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®

Contents

VOL. 6 • ISSUE 12

Cover Story Cliff Lightsey

Page 34 Cover Story Photos by Lacey Waters

Master Gardener

Page 10 From the Farm to the Table

Page 12 Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

Page 14 Support Good Kids

Page 16 Polk County Sheriff’s Office

Page 18 Burning to Help

Page 20

POLK COUNTY

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831-9005 OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Charles Clark (863) 412-8349 cclark@expoco.com Vice President - Dave Tomkow (863) 665-5088 cattlemanslivetock@earthlink.net Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch (863) 425-1121 jbunch@agriumretail.com Al Bellotto - (863) 581-5515 Ray Clark - (863) 683-8196 rclark@tampabay.rr.com L.B. Flanders, DVM - (863) 644-5974 Dewey Fussell - (863) 984-3782 Mike Fussell - (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@verizon.net David McCullers - (863) 528-1195 Moby Persing - (863) 528-4379 Ned Waters - (863) 698-1597 watersn@doacs.state.fl.us J.B. Wynn - (863) 581-3255 jbwynn29@gmail.com Alternate - Howard Yates 2501 Arbuckle Lane Frostproof, FL 33843-9647 Standing Committee Chairs: Membership - J.B. Wynn

Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22 Would You Eat Pink Slime?

Page 28 Education and Fun at the Lake

Page 30

Events - Kevin Fussell (863) 412-5876 Rodeo - Fred Waters (863) 559-7808 watersf@doacs.state.fl.us Cattlewomen - President Marjorie Wood (863) 660-4137 onnie397@aol.com Extension - Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. - Sgt. Howard Martin

Recipes

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt

Did you hear about the United States Department of Agriculture’s gaff over Meatless Monday? Some poor soul had the nerve to suggest that the USDA’s cafeteria participate in Meatless Monday. Yep, really. I saw the briefest of notes on this in a local paper and had to investigate it more. Here’s what I found: An internal memo at USDA suggested: "One simple way to reduce your environmental impact while dining at our cafeterias is to participate in the 'Meatless Monday' initiative http://www.meatlessmonday.com/. … How will going meatless one day of the week help the environment? The production of meat, especially beef (and dairy as well), has a large environmental impact. …. Because Meatless Monday involves only one day a week, it is a small change that could produce big results. Did you notice that our cafeterias have tasty meatless options? So you can really help yourself and the environment while having a good vegetarian meal!” Of course after the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Texas agriculture commission Todd Staples, among others, put in their two cents worth, the USDA issued the following via Twitter: “U SDA MT @usdapress: U SDA does not endorse Meatless Monday. Statement on U SDA site posted w/ o proper clearance. It has been removed / / @FarmB ureau”. What does this tell us? Would you like to be a part of an organization that will stand up for your rights as a rancher? Take action and become part of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association. They will be your legislative liaison and ensure that your voice is heard. Once again, a big Thank You to our advertisers. You allow us to continue to cover what is growing! We appreciate each and every one of you.

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Polk County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association & Florida Citrus Mutual. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com, or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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EDITOR Patsy Berry OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton José Mendoza CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey Lacey Waters STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Dag-Burn-It In the article from the July issue on page 18, the Florida Forest Service’s name was listed incorrectly. We apologize for any confusion!

Index of Advertisers Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ........................23 Arrington Body Shop, Inc. ...........9 Ballclover ...................................19 Broke & Poor ............................31 Carlton & Carlton, PA ..............43 Cecil Breeding Farms .................41 Chemical Containers..................44 Choo Choo Lawn Equipment .2 & 47 Circle Bar J Feed & Tack.............5 County Line Road Auction ........13 Discount Metals.........................15 Ellison RBM Inc. .......................13 Farm Credit ...............................26 Fields Equipment Co. Inc.............7 Florida Farm & Ranch Supply.............................19 Florida Dept. of Agriculture.......17 Florida Mineral & Salt ..............39 Fred’s Market.............................15 Froto Recycling ................24 & 25 Grove Equipment .............19 & 31 Helena Chemical-Tampa..............9 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc. .......44 International Market World.........5 John Locke Painting, Inc............48 Key Plex.....................................40 Lacey Waters Photography.........19 Lightsey Cattle Co. ......................9 Malissa Crawford ......................21 Mark Smith Excavating .............21 Mosaic .......................................38 Parkesdale..................................11 Pathway .....................................36 Polk County Cattlemen’s Association ...............4 Polk Equine, PL .........................29 Payne Air-Conditioning..............13 Repair Solutions...........................7 Ring Power Corporation............29 Southeastern Hay, Inc. .................3 Southeastern Septic, LLC ...........43 Southwestern Produce................27 Stephanie Humphrey..................29 Stingray Chevrolet .....................32 The Bug Man...............................7 Weather King .............................13

We have moved our main office to better serve you. Our new address is: 1501 S. Alexander Street, Suite 102 • Plant City, Florida 33563 Our phone number is still the same - 813.759.6909 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2012

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The summer dinner was well attended and moved along

Dusty Holley, the new Field Services Director for the FCA

at a quick pace even though there were many events on

was introduced. Having a long standing family interest in

the agenda. Hope you were able to attend and gather

the cattle business and being raised in Polk County, he is

some useful information as well as visit with friends from

eager to help with any issues of concern. After his

across the county.

remarks he introduced Ashley Hughes, Director of Beef Marketing and Production for the Florida Beef Council.

The Cattlewomen did their usual great job of decorating

She gave us the history of the program, how the finances

the meeting room. Their portion of the program was well

are divided among the states, what type programs they

received as our Sweetheart presented the annual scholar-

offer and some of the organizations they work with to

ships. The cake auction went well as Bern Kinard kept

promote our beef products.

everyone in good spirits as he coaxed the audience to dig deeper and support this worthwhile event.

Lauren Lewis was the final speaker. Lauren is heading up the new four year agriculture program that will be

We tried improving the problem of being able to hear in

offered at Warner College in Lake Wales. This is going to

the meeting. We borrowed a sound system from Kenny

be a hands on multi-disciplinary program that will

Rainey to try and carry the sound to the back of the

provide advanced instruction to students in many facets

room. I am not sure how successful this was. Let us

of the agriculture industry.

know if it didn't work and we will continue to work on this problem.

Charles Clark Charles Clark Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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• Peter the Great taxed people with beards. • Gibraltar was named after a slave. • Diamonds will break if hit with a hammer. • There are more than 20,000 brands of beer. • More movies are produced in India than Hollywood. • The first credit card was issued in 1951. • The Tower of Pisa has never been straight. • Paul Revere never finished his ride. • Five billion crayons are produced every year. • The first submarine was designed in 1578. • Half of the worldʼs population has seen at lease one 007 movie. • Expresso has less caffeine than a cup of coffee. • If you give flowers on Motherʼs Day from a florists in the United States, itʼs likely that the flowers you get were grown in either California or Colombia. • The first known government sports organization in the country was the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation. • Thereʼs a national championship for pigeon breeding. • Did you know that the rooster crows at dawn? • Roosters cannot crow if they fully extend their necks. • The Underside of horseʼs hoof is called the frog.

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By Debra Howell o you secretly crave a little pond or water feature in your home landscape? If you have a low spot in your yard where water collects during rain events (and who doesn’t?) then maybe that’s just the place to begin.

D

Even if you have a well-established landscape, the addition of a small bog, swale or raingarden, plus the aquatic plants you’ll use for the project, will add new visual interest to your yard. You probably already know where the lowest spot in your yard lies, but this may not necessarily be the ultimate choice. Runoff and debris may end up at that spot. So let’s go with the penultimate spot. Penultimate means “next to the ultimate,” or in this case, next to the lowest spot.

The lowest point in my yard apparently happens to be my carport, as the rainwater literally flows in sheets from the street down my unpaved driveway into my carport and utility room. Tropical Storm Debby (no relation) found me in a driving squall hacking out a ditch to shunt off the encroaching rainwater. The difference between a raingarden and a bog garden is that raingardens are pervious (water soaks through) and can tolerate very wet conditions, but normally will only hold water for about a day. A bog will normally stay moist and muddy most of the time, so make use of an existing sunny, wet area on your property. Consider using road ditches, gutter runoff areas, muddy areas or pond edges. My friend, Leta, and her gardener, Talo, made use of a swale-like ditch or drainage area along the edge of her beautiful

yard to cultivate sugar cane. The cane has a lovely aquatic look and really enhances the depressed area. In addition, the cane will soon be ready for a “syrup sop”! In nature, bogs are important because water leaches through sand, gravel and plant roots to filter sediments and excess nutrients before it re-enters the water cycle. A garden hose comes in handy for laying out the configuration of your bog garden. It’s flexible and easy to conform to most any shape. To make a bog garden, you’ll need to excavate a shallow depression in your preselected spot of about a foot deep and place a good quality pond liner in the bottom of the depression. It is essential to poke large holes along the sides of the liner thereby allowing for drainage of your bog garden. This is a must, as the plants won’t do well in stagnant water. Pile some of the excess soil on the side of the garden farther from the flow of water. This small berm will help stop quickly flowing water. For the edges, you’re going to need a soil medium of 80 percent coarse peat moss and 20 percent sharp sand. You may also use gravel, river rocks, or native rock to lend ambience to the area. The lush vegetation afforded by your bog will provide shelter and habitat for a large range of wildlife and butterflies, as well as Hummingbirds. Make sure that your plant choices are appropriate, and that none could be deemed invasive. By using plants of varying heights, sizes, textures and colors, you provide the vertical layering necessary for wildlife and for eye-appeal. An excellent example of a bog garden may be seen at the county extension office at 1702 South Highway 17 in Bartow. This is a recently completed project undertaken by Master Gardener Mike Howell and Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Agent, Anne Yasolonis.

