you'll replace the mulch, bearing in mind that even when your mulch disappears, you're building nutritious soil. Mulch makes weeding much easier, too. If you plan to use your roses as cut flowers, think about your intended arrangement and trim the roses length accordingly. Use larger blooms low in the container and use smaller blooms and buds at the top for height. Also, try to use odd numbers of flowers in your arrangement, as florists do. If you cut buds when they are too tight they'll probably refuse to open. Always make a clean cut with a sharp knife or cutting shears, trying to avoid a ragged cut for the sake of the plant.

Roses have graced gardens literally for centuries, being used as ground covers, shrubs, vines, container and specimen plants, flowering almost year-round in central Florida. Roses appear in a plethora of colors and scents. They also come with a wide range of implications and situations. You may give them on the occasion of a sweetheart, the Prom, a proposal, an acceptance, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Grandparents Day, Boss' Day, Employees Day, Good Grades Day, Apology Day, the Kentucky Derby (Run for the Roses)...well, let's just say from birth to death, there's an occasion for roses. Now that you know that there's no need for an excuse to give this beautiful flower, plan a garden plot for roses and bestow the splendor of the rose on some unsuspecting soul soon and often. These roses are in memory of my precious dad Nelson Lunn, athlete and great golfer, now playing through with his good friend Art, both having gone home on December 18th, 2012. You've got all my love and respect, dad.

Some roses will require weekly fungicidal or insecticidal spraying to maintain the quality of the plant. An important aspect of rose care is the proper management of fungal black spot. This disease would not be near as prevalent in states which lack our wet, humid climate. Begin to treat roses when new growth emerges, continuing through the growing season. One asset associated with shrub roses is that these low-maintenance roses are resistant to black spot with very few or no sprays. Yet another fungal disease which is a threat in spring or late fall is powdery mildew, which covers new leaves and buds with a powdery white substance. This disease rarely kills the plant but will damage leaves and blooms. Other pests which you might encounter include caterpillars, aphids, thrips or spider mites. The best hedge of protection for your roses is early detection of infestations. But that should be easy considering the close scrutiny you'll afford your beauties once you fall in love with them. You may contact the extension office for BMP's (best management practices) for these and other pest problems you may encounter.

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DON’T

GET CONFUSED WITH TOO MANY KNOTS by Captain Woody Gore

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ook at any magazine or internet fishing site and you’ll find enough information about all those special knots you should be using to catch fish. In fact, there is so much information it can boggle the mind of the most serious angling individual. With the thousands of knots available today, anglers put too much emphasis on knowing how to tie them all. Regardless of the type of fishing you’re doing, at best you probably only need a couple of knots to make it happen.

3.

4. 5.

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of the line coming from your fishing reel. When pulling them tight always lubri cate your knots with saliva. This pre vents damage to the line. Trim knots closely. A good knot, pulled tight, will not come loose. Pull up all ends when tightening the knot, cinching them as tight as possible. If it slips in your hand, it will slip when you’re hooked up. Once you find a knot that’s working for your particular type of fishing, use it so you won’t forget it.

1. Start by tying a loose overhand knot in your leader. 2. Run the tag end through the eye of the hook or lure and down through the overhand loop. 3. Wrap the tag end around the main line two times. 4. Here’s the important part: take the tag end back through the overhand loop up from the bottom. Make certain the tag end goes through the middle of the overhand loop, as shown, to prevent the knot from slipping. If it only goes through one side, “it will slip.”

Learn to tie a few simple knots that directly relate to your style of fishing and you’re set. For example, with all my fishing, I basically use only three knots on my charters. These are a Yucatan (for leader to braid), Loop Knot (for hooks and lures to leader), and the Double-Uni Knot (for braid to braid). Once in a great while I might use a Bimini Twist (for a double line application). But 90 percent of the time I use the Yucatan and Loop. Since a large percentage of lost fish can be blamed on poorly tied knots, it’s essential to fishing success that they are tied correctly. By using these basic fundamentals your knots should be secure while still retaining their maximum breaking strength. 1. As always, “Practice, Practice, Practice”... Take a length of fishing line, an old lure with hooks removed, and practice until you can correctly tie each knot 25 times. 2. When learning knots, the "tag end" sometimes called the working end is the end of the line used to tie the knot. The "standing end" is that part 14

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LOOP KNOT: With many excellent knots in used today, especially when there is a desire to catch fish, one stands out as the perfect choice. It provides artificial lures and natural baits the most realistic approach and appeal. It’s called a Loop Knot. Actually loop knots have been use for decades but now with swim baits, top waters, diving and suspending lures along with a variety of soft plastics this knot has emerged as the go-to method of attaching hooks and especially lures to your fishing line.

JANUARY 2013

YU CATAN KNOT: This knot was developed by fishermen off the coast of Mexico with some confusion as to the correct way to tie it. Often confused with the Albright Special, when tied correctly the Yucatan is stronger than the Albright and probably the strongest monofilament leader to braided line knot. Many anglers using braided line prefer a double main line and use a Bimini Twist. However, I use exclusively braided line and prefer a single-line main line attached to the leader. To accomplish this you must start with a doubled braided line to wrap around Seaguar Fluorocarbon leader, similar to using a Bimini. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


1. Lay leader and doubled braid main line from reel parallel to each other. Doubled braid main line is often created (for the more adventurist types) by using a Bimini Twist. However, you can simply double your braid line and wrap it around the Seaguar Fluorocarbon leader. 2. If using Monofilament to Fluorocarbon wrap the doubled line around leader 4 to 6 times, 10 to 12 times when using braid to fluorocarbon. 3. Now feed end of leader through loop at end of doubled braided line. 4. It’s critical that when setting the knot you have a firm grasp on both ends of the doubled braided line and both ends of leader. Start pulling slowly until the knot begins to twist. Now wet it with saliva, drop the tag end of the leader keep ing a firm grip on the main leader, in your other hand get an extra firm grip on the doubled braid (making certain you have both ends in your hand) and with one quick pull the tag end of the leader and the braid will twist together into a tight compact knot. Note that although the wraps were made with the doubled line, when the knot is pulled tight the leader will –wrap onto the doubled line. There you go; there is nothing to tying the perfect Knot to Catch Perfect Fish! If you want to learn these knots and other great fishing tips “Give Me a Call and Let’s Go Fishing on a Catching and Learning Charter”. “LET ’S GO FISHING” TAMPA B AY FISHING REPORT JANU ARY - FEB RU ARY 2013 SNOOK (CLOSED): You can still catch snook however, if the water temperatures are lower than normal you might want to fish areas like creeks, canals, and rivers; especially those with muddy bottoms and deep water docks. On cool or cold days snook also like SHEEPSHEAD: Sheepshead should start moving in for the spawn and hanging out around sunny sandy bottoms along a shallow shore- we should begin to see some nice sized fish on the rock piles line because the sun tends to quickly warm the water. throughout the bay. Look for quality fish around bridges, pilings, docks, oyster bars and artificial reefs. Many folks don’t like to REDFISH: You can usually find redfish during the winter and some- keep Sheepshead and actually I really can’t think of anyone who times cut bait, shrimp and artificial lures are your best bet. Many really does, however if you’ve got yourself a mess of larger fish go times they’re not going to be the larger fish but many rats can ahead and bite the bullet and clean them, because the fish dinner make a good fishing trip, especially for the kids. Don’t forget is well worth it. canals, creeks, deeper oyster bars and docks. “Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain SPOT TED SEA T ROU T: Tampa Bay seems to be full of nice sea trout Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and especially around broken bottom grass flats with sandy pot holes. fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Plenty of trout should show up through the winter months and Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years; he offers world wading on low tide days is a great way to target them. Most grass class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. flats with moving water seem to produce the best bite using shrimp free-lined or under a popping cork and artificial lures. However Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years some deeper rivers, channels, canals, and creeks will hold nice fish of organizational experience and access to the areas most experiand often plenty of silver trout. enced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. MACKEREL, COB IA, SHARKS: When trout fishing the flats it’s not unusual to get a decent mackerel bite going. They like hanging Visit his website at: around chasing schools of glass minnows. Also many times we’ve WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, landed some really nice pompano off the same trout flats. So, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or when running the flats looking for your favorite spot watch the give him a call at 813-477-3814. wake behind your boat for pompano skipping in the wake. As the water cools down the power plants are the place to look for cobia and sharks during the winter months. But be alert as other species frequent the warm water discharges. During the winter months on the flats we still get the occasional mackerel and plenty of bluefish, ladyfish and jacks. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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UF/IFAS

