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The College of New Jersey

International Student Handbook 2013-2014 1


Table of Contents for International Student Handbook

Contents Welcome Message ........................................................................................................................................ 5 Academic Studies .......................................................................................................................................... 6 Academic Integrity .................................................................................................................................... 6 Academic Tutoring .................................................................................................................................... 7 Academic Standing.................................................................................................................................... 7 Student Records ........................................................................................................................................ 9 Tuition and Fees for Exchange Students ................................................................................................. 10 Academic Calendar ..................................................................................................................................... 10 Code of Student Conduct ............................................................................................................................ 10 How the Conduct process works ............................................................................................................ 11 Cultural Adjustment .................................................................................................................................... 13 Stages of the Cultural Shock and Reverse Culture Shock ....................................................................... 14 Tips that will help you through the Cultural Adjustment Process .......................................................... 15 How to survive Reverse Culture Shock ................................................................................................... 15 Cultural Partner program ............................................................................................................................ 16 Technology and Banking ............................................................................................................................. 16 Banking.................................................................................................................................................... 17 Checking / Savings accounts ............................................................................................................... 17 Credit cards ......................................................................................................................................... 18 Cell phones .......................................................................................................................................... 18 Employment options ................................................................................................................................... 18 On Campus employment ........................................................................................................................ 18 Off campus employment (students with F-1 visa status) ....................................................................... 18 Curricular Practical Training (CPT) .......................................................................................................... 19 Optional Practical Training (OPT) ............................................................................................................ 19 How to Apply For OPT ......................................................................................................................... 20 Academic Training (AT for J-1 students) ................................................................................................. 20 Getting a Social Security Number ............................................................................................................... 21 2


Getting a driver’s license............................................................................................................................. 21 Entertainment, Activities, Religious Centers, and Shopping ...................................................................... 21 Princeton, New Jersey............................................................................................................................. 23 New Hope, PA ......................................................................................................................................... 24 Philadelphia............................................................................................................................................. 25 Nightlife................................................................................................................................................... 26 Sports ...................................................................................................................................................... 26 Grocery stores ......................................................................................................................................... 27 Shopping ................................................................................................................................................. 28 Religious and Spiritual Centers ................................................................................................................... 29 Christianity .............................................................................................................................................. 29 Jewish ...................................................................................................................................................... 30 Hindu ....................................................................................................................................................... 30 Islam ........................................................................................................................................................ 30 Campus Organizations ............................................................................................................................ 30 Textbooks .................................................................................................................................................... 31 Bedding and furniture ................................................................................................................................. 32 Sports and recreation TCNJ Campus ........................................................................................................... 32 Outdoor activities ....................................................................................................................................... 33 Rest and relaxation (R&R) ........................................................................................................................... 34 Transportation ............................................................................................................................................ 34 Getting to know campus ............................................................................................................................. 36 Places of interest on campus .................................................................................................................. 36 Recycle and reuse at TCNJ .......................................................................................................................... 37 Health Insurance ......................................................................................................................................... 37 Housing and Residence Halls ...................................................................................................................... 38 Off campus housing .................................................................................................................................... 39 Short-term, temporary, or emergency housing...................................................................................... 40 Meal plans ............................................................................................................................................... 41 Immigration Regulations ............................................................................................................................. 42 Travel ...................................................................................................................................................... 43 Safety .......................................................................................................................................................... 45 3


Campus police ......................................................................................................................................... 45 Personal boundaries ............................................................................................................................... 46 Reporting options ................................................................................................................................... 46

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Welcome Message We would like to extend a special welcome to all new international students at TCNJ. As an exchange student, you have a unique opportunity to expand and share your cultural, social, and academic experiences. We encourage you to come in to the Center for Global Engagement with any questions you may have. Not only can we provide important information about your immigration status, but we can also answer questions about TCNJ, Ewing, and the surrounding areas. Our office is located in Green Hall 111; 609-771-2596. The Center for Global Engagement wishes you a successful and memorable time at TCNJ. Name Dr. Jon Stauff

Desiree Shrode** Melissa DiMeglio Curtis Chan

Position Director of the Center for Global Engagement; PDSO and RO International Student Program Coordinator Study Abroad Advisor; ARO and DSO I-House and J-House Resident Director

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Email stauffj@tcnj.edu

Phone number 609-771-2248

shroded@tcnj.edu

609-771-2596

dimeglim@tcnj.edu

609-771-2576

chanc@tcnj.edu

609-771-3455


Orientation: Orientation for the fall semester typically begins the last week and a half of August. Orientation for spring semester typically begins at the end of the third week in January. People who are likely to attend this orientation would be J-1 (generally International House students), ESLAS, and some F-1 students. During this time for those who are living in the International House (I-House), you will have the opportunity to meet with the key offices, learn about intramural sports, how to register for classes, how to stay healthy, and of course have time to bond with your housemates!