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Marginal plants are those that enjoy wet or damp feet. Some interesting and appropriate plants for the marginal zone include Pickerelweed, Spider lilies, Pine hibiscus, Taro, Lobellias in red or blue, Irises in blue or yellow and Joe Pye weed. Now I didn’t say these plants were going to be easy to procure, but I have faith you’ll do your homework. Plants like Golden Club prefer the deep mud, as do amphibians. Amphibians are critical as an “indicator species.” An indicator species is one which is sensitive to the environment changes, even subtle ones. When these types of species begin to wane, there’s trouble in Paradise, meaning we’re poisoning our environment. A small bog garden may be cultivated in a container – For real! Using a soil medium of the same type previously described, prepare this medium in a pot at least 8 inches deep and 12 inches wide. Personally, I’d use a larger one, but not much deeper. You’ll need to provide a saucer for your garden to keep it from drying out. It is in this manner that I have been able to grow a Horsetail rush that I purchased many years

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ago at Kanapaha Gardens in Gainesville. The rush, an aquatic plant, has been transplanted twice and is now doing quite well in a plastic pot of about 12 deep and 30 inches in diameter. I’ll admit it hasn’t been easy to keep the rush hydrated, but the plant is precious to me, and is a study in endurance. Horsetail is also called “scouring rush” because in Colonial times it was used to scour pots with the silica sand that it naturally contains. Remember that bogs and raingardens are not ponds. Ponds are more involved and will most assuredly involve a pumping system. Now here’s the pitch – on Thursday, September 6 at 10:00 a.m., the Master Gardener’s Speaker’s Bureau will provide a video called “Landscaping for WildlifeProviding Water,” which includes a section on constructing a pond and waterfall feature in your landscape. This is our monthly gardening series presented at Mackey Gardens in Lake Alfred. Instead of becoming frustrated with rainwater runoff the next time it rains, try using your ditch, swale or boggy spot for a miniwildlife sanctuary and revel in the natural, serene landscape which results from your efforts. •

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“Farmer Gil” Gil Diagneau

From the

Frankie Ambrose Bartender at La Porta Rossa

Farm

By Libby Hopkins

to the

Table

P

eople have a love affair with food. We love all kinds from junk to healthy, we don’t discriminate when it comes to food. But does food love us back? We would like to think it does but in reality it may be bad for us. Every day in the news we hear stories, like the one out of Scarobough, Maine where Hannaford Supermarkets are alerting consumers that a company is voluntarily recalling 29,339 pounds of ground beef that may contain salmonella. Each year 9 million shipments of food products enter the United States. Of these about 20 thousand are actually inspected. Vegetables sprayed with chemicals outlawed for use in our country are imported from all over the world without any restrictions. Consumers and restaurants owners are working toward finding ways to get healthier and chemical-free foods on their plates. We want to know where our food is coming from and how it’s produced. This new movement is called “From the Farm to the Table.” This movement works to promote locally based agriculture through education, community outreach and networking. It gives marketing opportunities to farmers and it encourages family farming. Gil Diagneau owns Go Natural Organics in Lakeland. He runs his business like a Co-Op of sorts. Members are required to make $100 deposit, which will become their credit balance. They are allowed to pick $10 to $20 (or reasonable amount) of vegetables per week until they use up their credit balance. At that point members have the option to join again. In essence, with their deposit, Diagneau plants the crops for them. Some of Diagneau’s members are restaurant owners and they come to get fresh fruits and vegetables from his farm. “There has been a real interest growing in the community over the last year or so about where their food is coming from and how it’s produced,” Diagneau said. “They want to make sure they are getting food that is not being treated with harmful toxins and chemicals.” Chef Patrick Rene Schaefer and his wife, Lisa, are members of Diagneau’s farm. The couple own La Porta Rossa Bistro in Lakeland. Their bistro has incorporated what’s called SLO movement at their establishment. SLO means slow food and

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it’s an international movement founded by Carlo Petrini in 1986. It’s promoted as an alternative to fast food and it strives to preserve traditional and regional cuisine and encourages farming of plants, seeds and livestock characteristics of the local ecosystem. The concept spawned SLO, Sustainable, Local and Organic wherever possible. The bistro’s sister business, the Red Door Wine Market, also implemented SLO and is a member of Digneau’s farm as well. “Our SLO business practices are reflected in our food and beverage offerings,” Lisa Schaefer said. “Our corporate philosophy is such that we are rapidly becoming inextricably linked to our community.” Frankie Ambrose is the bartender at La Porta Rossa and he is one of the “Top Five Bartenders” in Polk County. He believes in “old school bartending,” which is making drinks with fresh fruits and vegetables with the proper bartending tools. “I go to the market every day and buy fresh fruits and vegetables,” Ambrose said. “I make up my own concoctions from fresh squeezed juices that I squeezed myself.” On any given night at the bistro, all six of Ambrose’s seats at his bar are full with customers waiting to taste one of his fresh creations. He said the food served at the bistro is not only healthy, it’s sexy. Chef Schaefer feels using local produce and meats is vital because they taste better and that is most important to him. “For me, it’s the ingredients,” Chef Schaefer said. “They are healthier and the flavor is there because the last thing I want is when I taste the food, it has no flavor.” He thrives on giving his customers great quality food at a good price point because he has gotten most of his ingredients from local farmers. He doesn’t have to pay extra money to have food shipped in from somewhere else. Chef Schaefer feels that the “Farm to the Table” movement will become the standard with more restaurants in the future. “I think it’s going to be a huge thing because if you look at current trends, everything is turning around. People are going back to sitting down at the table and enjoying a fresh and healthy meal.” La Porta Rossa is located at 1833 E. Edgewood Drive in Lakeland. If you would like to learn more about SLO or take a look at their menu, you can visit them on the web at www.lprlakeland.com or call 863-688-9616. Go Natural Organics is located at 2035 Edgewood Drive in Lakeland. If you would like to learn more about the farm, you can visit its website at www.gonaturalorganicsinc.com or call 863-272-0740. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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by Captain Woody Gore

L

ike us, comfort is paramount to all species and water temperature is a major factor because of its governing effect on bodily functions. Ever questioned why some fish congregate in a particular area one day and completely disappear the next? There could be different reasons fish relocate, but the most overlooked is probably water temperature. Whereas almost all fish are cold-blooded, weather and water temperature inevitably controls their activity, feeding patterns, and where you find them. Every species has particular temperature ranges they tolerate better than others and within that range there is a comfort zone where they’re most comfortable. Every species has a preferred temperature range and are most active within that range. When temperatures exceed or drop below that particular range, they often become non-responsive and lethargic. Learning the tolerances of those species will go a long way toward helping you choose the right location, time of day, and the right baits and lures. For example, water temperatures dropping in the low 60s puts Spotted Sea Trout in high spirits, but becomes very perplexing to Snook, Redfish, and Tarpon. On the other hand, temperature in the 80s is fine for Snook, but in the high 80s Redfish,

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Tarpon and particularly Sea Trout start getting a little uncomfortable. When water temperatures reach into the 90s, as is often the case in Tampa Bay, start looking for deeper cooler waters. How fish react to today’s temperature often depends on yesterday’s temperature and even some days before. Gradual temperature changes over several days or weeks have different effects as opposed to rapid temperature changes. Slower changes usually result in better long-term fishing, while rapid changes sometimes motivate only a strong short-term feeding rush. With clear skies and hot summer days the suns thermal energy quickly penetrates shallow water allowing dark and grassy bottoms to become warmer than the white sandy ones. The difference between dark and white bottoms may only be one or two degrees but it can make a difference when you’re looking for happy fish. Inexpensive sinking swimming pool thermometers are available for use in finding the different ranges at different levels.

shores and oyster bars on incoming tides. Live bait normally produces good catches along with cut baits. Early morning artificial lures on the grass flats and around the mangroves will offer some excellent excitement as well. Work both incoming and outgoing tides. SNOOK – STILL CLOSED… Snook fishing will continue strong this month with some larger fish still in the passes and on the beaches. Expect those near the passes to congregate near the deeper holes and back eddies. They often appear to have lockjaw but patience seems to pay off when looking for larger fish. Snook of all sizes like dead bait, especially the big ones. Simply cut the tail off a threadfin and let it lay on the bottom. Artificial lures usually produce some awesome action and once you pass the learning curve, tossing plastics to waiting snook can be loads of fun and excitement.