RESEARCHERS SAY

Florida Panther

EFFORT LIKELY SAVED BIG CATS FROM EXTINCTION By Mickie Anderson

An adult Florida panther perches in a tree, in this file photo supplied by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A study published in Journal of Animal Ecology shows that Florida’s population of the big cats was probably saved from extinction by the importation and raelease of eight female pumas from Texas, in 1995. Madan Oli, a population ecologist with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, has a long-term research interest in the Florida panther, which has been federally classified as endangered since 1967.

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hen wildlife managers imported eight female Texas pumas in hopes they would mate with native Florida panthers, they knew they were taking a bit of a risk.

But a new University of Florida research study, published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology, suggests their gamble paid off. Without those pumas, UF researchers Madan Oli and recent UF doctoral graduate Jeff Hostetler found that the probability of the Florida panther population falling below 10 panthers by 2010 was nearly 71 percent. “We found that the Florida population would’ve declined, on average, by about 5 percent per year,” said Oli, a UF population ecology professor and Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty member. “And that’s essentially telling us there was a high chance that the population would’ve eventually gone extinct.” There were an estimated 20 to 25 panthers left in the state when the Texas female cats were brought to Florida in 1995. Officials believe the population has since grown about 4 percent per year, and their estimate now ranges from 100 to 160, said Dave Onorato, a panther expert with the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Florida Panther Project. Having a scientific study in hand that validates what conservation officials had believed would happen is helpful, Onorato said. “It shows that the genetic restoration effort was effective at averting the loss of the Florida panther,” he said. The Florida panther had been listed as an endangered species since 1967, and although it was named the official state animal by 1982, it was in peril by the 1990s. The cats suffered from numerous inbreedingrelated problems, including poor sperm quality and other reproductive abnormalities, kinked tails, heart defects and heavy parasite loads. 16

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When the Texas cats were brought to Florida, officials weren’t sure how they would fare or that the breeding effort would work, but with the success of the genetic restoration, Onorato said a similar effort could be initiated again in the future. For now, however, there is no specific timetable for such an effort. He said the cats continue to face threats from loss of habitat, cars and inbreeding. Although they sometimes roam far and wide, Florida panthers – the only puma population east of the Mississippi River — are primarily found in the Big Cypress National Preserve and Everglades ecosystem areas that include parts of Collier, Lee, Hendry, Monroe and MiamiDade counties. The recent UF study, which examined several decades’ worth of field data and genetic information about the panther, found that the robust survival of the Florida-Texas hybrid kittens played a large role in the panther population being reeled back from the brink of extinction. “I would say that at least in the short term, the outlook is good for the Florida panther,” said Hostetler, who worked on the project for more than four years as part of his doctoral studies. “But there are still a lot of threats to their survival that could be important in the long run.” The paper’s other author is Deborah Jansen of Big Cypress National Park. The research study was funded by the Florida Panther Research and Management Trust Fund (via sales of the Florida “Protect the Panther” license plate), National Park Service, the University of Florida and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.•

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Easily Connecting Through With Technology

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ere at the Sheriff’s Office we strive to keep up with cuttingedge technology, and to use the latest social media and Internet tools to interact with our citizens. That includes having our very own Facebook page, Twitter account, Youtube page, and Pinterest account. Recently we added another tool to our belt that we know will help us keep our citizens better-informed about what’s going on in Polk County. Thanks to the Appriss® mobile phone application, you can now take PCSO information with you wherever you go. Download our new free mobile app to your iPhone or smartphone—just search for “Polk County Sheriff” in the App Store, or find us by our app name “FLPolkSO.” This app allows you to search for wanted persons, see who’s been booked into the jail, receive news alerts, and have access to other types of information that’s always available on

our website. The difference is, now it’s at your fingertips. As always, when you visit our website directly at www.polksheriff.org you can: • Learn about our staff and our district locations • Search for sexual predators and offenders • Sign up to receive news alerts of crime in your area • Learn about how you can potentially receive a reward if you give a Crime Stoppers tip that leads to an arrest of a criminal

• Check out our Animal Control tab for regulations and fees if you are considering adopting a pet • Learn how to protect your belongings and as a result be safer by reviewing our Crime Prevention tips

• Check out career opportunities • Find out who has been booked in to our detention facility • View photos from our cold case files to help us solve these homicides • Learn about methamphetamine labs and tips for landlords

For more information on downloading this application please contact the Crime Prevention Section at 863.298.6677. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/ polkcountysheriff Have a safe and happy new year, everyone!

• Review wanted posters from our county and from across the nation

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IN BUSINESS NOW FOR OVER 15 YEARS

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ne of my long-time friends in Plant City is Dick Elston. Ever since high school we have enjoyed our friendship and telling jokes.