Academic Studies Academic Integrity Americans value originality and individual achievement.

These values are reflected in the rules of academic integrity, and thus students are evaluated on their own individual work. What constitutes academic integrity varies from culture to culture, so it’s important to understand these rules of Academic Integrity here at TCNJ, as there are serious consequences for Academic Dishonesty. Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty is any attempt by the student to gain academic advantage through dishonest means, to submit, as his/her own, work which has not been done by him/her or to give improper aid to another student in the completion of an assignment. Such dishonesty would include, but is not limited to: submitting as his/her own a project, paper, report, test, or speech copied from, partially copied, or paraphrased from the work of another (whether the source is printed, under copyright, or in manuscript form). Credit must be given for words quoted or paraphrased. The rules apply to any academic dishonesty, whether the work is graded or ungraded, group or individual, written or oral. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following behaviors, which is also known as plagiarism:  Copying from another student’s exam  Completing an academic activity or taking an exam for someone else  Giving answers to or sharing answers with another student during an exam  Using notes, books, or other aids of any kind during an exam when prohibited  Stealing an exam or possessing a stolen copy of an exam  Sharing answers during an exam by using a system of signals  Disrupting or delaying the administration of an exam or academic activity  Submitting a work for credit that includes words, ideas, data, or creative work of others without acknowledging the source  Using another author's words without enclosing them in quotation marks, without paraphrasing them, or without citing the source appropriately  Concealing, destroying, or stealing research or library materials with the purpose of depriving others of their use  Falsifying bibliographic entries

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       

Submitting any academic assignment which contains falsified or fabricated data or results Submitting the same term paper or academic assignment to another class without the permission of the instructor Feigning illness or personal circumstances to avoid a required academic activity Sabotaging someone else's work Collaborating on homework or take-home exams when instructions have called for independent work Attempting intimidation for academic advantage Inappropriate or unethical use of technologies to gain academic advantage Submitting a falsified document

For more comprehensive information about Academic Integrity and the policies and procedures for Disciplinary Action, please visit http://policies.tcnj.edu/policies/digest.php?docId=7642

Academic Tutoring At TCNJ, we want you to succeed in your courses.

One distinction about TCNJ’ education philosophy is that active class participation is crucial to the success of your courses. On the other hand, writing strong essays is also important. However, each and every one of you comes from different cultures and different higher education cultures. That being said, you may need help learning how to write an American essay (very direct communication style), or need help in one of your courses. The Tutoring Center is free and available to all students. The program has received national certification. Tutoring is available in The Center (Roscoe West Hall 101), and some groups meet in other academic buildings. Some examples of courses you can get tutoring in are: Mathematics and Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, and writing consultations. To learn more about the tutoring services, please visit: http://tutoringcenter.pages.tcnj.edu/

Academic Standing

International undergraduate students must maintain full-time academic status (a minimum of 3 units, equivalent to 12 credit hours). Graduate international students must maintain full-time academic status by being enrolled in at least 9 credits. Grades: End of semester grades are typically available 3-4 days after the last day of finals. Grade Point Average: The below chart is how your Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated in congruence with the weight it holds.

To learn about your Grade Point Average (GPA), or how to calculate it, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/gpa.html

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Types of Academic Standing: Good Academic Standing: A student’s academic standing at the College is determined by his or her grade point average. The grade point average is based only on courses taken at the College and is calculated by dividing the student’s quality points (the product of the number of credits attempted per course and the weight of the grade earned in each course) by the student’s quality hours (the total number of credits a student attempted in letter-graded courses at the 100 level or above). Academic Warning: This takes place when the students fall below a 1.75 GPA at the end of their first semester. Students will be sent an official letter. Academic Probation: A student will be placed on Academic Probation by the Office of Records and Registration if: a) The student has attempted credits, in letter-graded courses, from more than four to eight courses and has a combined GPA of less than 1.75; or b) The student has attempted credits, in letter-graded courses, more than eight courses and has a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. While on probation, the student is required to meet with their academic advisor to discuss his or her academic performance. Academic Dismissal: If a student is placed on Academic Warning and/or Academic Probation for any two consecutive semesters (or three total semesters) and is not in good academic standing, he or she will be dismissed from the College. It should be noted that students may be dismissed after either the fall or spring semester. The Office of Records and Registration will send students their dismissal letter upon the posting of grades. Those students receiving an Academic Dismissal letter will be provided with the opportunity to appeal this decision, by following the instructions included in the letter. Every student must appeal his or her academic dismissal in order to be reinstated at the College. For more detailed information about Academic Standing, please visit http://advisingresources.pages.tcnj.edu/dismissals-probation/ Registration and Records (registering for classes and requesting transcripts): All new international students are eligible to register for their courses in PAWS—for exchange students this will be done for you before you arrive to campus. PAWS is where you will access course descriptions, add/drop courses for your Shopping Cart, process enrollments, review your academic requirements, update personal information and review and process student account information (https://cas1.tcnj.edu/cas/login?method=POST&service=https://paws.tcnj.edu/psp/paws/?cmd=start). Registration and Records is located in Green Hall 112.

