Page 1

in: THE CONDÉ NAST INTERN MAGAZINE

THE GENERATION ISSUE

THE NEW

CONSUMER STEFANO TONCHI

THE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

ON THE CUFF

NYC’S YOUNG DESIGNERS

SUMMER 2010


Power. Outlets. Same

New


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in:

SUMMER 2010

FEATURES

34 THE HOLY GRAINS Ancient carbs that satisfy your stomach without adding those extra inches. Dr. Atkins is turning in his grave. 46 INTERVIEW: STEFANO TONCHI The newest editor-in-chief at Condé Nast gives an exclusive interview, touching on his arrival at W and the future of the magazine. 48 THE NEW CONSUMER The magazine industry reacts to ever-changing technology, hoping to gather a few (million) new customers along the way.

FRONT & BACK CITY INTELLIGENCE FASHION 8 LETTERS Letter from Chuck Letter from the Execs 9 FINDINGS Gadgets Sports Books Dining Politics Society 60 PARTING THOUGHTS According to IN staffer Lauren Leibowitz, Williamsburg just ain’t the ’hood it used to be. These days, even the brass knuckles are designer.

24 THE APPROPRIATION GENERATION Ironically enough, young New York artists are trying to stand apart from one another by sampling found images. 27 THE HIGH LINE Not exactly new, but certainly not finished. Surveying the future of Gotham’s latest landmark. 30 IMAGE VS. PICTURE For emerging photographers, the line between commercial and avant-garde is often blurry. And sometimes that’s just fine. 32 FASHION AT THE MET Beauty and independence collide in an exhibit by the Costume Institute that traces the many fashions of the American woman.

39 ON THE CUFF New York’s up-andcoming designers show off their studios, share their various muses, and talk about Fashion Week dreams. 54 THE INTERNS They might be green, but Condé Nast Interns know how to get taken seriously at the office in neutrals and hues of blue.


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in: PUBLISHER Katie Steen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Patrick Knoth

FASHION DIRECTOR STYLING ASSISTANT STAFF WRITERS

Joe Satran Margaret Slattery

SALES TEAM

Emily Note Elyse Roth Ariba Alvi, Sara Angle, Jamie Bachmann, Kat Balkoski, Julianne De La Torre, Ava Feuer, Dana Fraser, Kristen Griffin, Alyssa Hood, Brittany Kaback, Lauren Leibowitz, Zoë Lescaze, Matt Margini, Nancy Mucciarone, Stephen Ostrowski, Rosie Purdy, Elyse Roth, Elizabeth Rowe, Lana Russo, Haley Schattner, Jonathan Topaz, Rachel Vorsanger

MARKETING DIRECTOR MARKETING MANAGER PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR PROMOTIONS TEAM

FINANCE MANAGER

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Allie Fisher

Rachel Vorsanger John Lockett Maya Robinson Ariba Alvi

Sara Angle Laurance George, Dana Horowitz, Nicole Kluger, Lara Kovant, Robbie Sauerberg, Isabel Tawney David Held

CONDÉ NAST Gregg Delman, Diane Fields, DIGITAL STUDIO Mel McNamara, Jesse Newhouse, Jeffrey Schad

DESIGNERS Liz Howell, Lauren Leibowitz, Maggie McVeigh PHOTO EDITOR PHOTO DIRECTOR FASHION PHOTOS PHOTOS & RESEARCH

Cassie Willard Andrew Odenheimer

SPECIAL THANKS TO

ART DIRECTOR Ashley Kolodziej SENIOR DESIGNER Kristen Whaley

Rosie O’Connor, Meredith Joyner, Becky Mantell, Toluwalope Okeowo, Stephen Ostrowski, Sarah Severe

HUMAN RESOURCES Jill Bright, Janice Calitri-Mehos, Meg Gruppo, Mary Macnab Kennedy, Marian Lee, Matt Norman, Justin Shu, Emily Welsh CONDÉ NAST Michelle Cardone, Autumn MEDIA GROUP Cummings, Shaun Gough, Barbara Warnke

ARCHIVIST Sam Friedman OTHERS IN THE CONDÉ FAMILY

PUBLISHED BY CONDÉ NAST 4 Times Square New York, NY 10036 © 2010 Condé Nast, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Sarah Goldstein, Jackie Lebowitz, Meredith Millen, Tamaki Sakai, Stefano Tonchi, Merritt Watts

Cover photo by Diane Fields, Cover Art DIrection by Allie Fisher.

MANAGING EDITORS


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LETTER FROM CHUCK The theme of this magazine—The Generation Issue—is entirely appropriate. Condé Nast’s 100+ year legacy of editorial excellence has spanned, influenced, and inspired entire generations. And we look to your generation to create and develop the innovative ideas that will move our business into the next century. Our iconic brands help us look both backward and forward… to a rich heritage and to limitless horizons. It’s not one or the other— there is tremendous resilience and vitality in combining the best of both our past glory and our future promise. So, what does this mean for you? You were born into the digital age, and this is the perfect time to leverage and develop your knowledge of new media and emerging technologies. But I would also encourage you to take note of the generations that have preceded you in the halls of Condé Nast and their profound influence on the evolution of media, advertising, fashion, culture, and technology. It is always best to appreciate the broader picture— understand yesterday, today, and tomorrow. That knowledge and broad-mindedness will enable you to engage people and effect change—no matter what career path you choose. Thank you for your contributions this summer to our Company and its brands. One day you will look back at your time spent at Condé Nast as a valued part of your past and, hopefully, an important building block in your future. Best of luck and good fortune, Charles H. Townsend C.E.O.

A band of interns, cheeks red and foreheads glistening, streamed into the third-floor studio at 4 Times Square for their photo shoot. It was the hottest day New York had seen in more than a decade, but the group faithfully adhered to their wardrobe instructions: black shirts, dark jeans. Music filled the room, poses shifted delicately, lights flashed, and we got our first shot. A new group of interns—happily dressed in taupes and gold—filed in. The shooting continued. When lunch arrived, the photographer, Gregg Delman, joined us to eat. While munching on a Thai wrap, Gregg asked a stylist how long she had worked at Condé. “I guess it’s been a month now? I’m an intern too,” she explained. He surveyed the rest of us. We gave the same answer. His confusion set in. “So wait, you’re all interns?” We nodded, and he responded simply. “That’s really cool.” We know that we’re interns, with limited experience for our short summer here at Condé. But from the magazine’s first meeting, it was clear everyone wanted to go big. Breaking from the mold of years past, we rechristened the magazine IN to signify our new direction. Writers and editors pitched inventive and complex pieces. Designers created layouts and graphics deserving of a Condé Nast publication. And the newly formed marketing and sales teams launched IN’s inaugural advertising campaign. Together, we’ve nearly tripled the size of the magazine, and hopefully set a new standard. Our approach to IN parallels what we see as the mindset of our generation: building upon precedent, but continuing toward untouched territory. With the ever-growing opportunities in the world of magazines—in whatever the physical form—we find ourselves in a time ripe for innovators. IN proudly presents The Generation Issue. Patrick Knoth, Katie Steen & Allie Fisher Editor-in-Chief, Publisher & Creative Director

PK KS

AF

Photo by Rachel Vorsanger

LETTER FROM THE EXECS


Photo by Rachel Vorsanger

FINDINGS 10

Gadgets

12

Sports

14

Books

16

Dining

18

Politics & Society


IN: GADGETS

MATT MARGINI & HALEY SCHATTNER

BY

PROS CONS and

Nintendo Wii The Wii’s simple, sleek remote, family-friendly library, and (formerly) low price tag first captured our hearts and wallets in 2006. It continues to be a hit. FOR: Your in-laws approve. Friends and family bond quickly over a simple, intuitive waggle session, landing the Wii a spot on the pop culture landscape. AGAINST: Same old, same old. The Wii’s success has paved the way for competitors Sony and Microsoft, but the Wii console itself has remained surprisingly stagnant. Many Wii gamers only own Wii Sports—which comes in the system’s box—because other Wii-compatible games are not as well known.

If you’re a gamer, you’ve heard the legend already: Motion control is a

gateway drug.

PlayStation Move Sony is not bashful about its upcoming Wii alternative, PlayStation Move: Its official slogan is “This Changes Everything.” The two black controllers are essentially Wiilike, except that one has a cute glowing orb on the top for better motion tracking. FOR: Painless transition. Rather than creating a walled-off garden of wand-waving zaniness, the company is making sure that Move can be used with traditionally “hardcore” games that users already own. AGAINST: Limited mass appeal. The system may only attract those enthusiasts who already own a PS3. The Move may work with Killzone 3, but don’t count on Grandma playing.