I recall when Dick was in high school he was hired by A.P. Cooke, owner of the Plant City Courier, as a part-time type setter. Dick was later delegated the job of laying out the classified ads. He was pretty good at what he did, although at first he was known to make a few slip ups. On his first publication he had an ad for Barwick’s Drug Store, which should have read, “Wanted: Parttime job for married girl to work our soda fountain.” When the Courier came out it read, “Wanted: Part-time married girl to work our soda fountain.” The only other one I can remember was an ad for Carlos Cone. It read, “Wanted, man to take care of cows at Cones ranch that does not smoke or drink.” Last month Dick gave me a copy of his new book entitled, “Life and Times of Plant City in the 1940s” (copies are available at the Plant City Photo Archives). Reading through the pages brought back a lot of memories. He recalled in the good ole days, when everyone was low on money, they suffered because of rationing. He writes about gas being rationed during World War II, you were given a sticker to put on your windshield for gas. Either “A,” “B” or “C”. Usually, as I remember, you were allowed only five gallons of gas at a time. One day I went to Bell’s restaurant for lunch and sat next to Dick’s dad. I told him we were good friends, and were always telling stories on each other. He laughed and said, “Did you ever hear the story of Dick leaving home?” “No,” I replied. “Tell me about it.” He laughed and said, “When Dick was seven years old he decided to run away from home. I recall he packed his little suitcase 22

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with a few clothes and a couple of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. As he started for the front door his mother asked him where he was going. ‘I’m leaving home,’ he said. ‘And what are you carrying?’ she asked. ‘Some clothes and food,’ was his reply. ‘Dick, if you want to run away, that’s alright,’ his mother said. ‘But you came into this home without anything and you can leave the same way.’ He put down his suitcase on the floor defiantly and started for the door again. ‘Wait a minute,’ his mother said. ‘You didn’t have any clothes on when you arrived, and I want them back.’ Turning red as a beet he quickly took off his clothes, shoes, socks, underwear and all, and hollered, ‘Now Mom, can I go now?’ ‘Yes’, was her answer, ‘but once you close that door, don’t ever expect to come back.’” Dick’s dad said his son was so angry he slammed the door and stepped out on the front porch. She peeked through the window and there he stood completely naked. He saw two girls coming down the street and immediately jumped in the shrubbery. After the girls passed by he ran to the front door and knocked loudly. “Who’s there?” his mother said. “It’s me, Dick, let me in!” “Dick doesn’t live here any more!” she replied. “Aw, c’mom, I’m still your son. Please let me in!” Dick’s father concluded, “I watched her slowly open the door with a smile on her face, and say, “Did you change your mind about running away?” Dick walked in, grinned, and said, “What’s for supper?” Dick pointed out a lot of things I had forgotten about the 40s. Blind Charlie was the peanut vendor. We had inner tubes inside of W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


automobile tires. Photos were taken in black and white. We put water in ice trays, and then into the freezer to make ice cubes. We had old fashion tent revivals. First class postage was 3 cents. The Artic Ice Company delivered ice to homes for iceboxes. There were no disposable diapers and all cars had manual transmissions. Things have changed since the 40s! Dick points out that a gallon of milk was $.62, a loaf of bread $.09 and a gallon of gas was $.16!

answer the question about his father’s cause of death. The agent asked why. After some embarrassment the client explained that his father had been hanged. The agent paused for a moment and said, “Just write: ‘Father was taking part in a public function when the platform gave away.’” Dick Elston and his wife Shirley live on Cedar Run in west Plant City. •

For those of you that have lived in Plant City for a long time, do you remember where McGuires’s Second Hand Store was located? What about Helm’s Dress Shop, Bender’s Market, Pan Tex Dry Cleaners, Kirby’s Bakery, Harold’s News Stand, and Table Supply? You’ll find the locations and many others in his current edition of “The Life and Times of Plant City in the 1940s.” For more memories of the 40s in Plant City, why not stop by the Plant City Photo Archives and pick up a copy. By the way, Dick Elston has published three individual editions. All very thought provoking. He has served Plant City well. He worked with his father in the insurance business at the apex east of Maryland Fried Chicken. Richard (Dick) Elston was named Citizen of the Year in 1986 and served as City Commissioner/Mayor 1968-1969. I asked Dick what was the funniest thing that ever happened to him as an insurance agent. He said, “We had a new agent working for us one summer to help fill in while dad went on vacation. A customer came in and this new employee noticed the applicant was having trouble filling out the application. He asked the man what trouble was he having, and the man said he could not

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THE 66TH ANNUAL POLK COUNTY

YOUTH FAIR

KICKS

OFF ON

T FLORIDA AGRICULTURE LITERACY DAY SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013

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he 10th annual Florida Agriculture Literacy Day is scheduled for Tuesday April 30, 2013, and the children’s book being developed for the event will commemorate the 500th year anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s discovery of Florida. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and Florida Agriculture in the Classroom, invite farmers, growers, ranchers, FFA teachers and students and agriculture industry representatives to read in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms around the state as part of the event. The book being developed is about Florida history and the role agriculture has played in it. The book and materials provided to volunteer readers for free thanks to the funding Florida Agriculture in the Classroom receives from sales of the agriculture specialty license plate nicknamed the ’Ag Tag.’ Teachers and agriculture industry representatives interested in participating, please check Florida Agriculture in the Classroom’s website, www.agtag.org in early 2013 to register. Florida Agriculture in the Classroom is a nonprofit organization that educates Florida teachers and students about where their food, fiber and fuel come from using lessons, materials, grant programs and other projects. To buy an Ag Tag online, please visit https://www.eztagfl.com/ag.htm For more information contact FAITC’s Marketing Program Manager Holiday Noel Hogg at 352-846-1391 or email hgriffin@ufl.edu

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he 66th Annual Polk County Youth Fair, located at 1702 Highway 17 South in Bartow, will begin on January 26. This event is full of fun and exciting competitions throughout the week beginning with the Horsemanship Show at 8:30AM on Saturday. This is a family event and admission is free. The Fair consist of market animals, ornamental plants, consumer science projects, competitions and much more. The Annual Polk County Youth Fair had its beginning on Nov. 7, 1947. The concept of the Fair has been to provide a means for the youth of Polk County in 4-H Clubs, FFA and FHA to display exhibits of their work in agricultural and consumer science projects, and to compete as individuals with one another and against the highest standards of perfection in a program “serving to promote the educational development of the youth of the county.” Polk County comes together with over 200 volunteers that support and educate the Youth of Polk County. Not only are these young exhibitors learning to care for and prepare their projects, they are learning to take responsibility for their project and see it through to the end. The Youth Fair has created an atmosphere that appeals to the interest of spectators and others who give personal and financial support to the Fair.

SCHEDU LE OF EVENT S Buildings open to public each day at 8:30 am and close after the last event of the evening.