Students may make adjustments to their registration by dropping or adding a course only during the drop/add period. The add/drop period is any time before the semester begins and during the first week of classes. Students may make adjustments to their registration/course enrollments from the day they initially register until the end of the first week of classes. The College's online Schedule of Classes found on PAWS’ class search will contain specific semester dates. In cases where a class enrollment is at its 8


designated maximum, the student must be approved by the Department Chairperson or Assistant Dean to enroll in the class. Registration for these classes may be done in person by the student at the Office of Records and Registration with an accompanying written approval or in the consenting department. For more detailed information about Registration and Records, please visit http://recreg.pages.tcnj.edu/regandroll/ . Tutorials in how to use PAWS can also be found online at http://pawshelp.pages.tcnj.edu/enhancements_video_tutorial_st1/ During orientation, you will have the opportunity to review the classes you are enrolled in. Account Holds: A service indicator / hold is an obligation which may prevent you from registering and from receiving an official transcript. Obligations to the College (e.g., tuition, fees, outstanding library books, immunizations, and parking fines) which have not been fulfilled may result in a student being prohibited from registering for courses or in the withholding of a student’s transcript. Enrollment Verification: If you need to provide verification of enrollment, Exchange students need to bring the Enrollment Verification form to Green Hall 111 for our staff to sign off on it. In the event that you need a letter written, please contact Dr. Jon Stauff at stauffj@tcnj.edu. Student photo ID Cards: Once you arrive to TCNJ, you will be able to get a Student ID card, which you will use for a variety of functions, such as getting into your rooms and into the Eickhoff dining hall. Getting your ID card will typically happen either before or during orientation, depending on when you arrive. To get the ID card, come to Green Hall 119 and be ready to have your photo taken.

Student Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) give domestic and international students particular rights in regard to their educational records. These include the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the students’ records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. FERPA authorizes the university to make public disclosure, upon request, of student directory information. Student directory information includes the student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, number of credits earned, and the fact of enrollment, including whether the student is enrolled full-time or part-time. Students may request nondisclosure of student directory information by completing the Authorization to Withhold Directory Information form and returning it to Green Hall 112. (http://recreg.pages.tcnj.edu/files/2013/07/Authorization-to-Withhold-DirectoryInformation-Form.pdf) Due to FERPA regulations, TCNJ cannot release information to parents and family; therefore it is always important to keep them up to date on your academic and living situations. International students should be aware that the Patriot Acts gives special permission to employees of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). At their 9


request, college officials are required to release information to Homeland Security about any F-1 or J-1 students who are currently studying at or have previously studied at TCNJ.

Tuition and Fees for Exchange Students Tuition and fees: Exchange students will not need to pay tuition and fees, and they will not be billed for these. Exchange students will be billed for housing and board, and these fees will be applied to their PAWS accounts in July and in December. Bills are due in August (for Fall) and January (for Spring). Students may pay in person - we do make accommodations for them and "protect them" from disenrollment for lack of payment. They may use credit cards (as long as they pay a 2.5% convenience fee - which makes the bill that much bigger). Or they may wire money as per the instructions on http://iss.pages.tcnj.edu/what-you-need-to-know/finances/ International exchange students are NOT eligible to do a Sallie Mae payment plan-information about which may be found at http://studentaccounts.pages.tcnj.edu/billing/bill-payment-options/

Academic Calendar To learn about deadlines for adding / dropping classes, or about breaks, please visit the below link. http://tcnj.pages.tcnj.edu/academics/academic-calendars/

Code of Student Conduct Behavioral Misconduct: Below is a quick list of behaviors that you should not engage in:  Sexual harassment (i.e., unwelcome sexual advances)  Obscene or indecent behavior  Physical sexual misconduct  Bullying, intimidation, and harassment (i.e., Engaging in conduct, including any gesture, written, verbal or physical act, or any electronic communication (which includes e-mails, text messages, and Internet postings on web-sites or other social media), whether it be a single incident or series of incidents)  Invasion of privacy (i.e., intrusion of property, recording  Stalking  Defamation (i.e., Oral or written publication of a false statement of fact that exposes the person about whom it is made to hatred, contempt, or ridicule)  Physical abuse  Hazing (i.e., Any action taken, or situation created that negligently, intentionally, or recklessly subjects any person to the risk of bodily harm, physical discomfort, harassment, emotional or mental degradation, abuse, or interferes with academic activities).

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How the Conduct process works 1. Filing a complaint: Any member of the College community may file a complaint against a student for possible violations of the Student Conduct Code, including a representative from the Office of the Dean of Students on behalf of a person outside the College community if the incident has an adverse effect on the College and there is documentation from a verifiable source. 2. Investigation: The Director of Student Conduct will conduct an investigation to determine if the information in the complaint merits charges against a student or students, a formal admonishment, no charges, or if the incident can be addressed through an alternate dispute resolution process, including mediation.

