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Quick Condo Guide Condominiums and townhouses offer an affordable option to single family homes. Before you buy, consider this quick guide and some important points. Talk to your Intero agent for more information.

WEST AVE OFFICE 2800 Kirby Houston TX 77098 713 568 2389 www.interowestave.com info@interowestave.com


Pros and Cons of Going Condo Condominiums and townhouses offer an affordable option to single-family homes in many markets, and they’re ideal for those who appreciate a maintenance-free lifestyle. But before you buy, make sure you do your legwork. These are some of the important elements to consider:


Storage

Some condos have storage lockers, but usually there are no attics or basements to hold extra belongings.

Outdoor space

Yards and outdoor areas are usually smaller in condos, so if you like to garden or entertain outdoors, this may not be a

Association fees

decided by the condo board, whether or not you’re interested in the amenity. Resale

good fit. However, if you dread yard work, this may be the perfect option for you. Amenities

Many condo properties have swimming pools, fitness centers, and other facilities that would be very expensive in a single-

Condo rules

Many condos have onsite maintenance personnel to care for common areas, do repairs in your unit, and let in workers

Keyed entries and even doormen are common in many condos. You’re also closer to other people in case of an emergency.

Although you have a vote, the rules of the condo association can affect your ability to use your property. For example, some condos prohibit home-based businesses. Others prohibit pets, or don’t allow owners to rent out their units. Read the covenants, restrictions, and bylaws of the condo carefully before you make an offer.

when you’re not home — good news if you like to travel. Security

The ease of selling your unit may be dependent on what else is for sale in your building, since units are usually fairly similar.

family home. Maintenance

Although fees generally help pay for amenities and provide savings for future repairs, you will have to pay the fees

Neighbors

You’re much closer to your neighbors in a condo or town home. If possible, try to meet your closest prospective neighbors.


10 Questions to Ask the Condo Board Before you buy, contact the condo board with the following questions. In the process, you’ll learn how responsive — and organized — its members are. You’ll also be alerted to potential problems with the property.


1 What percentage of units is owner-occupied? What percentage is tenant-occupied? Generally, the higher the percentage of owner-occupied units, the more marketable the units will be at resale. 2 What covenants, bylaws, and restrictions govern the property? What grandfather clauses are in place? You may find, for instance, that those who buy a property after a certain date can’t rent out their units, but buyers who bought earlier can. Ask for a copy of the bylaws to determine if you can live within them. And have an attorney review property docs, including the master deed, for you. 3 How much does the association keep in reserve? How that money invested? 4 Are association assessments keeping pace with the annual rate of inflation? Smart boards raise assessments a certain percentage each year to build reserves to fund future repairs. To determine if the assessment is reasonable, compare the rate to others in the area. 5 What does and doesn’t the assessment cover? Does the assessment include common-area maintenance, recreational facilities, trash collection, and snow removal?

6 What special assessments have been mandated in the past five years? How much was each owner responsible for? Some special assessments are unavoidable. But repeated, expensive assessments could be a red flag about the condition of the building or the board’s fiscal policy. 7 How much turnover occurs in the building? This will tell you if residents are generally happy with the building. According to research by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, owners of condos in two-to-four unit buildings stay for a median of five years, and owners of condos in a building with five or more units stay for a median of four years. 8 Is the condo building in litigation? This is never a good sign. If the builders or home owners are involved in a lawsuit, reserves can be depleted quickly. 9 Is the developer reputable? Find out what other projects the developer has built and visit one if you can. Ask residents about their perceptions. Request an engineer’s report for developments that have been reconverted from other uses to determine what shape the building is in. If the roof, windows, and bricks aren’t in good repair, they become your problem once you buy. 10 Are multiple associations involved in the property? In very large developments, umbrella associations, as well as the smaller association into which you’re buying, may require separate assessments.


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Condo Guide