Motion control

is full immersion,

unobstructed bliss, freedom from the shackles of the controller. Like touch-based computing, motion control will be around, in some form, indefinitely. It is intuitive, and eliminates complex interfaces. Motion control bridges the generational gap—it’s the simple way to get Grandma in (virtual) boxing gloves. Soon, two new systems that allow gamers to play using their bodies will join the veteran Nintendo Wii on store shelves. How do these three systems measure up?

Xbox Kinect Using a special camera, Microsoft’s upcoming Kinect will treat your body as the controller, detecting dance moves, posture, and even that finger you brandish when you lose. FOR: No complicated, threatening plastic. Kinect offers an entirely new way to play. Its official website preaches that “when technology becomes invisible and intuitive—you and your experience become one.” AGAINST: Too real. Why leave behind the days of ninja-caliber combos to step back into your own creaky joints? With Kinect, the possibilities for true escapism seem limited. You can’t even sit down. GRAPHIC BY ALLIE

INTERN

OPINIONS

[

10

[

THE RESULTS OF A SURVEY OF 58 INTERNS

GAMING DEVICES AT HOME:

MOTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY SHOULD BE DEVELOPED:

NONE 55.4%

YES 48.3%

_1 >

44.6%

3.4% NO

FISHER

48.3% DON’T CARE


“Amaze us. Tell us something we’ve never heard before, in a way we’ve never seen before”

—Chris Anderson—Editor in Chief, WIRED

WIRED for the iPad. Reimagined. Redesigned. Remarkable.

WIRED.com/app | Powered by Condé Nast.


IN: SPORTS

STEPHEN OSTROWSKI Photos Courtesy of Associated PRess

BY

US OPEN YOUNG GUNS In the 2001 cult flick The Royal Tenenbaums, tennis virtuoso Richie Tenenbaum—played by Luke Wilson—suffers a bizarre meltdown during match play. Wryly describing the disaster, an announcer observes: “He’s taken off one of his shoes and socks, and...actually I think he’s crying.” Consider this the exemplary metaphor for the United States’ recently anemic US Open performances. The American men are title-less since 2003 (Andy Roddick), while American women very recently saved some face with Serena Williams’ 2008 championship—in short, an American attack that is a far cry from the John McEnroe-, Jimmy Connors-, and Chris Evert-dominated Levia­ than of old. Still, there exists an exclusive school of American wunderkinder, all 25 years old or younger, that may be capable of a miracle run at the 2010 US Open. A combination of power (Isner), winning experience (Querrey), and speed (Oudin) may just be enough to diffuse another American Baum—er, bomb.

INTERN

OPINIONS

[

[

12

THE RESULTS OF A SURVEY OF 58 INTERNS

POWER RECORD SPEED JOHN ISNER

SAM QUERREY

MELANIE OUDIN

At 25, John Isner is ranked 19th in men’s tennis and grabbed the ATP’s Most Improved Player award last year. The 6'9" North Carolinian reached the fourth round of this year’s Australian Open and picked up a singles title at the Heineken Open. At this year’s Wimbledon, Isner defeated France’s Nicolas Mahut after three days of play, the longest match in tennis history. Most telling? Isner clobbered an impressive 66 aces at his 2007 US Open debut. The Open’s hardcourt surface should do major favors for his lethal baseline game.

Also heading the younggun charge is 22-year-old Sam Querrey, of Thousand Oaks, Calif. Though Querrey made first-round exits at this year’s French and Australian Opens, his résumé boasts singles titles at the 2010 Serbia Open and the 2009 LA Tennis Open. He’s never made it past the third round of a Slam event, but Querrey will likely benefit from the US Open’s surface, especially since he considers his serve and forehand his greatest strengths. And at 6'6" Querrey cuts an imposing, formidable figure to his opponents.

While the American men boast quality contenders in Isner and Querrey, they cannot lay claim to the American women’s golden stake: a Top 100 teenager. Ranked 35th on the WTA tour, 18-year-old Melanie Oudin is the third-highestranked American woman, trailing only Venus and Serena Williams. Despite first-round losses at this year’s French and Australian Opens, it’s too early to call “slump” on the young lady, who in 2009 made it to the fourth round of Wimbledon and the quarters of the US Open, upending Maria Sharapova along the way.

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Daily. Weekly. Monthly. Globally. GOLF DIGEST AND GOLF WORLD WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE INTERNS FOR THEIR HARD WORK AND DEDICATION THIS SUMMER. IT WAS GREAT TO HAVE yOU WITH US, AND WE APPRECIATE ALL OF yOUR EFFORTS!


IN: BOOKS

BY BRITTANY

KABACK

CADAVEROUS

COLLABORATIONS “I envied all the creative copyright infringement that flourishes on the Internet, and I wanted to do similar things at Quirk Books,” says Rekulak.

No author has been subject to literary spinoffs quite like Jane Austen. Her seven novels have spawned scores of prequels and sequels—from Mr. Darcy’s Diary to Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen. But few have matched the stir caused by the most recent one: Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Rather than continuing the story that Austen began, he instead collaborated with her. The fusion of two literary works into one has spawned an entirely new genre: “mashup” literature. According to Library Journal, GrahameSmith claims to keep 85 percent of Austen’s original Pride and Prejudice in his mashup novel, while incorporating horror into the romance. The New York Times bestseller is being adapted into a graphic novel and is in development by Lionsgate as a movie that will star Natalie Portman. The book’s success inspired its publisher, Quirk Books, to form a series imprint specifically geared to mashup classics like Zombies.

“The series was inspired by video and music mashups that are common on the Internet. I envied all the creative copyright infringement that flourishes on the Internet, and I wanted to do similar things,” explains Jason Rekulak, the associate publisher and creative director of Quirk Books. “But since we sell our products, I knew I couldn’t touch anything that was copyrighted. This led me to classic literature in the public domain. I thought it would be fun to take all the classics we had to read in high school and ‘enhance’ them with new elements.” This Internet-inspired series has popularized its own online trend. Book trailers, or short video advertisements for a publication, circulate on video-sharing websites like YouTube. The current number one hit for “book trailer” on YouTube is Quirk’s Sense and Sensibility and Seamonsters trailer. Reactions to the texts have ranged from outrage to gimmicky delight. Still, whether seen as novelties, satires, or strokes of brilliance, they seem to have resurrected the most beloved authors—in spirit if not, sadly, in body.

IN RECOMMENDS: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith Quirk Books, $12.95 Jane Slayre Charlotte Brontë and Sherri Browning Erwin Gallery Books, $15.00 Android Karenina Leo Tolstoy and Ben H. Winters Quirk Classics, $12.95 Little Vampire Women Louisa May Alcott and Lynn Messina HarperTeen, $8.99

PHOTO BY ARIBA

INTERN

OPINIONS

[

[

14

THE RESULTS OF A SURVEY OF 58 INTERNS

CURRENTLY READING:

Stieg Larsson

Tom Wolfe

Elizabeth Gilbert Malcolm Gladwell

Sylvia Plath

Haruki Murakami

Jane Austen

ALVI

TOP GO-TO SECTIONS IN THE BOOKSTORE:

Classics 61.4% Bestsellers 61.4% Fiction 42%


Ad designed by Oren Katz

PUTTING THE WOW BACK IN VOW


IN: DINING

REPORTING & PHOTOS BY ARIBA

ALVI

ONE ITEM WONDERS 1

2

3

The Lower East Side and East Village have long been on foodies’ radars: Gems like Momofuku Ko and wd-50 are global destinations. But the past few years have marked another, humbler species of East Village and LES restaurants: the one-item eatery. Instead of spreading their resources thin, these petite, often-crowded spots have each perfected one dish, usually the restaurant’s namesake. Here are IN’s four favorite one-item eateries worth venturing downtown for—line or no line.

Instead of spreading their resources thin, these spots have each perfected one dish. 1

2

4 4

3

S’mac 345 East 12th Street

Stuffed Artisan Cannolis 176 Stanton Street

Vanessa’s Dumplings 220 East 14th Street

The Meatball Shop 84 Stanton Street

S’mac, just a short walk from Union Square, is known for its classic macaroni and cheese—but you can also order with creative add-ons. All are cooked on the stove, then baked in an iron-cast skillet to add a crispy topping. It packs a cheesy wallop and strikes the difficult balance between cream and crunch. Even if you swear by Kraft’s, one taste of this cheesy goodness will have you crossing over from the boxed side.

Is the cannoli the new cupcake? If Stuffed Artisan Cannolis is indicative, the answer may be “yes.” This tiny shop boasts some daring flavors: s’more, Girl Scout cookie, piña colada, and banana cream pie. But they still do justice to the original cannoli; it’s perfectly sweetened with the ideal crunch level. The only drawback? The cannolis come pre-stuffed rather than being stuffed on the spot. Luckily, the unique flavors here help you forget any quibbles.