3. Charge(s): Any charges will be presented to the accused student in writing through the student’s College email address, as the official means of communication at the College, and a conference with a hearing administrator shall be scheduled within a timely period. Maximum time limits may be extended at the discretion of the hearing administrator for unforeseen circumstances. 4. Conference: The accused student will meet with an assigned hearing administrator for a conference to discuss the grounds for any charges, process, and sanctioning practices. The accused student will select whether he or she will participate in a formal or informal conduct hearing. An advisor of the accused student’s choice may be present during the conference. Informal Hearing vs. Formal hearing Informal: If the accused student selects an informal hearing to address any charges, the hearing administrator conducting the conference will immediately conduct the informal hearing. The accused student’s advisor may remain present for the informal hearing, but may not represent the student or address the hearing administrator. The advisor’s role is limited to providing support to the student by observing or advising the student outside of the proceeding. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in student conduct proceedings. The hearing administrator may temporarily adjourn the informal hearing if he or she determines that further review or clarification is necessary including, but not limited to, interviewing the complaining party and/or other witnesses. Formal: If the accused student selects a formal hearing, then he or she has the opportunity to select an administrative hearing, a Community Standards Board hearing, or an All College Standards Board hearing. A student may choose an All College Standards Board hearing only if his or her case may result in suspension or expulsion in the event he or she is found responsible for any charges. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in student conduct proceedings. There is an Appeal process for both informal and formal hearings. For more information, please see the Student Code of Conduct at http://conduct.pages.tcnj.edu/files/2011/08/Student-Conduct-Code-FINALAPPROVED-07.12.2011.pdf

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Alcohol policy: No one under the age of twenty-one is permitted to be in the presence of, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages in the residence halls. These residents also may not have empty alcohol containers in their rooms for decoration. The College condones the responsible use of alcohol by those twenty-one or older; however, any student found abusing alcohol will be held accountable. Residents twenty-one or older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol in the privacy of their rooms, with the door closed, and with no-one under the age of twenty-one present. Residents and guest over the age of twenty-one are NOT permitted to consume alcohol in the presence of those under 21. Within the common areas of an apartment or townhouse, open alcohol is permitted provided all residents and guests are twenty-one or older. No alcohol may be consumed or carried in open containers in any public area of the residence halls. Kegs or beer containers over thirty-two ounces are not permitted. Hosting an event which violates the alcohol policy is considered a serious violation and may result in removal from residence. Any student and/or guest in the presence of open alcohol will be held accountable for any violation of the college alcohol policy. As per the College Alcohol policy, any staff member has the right to inspect packages and coverings entering a residence hall. You may view the College Alcohol Policy and other policies in the College’s Student Handbook Online. For a full review of the policy, please visit http://adep.pages.tcnj.edu/files/2013/07/Alcohol_and_Other_Drug_Policy.pdf Penalties for underage consumption of alcohol: There is a $250 fine for a first offense of this type, and $350 for subsequent offenses. The minor’s driver’s license will also be suspended for six months, and the violation reported to the Division of Motor Vehicles. For those who are not NJ residents, the court will not collect the license from the violator. Instead, the court will submit its report to the New Jersey motor vehicle division, and notify the appropriate officials in the state where the violator holds a driver’s license of the suspension time period. Often times, community service and drug and alcohol awareness programs will be required. Smoking policy: Smoking is prohibited Smoking inside any College building and/or within 10 feet of a doorway to any College building. All buildings are smoke-free.

Weapons policy: Possession, storage, or carrying of a firearm or other weapon in a residence hall room, on a person, or in a motor vehicle on College premises or at any College-affiliated activity or event. Possession or use of fireworks, gun powder, explosives or other incendiary devices, or dangerous chemicals, except as authorized for use in class, in connection with College-sponsored research, or for another approved activity and used in the way authorized and approved on College premises or at any College-affiliated activity or event.

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Cultural Adjustment The adjustment experience: When you first decided to study abroad, you may have anticipated adjustments in regards to food, culture, and time. However, the cultural adjustment is not easy or a comfortable process, though, it is rewarding in the long run. It may take several months to feel comfortable in your new environment, or it may take a much shorter amount of time. Many people attain new levels of self-awareness, personal and professional growth, and gain a new insight into understanding their own culture, in addition to that of their host country. Going through the adjustment process is normal and it’s important to remember that the experience is different for each of us! Thought, it is important to bear in mind that the more you assimilate and acclimate to your host culture the more reverse culture shock you may experience.