Spotted Sea Trout

LET’S GO FISHING! REDFISH - August should see more redfish action around the Tampa Bay area. This past month we could find lots of single and a few small schooling fish, but getting them to take live bait with any consistency was often difficult. We seemed to have better luck using cut bait on the bottom with the rod in the rod holder. We also had decent success using shrimp around mangroves and docks. The bay area notoriously produces good catches of redfish, you just need to find the ones ready to eat. Redfish will push into the Mangrove lined

SPOTTED SEA TROUT – Tampa Bay Trout have come back like gangbusters. It’s not unusual to catch a limit of nice 18 to 19 inch trout for dinner on any grass flat provided you’re on good incoming or outgoing tides. Trout fishing is always fun W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


especially when you find some larger fish willing to eat. If you’re free-lining white or shrimp and the current is moving, you might need to add # 5 split shot to keep the bait down. In water five feet or shallower try a popping cork, but again you might want to add a little weight to keep the bait down. TARPON - Tarpon fishing on the beaches has been really good but the storm and full moon pushed many off shore to spawn. Now they are heading back. The first week of July my son Capt. Mike Gore, spotted a huge school about nine miles off shore heading for St. Petersburg. MACKEREL & BLUEFISH - Tampa Bay has its share of mackerel and bluefish and fishing this month should be great. Just look for schools of threadfins, put out a chum bag and hold onto your rod and reel. The real bite is off shore. The mackerel will actually wear you out to the point of putting your rod and reel down and taking a seat. For some exciting top water action try tail hooking your bait and let it work against the current. This forces the bait to the top for some great top water strikes.

Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing 813-477-3817 Captain Woody Gore is the areas top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, and Bradenton for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

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Support Good Kids Polk County Jr. Cattlemen’s Association By Ginny Mink

M

otivation can some times be quite a foreign word. There are an infinite number of things that stifle even the greatest of ideas. Unfortunately, our country has seen a great decline in the realm of motivation as it applies to our young people. Sadly, we live in a rewards-without-effort era. So, when an organization seems to be sitting on its brakes rather than utilizing the accelerator one would hardly suspect that a radical change would occur at the hands, and feet, of young people. Thankfully though, there are still kids out there who are motivated and aspiring to greatness. That’s what we found in the girls who are heading up the Polk County Jr. Cattlemen’s Association. Harley Zoeckler is the President of the organization and like her name implies, she’s roaring in positive directions. Harley has a passion for the beef industry and the drive to see the young people attached to it become successful. She says, “I’ve kinda been in the industry my whole life. My grandfather is Mack Paggett, he is a cattle rancher in Lake Wales and he has been for over 40 years. So, I’ve kind of grown up around the beef industry mainly. I enjoyed being able to be around my grandfather a lot. That was probably my most favorite thing about cows.” You can sense the tenderness in her voice when she talks about her grandfather. Family is very important to her. Harley was relatively young when she got her true start in agriculture. She says, “I started showing cows when I was 12. I really got my start in sixth grade when I joined FFA. Then I joined Jr. Cattlemen’s my freshman year of high school. So, I’ve been in it for five years.” Harley’s a recent high school graduate and she’s certainly not one of those kids who join organizations just to look good on their college applications. In fact, she says, “My second year of being a Polk County member I was elected Secretary of the Polk County Jr. Cattlemen’s Association. I’ve been a state Jr. Cattlemen’s officer for three years. I was Vice President, Treasurer and Ex-Officio. For the county, I’ve been Secretary and President for two years.” Certainly those titles look nice on her college applications even if that wasn’t what she was going for. Actually, Harley’s already been accepted to college and she explains, “I’m attending Warner University this fall. I’m studying agricultural studies. I’m probably going to get my certification in Ag education to be an Ag teacher.” Given her easy laughter and relational tone, there’s little doubt that she’ll be a big hit with her students. But for now, she’s really focused on reviving, and revving up, the Polk County Jr. Cattlemen’s. She says, “For the

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past couple of years our county hasn’t been real active, we haven’t done a lot. The National Cattlemen’s Convention is in Tampa February. It’s called the NCBA.” Harley is truly excited about this event and the ones to come. She continues, “We’re going to try to have a livestock judging team go to that. Three years ago our team marketing team got second place at state convention and that was really good for our county. We plan on having a team marketing and quiz bowl team at the Florida Cattlemen’s Convention in June.” With ambition emanating from her, it’s hard not to want to help. That said, Harley elaborates further on all their plans, “We’re having a back to school bash and we’re expecting about 30 people to be there. We’re having a bake sale at the National Day of the Cowboy at Eli’s Western Wear. We’re going to sell baked goods as a fundraiser. We’re trying to get more members and try to be more active. We just really need our county’s support. County dues are $10 and that includes a t-shirt. We meet once a month and every meeting we always have food and games and fun, they’re not boring, and we discuss whatever business we need to discuss.” Currently that business is centered on growing their organization. She backs her help requests with the following explanation, “All of the officers and our members are very passionate about the beef industry. Beef is a good product for you, it has tons of nutrients in it. The people who raise it are good family people, they work really hard. There are a lot of different things we get from beef besides meat, they’re called by-products. An ingredient in toothpaste comes from cows, our shoes, leather, comes from cows, that’s stuff we need in our everyday lives!” More important than her group’s knowledge about the industry though, she points out, “All the kids are good kids! We work hard and we just really love doing what we do. We need help to go to state and national convention. The kids really want to get recognized and noticed for doing stuff.” If her plea pulls on your heart strings consider offering your assistance. In closing she vehemently declares, “All I can say is, cattle ranchers help to feed America!” Thusly, anyone who supports that sentiment and would like to help Harley (and the other officers) pursue greatness, can contact her at: hmzoeckler@yahoo.com or polkjr.cattlemens@yahoo.com

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“Agricultural Watch" Program Sheriff Grady Judd

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he Polk County Sheriff's Office is a full service law enforcement agency serving Polk County Florida. Polk County is the fourth largest county in Florida with over 2,010 total square miles, of which 1,874.9 square miles is land area. And much of that land is agricultural property. Agricultural continues to be one of the largest industries in Polk County. According to the Polk County Farm Bureau, there are 626,634 acres of agricultural land in Polk County, with 3,114 farms, which uses 52 percent of Polk County’s over 2000 square miles. Polk’s agriculture businesses have an estimated $2.8 billion annual economic impact. Keeping that investment safe is a priority for PCSO Agricultural deputies. During 2011, the Agricultural deputies responded to 2,681 calls for service, which averages to be over seven calls each day of the year. And of those calls for service, PCSO Agricultural deputies made 60 arrests relating to trespassing on property. From January to June in 2012, Agricultural deputies have made 17 arrests for trespassing on property.

The PCSO recognized the need to allow deputies immediate access to landowner information to enforce a "zero tolerance" stance for crimes committed against agriculture. The “Agricultural Watch” Program has been embraced by the Florida Sheriff's Association as a model program on a statewide basis. The program was developed as a means to identify ownership of agriculture properties in Polk County. The program consists of a "No Trespassing By Order of Sheriff" sign listing the property/business owner's name and a code number. The code number displayed provides deputies on patrol instant access to owner information and the content of their agent agreements with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. Sales of the "Agriculture Watch" signs benefit the Polk County Sheriff's Office Explorer Post 900.

Lakeland’s 3rd Annual Warrior Walk

The Silent Drill Team came in just for this event from Washington D.C. and the releasing of the Doves by the Gold Star Families

Polk County Cattlewomen, Donna Smith and Jennifer Nall, participated in the 3rd annual Warrior Walk.

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o honor US Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines killed in action while serving during Operation Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan,

This program is open to all qualified Agribusinesses or persons whose interest is in, and limited to, agriculture related activities. Qualified participants may purchase the Department of Transportation grade metal signs, which are custom made to order for the participant. The signs can be purchased at a cost of only $13.91 each, including tax. If you are interested in participating in the program, please contact the Polk County Sheriff’s Office’s Agricultural Crimes Unit at 863.534.7205, or 863.298.6200. They will be glad to assist you or answer any questions you may have. •

the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of Polk County and the Polk County Veteran’s Council held a patriotic themed “Warrior Walk” around Lake Hollingsworth in Lakeland on July 28. The Warrior Walk began at the First Presbyterian Church on Lake Hollingsworth, and after a short ceremony, the walk was under way. Heading toward Florida Southern, the walk proceeded to the George Jenkins Field House where the USMC Silent Drill Platoon performed. After the performance the walk continued around the Lake. The Polk County Cattlewomen were in attendance wearing shirts designed for the occasion. • Photos: Courtesy of Donna Smith

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By Ginny Mink

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o matter how knowledgeable one might be in any given field, additional training and education is always the key to success. Thankfully, even in the agriculture industry there are organizations designed to offer farmers and ranchers training and assistance. According to Brandee Williams, a range land management specialist, “The Florida Grazing Land Coalition (FGLC) is a producer led organization that does a lot of training, education and outreach and it’s all based around topics that typical ranchers, or producers, deal with on a regular basis, like invasive weeds, feral hogs, prescribed burning and rotational grazing management.” While Brandee is employed by the National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), her position has her partnered with the FGLC. This is definitely her passion. She says, “I knew from an early age, like seven or eight, that I wanted to save the planet,” she chuckles. “I thought about environmental engineering but I wasn’t smart enough for that,” another laugh. “When I was in high school, I went to a ranch and wildlife academy, it was a week long youth camp. The people running it were from the NRCS. After that week long camp I decided that was really what I wanted to do. I enjoyed being outside and I didn’t really want to have a desk.” Brandee went to Texas Tech University and got a degree in environmental conservation. Upon graduation she was offered a

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job in Oklahoma working for the NRCS. She spent three and half years there before transferring to Florida. She’s been in her current position for the last five years. She says, “I cover 15-17 counties, my area’s pretty big for the stuff I do. Basically my job is just to write grazing plans for cattle so I work with some of the bigger ranches and things. We’re just here basically to help make ranchers lives a little easier.”