Wednesday, January 23 9:00 AM

Judging of Non Perishable Exhibits

JANUARY 26TH, 2013

Monday, January 28 8:30 AM – 4:00 PM Archery Competition 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM Tablesetting & Menu Planning Contest 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Top Ranch Hand Contest 6:00 PM Market Hog Showmanship Contest

Tuesday, January 29 9:00 AM Market Hog Sale 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM Sew Off Contest – Individual (pajama pant) 10:00 AM (approximately) Cake Auction 1:00 PM Mannequin Modeling 3:00 PM – 7:00 PM Working Booths 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM Sew Off Contest – Team (pillow) 4:00 PM Commercial Heifer Show/Showmanship

Wednesday, January 30 9:00 AM – Noon 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Storytelling Contest Chili Cook Off Contest Stuart Center open to Public 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM Dog Showmanship Class 5:00 PM Poultry Show/Showmanship 7:00 PM Whip Popping Contest

T hursday, January 31 8:00 AM Dog Show 9:00 AM Demonstrations 10:30 AM Illustrated Talks 9:00 AM – Noon Poultry, Egg & Rabbit Judging Contests 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Beef Breeding Show/Showmanship 2:00 PM Scrap Off Contest 3:00 PM – 7:00 PM Mannequin Modeling 3:00 PM – 7:00 PM Working Booths 7:00 PM Market Steer Show/Showmanship (Open & Commercial)

T hursday, January 24

Friday, February 1

10:00 AM Tri Color Judging of Non Perishable Exhibits

9:00 AM – 9:45 AM Horticulture Judging Contest 10:00 AM – Noon Working Booths 10:00 AM – Noon Mannequin Modeling 10:30 AM – Noon Livestock Judging Contest 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Blueberry, Citrus, Peach & Ornamental Plant Sale 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM Tri-Color Presentation 6:00 PM Parade of Champions 6:30 PM Commercial Heifer Sale 7:30 PM Market Steer Sale

Saturday, January 26 8:30 AM 9:00 AM

Horse Show Judging of Perishables/ Tri-Color Judging

Sunday, January 27 10:00 AM Market Hog Show 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM Intermission of Market Hog Show 2:30 PM Market Hog Show

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Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Community Association Outreach Program JULIE HIRST, HILLSBOROUGH AND POLK COUNTY Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION OUTREACH COORDINATOR

Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL) means landscaping with low maintenance plants and following nine simple Florida-friendly principles. The mission of the FFL program is to conserve water, protect water quality and reduce negative effects on Florida’s natural resources. FFL is a joint venture with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, county governments and Florida’s water management districts. Central to the FFL program are its 9 Principles including: Right Plant, Right Place; Water Efficiently; Fertilize Appropriately; Mulch; Attract Wildlife; Manage Yard Pests Responsibly; Recycle; Prevent Stormwater Runoff and Protect the Waterfront. We recognize that homeowners associations (HOAs) can have a significant effect on water consumption and the environment through restrictive covenants involving landscape design and maintenance. In 2009, the Florida legislature enacted laws defining and promoting FFL. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program works with HOA boards of directors, property managers and landscape maintenance professionals to educate them on FFL principles and assist them in making landscaping decisions. Florida Statute 373.185 (S.B. 2080) precludes HOAs from prohibiting property owners from implementing FFL on their land. The legislation also specifies that local governments cannot disallow homeowners from using FFL principles in their landscapes. In addition, it states that HOAs cannot prohibit FFL in their association covenants and documents nor can HOAs mandate landscape rules that are not FFL, such as water wasting practices or inappropriate site design. There are several items this legislation does not require. For instance, HOAs and their homeowners are not required to practice FFL. The law does not change the HOA review-approval process. It also does not invalidate HOA landscape and architectural committee require26

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ments that landscape changes must be requested and approved in advance of changes being made. HOAs may still set reasonable restrictions with regard to FFL practices, including specifying the location of rain barrels, compost bins and certain plants. HOAs can also require the use of St. Augustinegrass as turfgrass. The FFL legislation does not address community common areas, but recommends that HOAs set an example for residents by exhibiting FFL principles in those areas. The law also recommends that HOAs hire landscape contractors that are certified in the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMPs). There is no enforcement agency associated with the legislation. Therefore, when disputes between homeowners and HOAs arise regarding this legislation, they are commonly settled by lawsuits. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is educational in nature and does not intervene in disputes between HOAs and residents. However, we can offer resolution suggestions. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is related to S.B. 494, which deals with commercial fertilizer contractors. This legislation requires that all commercial fertilizer applicators be licensed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services by January 1, 2014. Passing GI-BMP training or equivalent is a requirement for licensure. This law stipulates that all homeowners that have an in-ground irrigation system must have an operational rain shut-off device or a soil moisture sensing device. As a means of providing guidance to community associations, the FFL Community Association Outreach Program offers free site evaluations. Areas that are assessed include: plant health and maintenance; water conservation recommendations; landscape design and plant suggestions; landscape maintenance contracts; covenants and W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


deed restrictions dealing with landscape issues; pruning practices; problem plants such as invasive, non-native plants; pesticide and fertilization practices; plant nutritional deficiencies; mulch application; and irrigation system issues including frequency and timing of applications. Other frequent areas of interest cited by communities participating in the FFL Community Association Outreach Program have included stormwater pond best management practices, dealing with erosion caused by stormwater runoff and questions involving reclaimed water. Evaluations and recommendations are based on science-based research from UF/IFAS. In addition to site evaluations, the Community Association Outreach Program offers onsite presentations about the FFL principles. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is a free resource for HOAs and other community associations to provide for guidance in instituting sustainable landscape practices, reviewing landscaperelated covenants and working with landscape maintenance contractors. FFL has had several success stories with communities that adopted FFL practices from which they were able to see reduced water consumption and water utility and maintenance costs. Contact me at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, 813-744-5519 x 54142, if these services would benefit your homeowner or condominium association. For more information on environmental horticulture topics, contact your local County Extension Service. Additional information on Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ can be accessed at http:/ / floridayards.org, http:/ / fyn.ifas.ufl.edu and WaterMatters.org. The Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Community Association Outreach Program is sponsored by the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the Hillsborough and Polk Boards of County Commissioners and the Southwest Florida Water Management District.

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urely we’ve all heard the old adage, “Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for life.” Of course, that may not be the word for word quote but you get the point. This same concept can be applied to moments in which we reach out to the less fortunate in our own communities. One of the greatest things about the 4H program is its focus on community service. Unfortunately, it is often easier to give someone a fish than it is to teach him/her to fish. Many 4H clubs struggle with this issue, they desire greatly to assist those around them and though they can put together bags and bundles for the homeless or meals for the disadvantaged, very rarely can they create a lasting change in the environments in which these people exist. However, Home Grown 4H just might accomplish the task this coming Spring! Stacey Hosegood is the current Organizational Leader for the club. She says, “I did not get involved in 4H until my children came along and actually started when my oldest was in second grade. We started in Home Grown when my son was in second grade. This is actually Home Grown’s 26th year and we’ve been in it for 19 years. Nineteen ninety-four is when my family started in it. My daughter, who’s the last one, is a junior so she still has her senior year but she’s the last and I will have had three kids go through it. I never even knew about 4H growing up!” While it is unfortunate that Stacey didn’t have the opportunity to be exposed to the valuable lessons learned through 4H participation as a youngster, she has made sure to provide that missed out experience for her own children. She adds, “My three kids have raised and shown chickens, goats and heifers, horses and dogs. Oh, actually, we had pigeons and quail. We’ve done container gardening and raised bed gardens, we did that as projects and one year my daughter entered vegetables in the Youth Fair. All three of them showed animals at Youth Fair and State Fair. Public speaking and archery and photography have been big in our family over the years, they’re the top three. We’ve also done riflery, rocketry, marine science, forestry, entymology, aeronautics/aerospace (planes and stuff like that). Oh, and community service. Community service is the main thing that our club is about, giving back to the community.” Thusly, Stacey’s, and Home Grown’s, drive to make a longstanding impact on the community in which they live. Stacey elaborates on the current community service projects her club is involved in. “This year we’ve made bags for the homeless, like actually filling them with things and distributed them. We’ve done the Salvation Army bell ringing…” mostly just “fish-giving” up until this point and then she shines the light. “We are putting together our project that we’re going to do in the Spring. We’re going to build raised bed gardens for a homeless community in North Lakeland. We’re putting that project together now.” She’s going to teach them to raise their own food. How awesome is that? Here’s another great one, “We’re also doing,” she pauses and thinks, “well, we’re calling it a baby shower for A Woman’s Choice where the kids bring items for babies and we’re going to have a party and bring it to the pregnancy center; it’s for women who don’t want to have an abortion but need help.” Talk about making a lasting impact, supporting life! Perhaps it would appear that Stacey just sort of fell into her current position with Home Grown 4H, but given the success W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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she’s had, we suspect there’s a reason she got drawn in by her friend, Judy Raymond back in 1994. She explains, “I knew the leader before me, she was the leader for 17 or 18 years. I knew her personally, she is one of the reasons I home schooled my children. I home schooled them until they got into eleventh grade. Our group is primarily a home school group but not exclusively; we have kids that are in public school as well. We’re actually the largest 4H club in Polk County, a couple of years ago we had 191 kids, this year we have 154.” That’s a really big club and there’s no doubt that it’s going to be making a really big impact. There is one piece of seemingly bad news that must be shared. Stacey informed us, “I’m in the process of transitioning out of the main leadership position. I’m still going to be involved but I’m stepping down as Organizational Leader after this year and it has yet to be determined who will be.” However, while she’s still in her current position, you can reach her at: jshgood@verizon.net with any questions about Home Grown 4H club or you can check out their website: www.homegrown4H.com