Feelings

Honeymoon stage Arrival to New Jersey and TCNJ; Enchantment; fascination; enthusiasm

Leave home Excitement; expectations; apprehension

Cultural Adjustment Reflection and enjoyment in competently functioning in new environment

Recovery Culture learning; crisis resolution

Culture Shock Too much ambiguity; high selfexpectations, self-doubt, depression, wanting to go home

Reintegration Incorporating new attitudes, beliefs, professional goals into new perspective of yourself

Return home Disengagement; Excited to return home

Recovery Life will seem normal again; new routines

Reverse Culture Shock Frustration; alienation; depression; feeling like a stranger at home

Based on Oberg (1960) and Gallahorn & Gallahorn (1963)

Time in host country

Time in home country

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Stages of the Cultural Shock and Reverse Culture Shock 1. Honeymoon Stage: During this period, the differences between the old and new culture are seen in a romantic light. For example, in moving to a new country, an individual might love the new food, the pace of life, and the locals' habits. During the first few weeks, most people are fascinated by the new culture. They associate with nationals who speak their language, and who are polite to the foreigners. This period is full of observations and new discoveries. 2. Culture Shock: Initial excitement faces and it may seem like it takes forever to accomplish something that once took a very short amount of time. You may miss your friends and family; have less energy, and less tolerance than usual. Changes may occur in eating and sleeping habits, so it is important to pay special attention to your health and to listen to your body. The sentiments in this stage are normal and expected. 3. Recovery: You develop routines, laugh at mistakes that once irritated you, and may absorb information more easily. Your energy level is now higher. 4. Cultural Adjustment: You are now eased into your host culture and have a better understanding of how it works. You become more and more confident in your interactions and your comfort level greatly increases. 5. Return Home: You begin thinking about re-entry and making your preparations for your return home. You also realize it’s time to say goodbye to your friends and realize that things will be very different once you return home. This stage is usually met with finals, good-bye parties, packing, and can be coupled with feelings of frustration and sadness. This is a good time to reflect on your emotions and experiences you’ve had in your host country. 6. Reverse Culture Shock / Reentry: You are excited to go home and see your friends and family. However, you soon notice that when you start telling your friends and family your stories and experiences from abroad, they become disinterested and want to move onto the next topic. You may also feel lonely, disoriented and depressed in your home culture without understanding exactly why. You may also become irritated and hypercritical of your home countries’ culture. You may also feel like you want to go back abroad. 7. Recovery: In this stage, you gradually readjust back to life at home. You will probably find old routines, but things won’t be exactly the same as how you left them—you realize that life has continued on while you were abroad. 8. Reintegration: Here, you start realizing how much you’ve changed, understand your new attitudes, beliefs, and habits and perhaps reexamine your professional goals. It will be important to incorporate the positive aspects of what you learned abroad into those of your life in your home country.

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Tips that will help you through the Cultural Adjustment Process  Understand that the cultural adjustment process exists and that it’s natural to miss your friends and family. Talk about these feelings with those who you feel comfortable with;  Find an American to be your cultural informant / partner; this person will give you insight into American culture  Stay busy and get involved in activities and student organizations / clubs. There is a lot at TCNJ that you can get involved in!  Maintain your sense of humor. Anyone who has lived in another culture has funny and / or embarrassing stories. You’re not alone! Laughing at yourself eases tension!  Have realistic expectations and be patient with yourself. It may take longer to accomplish tasks in a new culture and new academic environment, let alone a new language!  Be open-minded, flexible, and adaptable. Things won’t make sense; just remember you are experiencing it through a different cultural lens that will better you as a person in the future.  Talk to your professors. In many cultures, students do not talk to their professors, but here in the U.S., it is extremely important and expected of you to communicate with them. Class participation at TCNJ is critical to your academic success, so if you need a homework extension or need to miss a class, it will be important to tell your professor(s).

How to survive Reverse Culture Shock 1. Stay in contact with the friends you met abroad—Skype is great! 2. Keep a journal 3. Cook food that is from your host country 4. Help newcomers / international students assimilate into your home culture— become an ally 5. Talk with people who have gone through similar experiences 6. Become a conversation partner 7. Push your comfort zone. Keep trying to find new ways to view the world, new ways to experience human culture, and new ways to interact with those who are culturally different from you. The Center for Global Engagement, particularly the International Student Advisor is here to support you during your time at TCNJ. If you’re having any adjustment issues, you can visit Green Hall 111 to talk with an advisor or talk with your Community Assistant (CA). The International Student Advisor organizes many events in congruence with Residence Life throughout the year. These events and activities will help you meet new people and have meaningful experiences here in the U.S. Living in the International House, you will participate in events such as Culture Night and Trip Around the World, which is a great opportunity to showcase your culture and engage in

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conversation. Since you will be living with domestic U.S. students, you will learn more about American culture as well as your own.