You could very easily walk past Vanessa’s Dumplings, mistaking it for just another Asian eatery. Don’t. The dumplings come cheap and plentiful; one order of these pillowy, juicy stuffed balls of dough is enough to fill you up for a whole afternoon. Quickly cooked in water with an oversize wok, they arrive steaming and with scrumptious fillings, which range from pork and cabbage to chicken and mushrooms.

The Meatball Shop looks even more rustic and familial than its name suggests. There’s typically a wait every night of the week, and with good reason: The meatballs are pure bliss. Order them on sliders, subs, pasta, or alone. Whichever way they’re served, they come perfectly round, tender, and moist—but substantial enough not to fall apart. Even the buns for the sliders and subs are top-notch: soft, with a buttery taste to round out the meal.

Try: Four cheese

Try: Banana cream pie

Try: Steamed pork &

Try: Anything on the

mac-and-cheese. $6.25

cannoli. $2.00

chive. $3.99 for eight

menu. $3.00–$9.00

16


PROMOTION

PHOTOGRAPH BY ETHAN PALMER; CUPCAKES BY SHORTBREADNYC.COM

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IN: POLITICS BY

JONATHAN TOPAZ

18

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMOMS/AMAGILL

ELITE ACCESS

ing—continues to undermine the political authority of minorities. Equally disturbing, though, is our society’s unwillingness or inability to have a nuanced and courageous discussion on race, socioeconomic status, and their places in American politics. In a New York Times op-ed in the wake of President Obama’s reaction to the Henry Louis Gates arrest, Professor Glenn Loury identified America as a society “incapable of talking straight with one another about House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) was stunned. race.” Reinforced by a Alvin Greene, a 32-year-old unemployed veteran, who had been arself-righteous and ravrested on charges of obscenity and lewd conduct, had just won— enous mass media, “our easily!—South Carolina’s Democratic nomination for November’s talk about race must US Senate elections, held on June 8, 2010. Greene had failed to be forced into a comattend any official Democratic Party events, hold any rallies, or fortable and familiar, produce extensive campaign literature. Running against the wellif false, narrative where respected lawmaker Vic Rawl, Greene was about the unlikeliest canvillains (‘racists’) and didate to receive 60 percent of the vote. heroes (‘victims of racThough Clyburn scoffed at how ism’) are clear-cut, and South Carolina could vote for someone The uproar over Greene’s victory where all one needs do so unqualified, he was more shocked by highlights perhaps the greatest bias to stand on the right something else. “What is an unemployed remaining in our electoral system— side of history is to enguy doing paying $10,000 to run for the gage in a bit of moral United States Senate? It just doesn’t add socioeconomic status. sanctimony.” Our up.” In other words, a candidate with a country’s discussion of criminal record who completely lacks race is disingenuous, public policy experience is more politicaland this extends to the ly viable than one without much money. obvious yet uncomfortable connection between socioThe uproar over Greene’s victory highlights perhaps the greatest bias economic status and race. remaining in our electoral system—socioeconomic status. Since the 1964 The structural inequalities that our society reinCivil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act (1965), American society has forces affect African-Americans disproportionately. The seen few explicit structural barriers to political equality. Yet today our average white family makes nearly 40 percent more representatives disproportionately come from upper economic echelons. in annual income than the average African-American Congress seemingly exchanged one electoral prerequisite for another— family. Because the educational system promotes loracial qualification for economic. More unfortunately, these two factors cal funding, educational inequality is rampant. School are inextricably intertwined. districts with large African-American populations tend The modern campaign necessitates personal wealth and sophisticated to be poorer and thus have less funding, compoundfund-raising mechanisms. In late 2007, The Wall Street Journal and Fox ing the problem. American society gives low-income News were quick to write off Senator John McCain’s campaign because children—disproportionately African-American and of its fund-raising woes. Every single one of the nearly 20 presidential already at a structural disadvantage—under-funded candidates in 2008 reported incomes of at least $200,000. Congressional schools, and expects these students to compete in a incumbents—already armed with the distinct advantages of coalition and meritocratic society. Essentially, the problem of a disname recognition (and the consequent fund-raising)—enjoy an annual proportionately wealthy Congress is also an implicitly salary of just under $174,000, over three times the median income for an racial problem. American family. The recent primary victories in June—billed by many as It takes a more astute public to recognize barriers a female revolution—are more truthfully a reinforcement of the socioecofacing aspiring public officials today. The problems 45 nomic status quo, as these women include two extremely wealthy former years ago were enormously challenging, but they were CEOs and one seasoned incumbent, Blanche Lincoln. All three enjoyed blatant—explicit prejudices written into law that exconsiderable fund-raising advantages. plicitly excluded members of society. Generations later, Of course, explicitly racial prejudice in American politics has not Congress is still an “in” club, but its exceptionality recompletely died out. Pundits debated extensively before and after the 2008 volves around a subtler factor, socioeconomic status. election about the possible existence of a Bradley Effect, a theory positing When will our society give the Alvin Greenes of the that black politicians poll better than they perform because of, among world a fair shot? other things, hidden prejudices. Gerrymandering—systematic redistrict-


PHOTOGRAPH BY CASS BIRD NOVEMBER 2008

IS IN THE DETAILS

THE DIFFERENCE IS IN DETAILS


SUMMER

IN THE CITY Anna Wintour

Interns chat before orientation day.

Photographer Gregg Delman

Names Names, Names Names The art and photo interns take five during their shoot.

Bill Wackermann Mentors and interns mingle at the cookie break. PHOTOS BY JOHN

LOCKETT

and

RACHEL VORSANGER


Interns kayak along the Hudson.

Megan Salt, Virginia Smith, and Trey Laird

Ivan Shaw

INTERN EVENTS The Business of Content DAVID CHEMIDLIN, Senior Vice President—Corporate Controller JOHN DUFFY, Senior Manager, Policies & Controls Archive Tours SHAWN WALDRON, Archive Director Intern-al Exposure: Developing a Photographic Career at Condé Nast IVAN SHAW, Photography Director, Vogue Photo Studio: Lucky Cute Outfit Shoot MEL MCNAMARA, Digital Studio Manager

The marketing interns get ready for their shoot.

21

Executive Advertising Seminar Networking Cookie Break BILL WACKERMANN, Senior Vice President, Interns and their Mentors Publishing Director, Brides, Details, Glamour, and W Future of Advertising JOSH STINCHCOMB, Publisher, Executive Editorial Seminar Condé Nast Digital ANNA WINTOUR, Editor-in-Chief, Vogue VIRGINIA SMITH, Fashion Market/ Digital Magazines—Game On Accessories Director, Vogue RICK LEVINE, Vice President—Editorial MEGAN SALT, Director of Public Relations, Operations Vogue TOM WALLACE, Editorial Director TREY LAIRD, Chief Executive/Creative Officer, Laird+Partners


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PHOTO BY ALLIE FISHER

CITY INTELLIGENCE

24

The Appropriation Generation

27

The High Line

30

Image vs. Picture

32

Fashion at the Met


THE

APPROPRIATION

GENERATION By Zoë Lescaze

By the time of his first gallery show, the subways were already covered in his graffiti tags, and his canvases resonated with the same boldness he applied to his street art. He came of age in a decade that must have felt like the leading edge of apocalypse: Reagan was president, Iran-Contra came to light a year after scientists discovered the hole in the ozone layer, AIDS ran rampant, the stock market plummeted, and 11 million gallons of crude oil were spilled off the Alaskan coast. And though the truly great artists of the 1980s were not painting tar-covered pelicans, the anxieties and atrocities of their age engendered powerful art. Now there are more artists under the age of 30 exhibiting their work than ever before. But the present day, despite its unsettling similarity to the 1980s, has not inspired a generation of Basquiats, Harings, and Hirsts. No single wunderkind stands out—but plenty are trying. “I think it’s just a crowded field right now, [and] it’s hard to cut through the white noise,” says Bill Powers, the co-owner of Half 24

Gallery and editor-at-large of the magazine Purple Fashion. “One thing that’s really changed in the last generation or so: It used to be that you would never think of having a show until you were 30 or 40 years old.” According to Powers, a shift in the market accounts for the recent tidal wave of young artists, flotsam and jetsam included. In the ’90s, dealers started searching for new talent among the young. Soon, artists fresh out of grad school were experiencing instant, but perhaps illusory, success. Today, young artists are flooding the market in droves. While it’s hard to characterize the work of all young artists, one trend is apparent in both the white noise and the noteworthy buzz: Young artists on the whole are seizing upon found images, just as mixtape-makers are sampling and sourcing preexisting tracks. “It seems to be the Appropriation Generation,” says Powers (who should probably copyright the apt label, and fast). The move-

All photos courtesy of the MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center.