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

PREPARATION For crust: Combine 3/4 cup chopped pecans, whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, sugar and salt in a food processor. Pulse ingredients together until the nuts are finely ground. Add the cold butter to the pecan mixture and pulse until well incorporated. In a small mixing bowl, whisk egg, oil, vanilla and almond extract together. With the motor running on the food processor, add the egg mixture to the pecan mixture. Continue to pulse mixture until it begins to clump, 30 to 45 seconds. Measure out 1/2 cup of the mixture and combine in a bowl with the remaining 1/4 cup of chopped pecans, and set it aside to be used for the topping. Set aside.

Florida Berry Snack Bars INGREDIENTS CRUST 1 cup pecans, chopped, separated 3/4 cup natural whole-wheat pastry flour 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup natural sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 1 large egg 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 teaspoon natural vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon natural almond extract pan-release cooking spray FRUIT FILLING 3 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and diced 2 1/2 cups fresh blueberries

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with pan-release cooking spray. Combine 2 cups strawberries, 2 cups blueberries, orange juice, sugar and cornstarch in a large saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture has thickened (about 4 to 5 minutes). Stir in the remaining fresh fruit and add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Transfer the crust mixture to the sprayed baking dish. Spread evenly and press firmly into the bottom to form the crust. Evenly spread the fruit filling over the crust. Sprinkle the top of the fruit filling with the reserved topping mixture. Bake the bars for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F and bake until the crust and topping are lightly brown, 25 to 30 minutes more. Let the bars cool completely before cutting. Serve with fresh fruit.

1/4 cup orange juice Yield: 20 bars

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Strawberry-Yogurt Freezer Pops INGREDIENTS 1 pound fresh strawberries, hulled 1/4 cup natural sugar 1 lemon, juiced 2 cups low-fat vanilla yogurt 10 freezer pop molds and sticks

PREPARATION In a blender or food processor add strawberries, sugar and lemon juice. Purée ingredients until the sugar is dissolved. Pour mixture into a small pitcher or container. Fill each freezer pop mold by alternating layers of the strawberry mixture and yogurt. Insert the handle or stick into each freezer pop and freeze for at least 5 hours. To serve freezer pops, run warm water over the outside of the molds until the pops come out easily. Chef’s Tip: If you don’t have plastic freeze pop *C molds, you can use small paper cups. Cover tops of the cups with plastic wrap once you have added your ingredients and poke the sticks through the plastic to keep them standing upright while in the freezer. Yield: 10 servings

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Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

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Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

“Some people think an auctioneer is nothing more than a fast talker,” said Martin E. (Marty) Higgenbotham, president of Higgenbotham Auctioneers International, Ltd., Inc. (HAI) “but we are a great deal more.” And that is an understatement of significant proportion when you are talking about Marty. Originally from a farm and ranching family in Wellsville, Missouri, a town about 75 miles northwest of St. Louis, Higgenbotham got the auction “bug” when he was five-years-old. “I was with my dad at a farm auction near Wellsville and we were in the front row of the auction,” he said. “I was making bids throughout the auction, but was outbid until a pair of boots was offered, my 10-cent bid took the boots and that transaction, which my father paid for, set me on my lifelong career path.” Marty’s family, which consisted of his parents, three brothers and two sisters, farmed some 400-acres for grain and raised livestock. Higgenbotham came to Lakeland in 1962 after selling Wellsville Realty and Auction Company. “I really got tired of those cold winters and wanted to relocate to a warmer climate. After traveling about Florida for six months earlier in ’62, Marty and his family settled on Lakeland. “It was the right sized town where I thought I could make a living in the auction business and also afforded agriculture as a backup occupation should auctioneering not work out. The people were very friendly, too.” The final factor in his decision was the construction of Interstate 4, which was taking place at the time.

Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

Needless to say the auction business has been very good for Higgenbotham whose firm “markets everything from mom and pop’s home to islands in the ocean.” His staff, which today numbers 12, (In house plus a number of regional associates across the nation) engages in a four-step process for every auction the firm undertakes and there have been thousands over the years in nearly every state of the union and many foreign countries. The advent of the Internet has afforded the firm and its customers the opportunity to conduct online auctions for items of any size, to be brought to an Internet auction site. “Though we primarily focus on the sale of real estate (Commercial is our specialty), we have an experienced foundation in the auction of antiques, equipment, antique cars, collectibles and firearms,” Higgenbotham noted. “We are in the business of providing solutions to our client’s problems!” The HAI process begins with the assignment of an auction manager who has responsibility for all phases of the engagement. This includes the assembly of information, definition of the target market and best way to offer the property. The auction manager works with Brenmar Advertising, an affiliated firm specializing in auction marketing, to develop a detailed marketing plan based upon the type and location of the property and prospective buyer profile.

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of last resort. “Fair market value may not be the same as the seller’s concept of value, but it is accurate and you can’t dispute the speed of the process,” he added.