Cultural Partner program In the International House (I-House), a Culture Partner(s) is the pairing of international/exchange students with an American TCNJ Ambassador. Via email and various types of social media, I-House ambassadors will reach out to international students and establish a relationship prior to their arrival. They will also explore and share one another‘s perspectives, cultures, and experiences, address questions they may have, and be a friendly face in a new place. The purpose of the Culture Partners program is multidimensional. It provides students and their partner(s) with cultural exchange opportunities while at the same time assisting international students with the transitions of studying abroad in the U.S. By establishing contact prior to arrival, I-House American Ambassadors are a resource for the culture of TCNJ and the U.S. in general. Creating intercultural relationships is also one of the fundamental aspects of the I-House mission. Also, through one on one interaction, students will learn different cultural aspects from each other. It helps to strengthen their inter-cultural competency. Cultural partners meet regularly during the semester and you will have several opportunities to meet for discussion during the semester. At the end of the semester, the cultural partner groups will give a presentation sharing their experience and learning throughout the semester.

Technology and Banking TCNJ Email accounts (SOCS and CANVAS): TCNJ offers free Gmail accounts to all students. Students must use the account not only for the email service, but also for accessing student accounts and information on class registration, Qualtrics (survey system), SOCS (professors use this official course management system), CANVAS (new official course management system, which should be officially effective by May, 2014). All correspondence from TCNJ will be sent to your TCNJ email address. Forwarding emails to an outside email account is not reliable, so be sure to check your TCNJ email account regularly. If you have questions about accessing your accounts, you can contact the Information Help Desk by calling ResNet – call 609-771-3138 for visit Green Hall Room 18 or emailing helpdesk@tcnj.edu Internet (townhouses and campus wide Wi-Fi): There is no wireless internet access in your dorm room in the Townhouses; however, there is Wi-Fi access in the Townhouse Lounges. To connect to the internet in your room, you will need to purchase an Ethernet cable.  Dot1x, or properly known as 802.1x, is an IEEE standard for network authentication. Devices that support dot1x allow you to configure them to automatically provision and connect to the wireless network without the need to launch a web browser to login each time. When you are within range of a dot1x network, your device will automatically connect and authenticate without 16


you needing to manually login. Most laptops, tablets and smartphone support 802.1x. These include Windows XP/Vista/7/8, MacOS X, iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch, and Android phones & tables. Devices such as gaming consoles (PS3/Xbox/Wii/Wii-U), portable gaming devices (PSP/PS Vita/DS/3DS) as well as smart TVs, BluRay players and Roku boxes don’t support 802.1x at this time. To configure your device, open its network preferences, select the TCNJ-SETUPWIRELESS network. After you are connected, open your web browser and you should be presented with a page that starts the configuration wizard. Proceed through the wizard. Take note of which username and password it is asking for. While you will need to provide your TCNJ username and password during the configuration, it may also ask you for your local username and password so that the wizard can make changes to your device such as installing a security certificate or updating your network preferences. If you have trouble with the configuration wizard, try running it again. There is no harm in running it multiple times. In fact, if you have wireless configuration problems in the future, the first thing you should do is re-run the wizard. Computer labs: If you do not want to bring a computer to TCNJ, you don’t have to. There are several computer labs on campus and the library is an example of one. For a full list of the computer labs and a list of their hours, please visit http://it.pages.tcnj.edu/computer-labs/ Computer discounts: Many computer manufactures offer discounts to students which can be obtained by confirming your TCNJ e-mail account their website. This is a great way to cut costs! Some of the companies that offer discounts are: Dell: http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/6099/campaigns/welcome-to-delluniversity Apple: http://store.apple.com.us/browse/home/findyourschool Lenovo: http://shop.lenovo.com/us/en/portals/students/ Hewlett-Packard (HP): http://hp.force.com/external/hpacademy Software and Technology discounts: Popular programs that are offered to students at discounted rates are Microsoft Office and Adobe Illustrator. One website that includes these programs among several others is TechHead: http://techhead.org/highered/

Banking Checking / Savings accounts If you are going to be on campus more than one semester, we recommend you to open up a bank account. Basic information will be asked of you to prevent fraud and a Social Security Number (SSN) is not required to open an account. We suggest that you do your own research before opening up a bank account to ensure that the bank will fulfill your needs. Some banks that are near campus are: Wells Fargo, TD Bank, Bank of America, and Chase. There are 2 Wells Fargo ATMs in the Brower Student Center. 17


Things to look into when selecting a bank: 1. 2. 3. 4.

International transfer fees Amount of branches and ATMs / cash points in the area Online banking system Student benefits

Credit cards To apply for a credit card, a credit history and SSN are needed. A good credit history is a requirement for many financial affairs like attaining good interest rates on loans, but unfortunately new students usually do not have a credit history in the U.S. To build a good credit history, it is recommended to not purchase more than half of your credit line each month and to pay the balance on the due dates; it’s best if you pay your balance in full each month. Telephones: A land line and phone will be provided in your dorm room, and you can find your phone number in PAWS. This is subject to change as more people are solely using cell phones.