So, how do they achieve that, one might wonder? Brandee gives an example, “About three or four years ago we brought in Fred Provenza for a three day workshop and he taught us how to think in terms of animal behavior and training animals to do things they wouldn’t normally do. Animals think in terms of buffet when you send them out in the pasture and they eat their favorites and go down the line. Fred Provenza taught us how to shift that thinking of an animal into eating everything. He’s a big proponent of just training animals to eat what they don’t want to eat.”

While that might sound a lot like the cow whisperer mumbo jumbo, apparently it works because Brandee continues, “Out of that three day workshop, our current Chair, Buzz Eaves, did his own study. He began treating thistles with molasses. He would just go into a pasture and spray a little molasses on them and he trained his cows to eat thistles and then eventually the cows, no matter what age they were, would eat the thistles without molasses on them. So, he doesn’t struggle with thistle anymore in his pastures.” Perhaps this is something other ranchers will be interested in attempting. In addition to getting cattle to utilize all the greens in the fields, Brandee has another initiative she supports. She says, “In Oklahoma we had what we called prescribed burn associations. When I very first got here I wanted to get one started here in Florida. It’s a group of landowners from a particular area, say a county, and they get together to help each other out with the burning. They take the group, one has a tractor, one has a spray tank, one has three or four field hands, and they pool their time and effort, and resources and they take a lottery to burn each other’s land each year. Florida’s lucky because it has more burn days. They can help different agencies, like NRCS, we’re not allowed to burn but we can write a prescribed burn plan. The forest services can do burning but they already have their own land that they have to take care of. If the ranchers have their own coalition they can do their own burning and they don’t have to wait for a state or federal agency. We had a full W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


conference is that 50 percent of the speakers are landowners or producers, it’s not all academia. That’s kind of what makes this conference unique because its successes and failures are from the landowners’ perspective.” Given the nine year break between opportunities, this might very well be something to attend!

day workshop in March on different aspects of burning and we brought in John Weir. He is a research associate out of Oklahoma State University and he is kind of recognized as the guy who starts burn associations. He gets everyone excited. Hopefully we’ll have a burn association started, I’m hoping, in the next year.” If you’re a rancher maybe you’ll consider looking into starting a burn association in your area. No doubt Brandee will eagerly assist you in the endeavor.

If you’d like to find out more about what the FGLC does, there’s a wealth of information at: http:/ / www.ces.fau.edu/ fglc/ or if you’re interested in learning more about the GLCI, check out their website: http:/ / www.glci.org. You can find out conference information there as well. •

Putting animal behavior and prescribed burn training aside, Brandee continues, “The biggest thing we’re doing, the huge ta-da moment, is having a national conference with our parent association, the Grazing Land Conservation Initiative (GLCI), and it’s in Orlando, December 9-12. We’re having some pretty big people there who are going to be speakers: Fred Provenza, Don Ball, Garry Lacefield, Kit Pharo and Temple Grandin. The conference is only every three years and it rotates among three different sections. There’s the West and Central and then there’s the East. So the East only gets it every nine years. The best thing about this

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ne day last month I passed by “All A Bloom Florist” in downtown Plant City. While standing there looking I reflected back to when I was a boy and this location was a barbershop owned by Mike Sansone. Mike was an Italian immigrant that settled in Plant City just before World War I. He opened a barbershop but left to serve in the War. When he returned, Mike helped form the American Legion Post 26 in Plant City in 1919. The Post was later named Norman E. McLeod, who was Plant City’s first casualty of World War I, and with whom Mike Sansone served. During his time Mike Sansone was always working with the youth in Plant City (especially scouting) and the surrounding area. For his tireless effort for so many years the City Commission named the sports complex on north Park road in his honor. It seemed like yesterday that I would jump up in the chair at his barber shop and Mike would ask me if I was playing baseball, football or what ever sport was in season at the time. He had a couple of barbers that worked in his shop, too. Can’t remember their names, but I do remember the short, heavy set, bald-headed man was always talking about something. The barber had a man in overalls pushed back in the barber chair and started foaming his face for a shave. The man mentioned the problem he was having getting a close shave around his cheeks. “I have just the thing,” he said, as

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he turned around and picked up a small wooden ball off the shelf. “Just place this ball between your cheek and gum.” The man rolled his eyes and did as the barber said. After a couple of strokes the man under the lather said, “What if I swallow the ball?” “No problem,” he replied, “Just bring it back tomorrow like everyone else does.” Then there’s the story of the priest who went into a Washington, DC, barbershop, got his hair cut and asked how much he owed. “No charge, Father,” the barber said. “I consider it a service to the Lord.” When the barber arrived at his shop the next morning, he found a dozen small prayer booklets on the stoop along with a thank you note from the priest. A few days later a police officer came in. “How much do I owe you?” the cop asked after his haircut. “No charge, officer,” the barber answered. “I consider it a service to my community.” The next morning the barber found a dozen doughnuts on the stoop along with a thank you note from the police officer. A few days after that, a Senator walked in for a haircut. “How much do I owe you?” he asked afterward. “No charge,” the barber replied. “I consider it a service to my country.” The next morning when he arrived at the shop, the barber found a dozen Senators waiting on the stoop. Did you hear the story of a man and a little boy that entered a barbershop together? After the man received the full treatment - shave, shampoo and haircut, - he placed the boy in the chair. “I’m going to

AUGUST 2012

buy a green tie to wear at the party tonight,” he said. “I’ll be back in a few minutes.” When the boy’s haircut was completed the man still hadn’t returned. The barber said, “Looks like your daddy’s forgotten all about you.” “That wasn’t my daddy,” said the boy. “He just walked up, took me by the hand and said, “‘Come on, son, we’re gonna get a free haircut!’” Coleman Davis, owner of Badcocks in Plant City, told me about the time last year when he was returning from a furniture convention in Chicago. (This has nothing to do with a barbershop). Coleman said, “While waiting at the baggage return for my bags I checked my pockets, only to find I did not have my car keys. It was then I realized I must have left them in car. My flight arrived early and part of the luggage did not make the flight I was on. They advised me that the luggage would arrive on a later flight. Having plenty of time, I took the shuttle to the long term parking where I always parked.” He said, “Al, I checked the lot twice, and could not find my car. I immediately picked up my cell phone and called 911. When I got back to baggage return about 15 minutes later I decided to call Sue (his wife).” “This had to be the most difficult call I have ever made.” “Honey,” I said, “I left my keys in the car, and it has been stolen.” “There was a period of silence. I thought the call had been dropped. Then Sue said W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


in a very stern voice, “‘Coleman, I dropped you off at the Airport.’” “Oh yes, now I remember.” “Being somewhat embarrassed I said, ‘Well, do you mind coming over and picking me up?’ Sue replied, ‘I will as soon as I convince this policeman that I have not stolen your car!’” It has been sometime since I have had to take flight. However I spend some time on I-75 traveling to our place in Blairsville, Georgia. Recently I stopped at the rest area just over the Florida/Georgia line. Much to my surprise I found a clean cubicle and sat down. A few seconds later a voice from the next cubicle said, “Hi, how are you?” Embarrassed. I said. “I’m doing fine.” The voice said, “So what are you up to?” I said, “Just doing the same as you, sitting here!” Next he said, “Can I come over?” Annoyed, I replied, “I’m rather busy right now.” The voice next to me said, “Listen, I will have to call you back, there’s an idiot next door answering all my questions.” There are a few things I just don’t understand. How do those dead bugs get into those enclosed light fixtures? Why don’t