In 1980, Jean-Michel Basquiat roared onto the New York art scene.


25

ment has a godfather in Richard Prince (the “rephotographer” notorious for photographing photographs, such as old Marlboro advertisements) and a patron saint in Andy Warhol. The Appropriation Generation had a big New York showcase at last year’s “Younger than Jesus” exhibition at the New Museum, which featured 50 artists under the age of 33. An exemplar was Tigran Khachatryan, whose video art consisted of clips from Battleship Potemkin edited with his own footage of skateboarders. The trend continues today. Currently on view at the “Greater New York” show at the MoMA P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Deana Lawson’s “Ohio Series” contains snapshots of six murder victims taken by their friends, not by her. In the words of Powers, “We’ve taken the idea of found imagery to the square root of Duchamp.” Powers finds the most promising aspect of the art being produced by young artists today to be the reemergence of social and political commentary. “For a long time, people have been afraid to make real social commentary in their work because having political or social statements seems a little too earnest,” explains Powers. Hank Willis Thomas’ “Unbranded: Reflections in Black Corporate America” is a dazzling example of this social awareness. The series consists of two magazine advertisements from each year between 1969, the year Martin Luther King Jr. was

One trend is apparent. Young artists on the whole are seizing upon found images, just as mixtapemakers are sampling and sourcing preexisting tracks.

assassinated, and 2008, the year President Barack Obama was elected. All 82 target black consumers, or use images of blackness to target whites. As the statement accompanying it explains, Thomas’ work “encourages viewers to look harder and think more deeply about how advertising reinforces stereotypes surrounding race, gender and cultural identity.” “Unbranded” is a highlight of “Greater New York,” a twice-a-decade display of emerging talent and a decidedly mixed bag of media and messages that has both high and very low points. On the other side of the spectrum from Thomas’ keen social criticism, there are those who are simply making beautiful, original work. In an age where aesthetic appeal is no longer a requisite for quality art, these youthful instances of it are exhilarating. After all, the young artists of the 1980s weren’t defacing Reagan’s effigies: They were making aesthetically compelling statements that were relevant to (but not necessarily explicitly tied to) their time and its issues. Today, Rosson Crow, 22, paints inviting yet otherworldly interiors that belong to both the Victorians and Vegas. Tim Barber, 31, takes snapshots a cut above the typical photo diary fare. In one particularly intimate photograph, the viewer is placed in bed, just behind a woman lying with her back to the camera, surfing the Internet in the nude, illuminated by her laptop and the light from an open window. This generation hasn’t found its Basquiat, but the decade is young. With any luck, the recession will cool the fever for hot new talent and a more sincere atmosphere will reemerge, within which young artists will continue to explore the anxieties, guilt, nostalgia, irreverence, hope, and humanity of this generation.


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THE

HIGH LINE BY

Dana Fraser and Rachel Vorsanger

Photos by Rachel Vorsanger Graphics by Kristen Whaley

Somewhere between

the City of New York Department of Sanitation and the Diane von Furstenberg flagship store lies the High Line: an alternative sidewalk/promenade/park hybrid, whose true identity remains under construction. An urban oasis, the High Line aims to fuse the grit and grime of city life with the boutique-like sophistication of the surrounding Meatpacking District. With both permanent and movable seating, lighting, and artwork, the park honors the unruliness of wildlife that consequently keeps the High Line a forgotten, mystic sanctuary that one seems to stumble upon from the hustle and bustle below. The striking juxtaposition of wildflowers and dilapidated warehouses transforms the 1930s freight rail structure while respecting its unique history.

27


An alternative sidewalk/ promenade/ park hybrid

whose

true identity remains

Built in the 1930s on the west side of Lower Manhattan, the High Line kept dangerous freight-train traffic off the downtown streets. In 1999, when demolition threatened the tracks, the non-profit organization Friends of the High Line partnered with the City of New York to both preserve and transform this monument. Today, pedestrians have replaced trains in traversing the historic tracks that wind through the heart of the Meatpacking District. In the future, people may travel these tracks by bike. With the help of a “summer pilot program” produced by the Forum for Urban Design, the Storefront for Art & Architecture, and the City Bakery, the New York Bikeshare Project could be part of the High Line’s expansion. With 20 bikes available for free 30-minute rentals and multiple loca28

tions around downtown Manhattan, the project could help make the High Line the next route for a “green” commute. The recent announcement of a one-year delay in the opening of Section 2 (now pushed to mid-2011) also revealed new plans for the space from West 20th to 30th Streets. According to Friends of the High Line, the Chelsea Thicket, a dense patch of shrubs and trees, will be visible from a glass viewing platform called the Woodland Flyover, a three-block-long metal walkway that suspends visitors above the High Line tracks and juts into a forest of sumac trees. Lawn and bleacher seating will give visitors a place to lounge and view the flourishing flora and fauna. From bustling industrial hub to grass, glass, and concrete oasis, the High Line’s transformation embodies the future of New York, where rich history and forward thinking converge.


vs.

IMAGE

PICTURE

“The photographic medium is at the time when it almost recognizes the impossibility of absolute originality,” says Roxana Marcoci, curator of the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art. “What is more important is this very dynamic system of production and distribution or dissemination that happens, and how things are recycled.” Roe Ethridge, Elad Lassry, Alex Prager, and Amanda Ross-Ho explore these ideas as a part of “New Photography 2010,” an exhibition opening September 29 and curated by Marcoci, by blurring—or erasing completely—the lines between fine art, editorial, and commercial photography. The Pictures Generation of the late ’70s and early ’80s questioned the authorship of photographic media, appropriating images for their own critical practice. While indebted to their legacy, this new generation of artists is more interested in the “double, triple, quadruple kind of life” that photography now leads as images are shunted through news outlets, printed matter, advertising, and websites.

Julianne De La Torre

For example, Lassry employs tropes of stock photos or Hollywood publicity stills, composing basic objects on plinths or against silky backgrounds. These magazine-size images strongly resemble advertisements, uncanny in their wordlessness and glaring banality. In Lassry’s hands, the photograph is fluid, yet constructed, commercial, and conceptual. Alex Prager recycles images in a different way. Most known for taking Cindy Sherman–esque pictures of young women disguised and posed in cinematic settings, Prager recently created photo illustrations for a New York Times Magazine story about aging women and hormone therapy. Instead of relying on her formula, she inserted middle-aged women into the same settings and costumes, producing intriguingly new images. As a result, ideas from a commercial editorial found their way back into her artistic practice. For these artists, the hardened boundaries dividing commercial pursuits from artistic ones have dissolved. Now excitement comes from confusing photographic typologies, even getting them wrong.

The hardened boundaries dividing commercial pursuits from artistic ones have dissolved.

ALL IMAGES THIS PAGE COURTESY OF DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY, LOS ANGELES, AND LUHRING AUGUSTINE, NEW YORK

BY


York Magazine and The New York Times as well as ad campaigns for Levi’s, Stella McCartney, and Pringle of Scotland. His most recent artwork ranges from documentary pictures to portraiture and back again. McGinley embodies the spirit of the 21stcentury photographer, pulling inspiration from everywhere, even his own work, and reinventing himself with each new project. In this expanded field, photography is not always two-dimensional anymore,

says Marcoci. “The endlessly reproducible, scalable mutability of the photographic image” has unleashed—and will continue to unleash­—a seductive freedom for all image-makers. But, as the recognizable qualities of image typologies slip between contexts, one wonders if there will come a time when an advertisement will be completely indiscernible from a work of art or from an illustration, if that time hasn’t arrived already.

Elad Lassry

‘‘

Alex Prager

These artists are interested in the ‘double, triple, quadruple kind of life’ as images are shunted through news outlets, printed matter, advertising, and websites.