Cell phones There are several cell phone providers in the area whose plans and prices vary: AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint, Metro PCS, etc. The best way to find what you’re looking for is to go into a store and see what they have to offer. Remember to shop around before you decide on a particular provider. Additionally, if you plan on staying for no longer than 2 years, we recommend using a Pay As You Go Phone; otherwise, most plans are based on 2 year contracts. You can buy Pay As You Go phones or Trac phones from places such as Wal-Mart, Target, or even Shoprite. You can also buy refillable cards for AT&T at the book store in the Brower’s Student Center. However, please note that prepaid services are not as common in the U.S. as they are in other countries.

Employment options On Campus employment

LionsLink is the Career Centers online database of employment opportunities, please visit http://career.pages.tcnj.edu/ to log on. Please note that students may work no more than 15 hours per week during the academic year, or 40 hours per week during the summer, in all student employment positions combined. Summer schedules end mid-August. Students must submit an accurate timesheet for each pay period worked. Students should not combine hours for multiple pay periods on one timesheet.

Off campus employment (students with F-1 visa status)

Practical training is employment in a student’s major field of study. You are eligible for practical training if you have been a full-time enrolled student for one academic year and are in F1 visa status. There are 2 types of practical training: Curricular (CPT) and Optional (OPT). 18


Curricular Practical Training (CPT) Curricular Practical Training (CPT) allows eligible F-1 students to engage in paid internship/employment which is related to and is an integral part of the major field of study. 1. CPT employment must be a supervised, temporary position. 2. CPT can be authorized for part-time (less than 20 hours per week) or full-time (more than 20 hours per week) student needs to take a course that coincides with internship experience in the same semester they’re doing the experience. Exception exists for graduate students who programs require immediate curricular training. 3. Available only while student is in F-1 status, before the completion of the educational objective. Eligibility for CPT: In order to apply for CPT, you must meet all of the following requirements: 5. Have a job offer 6. Be in lawful F-1 status and have been lawfully enrolled on a full-time basis for at least one full academic year prior to the proposed CPT start date. (Graduate students enrolled in a program which requires immediate participation in CPT are exempted from this requirement.) 7. Be majoring in a field of study which requires the proposed internship/employment. How to Apply for CPT: 1. Follow all internal procedures and complete the F-1 CPT Application Form http://iss.pages.tcnj.edu/files/2011/09/F1_curricularpractraining_11.pd f for the DSO to make a determination of eligibility for Curricular Practical Training. 2. Sign the new I-20 (issued by your DSO) that will be issued to reflect CPT. Do not begin the training until the new I-20 bearing the DSO’s (Designated School Official) CPT authorization has been issued and the CPT’s Start Date has been reached.

Optional Practical Training (OPT) this enables international students to gain valuable work experience related to their fields of study. F-1 students are eligible for up to 12 months of full-time employment authorization for each HIGHER level of education completed (i.e., Bachelor’s, Master’s, and PhD). Applications are filed with the Center for Global Engagement, but it is U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that approves the applications. It is encouraged for you to apply 3 months prior to the completion of all degree requirements, as this is the processing time from USCIS. While OPT is not employer specific, OPT work must be related to the field of study for the degree program listed on the I-20. 19


International students who wish to gain OPT authorization must demonstrate that they are in valid F-1 status, which means that they must have been enrolled full-time for a full academic year prior to the OPT start date.

How to Apply For OPT In order to apply for OPT, you should meet with the authorized DSO 3 – 4 MONTHS IN ADVANCE OF THE DEGREE PROGRAM COMPLETION DATE to allow the SEVIS record to be updated and for the Form I765 to be received by USCIS in a timely manner. After your I-20 has been issued, please bring the following materials to the scheduled meeting with your school’s DSO: 1. Completed TCNJ OPT REQUEST FORM 2. Two U.S. passport-style photographs. DO NOT CUT THE PHOTOS DOWN. Lightly print your name and I-94 number on the back of each photo in pencil. 3. Most recently issued TCNJ I-20 4. Photocopy of I-94 card (both sides) 5. Photocopies of your passport identification pages, and visa. 6. Form I-765 (Application for Employment Authorization) completed, marked with the code “( c ) ( 3 ) (B)” at Item 16 7. $380 = Filling Fee in the form of a check or money order. Make it payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If you are using a personal check, it must have your name and address on it. 8. Copy of all previous CPT I-20s at current level (if applicable) 9. Copy of previous Employment Authorization Document (if applicable) 10. Copy of your job offer letter, if you have one (this is not required) 11. Copy of your degree (only required for OPT 17 month extension applications) Initial 12 Month OPT Applications: We recommend that you use the TCNJ address on Form I-765 and subsequently mail your application to the USCIS Service Center within jurisdiction over your place of residence. If you chose to use a home address and if that address in another state, you must mail the application to the USCIS Service Center for that state. To determine which service center you must mail your application to when not using the OISS address, please see page 11 of the I-765 instructions. Please see http://iss.pages.tcnj.edu/students/matriculated-students-f-1/optional-practicaltraining-opt/ for more information or call 609-771-2596 to set up an appointment with the DSO.