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you ever hear a father-in-law jokes? Why does a round pizza come in a square box? What disease did cured ham really have? Once you’re in heaven, do you get stuck wearing the clothes you were buried in forever? Why do men press harder on the TV remote control when they know the batteries are going dead? Why do people say they ’slept like a baby’ when babies wake up every two hours? If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, what is baby oil made from? Why is it that the Alphabet Song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star have the same tune? And why did you just try singing those two songs above? Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection? Why is it that no matter what color bubble bath you use the bubbles are always white? And Gail Lyons, why do banks charge a fee on ’insufficient funds’ when they know there is no money in the account? In closing, if you ever wondered how long a minute is, remember it depends on what side of the bathroom door you’re on. •

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lorida FFA recently celebrated 84 years of Competition, Leadership, and Service. 2012 marked an all time high membership level exceeding 16,000 members strong! During the last week of June Florida FFA held the Annual State Convention in Orlando, Florida. The week was filled with students competing in state contests, participating in workshops focused on building leadership skills, announcing the new District Officers and finally electing the new State Officers. During this past year, Shelby Oeserreicher served as the Area IV State Vice President. Shelby delivered a motivating retiring address that inspired many. She served Area IV exceedingly well and provided servant leadership during her year of service leaving a significant impact on the lives of so many students. State Convention is a week that I look forward to all year long. This being my final year as a High School FFA member made it even more special for me. I’ll never forget the moment when they started to announce the names of those who would make up the 2012-2013 Florida FFA State Officer Team. It was an almost electric mix of nervous energy, excitement, fear and anxiety. I had been working toward this moment for the past four years and I knew that this was my chance to live out my dream. There had been so much work, learning, growing, planning, screening, and campaigning invested to bring me to this moment in time. At the end of this very long and wonderful path, I had to believe that God had a special plan for my life that was uniquely mine. The moment came and they began to announce Area IV. There was an incredible amount of excitement built up and when they announced “from the West Orange FFA Chapter,” I knew right away, and it was okay too let out all of the excitement! I could hardly believe that it was real. In that moment my life changed in an irreversible way. I had just been given the opportunity to serve Area IV as a State Officer. It began starting to sink in when Shelby helped me put on my new Florida Association jacket. As your current Area IV State Vice President I am excited to build relationships, strengthen the leadership not only in our Area but all across the state of Florida, and help students grow. I have already started to learn and gather the tools to help me be the State Officer that Area IV deserves. My team and I attended NLCSO (National Leadership Conference for State Officers) in Asheville, NC. While we were there we learned how to be a stronger team, and work together productively at accomplish one common goal. We also learned the different steps of putting together a workshop or chapter program. While doing this we were able to learn from and collaborate with State Officers from other states including North Carolina and South Carolina. Right after NLCSO we came back to Gainesville for a week of Blast- Off training. During this training we learned how to best get things done on an individual basis such as writing speeches, delivering speeches, developing workshops, chapter programs, as well as etiquette. Here’s one of my favorite quotes: “Coming together is a beginning, keeping together is progress; working together is success.” – Henry Ford As we are all about to head back to school, that also mean that FFA activities will kick off. I hope that you will carry this quote with you throughout this coming year and that it will inspire you to serve, achieve and enjoy all the opportunities that Florida FFA provides to every Student. I believe in each chapter and in the ability of each member to reach your goals this year and that we will stand strong together. I’m looking forward to a great year and hope to see you soon.....

Katie Hutchinson

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By Bridget Carlisle, UF/IFAS Livestock Extension Agent with contributing information from Dr. Chad Carr, UF/IFAS Meat Science Specialist.

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es, I would! The media has brought much negative and untruthful attention to “Lean, Finely Textured Beef,” or what they have referred to as “pink slime.” One county commission, Miami-Dade, has even adopted a resolution against the use of the product in county government prepared meals and has encouraged other Florida counties to do the same. Unfortunately, being so far removed from where their food comes from, they failed to consider the facts about the product. According to Dr. Chad Carr, UF/IFAS Meat Science Specialist and Professor, there are two very similar finely-textured beef products which are available commercially, Beef Products Inc.’s (BPI) product, “Lean, Finely-Textured Beef” (LFTB), which accounts for the majority of this market, and Cargill’s product, “Finely-Textured Beef” (FTB). These or similar products have been available commercially within the U.S. for more than 30 years. You likely have heard that “your hamburger could come from hundreds of different animals.” This is absolutely true. The likelihood that a given ground beef patty comes from one animal alone is very small. The only way this would be the case is 1) if you asked your retail butcher to grind an existing roast or steak from the retail case, 2) if you buy custom ground beef from your local butcher or 3) if you slaughter and fabricate it yourself. Commercially manufactured ground beef is generally made by combining a very lean source of beef (≤ 10% fat), with a relatively high fat source of beef (≥ 30% fat) to produce a final product with ≤ 20% fat. These different sources would almost certainly come from different carcasses. In a commercial facility, beef subprimals, such as strip loins, top sirloin butts, briskets, etc., have a specification for how much external fat can be present before they are transported to endusers. Some external fat is removed at the packinghouse from all of these pieces. When the external fat is cut off, small pieces of lean are included as well. Those small pieces of lean are what

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ultimately becomes LFTB or FTB. The fat pieces containing a small amount of lean are called “trim” or “trimmings,” and are collected in large plastic-lined cardboard boxes or “combos.” The beef trimmings used to make LFTB or FTB must meet the same or greater microbiological requirements enforced by the USDA-Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) as a beef roast sold at your grocery store or a steak sold at your favorite steakhouse. These combos of fat trimmings contain no bones, no tendons, no spinal cord, and no organ meats. Each of these combos of trimmings must be sampled and tested for E.Coli O157:H7 and six other Shiga-toxin causing E.Coli, according to USDA-FSIS regulations. Products which test positive for E.Coli O157:H7 or the six other Shiga-toxin causing E.Coli are “adulterated” and cannot be sold for consumption as fresh ground beef. The inspected and microbially-tested fat trimmings are then processed to make LFTB or FTB. The process is accomplished by heating the product to approximately 100°F, then separating the lean from fat with centrifugal force similar to separating cream from milk. The liquefied fat is then food-grade beef tallow. The remaining lean product is then exposed to an additional antimicrobial intervention. Within the BPI facility the remaining lean is briefly exposed to ammonium hydroxide gas or within the Cargill facility, citric acid, both of which are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list of the USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The lean product known as LFTB or FTB is then flash frozen and ultimately shipped to ground beef manufacturers which include the product in formulations up to 20% of the final blend. The use of ammonium hydroxide gas has been perceived by many consumers as the most unsettling component of this event. Ammonia can be produced in very low levels naturally within the muscles of mammals after aggressive muscular exertion. Also, ammonium hydroxide is included in the commercial processing of multiple food products, including puddings and baked goods. So, put the tofu burger back on the shelf (as a side note, tofu and many other food products, are manufactured in much the same way as LFTB and FTB!) and enjoy that juicy, wholesome, safe and nutritious burger! I and my family certainly will! For more information about LFTB or FTB, please contact your local county Extension office or myself, Bridget Carlisle, at (863) 519-8677 Ext. 104 or bccarlis@ufl.edu. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


For Sale

2003 White Astro Chevy Van/Cargo A/C, Automatic, AM/FM Radio. $3,200 Please call Karen 813-759-6909.

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Education and Fun at the Lake By Libby Hopkins

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he City of Lakeland contains 38 named lakes and numerous smaller lakes. That makes a grand total of 500 lakes, so it really wasn’t a stretch to come up with a name for the city. Not only do the lakes provide homes for many plants, animals and fish, but they are also a great place to have fun and relax. Johnna Martinez is the Executive Director of the Lakes Education/Action Drive and she keeps the Lakeland community educated on the lakes around Polk County. “Our mission is to provide public education to preserve and protect the lakes,” Martinez said. “Since we have such a valued natural resource, we thought it would be something beneficial to protect through education.” LE/AD offers various programs and workshops to the public. One of the projects has been the lakeside display signs. LE/AD was instrumental in establishing lakeside displays around lakes in the county. The displays provide the public with information about lake preservation, water quality, lakeside habitat, flood protection and watersheds. LE/AD worked with the cities around the county to provide content and layout for the signs. This past July was “Lakes Appreciation Month.” The North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) designated the month of July as Lakes Appreciation Month around the nation. LE/AD participates each year in the celebration of their lakes. They worked with the City of Lakeland, Keep Polk County Beautiful, the City of Winter Haven, Lakeland Clean & Beautiful and Keep Winter Haven Clean & Beautiful to organize a countywide clean up along lakeshores during the month of July. Volunteers registered to receive equipment and picked the time and day to clean up their favorite lake. “We ended up getting 100 volunteers and they removed a lot of trash,” Martinez said. This year, one of the volunteers went out in a boat to clean up one of the lakes and ended up finding a safe. They thought maybe it was stolen and contained money. The safe was dragged on shore and the sheriff’s department was called in to open it.