‘‘

ALEX PRAGER PORTRAIT BY JASON LEE. ELAD LASSRY PORTRAIT BY PETER HOLZHAUER. AMANDA ROSS-HO PORTRAIT COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Exhibitions such as “New Photography 2010” have their limits. “You can only show a facet of what is new now,” Marcoci acknowledges. Yet this experimentation with multiple creative outlets appears to be a widespread trend among other photographers. Ryan McGinley, beloved of the young New York scene, first garnered public attention at age 23 with a solo exhibition of his beautifully carefree pictures. Since then, he has photographed editorial spreads for New

Amanda Ross-Ho 31


BY

Sara Angle

Through a series of six round rooms at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s newest exhibit in collaboration with its Costume Institute and the newly established Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection, visitors enter the worlds of centuries past, where styled mannequins recapture history through the luxe jewel tones of the bohemians, the drop-waist shifts of the flappers, and the twisting, elegant gowns of the Hollywood starlets. The exhibit, “American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity,” looks at female archetypes based on mass media representations of American women from the 1890s to the 1940s. Sponsored by GAP and Condé Nast, the display focuses on images that represent not the majority of American women but rather what women during these times aspired to be. Amid restrictive societal boundaries, these American women longed for independence and expressed this yearning through their clothing. Each era represented in the exhibit has its own characteristic style influenced by the zeitgeist of the time and the hurdles women have overcome—from the 1890s “Gibson Girl” and heiress to the bohemian of the 1900s to the patriots and suffragists of the 1910s, the flappers of the 1920s, and the screen sirens of the 1930s. Though the achievements of these female figures helped to emancipate the American woman, the importance of an idealized notion of “beauty” remains.

No matter the time period, the American woman has always been synonymous with glamour. No matter the time period, the American woman has always been synonymous with glamour, explains Andrew Bolton, curator of the Costume Institute at the Met. But where does the typical American woman today fit into this picture, and who is today’s exemplar

32

met

of American beauty? Though Bolton says he thinks women today most closely exemplify the Gibson Girl and the screen siren—slim, youthful, self-aware, athletic, and physically liberated, while still exuding glamour—he says that if he were curating an exhibit about the iconic 21st-century American female, he would simply title her the “modern woman.” “She’s representing progress and modernity,” Bolton says. “She’s liberated and independent.” Indeed, today’s American woman—the actresssinger-designer-model—can do anything, and often tries to take on everything. She mixes high- and lowend pieces into her outfit, even incorporating vintage treasures. Heels or flats, cropped hair or luxurious waves, delicate lace or edgy leather, short hems or sweeping skirts—there is nothing she can’t do and no outfit she can’t do it in. Lady Gaga can wear a beekeeper hat with a lace pantsuit. Heidi Klum can walk the runway six months after giving birth. Megan Fox can bare her tattoos in a Roberto Cavalli gown. But, Bolton says, while today’s “modern woman” may largely be free from social, political, and economic limitations, she, like her predecessors, is limited by the feeling that she must create a perfect image of herself to be “beautiful.” “She is still constrained by ideals of beauty and body because of the power of imagery,” he adds. “Fashion liberates and constrains at the same time.”

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF TTHE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

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Carb lovers, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in luck. Our ancestors may have known a thing or two about nutrition, and the days of low-carb diets are behind us.

THE HOLY GRAINS


BY

Jamie Bachmann

John Lockett and Maya Robinson PHOTOS BY

Should we really be surprised? The metabolic syndrome—obesity, hypertension and diabetes—is purely a product of our generation. But before heading straight to the pasta aisle, give the grains of yesteryear a chance. Atlanta-based sports nutritionist Ilana Katz, R.D., recommends eating “clean,” “earthy,” unprocessed carbs, which she says are higher in fiber and lower in cholesterol, and are “our main source of energy.” Katz works with athletes in need of high-energy, non-processed diets. After eating these grains, her clients report feeling energized, she says. While Katz notes that the whole-grain trend has been developing over the past few years, she blames the low-carb revolution for “freaking people out about carbs.” Merritt Watts, assistant nutrition editor at Self magazine, agrees that the low-carb lifestyle has passed, and that the health benefits of grains are undeniable. Watts notes that the fiber found in grains is noticeably better than the fiber in vegetables at preventing the body from absorbing cholesterol. Furthermore, Katz says ,whole grains have low glycemic indexes, preventing spikes in insulin and controlling diabetes. As nutritionists continue to unveil the health benefits of ancient grains, options such as quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wa, when you have to ask which shelf it’s on), flaxseed, and mila are making their way back onto our plates and into our stomachs. Many of the grains have a nutty taste, and they’re often great substitutes for or complements to your favorite whole grains. Plus, many of these grains are gluten-free, making them a great alternative for people with digestive problems.

35


Quinoa Quinoa, a South American grain, is packed with complete protein and supplies all the essential amino acids. It is also vitamin-rich and an excellent source of fiber, which both keeps you full and lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease.

Flaxseed Flaxseed, cultivated in Egypt, is high in omega-3 fatty acids that help to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol, and keep your heart healthy. It’s also high in fiber and B vitamins, and recent research suggests that omega-3s may help prevent cancer.

Mila Mila, a seed of the ancient Aztecs, supplies more omega-3s than salmon, more fiber than flax, more calcium than milk, more iron than spinach, and more potassium than bananas. Mila does not need to be prepared, but instead can simply be added to drinks or smoothies or sprinkled in your favorite cereal or yogurt.

Ancient grains salad with LEMON-DIJON VINAIGRETTE Serves 4

Ingredients • ¼ cup bulgur • ¼ cup millet • ¼ cup quinoa (rinsed) • ¼ cup dried cranberries • ½ cup parsley leaves, chopped • 1 sweet red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped • 1 pear, sliced • 1 cup chopped walnuts • 1 package mixed greens Vinaigrette:

• 2 tablespoons lemon juice • 5 tablespoons olive oil • 2 tablespoons garlic clove, minced • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard • ¼ teaspoon salt • Ground peppercorn

Directions In large bowl, pour 1 cup boiling water over bulgur. Cover and let stand for 30 minutes, then fluff with fork. Meanwhile, bring 1½ cups water to boil in saucepan; add millet and reduce heat to medium. Cover saucepan and let simmer for 5 minutes. Add quinoa; cover saucepan and let simmer until water is absorbed (about 12 minutes). Add millet, quinoa, parsley, red pepper, pear, and cranberries to bulgur. FOR VINAIGRETTE: Whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, mustard, salt, and pepper to taste. Toss with mixed greens, and top with grain mixture and walnuts.


Pepper lime bulgur risotto

blueberry spelt muffins

with SHRIMP AND Peas

with NUTMEG and orange

Serves 4

Makes 1 dozen

Ingredients • 2 tablespoons olive oil • 3 cloves garlic, minced • 1¼ cups bulgur wheat • ¾ teaspoon salt • 2½ cups chicken broth • 1 pound fresh or frozen (thawed) raw shrimp, shelled and deveined • 2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels • 1 cup frozen peas • 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped • 1 medium yellow bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped • 2 limes (1 juiced, 1 cut into wedges) • ¾ teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions Place peas (and corn, if frozen) in a colander. Run warm water over mixture for about 15 seconds. In a medium-sized pot, bring chicken broth to boil. In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add garlic and stir for 30 seconds; add bulgur and salt; stir 1 minute more. Stir in ½ cup chicken broth. Wait for bulgur to absorb broth, then add another ½ cup. Continue adding broth until about ½ cup remains. Bulgur should be slightly soupy. Add shrimp. Cook, stirring constantly, until they turn pink (2 to 3 minutes). Add corn, peas, peppers, juice from 1 lime, and red pepper flakes. Continue stirring and adding broth to keep mixture creamy. Cook until corn, peas, and peppers are warmed through (1 to 2 minutes). Garnish with lime wedges.

Ingredients • 4 tablespoons (½ stick) softened butter • ⅔ cup sugar • ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce • 2

eggs

• ⅓ cup orange juice • 1 tablespoon maple syrup • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract • 2¼ cups spelt flour • 2 teaspoons baking powder • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg • ¼ teaspoon salt • 2 cups fresh blueberries

Directions Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper muffin liners. In a medium-size bowl, stir together butter and sugar with a spatula. Stir in applesauce, eggs, orange juice, maple syrup, and vanilla. In a large bowl, whisk together 2 cups flour, baking powder, nutmeg, and salt. Stir flour mixture into butter-egg mixture until just combined. Dust blueberries with remaining spelt flour to keep them from bursting while baking. Gently stir blueberries into batter. Spoon batter into muffin cups and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean, about 30 minutes.

37


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ON THE CUFF: NEW YORK CITY’S EMERGING FASHION INNOVATORS FIVE UP-AND-COMING DESIGNERS OPEN THEIR STUDIOS AND PREVIEW LOOKS FROM THEIR NEW COLLECTIONS. Photography by Maya Robinson Styling by Emily Note

STYLE BY GILDA SU

39


WHIT

POZGAY Whitney Pozgay has captured the essence of personalized cloth­­ing with her new line titled WHIT. Her time as an employee and intern for four years at her aunt’s company (Kate Spade New York), and her study of costume design at the Fashion Institute of Technology and Parsons taught her the art of creating unique staple pieces that can be styled according to their owner. Pozgay says her line “looks to dress the educated and savvy woman without being too overtly sexy or too conservative.” Her designs show clear inspiration from the ’60s and ’70s, using forms from those eras to offer a fresh take on stripes and polka dots. Last February, Pozgay saw her designs come to life while shooting her first lookbook. Her line premiered in May at Bird in Williamsburg. During our meeting, her smile widened at the idea that starlets like Kirsten Dunst and Tavi might wear her clothing someday. Her first line began selling at 40 stores this July—an auspicious start toward her goal of “keeping it going and keeping it growing.” –Alyssa Hood & Kristen Griffen

[My line] looks to “ dress the educated

and savvy woman without being too overtly sexy or too conservative.


like to “Igowould to Fashion Week, but I’m definitely not looking to turn it into a massive company.