Photo from Higgenbotham Auctioneers

Attesting to that statement are HAI’s client relationships with major corporations such as Albertson’s, Walmart and International Paper to name just a few. Success demands a breadth of knowledge that enables Higgenbotham and his staff to properly consult with their clients. “We must have in depth knowledge, of what it is that is being marketed, the best way to package those items along with resources and tactics to alert potential buyers and then to properly execute the actual auction and critical follow-up steps,” he said. The firm also offers free appraisals “and that in itself requires a diverse knowledge basis that is continually kept up to date. So, the fast-talking auctioneer is just one small aspect of this profession.” The firm’s real estate auction experience has included high rise office towers and complexes, big box retail stores and strip malls, Walmart Supercenter outlots, major land tracts: waterfront, subdivisions, groves, ranches and commercial acreage, as well as condominiums and commercial and residential properties. HAI has also marketed executive and “trophy” homes, warehouses and distribution centers, schools, museums and lodges such as Elks, Shriners and Moose.

The marketing plan is then implemented. That involves the creation of a brochure and advertisements, along with posting of property information on the HAI website. A series of Email notifications begin and site-specific signs are placed on the parcels involved in the sale. The firm direct mails color brochures in advance of the auction to prospective buyers on its in-house database along with selected external mailing lists. Media advertising then occurs. Prospective buyers that request information on the properties for sale are given comprehensive due diligence packages, which are also posted on the HAI website. “We keep our sellers advised of each step along the way,” said Higgenbotham. “We educate our prospective buyers about the offering this enhances the purchase price the seller receives. An informed buyer is a serious participant.” On the day of the auction, the manager assembles the team on site several hours before the actual auction to review details related to the auction, and register bidders, as well as answer questions about the property or the auction process. The auctioneer begins the sale with opening remarks, detailing the process and making any necessary disclosures. The auction then begins and the auction staff encourages participation, prepares purchase contracts and collects escrow deposits.

Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

The final step involves the delivery of the escrow deposit and copy of the purchase contract. Higgenbotham Auctioneers monitors the complete closing process. The two key advantages of an auction versus other types of marketing are the speed of the transaction and its ability to garner fair market value of the sale property. “Generally, we complete the entire process within six weeks,” said Higgenbotham. “All things considered, we achieve the same result as other processes, but we do so in far less time than typical real estate sales.” There are a number of shows on television that depict different types of auctions. “They have been good for our profession since they reflect the speed of the process and attainment of fair market value,” said Higgenbotham. Those shows also help to correct the misconception that some have that an auction is akin to a “fire” sale or sale 36

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There have been very interesting auctions, both on and offshore for Higgenbotham over the years. “One was an amusement park in this area,” he said. “It was Masterpiece Gardens and we auctioned everything from the merry-go-round and black bears to monkeys. We have also done an island in Kissimmee Lakes that included homes and a herd of deer. There was also Rosiao Resorts on the Orcas Islands off the coast of the state of Washington. From mountaintops and condos to resorts, we have done it all,” he said.

Auctioneers Institute, a course he helped create, was designed to accredit auctioneers, thereby raising professional standards in the industry. The Institute is now an annual, 3-week, multi-level course. Marty is also a 44 year member of the Lakeland South Rotary and a past president. “We are looking forward to hosting the Lakeland South Rotary Fundraiser March 8, 2013 here at the ranch,” he said. “We will raise funds for multiple charities serving our community.”

Marty and his wife Angela live on a 100acre cattle ranch in the south Lakeland area. The cattle range from exotic African Watusi to Angus and Brahman. The ranch is noted for the many events held there each year. “I have conducted farm sale/estate auction events several times throughout the year, and have done so for many years. From that activity, requests have come in for events and weddings.” he said. Rocking H Ranch Events has been developed and managed by Angela. There have been weddings, Rotarian fundraisers, Wounded Warriors events, C.C.A., cancer fundraisers. Many corporate events also, including attendees at the National Auctioneers Convention in 2006, some 1500 of Marty’s close personal friends.

Giving back for Marty is not limited to his profession. He is a staunch supporter of the community and agriculture programs, especially activities that focus on our youth. ‘We just hosted our 5th Annual Polk County Youth Fair Fundraiser B-B-Q dinner and Barn Dance with the Sofa Kings performing at the Ranch.” Marty and his crew have voluntarily worked the Polk County Youth Fair auctions in Bartow for more than a quarter of a century. “Seeing the faces of those youngsters competing in the various events reminds me of my upbringing and gives me a great deal of satisfaction,” he said. “Those young people involved in 4H and FFA are the bedrock of our society. They understand the value of money based on projects where they learn and earn. They are respectful and deserve our support.”

Higgenbotham has been a moving force in his industry as well. He is a past president of the National Auctioneers Association and past president of the National Auctioneer Foundation. He is a member of the Auctioneers Hall of Fame and a Founding Father, past board member and instructor for over 30 years at the Certified Auctioneer Institute at the University of Indiana. Certified

Each year HAI helps to organize and conduct some 90-charity auctions benefiting groups such as the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, March of Dimes, VISTE, Wild Turkey Federation, Ducks Unlimited, countless schools and churches. “I serve as the auctioneer for about 30 of those charity events every year and love every minute. Giving back, that’s just me and my great employees,” he said.

Enjoyment time for Marty is any opportunity to work on the ranch. “Whether it’s driving my tractor or loader or working a horse, I derive a great deal of enjoyment from working with the land,” he said. “Angela and I love to work on projects together. We are always repairing or improving something around the house. But I draw the line at painting, that’s Angela’s area of expertise! The chainsaw is mine!” With no plans to retire from the business, Marty has some observations on real estate and our country. “The real estate market is controlled to a great degree by government policies,” he said. “Beyond that we are seeing increasing value in food producing lands, waterfront properties, but stagnancy in the recreational lands sector. “Land use is also changing from the development of traditional single family homes to multi-family living units as has been the case in Europe. I also think over the next generation the mindset in this country will undergo a change from a society with an emerging socialist mentality where entitlement is uppermost in the minds of most, to one in which the future is tied to an individual’s willingness to work hard to achieve whatever he or she seeks. That is precisely what I see, and appreciate in the young people who compete at the Polk County Fair and through organizations such as 4-H and FFA. If you put forth the effort, there’s no limit to what you can achieve,” he said. While he may be one of those fast-talking auctioneers, Marty Higgenbotham is also a genuine gift of many dimensions to his family, profession and the community. •

Photo from Higgenbotham Auctioneers W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

T

he Florida sunchoke, also known as the Jerusalem artichoke, is an interesting tuber vegetable with an equally fascinating name. Neither an artichoke nor from Jerusalem, this vegetable is in the same family as the sunflower and has been grown for centuries by the American Indians. Hardy and easy to grow, Jerusalem artichokes are grown in Florida and in many other states around the country. Popular varieties include French Mammoth White, Golden Nugget, Smooth Garnet, and Fuseau. These varieties differ in length, color, and taste. Sunchokes resemble bulbous ginger roots in appearance, and they taste like a cross between a potato and water chestnut. They can be prepared the same way potatoes are, but taste nuttier and slightly sweeter than potatoes. One of the most remarkable features of this tuber is its high concentration of inulin (not to be confused with insulin). A type of carbohydrate, inulin passes through the body without being metabolized for energy, so inulin does not raise blood glucose levels or contribute to calories as other starches do.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Jerusalem artichokes are comprised of water, inulin, fiber, and plenty of vitamins and minerals. This vegetable is also a great vegetarian source of iron. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one cup of raw, sliced sunchoke (150g) contains 117 calories, 3 g protein, 0.02 g fat, 26 g carbohydrate, and 2.4 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 28% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for iron, 20% for thiamin, 18% for potassium, 12% for phosphorus, and 10% for vitamin C, copper, niacin, and dietary fiber. A single serving also contains plentiful amounts of magnesium, folate, riboflavin, and vitamin B6. 38