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“They opened it and there really wasn’t anything of value in it,” Martinez said. “The speculation was more interesting than what was inside.” To thank the volunteers, LE/AD gave them gift certificates to local restaurants. In August, the organization will offer free “Living at the Lake” workshops. Some of the topics that will be covered are watershed and drainage patterns, water quality, aquatic life and storm water management. “This is the first year we are hosting this event and it’s a workshop to help answer questions about what living at the lake involves,” Martinez said. You don’t have to live at a lake if you want to attend the workshop. It is open to the public. The big event that all of Polk County looks forward to is the annual Cardboard Boat Challenge and Lakeshore Festival. It will take place on September 15. LE/AD, Lakeland Vision, and Lakeland Clean & Beautiful work together to make this event happen each year. “It started in 2004 as an idea to have a fun day at the lake because we were always cleaning up the lakes and educating people,” Martinez said. The event is held on Lake Hollingsworth in Lakeland. Approximately 400 participants and observers come each year to view the boat challenge. They also come out to watch and critique the participants as they build their boats before the race. While they are at the event, attendees have the opportunity to visit environmental exhibits that offer literature, which gives them a better understanding of water quality and how to make a difference in their everyday activities when it comes to preserving the quality of their lakes. “I would love to see the water quality improve from all the projects we are doing and again through education,” Martinez said. “One person making a change may not have such and impact but if we get everyone to change, that would improve our waters.” For more information on the different programs and workshops LE/AD offers or if you would like to participate in the Annual Cardboard Boat Challenge and Lakeshore Festival you can visit them on the web at www.le-ad.org or call them at 863-221-5323. •

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2670 Hwy. 92 E Plant City, FL (Between Lakeland and Plant City)

OPEN SATURDAYS: 8:30-5:00 www.brokeandpoorpc@aol.com

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A Club in the Making By Libby Hopkinsk

It has been said the structured learning, encouragement and adult mentoring kids receive when they participate in 4-H plays a vital role in helping them achieve future successes in their lives.

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yndi Barnhorst, advisor for the Highlander 4-H Club in Lake Wales, has thrived in life from her experiences she had growing up in 4-H. She was born in Frostproof and grew up in a farming environment. She was very close to her grandparent, and they made sure she learned as much as she could about citrus trees, growing vegetables, canning, baking, raising livestock, and how to set a table properly. “I developed a passion for my surroundings and it gave me a sense of respect and love for the simple life,” Barnhorst said. As she grew up, she discovered 4-H and it gave her the opportunity to continue the growth and development of the life she loved. “I eagerly participated in all the project from sewing a pillow, making jellies, woodworking and raising my very own hog,” Barnhorst said. She also learned life skills such as organization, serving the community and leading a healthier life. Studies have shown that young adults, who are part of a 4-H club, are more likely to have healthier eating and exercise habits. They are less likely to have sex at a young W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

age or use drugs and alcohol. They have better grades in school and they work toward having a career in science, engineering or computer technology. 4-H empowers youth to reach their full potential by working and learning in partnership with caring adults. Barnhorst held various officer positions and learned due process while she was growing up in 4-H. “With the foundation my family started and the growth I had in my local 4-H club, I became an active member of the Frostproof FFA Chapter and I become a part of the Parliamentary Procedure team,” Barnhorst said. As a mother of two and a teacher of many, Barnhorst felt a sense of responsibility to give back to today’s youth. When the opportunity to become the leader of the Highland 4-H Club at Hillcrest Elementary in Lake Wales came along, she eagerly jumped on board. She knew taking this position would be the best way she could teach the qualities and values of 4-H she grew up with in her life. The caring support of adult volunteers and mentors inspires young people in 4-H to work hard collaboratively, take the lead on their own projects and achieve goals with confidence. 4-H members chart their own course, explore important issues and find their place in the world. They also stand up for themselves and their community. “I want to show today’s youth the numerous opportunities available in life and help them grow in their interests,” Barnhorst said. “ I want to help them develop the life skills they need nowadays.”

Highlander 4-H is a club in the making. The 2011-2012 school year was their first year as a club. They have 20 active members and a lot of them have never been a part of 4-H. “We found ourselves wading through all the possibilities of what our club could achieve,” Barnhorst said. At the club meetings, the members dabbled in cake decorating, table setting, scrap booking. They also were taught archery, whip popping and how to raise animals. For the club’s community service project, they partnered with the Lake Wales Care Center and participated in delivering meals for Christmas dinner, which they will continue to do this year. “We are looking forward to getting involved with more community service projects this year in the area as the opportunities arise,” Barnhorst said. Even though they have only been a club for a year, the members did participate in the 2012 Polk County Youth Fair. They entered a variety of exhibits from raising animals to table setting competitions. They also did very well in the cake auction. Barnhorst said the group would continue to explore the treasures of 4-H and build on life and leadership skills. “We are looking forward to expanding our club projects to include archery, horticulture and various family and consumer science projects.” Highlander 4-H has an array of members whose families are on limited budgets. They are looking for volunteers and sponsors to help this year with various projects and offset the cost of materials and supplies. If you would like to help the club, you can email Barnhorst at highlander_4h@yahoo.com.

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Ranching, Hunting and Trapping, Oh My!

Cliff Lightsey By Ginny Mink

Photos by Lacey Waters

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attle ranchers are an interesting breed. The more time spent talking with them, the more increasingly evident it becomes that they would best be labeled the ‘strong but silent types.’ Cliff Lightsey, owner of Flying L Cattle, is the epitome of that. He definitely proved to be a man of few words so it was necessary to do a little digging with regards to his family history. That research revealed just how amazing his family history is and it illuminated to the nth degree, Cliff’s remarkably humble nature, one many would do well to strive for. According to an article published by the St. Pete Times in 2007, Johannes Jacob Lightsey was the first Lightsey to brand a cow in the US. He arrived in South Carolina, originally from Germany, in 1712. Since then, twelve generations of Lightsey’s have been associated with cattle ranching. However, the first one in Florida was John Lightsey, who, after fighting the Seminoles in 1837, came south. Thusly, six generations of Lightsey’s have been in Central Florida. Jeff Klinkenberg (2007) writes that Cliff’s great-great grandfather, Linton Lee Lightsey operated a dry goods store in Tampa during the 1800s. Linton’s son, Eustis, focused on livestock and had a dairy and cattle operation in the Brandon area. Cliff’s grandfather, Doyle, inherited that business. Doyle was a real go-getter and constantly bought more land and grew his herd. Unfortunately, he died from a stroke in 1973 when he was only 57. That’s when Layne (Cliff’s dad) and Cary (Cliff’s uncle) inherited the family operation. Since then, Layne and Cary have appeared in a myriad of articles due to their environmental conservation

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endeavors. The family has a philosophy of leaving at least 40 percent of their land in its natural state and nearly 70 percent of their property is protected from developers by contracts with the state and other governmental agencies. One of the most notable pieces of their property is Brahma Island, which happens to be the largest privately owned freshwater island in the United States. During the interview, Cliff talked a little about the island. He says, “We ran commercial hunts over there for almost 40 years. We still hunt it. We lease it out, now, to a private individual. They just hunt it for their own personal pleasure. We’ve got exotic deer and water buffalo over there. We do run cattle there too.” Cliff is certainly no stranger to cows, just look at his family history! Cliff’s personal history comes out slowly. He says, “I was born here in Lake Wales. I was raised right here on a ranch. I showed steers and Brahma bulls. We grew watermelons and citrus.” He inserts a bit of family history here, “My dad and uncle started our family business. They started off small and just started growing, hard work and dedication. My dad worked from daylight to dark every day except on Sunday. We go to church every Sunday. I’m a member of the First Baptist Church.” Then he returns to his own story, “I was real big in FFA. I was the FFA President at Lake Wales High School. I went on all the trips. When I graduated high school I went to work for another ranch for a year. I wanted some more experience. Then I saw I wanted to go to college so I went to TCU, Texas Christian University and got a ranch management degree back W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


on two different ranches. I just keep building my cow numbers up. I have 250 head. They’re all cross breed type cows, mostly Braford and Brangus. I’m a cow-calf producer. I raise the calves off a cow and then sell the calves, they’re going to feed.” Obviously the cattle business is in his blood and so that endeavor isn’t very surprising. However, he’s a man with many interests.

in 2001.” After college, Cliff ventured into the entrepreneurial world. He says, “I came home and started building my own cow herd up. That’s how Flying L got started. Actually, it was me and my cousin, Clint, we were partners. We started our own cattle business. As he got more cows he went off on his own little deal and we split up and I kept the company. I went ahead and bought my cousin out. My main herd is in Vero, in Indian River County. I’m running two herds, two different bunches