LAURA SIEGEL Being green doesn’t have to mean being a hippie: Laura Siegel makes organic fashion chic by incorporating old materials. Her clothes are constructed and colored using all-natural materials and dyes, giving her line a clean, modern look. Siegel describes her design aesthetic as natural. “No chemicals are touching the body,” she says. “That’s a very nice feeling.”

The inspiration for many of Siegel’s pieces derives from her world travel. “The people I met, the things I saw all played a huge role,” she explains. Her latest designs include a jacket that can convert into a bag and a scarf that can double as a vest. She made the latter for herself out of scraps from her collection. Siegel designs clothes for “a wo­man who wants ease.” In the future, she says, she hopes to stay close to her roots and not expand too widely. “I would like to go to Fashion Week, but I’m definitely not looking to turn it into a massive company.” Perhaps harder said than done, as word of her talent continues to get out. –Elyse Roth


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I love seeing how people own their clothes and use them to express their personalities instead of letting clothes define who they are.

GILDA SU It’s not all black and white for fashion designer Gilda Su. The Singapore native’s use of strong colors, combined with diverse muses, has resulted in designs that are unmistakably her own. At 27, Su has already garnered recognition of her talent, including having her 13-piece collection, named rêvasseur, sold at NoHo boutique Début. “I’ve only just started my label and am still finding my footing,” she says. “But we can all dream big, right? One day, I hope to take it back to Japan, where I first received my fashion education.” Su enjoys merging disciplines, regularly drawing design inspiration from architecture,

history, and historical costumes. “I tend to obsess about certain details and expand on them until they change and become mine,” she explains. This mentality radiated from Su’s collection, where she fused unexpected patterns with versatile silhouettes that could be worn in different ways. Her favorite piece, a tribal-patterned jersey romper with multiple armholes and necklines, is a strong example of her adaptable designs. Su, who once interned for Patricia Field, explains her gravitation toward design in straightforward terms. “I am very intrigued by how clothes can change a person and how people can change clothes,” Su says. “I love seeing people own their clothes and use them to express their personalities instead of letting clothes define who they are.” –Lana Russo


KATHLEEN

STUPP Simplicity is the name of the game for Kathleen Stupp, and it’s apparently working. The recent Parsons graduate focused solely on austere menswear garments during her student years and, through that work, landed a nomination for Parsons’ 2010 Menswear Designer of the Year. The Pittsburgh native isn’t letting her accomplishments go to her head just yet, though—she’s already anticipating the challenges ahead. “Each presentation of a new idea is a challenge,” Stupp says. “It is difficult to protect your vision and your confidence when putting out a new idea you wholeheartedly believe in.” Originally aiming for a career in ballet, Stupp recognized design was her calling. “I realized I could work with the body in a way that would not be limited by my own physical capabilities and would allow me to make people more comfortable and more content with themselves.” Stupp uses “the everyday” as inspiration for her clothes, which make the wearer feel good, but admits she’s not ready to produce her own line just yet. “I’m excited to continue moving around the industry and getting to know all the different kinds of products,” she says. “I am always making things, however, and experimenting with my friends and hope to eventually bring those collaborations into the market.” –Nancy Mucciarone

It is difficult to protect your vision and your confidence when putting out a new idea you wholeheartedly believe in.


I don’t like to design anything that is too fussy. No one wants to struggle to get dressed in the morning.

KEVIN JOO

HWANG When Kevin Joo Hwang created his first collection of women’s clothing, he had chic comfort in mind. “I don’t like to design anything that is too fussy,” he says. “No one wants to struggle to get dressed in the morning.” Vintage photographs of fishermen inspired his ideas for his current collection. “I started by looking at different occupations

that involved utilitarian functionality, and fishermen’s clothing really stood out for me,” he explains. He also looked to East Asian textiles, creating a look that combines “utilitarian functionality” with chic feminine modernity. The Los Angeles native’s collection was shown at the NoHo boutique Début. Consuelo Castiglioni (founder of Marni) and Dries Van Noten are among his favorite designers. Hwang hopes to design for both men and women, just as those two do. “It is really satisfying that others can relate to what I think is aesthetically beautiful and to know that my designs are relevant to people,” he says. –Rosie Purdy


Unpacked cardboard boxes clutter Stefano Tonchi’s eighth-floor corner office, hinting at his recent arrival to Condé Nast as the new editor-in-chief at W. Against one of the stark white walls rests a framed T etched into the image of a maple leaf, a reminder of his most recent position, editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine. Now he’s moving W to a new design, new content, and even new offices.

INTERVIEW


STEFANO TONCHI BY

You were born in Italy, one of the fashion centers of the world, and you ended up in the U.S. What brought you here?

Patrick Knoth

typefaces and introducing a lot of new features. We’ll look different and we’ll feel different and we’ll read different, but the process will take more than one month.

My love for magazines. I started working on magazines in college. I think I was 17, and a friend from school and I founded a Is the redesign a pretty big overhaul? magazine called Apache. We had to find the advertising, we had to The organization of the front of the book is completely find the money to publish it, go to the printer and try to distribute it. different. We have a large front of the book, five departments that My last couple of years at the University of Florence, I started another pose as the Who, the What, the Where, the When, and the Why. magazine called Westuff. Westuff was a little more ambitious and seriMy five W’s. I’m trying to have a more fluid structure between front ous and it became the Emporio Armani house magazine. Afterwards, of the book and the well. It won’t happen in September, but hopeI got a job at L’Uomo Vogue, where I switched from writing and editfully in the next 12 months. ing to art direction. I remember my first trip with L’Uomo Vogue—it was an entire issue in Nepal, where Were you trying to symbolize we shot a lot of the book with real that upcoming change with Aupeople. We would ask Buddhist gust’s Jon Hamm and Rebecca Hall cover? September is the first issue monks if they would wear a burgunNot at all. Having a couple dy cashmere sweater because they alof an evolution. We’ll look on the cover has been very sucways have to be wearing burgundy. different and we’ll feel different cessful, so there is a little bit of I worked in Italy for about five, six and we’ll read different. history there. It was an idea that years. I was attracted by the States, came from my editor-at-large, so I moved here, working for Italian Lynn Hirschberg. I see the magCondé Nast and collaborating with azine also as a more dual-gender all the Italian Condé Nast titles, and publication. The cover was a bit last minute, so we didn’t pick that then I got an offer to work for Self magazine as creative director. more relaxed look as something to send a signal.

How did studying classics at the University of Florence prepare you for a career in media and publishing?

It gave me a larger kind of open-mindedness. It was something that didn’t really prepare for anything in particular, so it would prepare you for anything. When I hire people, I always like people who have a multilayered knowledge, people who have multiple interests. You’ve called the readers of W “fashion-obsessed” in the past. Are you planning on reaching out to a different reader?

I’m planning to enlarge that audience, to talk to people who have an interest in fashion in the context of contemporary culture, contemporary society. So we’re adding a lot of features that are not just abstract—but also stories about the position of the art world right now, travel stories, entertainment stories. I would say the biggest difference is how we cover the entertainment industry. There are real stories, real journalists going on the sets of movies—stories have four-, five-, six-thousand words. These kinds of stories will be starting in September. September is the first issue of W that is really yours. How long do you think it will take for the magazine to truly reflect your vision?

September is the first issue of an evolution. The beginning of the transition will be evident because we are making changes in the

August’s issue featured an article about Gucci’s creative director, written by Lauren Collins, a staff writer at The New Yorker. Are you hoping to collaborate more with other Condé Nast magazines?

I hope so, especially with writers. I’m very excited, because for many years so many writers and photographers were off-limits because they all had contracts with Condé Nast. At The [New York] Times, we could not use them. With many Condé magazines utilizing technology to enhance their brand, do you have any plans for W?

We are going to redesign our website for September to match [the print redesign]. And we just heard that we will launch our iPad app in February. It will be with the Adobe platform. It’s a little bit more complex, but in the long run I think it’s much more interesting. Looking to the future, will it be tough to distinguish W from other Condé magazines?