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INULIN Jerusalem artichokes are one of the richest natural sources of the soluble fiber, inulin which comprises about 75% of the carbohydrates in this tuber. Other plant sources of inulin include onions, jicama, garlic, banana, and agave. Since the body cannot digest inulin as it does other carbohydrates, the enzymes in your gut digest it. Inulin is considered a probiotic because it increases the beneficial bacteria in your gut, which may improve bowel function. Notably, this type of carbohydrate does not raise blood glucose, a consideration for people with diabetes. Calcium absorption is improved when eaten with foods containing inulin. This soluble fiber also decreases total cholesterol and triglycerides, aids in weight loss, and reduces constipation. THIAMIN Jerusalem artichokes are a fantastic source of thiamin, with a one cup serving providing one fifth of your daily needs. This B vitamin plays a vital role in the proper functioning of muscles and the nervous system. It helps to convert carbohydrates into energy for the body to function and is needed for multiple enzymatic reactions. Thiamin aids in the flow of electrolytes through nerve and muscle cells, and is required for the production of stomach acid, which is needed for proper digestion. Since this vitamin is water soluble, it’s not stored in the body and needs to be replenished regularly with foods rich in thiamin. POTASSIUM A single serving of Florida sunchokes contains 18% of your daily potassium needs. This important mineral promotes healthy heart functioning and protects against high blood pressure. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance, aids in muscle contraction, and helps transmit nerve impulses. This mineral is also critical in maintaining cell membranes, and balances

with other minerals in the blood to regulate heartbeat and blood pressure. Most vegetables and fruits, such as sunchokes, are a rich source of potassium.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Choose sunchokes that are firm and free of decay or wet spots. They can be refrigerated for up to several weeks, or they can be simply left in the ground until ready to use. Rinse and scrub under running water to clean before use. Peeling is optional but unnecessary, and much of the fiber is found in the peel.

HOW TO ENJOY Jerusalem artichokes are very versatile and can be enjoyed raw, cooked, or pickled. Raw sunchokes are nutty and slightly sweet, much like water chestnuts. They can be sliced or grated into salads or sandwiches. Sunchokes are similar to potatoes when cooked, and they can be sautéed, steamed, roasted, baked, or fried. Here are more ways to enjoy this nutritious vegetable: • Slice and serve with crudités in a veggie platter. • Dice and mix into tuna or chicken salad. • Slice and stir-fry with other vegetables. • Roast in the oven after tossing with olive oil, salt and pepper. • Bake whole, then mash as you would with potatoes. • Steam and then puree into soup. • Grate and use for hash browns, dumplings, or potato pancakes Fresh Florida sunchokes are in their prime during the winter months. Enjoy more of this delicious, nutritious vegetable today! SELECTED REFERENCES http://www.harvesttotable.com http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ http://www.sunchokes.net http://www.hort.purdue.edu W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


4-H Youth Development Program Holds 2012 State Marine Ecology Event

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he 4-H State Marine Ecology Event (MEE) was held Saturday morning, December 1, 2012 at the Osceola County Extension Office in Kissimmee. The MEE is a contest in which youth are judged on their knowledge of marine and coastal plants, animals, and ecosystems. In one section of the contest, youth go on a “scavenger hunt” and match written clues to specimens on tables. The final section of the contest includes a multiple-choice "test" to assess what youth know about marine science and Florida’s coastal ecosystems. In order to prepare for the competition, members of the Polk County Sea Stars 4-H Club spent many hours studying together and individually and even visited the Sebastian Inlet and other nature centers. This year there were approximately 78 youth, ranging in age from 8 to 18 years old, competing from 12 counties in both teams and as individuals. Polk County 4-H had 15 participants who took home the following prizes: first place senior team, second place intermediate team, second place junior team, second place senior individual, and third place intermediate individual. Their hard work was well rewarded! The 4-H Program thanks the following for their ongoing support and assistance with the MEE - Florida Sea Grant, Florida Aquarium, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and the Florida Museum of Natural History. We also thank the Osceola County Extension and the Kissimmee Valley Livestock Show and Fair for their continued support and use of their wonderful facilities! Last but not least, a very special thank-you goes to all those who volunteered in teaching youth about marine ecology and helping during the event. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Make Jewel Candy By Sean Green

Materials: Cooking Pot Non-stick cooking spray a candy thermometer Pyrex measuring cup Hard Candy Molds Ingredients: Liquid Food Coloring Candy Flavoring Oils Light Corn Syrup Granulated White Sugar Water

PREP FIRST: Producing and consuming candy has been a natural activity for human beings for thousands of years, in fact, the origins of candy represent a key technology in the history of agriculture. Today candy is made from processed sugar, and is valued as a recreational food, its history, however, may surprise you. Ancient civilizations coated fruits and flowers with honey to preserve them. Because of its high sugar concentration, and its natural ability to absorb moisture, bacteria were unable to survive thus beginning one of the earliest methods of food preservation. In addition to the benefit of food preservation, early civilizations used candy as a form of medicine. Digestive problems were common in the Middle Ages because the food consumed was rarely fresh. Candies made from spices and sugar adorned the tables of only the wealthiest to calm the digestive system and sooth the throat. North American colonists learned that Native Americans had been tapping trees for sap and boiling the sap into maple syrup and maple sugar for hundreds of years, the technology shared by the Native Americans soon became a colonial staple food. By the 17th century, boiled sugar candies (hard candies) became all the rage in England and the American colonies and by the mid 1800’s over 400 factories in the United States were producing candy.