He continues, “I started a hunting business. I do hog hunts, gator hunts, turkey hunts. It’s called Tiger Lake Hunts. I’ve been gator hunting for about five years. We just go out on a boat, we catch ‘em with a harpoon or a fishing pole with a snatch hook. You reel him up on the boat and then shoot him. I haven’t shot a hole in my boat yet!” He laughs and continues, “I hog hunt here on the ranch. I take my horse and my hog dogs. The dogs will find the hog and bay him up and then I call the hunters. I’ve got some guys who all they wanna do is bow hunt so I’ll put ‘em up in a tree stand and hunt ‘em over a corn feeder. I cater to a lot of bow hunters, that’s got pretty big over the last few years.” Cliff’s hunting clientele enjoy more than just the opportunity to shoot something. He explains, “We have a camp here on the ranch. My wife does all the cooking for the hunters, provides and fries all the meals for them.” Talking about his wife brings out some more personal family information. “I got married back in 2004, almost eight years now. My wife’s name is Amanda. I met my wife, just from a friend and we started dating. She actually lived on another ranch. She grew up on Deseret Ranch in Melbourne. We hadn’t been dating that long and we got married. I knew she was the one. So…” he trails off. The love he has for her is infinitely apparent. He adds, “I’ve got three kids. My oldest son’s name is Holden, he’s six. My daughter’s name is Harlee, she’s three and my youngest son is Cooper, he’s fifteen months.” Cliff switches gears and returns to talking about his business endeavors. He says, “I started my own hog trapping business. It’s got kind of big, hogs have taken over. I started it on the side.” He reiterates, “The hog population in Florida is taking over.” Obviously he saw a need and is doing his best to fill it. He explains, “I started building traps. I have 25 traps and I set them up. I trap a lot of county and state property and private land. I have a buyer in Okeechobee that I sell all my hogs to. When I get 80 to a 100 head, I sell them. It takes me about two to three weeks. Last year I caught close to 700 hogs. Word of

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mouth gets around, they hear, ‘he’s got a bunch of traps’ and if they’ve got a hog problem they give me a call.” Cliff emanates contentment. He’s a man with three businesses and yet he still finds time to help others. He says, “About three years ago I started working for another guy on the side, Alec Fulford. His place started getting run down, he got Alzheimer’s real bad. I helped them. He died last April, so I helped his wife try to get their ranch back in order, her and her son, Randy. I had a good time working there because it was fifty thousand acres and all rough woods with wild cattle. We got to go rope a bunch. We got to rope wild bulls, wild cows.” Roping is something Cliff really likes to do. He mentions, “We ranch rodeo. I won the Florida Cattlemen’s finals twice out of four years. We won it the first year and the third year.” Though he must be an infinitely busy man, he reveals the true joy in his work, “Spending time with my family is my main ‘like to do,’ spend time with my kids. Every day is an experience. I guess the main thing I really like is working with my dad. My oldest boy is getting to where he can ride a horse now so taking him to work with me, it’s just a good experience. You’re never doing the same thing; you’re always doing something different every day. I don’t think I could ever handle sitting behind a desk, you know, working in an office.” Thankfully, this is something he’ll probably never have to do given his family’s rich history in the cattle industry! • Find out about Cliff’s hunting business at: www.tigerlakehunts.webs.com

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Collection; Catfish, Moonshine, Cattle on the Peavine: Surviving on Florida’s Last Frontier; and White Sand, Black Gold, and Sweet Water: History of the Heartland. It contains over 200 individual works. SFSC MOFAC, housed at the SFSC Highlands Campus in Avon Park, is dedicated to artists whose work is an interpretation of the history, heritage, and environment of Florida. For more information, call 863-784-7240 or visit www.mofac.org. Like us on Facebook at http:/ / www.facebook.com/ mofac

SFSC MOFAC Adds

Cracker Cowboy Photographs to its Permanent Collection

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he South Florida State College Museum of Florida Art and Culture (SFSC MOFAC) has acquired a series of photographs to add to its permanent collection. The Cracker Cowboy Collection consists of 109 photographs by Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist Jon Kral. These black and white photographs capture cattle drives, swamp land, daily fence repairs, the friendly and notso-friendly wildlife, and the families and children of ranchers inside their homes and were taken at over 15 Florida ranches between 1975 and 2000. “Ranching and cattle are a part of Florida history,” said Mollie Doctrow, SFSC MOFAC curator. “Unfortunately, that history is not well-known outside of central Florida. By acquiring this collection, SFSC MOFAC will be able to maintain these photographs in an area where they can be appreciated by the people who work in the industry, generations of families who have owned and worked on cattle ranches themselves, as well as educate others who may not be familiar with this part of our state’s history.” Kral grew up in Fort Pierce, surrounded by ranchland and farmland. He became disappointed when an influx of people into the area led to the disappearance of ranches – they were bought out and turned into subdivisions and golf courses. He wanted to document images of the land and lifestyle before it was gone and, perhaps, help slow down the loss of a unique way of life. In 1998, Kral released a book of some of his photographs, called Cracker: Florida’s Enduring Cowboys, which allowed the public to see some of his work. However, after holdW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

ing the original proofs in storage for a number of years, Kral realized the photographs needed to be seen in order to preserve this fast disappearing way of life. “I decided to sell them to SFSC MOFAC because it’s where they belong,” Kral said. “It’s a bit emotional because in a way I’m letting go of some old friends, but the cattle culture is such an important part of central Florida’s history. I’m very happy that now they can be seen, right in the heart of Florida.” “These prints are one of a kind,” Kral said. “They are my artist’s proofs. While there are duplicate copies out there, these are the only ones printed in the original silver gel selenium tone, and they will never be printed the same way again.” The collection of 109 photographs has been appraised at $151,000. “A number of generous people stepped forward to donate the funds SFSC MOFAC needed to acquire the collection,” said Don Appelquist, Dean, Resource and Development, SFSC Foundation, Inc. “The photos are high-quality and both artistically and technically appealing,” said Joey Sacco, artist and SFSC MOFAC Advisory Committee member. “While they will be appreciated for their cultural and historical significance, the artistic value of these photos can also stand on its own. They are true works of art and comparable to works by some of the great painters like Norman Rockwell, Rembrandt, and Van Gogh.” A selection of pieces from the collection will be available as a traveling exhibit in the future. Currently, photos from the collection are on exhibition in the SFSC MOFAC Lower Lobby Gallery, in the SFSC Theatre for the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. A larger display is planned for April. SFSC MOFAC is home to other permanent collections including the Highwaymen; the Florida Masters Collection; Randle/Sheffield

Season’s Final Florida Citrus Forecast Ends On Up Note USDA calculations hold steady, increase slightly.

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he 2011-2012 Florida all orange forecast released by the USDA Agricultural Statistics Board is raised to 146.5 million boxes (a slight bump up from last month). The total is comprised of 74.2 million boxes of non-Valencia oranges (early, midseason, Navel, and Temple varieties) and 72.3 million boxes of Valencia oranges, up 300,000 boxes from last month. The forecast of all grapefruit production remains at 18.8 million boxes. Of the total grapefruit forecast, 5.3 million boxes are white and 13.5 million boxes are the colored varieties. The all tangerine forecast remains at 4.3 million boxes. The total is comprised of the early varieties (Fallglo and Sunburst) at 2.35 million boxes and the later maturing Honey tangerines at 1.95 million boxes. The forecast of tangelo production is continued at 1.15 million boxes. As reported by the Florida Department of Citrus, the FCOJ yield is: all oranges at 1.628480 gallons per box, the late portion at 1.745597 gallons per box, and the early-midseason component at 1.529715 gallons per box. Drought conditions were nearly eliminated in all citrus areas by the end of June due to the significant rainfall provided by Tropical Storm Debby. This is the final forecast for the 20112012 season. The first forecast of the 2012-2013 season will be released on Oct. 11, 2012.

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eproductive efficiency has long been recognized as the most important factor influencing the economic viability of commercial cattle operations. Good reproductive management can make the difference between profit and loss in a cow operation.

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UF/IFAS Offers Beef Cattle Reproductive Management School October 8-11, 2012 By Bridget Carlisle, UF/IFAS Livestock Extension Agent

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The UF/IFAS South Florida Beef Forage Team will be offering an intensive course in cow herd reproductive management designed for owners and operators of the beef cow herd on October 8-11 in Lake Placid at Buck Island Ranch. Participants will improve their understanding of the broad subject of breeding herd management and will be better equipped to work with their veterinarians in accomplishing breeding program objectives. Topics included in the course are: cattle handling, heifer development, bull selection, herd nutrition, forage management, reproductive physiolo-

gy, herd health, calf husbandry, and performance records. While the topic of pregnancy diagnosis will be given extensive treatment, the school does not intend to make participants proficient in this skill. Rather, the goal is to improve understanding of the broad subject of breeding herd management that includes more than reproductive physiology but nutrition, genetics, health and various other facets of management that all have a direct effect on the breeding performance of the herd.

The fee for this three-day course is $350. For more information and registration forms, please contact your local County Extension Agent or Bridget Carlisle at (863) 519-8677 Ext. 104 or bccarlis@ufl.edu. Registration deadline is Friday, September 21st.