Sure. You are competing in-house. That’s the most peculiar aspect of this company—there is a lot of competition inside. But at the end, the company gets a larger share of the market, the final goal. 47


48


PHOTOS BY John Lockett GRAPHICS BY Kristen Whaley

the

New

Consumer BY

Kat Balkoski and Elizabeth Rowe ADDITIONAL REPORTING

by Ava Feuer


MEET THE NEW CONSUMER:

Touching the Future at Condé Nast

From flipping through photos of Frida Giannini’s latest collection for Gucci on the Milan runways to planning a weekend getaway with her fiancé at San Francisco’s luxury Cavallo Point hotel, one New Consumer wants it all. And she wants it now. On her iPhone. Another New Consumer would rather put together a shopping list for a roasted fingerling potato salad and order some new oxford wedges on her way home from work. A third can’t get enough of the rich multimedia experience of a new iPad app. He also wants to check out that hyped-up Jeffrey Eugenides story and maybe buy a mug with a Shanahan cartoon for his dad’s birthday. There is no simple model that captures the range of interests and purchasing habits of today’s much-talked-about “New Consumer” of media. But each of these examples identifies some of the diverse opportunities Condé Nast is now offering to its most media-savvy generation of readers. DEFINING NEW

Media consumption resembles a game of tag, with the business model racing to catch up with the technology available to consumers.

Kelly Bare, director of special projects for The New Yorker’s website, describes New Consumers as “more mobile, and having less money, than older readers” of the magazine. “I think [the New Consumer] might be more likely to read newyorker.com,” she writes in a message to IN. “My guess is that’s partly because they are as comfortable with screens as they are with printed pages and partly because they are probably less likely to be subscribers—to anything.” Indeed, many New Consumers, particularly young ones, do not want to pay for media content, preferring to seek out free web content instead of purchasing print copies of the publications they enjoy—and presenting a formidable business challenge to magazine publishers such as Condé Nast. But Bare’s statement also begs the question of whether the New Consumer is “new” solely in the sense that he or she is young. Might the New Consumer instead refer to a group defined not by age but by purchasing habits? Research has revealed that since the start of the current economic downturn, consumers have developed increasingly discerning taste; sick of the meaningless waste of mass-market disposable products, they are also tired of the superficiality and cost of conspicuous consumption. They want quality. They want convenience. They want interactivity. That’s where Condé Nast comes in. By presenting the consistent quality content of years past using convenient, innovative, and interactive media, publications renowned for their editorial excellence can give today’s consumers something to believe in. THE BACKBONE: ‘EDITORIAL EXCELLENCE’ At 79-year-old GQ magazine—as at many other Condé brands—the new medium of choice is the iPhone app, which GQ Assistant Web Editor Andrew Richdale believes maintains the complete integrity of the magazine reading experience. “I think the success of [GQ’s] apps is due to how clean, simple, and easy to use they are. Guys respond to those qualities,” he explains in an e-mail.

50


*All statistics taken from survey of Condé Nast Interns on surveymonkey.com

And respond they have: GQ’s was the first app in the industry approved by the Audit Board of Circulations (ABC), Richdale says, which means each purchase of the app counts toward the magazine’s circulation—in a sense, a recalibration of what that very term means. Meanwhile, Epicurious.com’s iPad app is the third most popular lifestyle app for Apple’s newest device, according to Tanya Steel, the website’s editor–in-chief. So what’s behind the success? “Editorial excellence,” answers Steel, without hesitation. Indeed, the site posts recipes directly from the pages of Condé veterans Bon Appétit, Gourmet, Self, and Parade, as well as Random House cookbooks. At the same time, it features web-exclusive articles and blog posts added nearly every day. Capitalizing on the popularity of social media, Steel explains, Epicurious also boasts 2 million registered users who can add personal information to their profiles, post on one another’s “fridge doors,” and save their favorite recipes in “recipe boxes,” digital pages where users can store, organize, and share those recipes. And the numbers are impressive: According to Steel, the site gets an average of 4.5 million unique visitors per month (and nearly 7 million during holiday months), and so far, 2.3 million people have downloaded the Epicurious iPhone and iPad apps. In May, Epicurious received two Webby awards in the food/beverage and lifestyle categories. Still, intense brand loyalty like that at Epicurious has hardly given Condé editors an excuse to rest on their laurels. The company has taken on a remarkable double role as both venerable publishing institution and cutting-edge tech innovator. For example, Tom Loftus, web editor of Condé Nast Traveler, says technology such as the Microsoft tag reader—a print graphic that magazine readers can scan with their smartphones in order to access extra, usually multimedia content—is enhancing the experience for consumers who still pick up magazines in print. He says the experiment has been “modestly successful” so far, but speaks highly of its contribution to editorial content. “There’s something cool about reading a piece on, say, Beijing, then coming across a tag to watch a video or download a list of hot hotels,” he writes in an e-mail to IN.

HOW DO INTERNS USE THEIR PHONE ASIDE FROM MAKING CALLS OR TEXTING?

86.0% Checking e-mail

78.9% Going online

68.4% Managing social media

63.2% Using apps

14.0% Nothing. I don’t have a smartphone

A MULTI-PLATFORM APPROACH Tag readers are just one way Condé publications are marketing their editorial content across a variety of media to reach the New Consumer. Wired magazine, befitting its name and function, now gives techies access to its content on three levels: the print magazine, a website, and, as of May, a digital version for Apple’s iPad, each unique medium forming its own brand. Because Wired.com was not owned by Condé Nast until 2006, Wired’s website and magazine have long functioned independently. Now that magazine and website are in the same hands, magazine content is repurposed online, but the website is also home to original content and gives voice to reader comments. “The website is a separate entity which shares an editorial approach,” explains John Abell, the New York bureau chief of Wired.com. Condé Nast Traveler, meanwhile, has its own website, cntraveler.com, as well as a destination site, concierge.com, and a blog, Truth.Travel. Loftus says Condé Nast Traveler created the blog last September “out of a frustration we felt over concierge.com/cntraveler.com[’s] inability to foster online community and react quickly enough to travel news of the day.” While he says Truth.Travel does not currently get enough traffic and ad revenue to be called a huge success, he says it has acted effectively “as an incubator for online experimentation, as well as a way for our print-based writers to get a feel for digital reportage.” Even the writing-heavy New Yorker is focused on creating a product that is easy and enjoyable to read on “all kinds of screens,” the magazine’s Kelly Bare says. “We know we are primarily about reading—in that way we’re more like a book, really, than a lot of magazines—though of course visuals and multimedia are important and have great digital potential as well,” she says. For instance, The New Yorker makes animated cartoons available on Hulu.com, newyorker.com, and an iPad/iPhone app. Yet this particular project does not necessarily constitute a trend, Bare notes. 51


PAY IT FORWARD Blogs and frequent web updates keep readers informed and coming back for more. But several Condé brands are also moving beyond the web with the release of new digital editions in the form of iPad apps. Publications like The Economist and The Atlantic have hailed the device as the possible savior of the magazine industry. For one, iPad apps allow for on-screen content similar in appearance to that of print magazines but with added multimedia features. As Loftus puts it: “Travel photos, videos, interactive maps…the iPad was made for showcasing content like Condé Nast Traveler’s.” And the good news for magazine publishers is that, unlike most providers of web content, magazines charge for their apps. Wired’s Abell says the magazine’s editors made the move to produce an app because they recognized that “it is difficult to create a magazine-type experience and make money in a purely web environment.”

For Wired, the introduction of an iPad app represents a promising business move. According to Abell, prices for the print magazine are much higher outside the United States. In addition to the rich multimedia experience and intense curatorial care that has made the app so compelling to its subscribers, its reasonable pricing (€7.50 per issue in Europe, equivalent to about $9.70) should appeal to a new foreign readership, he says. Abell also predicts that a forthcoming subscription model will soon make the Wired app even more attractive to consumers in the U.S., where each issue Consumers have currently costs $3.99. developed increasingly In one case at least, discerning taste. They want the iPad is even bringing a magazine back to quality, convenience, life. Coincidentally, while and interactivity. Epicurious’ Steel described the success of her website’s lifestyle app in an interview, Condé Nast President and CEO Chuck Townsend sent out news about the launch of Condé’s latest app, Gourmet Live. The app aims to repurpose the now defunct Gourmet’s editorial content into an accessible new digital medium. In a June 22 press release, Townsend described Gourmet Live as “a product that reimagines Gourmet and revalues engagement.”

WHAT SOURCES DO INTERNS USE TO GET THE NEWS?

80.7% National Papers

(NYTimes, USA Today, Washington Post, LA Times, WSJ, etc.)