Calibrate your candy thermometer. Bring a pot of water to a boil (212 °F at sea level). When the water is boiling, make note of the temperature difference between the water you are boiling and 212 °F. If your thermometer reads 220°F when the water boils, there is a difference of (+8°F) so you should add 8°F to the recipes target temperature Spray the molds with the non-stick cooking spray (thin coat without letting it puddle) Cover the work area with aluminum foil near the pot – (1 sheet for candy molds, 1 sheet for measuring cup.) Stir together everything except the flavoring oil, mix the color in well. Clip the candy thermometer to the pot, making sure it does not touch the bottom. Turn the burner on high (do not leave unattended). Let the sugar boil to target temperature As Soon as the mixture reaches the target temperature: • Remove the thermometer • Pour the mixture into the measuring cup Don’t panic, you have time, the mixture actually pours better after a minute or two of cooling. Add flavoring oil, (stir quickly but carefully)

This month’s activity was intended to supplement the article on the Jewel Caterpillar, but no caterpillar candy molds could be found. Not all is lost, everything happens for a reason. Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and this is a great activity to make sweet jewels for that someone special. In addition to creating a beautiful treat, a little research will reveal some healthful ingredient options for your candies, for example; peppermint oil not only helps sooth an upset stomach, but is also effective for killing germs and mint has been linked to an increases in short-term memory, heart rate, and the amount of oxygen in the brain. Experiment with ingredients and color, children can participate with close supervision and will learn measurement skills along the way. 40

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The mixture will be very easy to pour for 5 or 6 minutes, more than 8 or 9 minutes, it’ll be too thick to pour. Try to avoid dripping between the mold pieces, it will make the candy difficult to separate. Let the candy cool for 10-15 minutes and remove it from the mold by flexing the mold. The candy will be oily from the non stick spray which will prevent them from sticking together. Confectioners’ sugar or powdered sugar can be used to coat the candy if desired. Store the candy in an airtight container such as a zip lock bag.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


RESEARCHERS

PINPOINT

CULPRITS IN

Grapefruit DRUG INTERACTIONS

By Tom Nordlie

T

he quest to develop a grapefruit hybrid that will not interact with medication has taken a step forward, as researchers pinpoint compounds most responsible for the problem, a University of Florida citrus breeder says.

varieties of pummelo that have been shown to have low furanocoumarin content and can transmit the trait to their offspring.

The data were published in the December 2012 issue of the journal Xenobiotica.

In the current study, researchers investigated the effects of furanocoumarin compounds, testing each one to determine the amount required to slow the enzyme reaction by 50 percent. The results showed that a handful of furanocoumarins had the strongest effect.

Scientists have been aware of the so-called “grapefruit juice effect” since 1989. Compounds in the fruit called furanocoumarins inhibit the action of an enzyme that breaks down certain medications in the human digestive system.

More importantly, juice samples from 40 different hybrids and their parents were tested directly for their overall effect on enzyme activity, and one of the selected hybrids approved for impending release, known as UF 914, was among the samples with the lowest effect.

The phenomenon poses a health risk because it can produce unexpectedly high levels of these medications in a patient’s bloodstream. Doctors, pharmacists and prescription drug labels warn patients to avoid grapefruit and related products under these circumstances.

Gmitter said further study is needed to learn how low furanocoumarin levels must be to reduce the interaction risk.

The phenomenon is a disappointment for fans of the tart treat, but Fred Gmitter, a faculty member at UF’s Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred, is part of a team working to address the problem by developing a hybrid between grapefruit and selected

Other members of the research team included David Greenblatt, Yanli Zhao, Michael Hanley and Jerold Harmatz of Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center in Boston; Chunxian Chen of the Lake Alfred center and Paul Cancalon of the Florida Department of Citrus in Lake Alfred. .•

OUR SERVICES • Social Security Disability • Supplemental Security Income: Children and Adults • Initial Applications Reconsideration • Hearing with Judge

• Wills • Power of Attorney • Estate Planning • Trusts • Guardianships • Adoptions Charles L. Carlton

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TOLL FREE 1. 800.315.4590 863. 688.5700 *The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisments. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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By Sean Green

A Closer Look

Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa)

Jewel Catepillar It’s time once again to celebrate a new beginning. I hope you have all had a terrific holiday season and can reflect on this past year with gratitude. Stories and icons of transformation make it easy for some to cast away the past as little more than an ugly memory with anticipation of a more beautiful future. Some of the stories many of us grew up with support the notion that whence we came is less astounding than whither we go. Nature provides evidence that beauty is sometimes expressed in the preparation for transformation and not always restricted to its results. This month, we take a closer look at one cool cat (caterpillar), notorious for its spectacular beauty (before transformation). The Tropical Slug Caterpillar Moth (Dalceridae) is a small family of moths with 84 known species, most of which are found in tropical rainforests of the Neotropic ecozone. This family of moths, along with two similar taxa is collectively called slug moths or slug caterpillars describing their resemblance to slugs. Until recently, these insects did not get much exposure beyond the likes of National Geographic, and Scientific American publications. One species in particular, the Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa) has become a hit after amateur nature photographer Gerardo Aizpuru submitted his photographs to Project Noah, a citizen science community organization backed by National Geographic. The Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa) is native to the rainforests of Mexico. It’s most striking characteristic is the transparent, glasslike appearance of its body making it resemble a jewel. It is not the only species in the family 44

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Jewel Catepillar Moth

Spun Glass Slug

with these characteristics, but it may be the most colorful. Little is known about the Jewel Caterpillar and some of our understanding is the result of studies of similar species within the family (Dalceridae). It is believed that Dalcerides ingenita is the only Dalceridae species native to the United States and studies of D. ingenita revealed that adults are active from April to September producing two broods, the first persisting until the end of June and the second from July to September.

that a Neotropic ecozone of tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests are needed to support this caterpillar and South Florida is a Neotropic ecozone with moist broadleaf forests. We know that this caterpillar feeds on mangrove and the Florida Everglades is the most extensive continuous system of mangroves in the world supporting red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle), black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) and white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa). There are certainly other factors to consider, but there is at least a basis for possibility.

Nothing was known about the chemistry or function of the distinctive gelatinous coating of Dalceridae until the late 1980s when scientists proposed that the coating may serve as a defense function. Staged encounters between dalcerid caterpillars and ants demonstrated that when ants attacked the caterpillars, the jelly-like coating would stick to the ants mandibles making the attack difficult, and in some cases, the ants antenna would get stuck in the coating. Scientists observed ants that had previously attacked the caterpillar actively avoided them in subsequent encounters. This strategy alone provides a significant reduction in the number of natural enemies the caterpillar must endure to reach adulthood. Coloration is a common defense mechanism for all caterpillars, Dalceridae are believed to change their color scheme with each growth period (instar) which just makes the caterpillar that much more exciting, although it makes identification in the field more difficult. Although the odds of seeing one of these fascinating caterpillars in Florida are slim, it may be worth a shot to try. We know

JANUARY 2013

If Dalceridae can’t be found in South Florida, The Limacodidae family, one of the other two taxa of slug moths that were mentioned earlier can be found. The spun glass slug moth (Isochaetes beutenmuelleri) ranges from New York to Florida and west to Colorado and Texas and it is a year-round resident here. The spun glass slug moth can be found on the underside of beech and various oak trees, keep in mind that these are stinging caterpillars, if you intend to look for them caution will need to be exercised. Adults will be active from June to August and there will be a much better chance of finding these anywhere in Florida than finding Dalceridae. Both the eggs and the caterpillar will have a flattened appearance. Eggs may be found in either clusters or singly, and will be transparent enough to watch the larva developing inside. The caterpillars have suckers instead of prologs and use a lubricant made of liquefied silk to slide their way to a food source. Cocoons are hardened and the adults emerge from a small round hatch after metamorphosis. It’s not too late in the year to see caterpillars, Enjoy! • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com JANUARY 2013

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Profile for Berry Publications, Inc

In The Field Polk edition  

agriculture magazine in Polk County, FL

In The Field Polk edition  

agriculture magazine in Polk County, FL

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