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

Tropical Trifle INGREDIENTS CUSTARD 3 cups skim or evaporated milk 2 teaspoons orange zest, grated 5 eggs (2 yolks and 3 whole eggs) 1 cup sugar 1/4 cup cornstarch

Florida Cream Cheese Spread With Sun-dried Tomatoes and Greek Olives INGREDIENTS 12 medium sun-dried tomatoes (not packed in oil) 1 8-ounce package cream cheese,

SYRUP 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup sugar 2 teaspoons orange zest, grated 2 tablespoons orange-flavored liqueur or cream sherry LAYERING 2 cups angel, yellow or pound cake cubes 1 cup orange sections 1 cup mango, chopped, cubes 1 cup papaya, chopped, cubes 1 cup banana, sliced 1 cup whipped cream or reduced-fat whipped topping

room temperature

PREPARATION

2 tablespoons sour cream 1/2 cup black olives (preferably Kalamata) chopped and pitted 1/4 cup red onion, chopped

PREPARATION Place sun-dried tomatoes in small bowl. Pour enough boiling water over tomatoes to cover. Let tomatoes stand until soft, about 10 minutes. Drain. Pat tomatoes dry and chop finely. Mix cream cheese and sour cream in medium bowl until smooth. Mix in olives, onion and sun-dried tomatoes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour before serving.) 42

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Pour milk into a heavy saucepan and add orange zest. While milk is heating combine sugar and cornstarch then add egg yolks and whole eggs; stir until mixture is combined thoroughly. When milk begins to boil add egg mixture and whip. Cook over low heat until custard mixture comes to a boil. Pour immediately into shallow container and cover with plastic wrap directly on custard mixture to prevent forming a skin. Refrigerate. While custard is cooling prepare a syrup with water, sugar and orange zest. Cook for 5 minutes. Cool and add liquor or sherry. In a small trifle bowl or any glass bowl begin layering ingredients. Brush bread cubes with syrup mixture, then add fruit and custard. For best results refrigerate overnight. Top with whipped topping and serve.

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OUR SERVICES • Social Security Disability • Supplemental Security Income: Children and Adults • Initial Applications Reconsideration • Hearing with Judge

• Wills • Power of Attorney • Estate Planning • Trusts • Guardianships • Adoptions Charles L. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. University of South Florida J.D. Florida State University Law School

Geraldyne H. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. Georgia State University J.D. Florida State University Law School

2310 Lakeland Hills Blvd. Lakeland, FL 33805 (1 mile south of I-4, Exit 33 Lakeland - across from Detroit Tigers Baseball Spring Training Stadium)

TOLL FREE 1. 800.315.4590 863. 688.5700 *The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisments. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience.

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Polk Cattlemen’s Association’s

Looking for us?

Summer Meeting and Dinner

®

MAGAZINE

Find us in your neighborhood... Fields Equipment Company 3203 Havendale Blvd. Winter Haven, FL Phone: 863.967.0602

Chemical Containers, Inc.

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ith over 1.1 million head of beef cattle, Florida ranks as the third largest beef producing state east of the Mississippi River and 10th in the nation. On July 19, a group of these ranchers from Polk County gathered together in Bartow for the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association’s Summer Meeting and Dinner. A wrap up of the 2012 Polk County Cattlemen’s Ranch Rodeo was presented along with a slide show of the heart stopping action. If you missed it this year, it is a definite must do for 2013. The Ranch Rodeo is always a crowd pleaser. Bern Kinard once again lead the cake auction. Members of the Polk County Cattlewomen’s Association bake the cakes and the money raised from the auction goes in to their scholarship fund. I can personally attest to the absolute deliciousness of the cakes. This year’s award recipients from the Polk County Cattlewomen are: SCHOLARSHIP WINNER KAT IE SKIPPER, a graduate of Fort Meade Middle Senior High, who will be attending Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. PREMIER EXHIB IT OR AWARD MEGAN MEREDIT H of Teneroc High School W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

HANNAH SCIONT I was awarded a commercial heifer, donated to the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association as a give-a-way to the child of a current member of the association. ASHLEY HU GHES, Director of Beef Marketing and Promotion for the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, presented an overview of the Beef Checkoff Program. This program is a producer-funded marketing and research program that, through promotion, research and product development, is designed to increase the demand for beef. The Beef Checkoff Program funds the activities of the Florida Beef Council, with funds coming from producers who pay one dollar per head on all cattle sold in the state. Half of the funds go to national promotion, the other half is used in Florida. While the members of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association may come from various backgrounds, they all share a common goal, to promote the beef industry in Polk County, Florida and the entire country. If you support the beef industry consider joining the association. Where’s the Beef? Right here in Polk County!

413 ABC Road Lake Wales, FL Phone: 800.346.7867

Arrington’s Body Shop, Inc. 301 Sixth St.. S.W. Winter Haven, FL Phone: 863.293.4192

Fred’s Southern Kitchen 2120 Harden Blvd. Lakeland, FL Phone: 863.603.7080

Grove Equipment 5905 Hwy. 60 E. Bartow, FL Phone: 863.537.1345

Lay’s Western Wear & Feed, Inc. 5530 Old Hwy. 37 Lakeland, FL Phone: 863.646.1003

Circle R Ranch & Livestock Eq. 16490 U.S. Hwy. 27 Lake Wales, FL Phone: 888.693.4283 Note: This is just a sample of our distribution points. We’ll list different locations each month.

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909 NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378

ANIMALS & NEEDS ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Add living microbes to improve your soil, equipment serving the fur-bearing and exotic bird industry. Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. 813-752-2230 • www.ammermans.com Swap July 15, 2012 and Nov. 25, 2012

MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378

FARM EQUIPMENT

HORSE BOARDING Stalls and individual turnout, lighted arena and round pen. Owners on property. $325 full care. Call 813-610-4416

MASSEY FERGUSON 245 W/ STRAWBERRY WHEEL KIT Diesel tractor. Good condition. $6,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

1998 HART HORSE TRAILER All aluminum gooseneck trailer. Two horse slant load with dressing room. Original one owner. Call Today 813-650-3173! $9,500

KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722

CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES 3 older females that are 11 weeks old, from my first litter (2 sables, 1 bloke. & tan), they are $500 ea. I also have a 2nd liter that has 6 puppies, (4 males, 2 females) that will be ready to go 07/21/12 when they are 8 weeks old and those are $600 ea. (solid blacks & (2) very nicely marked sables). For additional information please contact 863-452-9770 or email: buckeyehio@centurylink.net FOR SALE – WESTERN SADDLE With bridle and blanket. $600 obo Call Today! 813-752-5554 DOVE HUNTS Lithia area limited number of memberships still available. Call Fish Hawk Sporting Clays. 813-689-0490

AUTOMOTIVE 1997 FORD F-250 4X2 Lariat Super Cab. This is a very low mileage (83,000) original one owner (non smoker) vehicle that has been professionally maintained and garage kept since new! Call 813-650-3173 $6,500 2003 WHITE ASTRO CHEVY VAN/CARGO A/C, Automatic, AM/FM Radio. $3,200 Please call Karen 813-759-6909.

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTOR 1980 Massey Ferguson 230. 34pto hp, power steering. $4,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 14’ Shop built, heavy duty trailer, 2 axel with ramps. $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 FORD NAA TRACTOR Good condition, gas engine. $1,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 3PT LIFT 3 row hole punch. Very good condition. $500.00 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON 255 Grove Tractor with 6’ mower $7,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722. KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 1984 MASSEY FERGUSON 240 tractor, 42 pto hp, 2wd, works great! $5,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 JOHN DEERE 6420 Cab with a/c, 4x4 3345 hrs. 9 pto hp. $37,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 KUBOTA L340 32 hp, 4x4, shuttle shift. 1783 hrs. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

DECKING BRDS. & TILL SIDING Call Ted 813-752-3378

FOR SALE

DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378 WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TILL 4 X 8 SHEET B-grade $17.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378 46

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TRAILER FOR SALE 44x12 single wide trailer in Winters Mobile Home Park. Zephyrhills 5k or best offer. Call (813)967-4515

info@inthefieldmagazine.com LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

REAL ESTATE BEAUTIFUL PLANT CITY 1 ACRE LOT With well. Private one street subdivision frontage 290 x 145 depth. 4521 Highland Creek Drive. $45,900. Call Today! 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 A SLICE OF HEAVEN 2.03 acres lot on Hare Mtn. Estates in Franklin NC. Breath-taking views. Purchased 10/08 for $73,400. Yours today for $32,900 GREAT INVESTMENT! Call 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – WHAT WAS 900K, REDUCED TO 375K? 20 ACRES LAKELAND AGRICULTURE RELATED, INCOME PRODUCING 1600 ft of I-4 frontage. Call us now to see how much you're losing by not owning this property! Estate Brokers USA at 813-986-9141 FOR SALE The Cat is out of the bag. Check this out- 2005 4/2 2300 sq ft residence income producing farm owner finance- non qualifying- zero interest. Antioch Call now, it might still be available. Estate Brokers USA at 813-986-9141

JOBS CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In The Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

ALL A BLOOM FLORIST Mylar Balloons for all occasions!!! $4.95 each. 116 N. Collins - Downtown Plant City. www.allabloomtampa.com

AUGUST 2012

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Profile for Berry Publications, Inc

In The Field Polk  

agriculture magazine for Polk County, FL

In The Field Polk  

agriculture magazine for Polk County, FL

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