56.1% Campus

Newspaper

43.9% TV News

(CNN, Fox, etc.)

38.6% Aggregate Site

(HuffPo, Daily Beast, Drudge Report, etc.)

52

10.5% Radio (NPR,

Local Radio, etc.)

*All statistics taken from survey of Condé Nast Interns on surveymonkey.com

“This is actually not really part of a cohesive larger strategy to reach people who aren’t familiar with The New Yorker,” she says of the cartoons, citing a one-off arrangement with RingTales, an animation company. “But of course, any deal with an outside media company can expand your reach and bring in new readers/consumers.”


HAVE YOU EVER HELD AN iPAD? 70.2% Yes

29.8% No

DO YOU SHOP ONLINE? 5.3% No 94.7% Yes DO YOU TYPICALLY MAKE A PURCHASE?

54.4% Yes

Steel says she recognizes that Gourmet Live “will undoubtedly share some of the same consumers as Epi’s apps,” but she points out that Epicurious, as a site, is “more database-driven.” So Epicurious and Gourmet Live will function independently while sharing some consumers and even editorial content. Wired and Wired.com do so at the moment. It appears, then, that Condé’s greatest chance at continued success will come from its flexibility and multifaceted presentation. THE NEXT FRONTIER These days, media consumption resembles a game of tag, with the business model racing to catch up with the technology available to consumers. Napster happened and the music industry panicked, but then the paid iTunes model was introduced. Likewise, alarmists who predict the death of the magazine may be panicking prematurely. With paid apps and pay walls, among other strategies in place, Condé Nast is forging a new path for the magazine industry, and in doing so is expanding its consumer base by reaching the New Consumer in fundamentally new ways. Still, beneath the technological whirlwind transforming the industry, Condé’s fundamental commitment to its editorial product will remain constant. GQ’s Richdale summarizes his take on the industry in straightforward terms: “The goal is to churn out smart, quality content on all fronts and have a good time making it in the process.”

40.4% No

HOW DO INTERNS GET THEIR MAGAZINE FIX?

75.0% Newsstand

66.1% Subscription

66.1% Online

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EDITORIAL

Back Row: ROSIE PURDY (Brides.com/Brides local), JOE SATRAN (Details), JAMIE BACHMANN (Glamour) wearing Kevin Joo Hwang black faille top, PATRICK KNOTH (GQ), AVA FEUER (Teen Vogue). Middle Row: JULIANNE DE LA TORRE (W ) wearing a WHIT black twist top and Kevin Joo Hwang stone and wood bead geometric necklace, MARGARET SLATTERY (Self ), ZOË LESCAZE (Vogue), ELYSE ROTH (Condé Nast Digital), ELIZABETH ROWE (Condé Nast Traveler). Front Row: NANCY MUCCIARONE (Footwear News), ISAAC LOBEL (Allure), VICTORIA CHATFIELD (Fairchild Books), LAUREN LEIBOWITZ (German Vogue), JONATHAN TOPAZ (Vanity Fair). Not Pictured: BEN KOREN (The New Yorker), MEG MARTIN (Condé Nast Digital), HAYLEY WILSON (Lucky)


THE INTERNS Photography GREGG DELMAN, Fashion Director EMILY NOTE, Art Direction ALLIE FISHER, Photo Director MAYA ROBINSON 55


CORPORATE, RESEARCH, IS&T

Back Row: ANDREW ODENHEIMER (Consumer Marketing), DAVID HELD (Financial Planning/Analysis), STEPHEN OSTROWSKI (Custom Research). Middle Row: TAS TOBEY (Strategic Sourcing), NICOLE KLUGER (Public Relations), SAM FRIEDMAN (Condé Nast Archives). Front Row: MEREDITH JOYNER (Condé Nast Media Group) wearing WHIT mauri top, LAURANCE GEORGE (IS&T), CASSIE WILLARD (Consumer Marketing). Not Pictured: KAT BALKOSKI (Editorial Assets/Rights)


MARKETING

Back Row: SARAH SEVERE (Brides.com), SARA MILLER (Fairchild Fashion Group), MATT MARGINI (GQ). Middle Row: DARA MORANO (Condé Nast Digital) wearing Kevin Joo Hwang black faille skirt, BRITTANY KABACK (Teen Vogue), DANA FRASER (Bon Appétit) rêvasseur diagonal pant, KATIE STEEN (Vogue), ROBBIE SAUERBERG (Wired ) wearing Kathleen Stupp graphic tee, ROSIE O’CONNOR (Golf Digest). Front Row: HALEY SCHATTNER (Condé Nast Traveler), LUCY BAIRD (W ), TOLUWALOPE OKEOW (Condé Nast Media Group) wearing Kevin Joo Hwang leather panel fleece jersey top


ART, PHOTO

Back Row: LIZ HOWELL (Details), RACHEL VORSANGER (Editorial Assets/Rights) wearing WHIT puff sleeve top, MAYA ROBINSON (Condé Nast Digital), JOHN LOCKETT (Corporate Editorial). Front Row: MAGGIE MCVEIGH (Style.com), ASHLEY KOLODZIEJ (Fairchild Summits), KRISTEN WHALEY (Brides), ALLIE FISHER (Condé Nast Media Group) wearing WHIT puff sleeve dress, EMILY NOTE (WWD) wearing WHIT belted pinafore dress


ADVERTISING

Back Row: KRISTEN GRIFFIN (Self ) wearing WHIT bone yoke dress, BLAIR CHEMIDLIN (Brides), ISABEL TAWNEY (Footwear News) wearing Laura Siegel hand-stamped tank and Laura Siegel skirt, ALYSSA HOOD (Glamour) wearing Laura Siegel one-leg maxi dress. Middle Row: BECKY MANTELL (Golf World ) wearing rêvasseur asymmetrical vest, TIM HUNSINGER (Golf Digest), LANA RUSSO (WWD), ARIBA ALVI (Allure). Front Row: DANA HOROWITZ (Condé Nast Traveler) wearing Laura Siegel vest, SARA ANGLE (Lucky), ELAINA MORRA (The New Yorker) wearing Laura Siegel necklace, LARA KOVANT (Fairchild Books). Not Pictured: ELISE CHOI (Architectural Digest), COURTNEY KERN (Vanity Fair)


PARTING THOUGHTS

OVER THE RIVER AND THROUGH THE ’HOODS: ONE FAMILY’S JOURNEY TO, AND FROM, AND BACK TO BROOKLYN Lauren Leibowitz

As I browsed the shopping blog Racked NY the other day, I encountered a post devoted to a sparkly new accessory: a “Brooklyn Bridge-turned-brass knuckles creation.” It’s a 22-karat gold double finger ring with New York’s most famous bridge suspended across, encrusted with cubic zirconia for good measure. The ring retails for a cool $250. And, as Racked NY’s post observes, it’s a powerful weapon if worn on the wrong hand. “We can’t stop thinking about how much damage this ring would do, should the wearer punch someone in the face,” the post reads. My father can surely recall plenty of kids who would have enjoyed pummeling their peers while wearing that ring (had the bullies been able to afford it, that is). He grew up on the streets of 1950s Brooklyn—when his Today, Williamsburg residents are Williamsburg neighborhood more likely to be wearing $250 was among the borough’s capitals of crime. Today, it’s finger bling than beating each one of Brooklyn’s hottest other down with brass knuckles. ’hoods, and its residents are more likely to be wearing $250 finger bling than beating each other my dad wouldn’t dare cross even in daylight. down with brass knuckles. Brooklyn has been turned into a buzzword. My father and I drove down his old block These Brooklynites have chosen to live off the recently. “That’s the corner I was standing on beaten Manhattan path. But the irony is that when I got shot at,” he indicated. You’ll see the trail the youngsters think they’ve blazed lots of shooting on the Williamsburg streets has been, by this point, quite well traversed. today, although the weapons of choice are Lately, I’ve explored Williamsburg not handguns, but DSLRs. Sidewalks no more than any of the trendy Manhattan longer overflow with garbage, but with reneighborhoods. I’ve even dragged Dad back cycling advocates in skinny jeans. to visit the current hot spots, like New York Today, I wander leisurely down Bedford Times–approved pizza parlors, funky music Avenue and sun on the shore of the East River venues, and independent bookshops. He Park, just about a mile from my dad’s old adcan hardly believe the population transfordress. Williamsburg’s north side now teems mation. Williamsburg has been gentrified with upscale boutiques and trendy eateries. almost entirely—today it’s a necessary desYoung folks stroll the streets at night—streets tination, not a radical one. 60

PHOTOS BY

Rachel Vorsanger

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TTHE LEIBOWITZ FAMILY

BY


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