Academic Training (AT for J-1 students)

This training may be done at a company or an organization and either before or after the completion of your studies. To be eligible, you must find work that is directly related to your field 20


of study as indicated on your DS-2019 form, and you must be a full-time student in good academic standing. Authorization for Academic Training is provided by the Center for Global Engagement. Please see the DSO for more information in Green Hall 111.

Getting a Social Security Number

To be employed in the U.S., you must have a Social Security Card. You can apply for this card at any Social Security office. Please be sure to bring: 1. Employment authorization letter and offer letter from your supervisor 2. Passport 3. I-94 Departure Card (this is now available only online, please visit https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html and print the card 4. DS-2019 or I-20 certificate of eligibility form. Be sure to get your receipt as this is your only proof of employment eligibility until you receive your card in the mail. Make sure you provide the Social Security Office with a valid mailing address on your application. You can also visit www.ssa.gov Social Security Office 635 S Clinton Ave Roebling Market Trenton, New Jersey 08611

Getting a driver’s license

To get a New Jersey driver’s license see below:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Valid passport with visa (if applicable) Form I-94, “Arrival/Departure Record” Form I-20 (for an F or M student) or Form DS-2019 (for a J exchange visitor) EAD card (Form I-766 “Employment Authorization Document”), if on postcompletion OPT 5. Form I-797, “Notice of Action,” in cases of a change of status (e.g., from F-1 to H-1B) 6. Social Security number (SSN) on a Social Security card or a Social Security Administration (SSA) Form SSA-L676, “Refusal to Process SSN Application.” Please visit this SSA website for more information.

Entertainment, Activities, Religious Centers, and Shopping As a guide, Trenton, NJ is about 10-15 min from campus; Princeton is about 20-30 minutes from campus; and New Hope, PA is about 30 min from campus; and Philadelphia is about 50 minutes by car from campus. Below is a short list of the activities offered in the surrounding areas of New Jersey. For more information, please visit http://www.visitnj.org/ and http://guides.milespartnership.com/nj/13/index.html for activities on other tourist activities and attractions.

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Please note: You can sign up for Groupon (http://www.groupon.com/browse/northjersey?z=skip) and/or LivingSocial (https://www.livingsocial.com/) to get discounts on products and tourist attractions. College Union Board at TCNJ (CUB): CUB is the campus activities programming board at The College of New Jersey that provides a variety of educational, social, recreational, and cultural programs. Activities such as: concerts, comedy shows, bus trips, movies, and overnight trips are organized. The organization also works heavily through Facebook so you can see their activities organized there. For more information, please visit http://www.tcnjcub.com/about.php Planetarium (Trenton): Learn about star constellations at the New Jersey planetarium. Approximate cost = $7 New Jersey Department of State: Planetarium 205 W. State Street PO Box 530 Trenton, NJ 08625 Tel: (609) 292-6464 (recorded message) Email: Feedback@sos.state.nj.us http://nj.gov/state/museum/dos_museum_programs_planetarium.html

AMC Hamilton 24 Cinema 325 Sloan Ave. Hamilton Township, NJ 08619 (609) 890-4900

NJ Grounds for Sculpture (Hamilton, NJ). Large 3-D art where you walk around outside and you see fantastic works that artists completed. Some abstract, some realistic, etc. Approximate cost = $12 Grounds for Sculpture 18 Fairgrounds Road Hamilton, NJ 0861 (609) 586-0616 http://www.groundsforsculpture.org/

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Adventure Aquarium (Camden, NJ). Learn, see, and explore the types of water-life in this aquarium. Approximate cost =$27.95. You can also swim with sharks! Adventure Aquarium 1 Riverside Dr. Camden, NJ 08103 Phone: (856) 365-3300 http://www.adventureaquarium.com/

Princeton, New Jersey does not only have Princeton University, but it is also a very cute town to visit with boutiques and great food! Paul Robeson Center for the Arts (Princeton, NJ): There are several events each week that range from workshops, classes, exhibitions, and performances. Many of the activities and festivals are FREE! Please check out their website for more information: http://www.artscouncilofprinceton.org/ a. Café Improv (Princeton, NJ): Cafe Improv is dedicated to bringing RESPECT to live home grown performance. It is a smoke-free open-stage where any kind of music poetry or performance is encouraged. It happens on the 4th Saturday of every month from 9:00 PM to Midnight.

Arts Council of Princeton 102 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 http://www.artscouncilofprinceton.org/ New Jersey’s Buddhist Vihara and Meditation Center (Princeton, NJ): This is the largest statue of Buddha in the United States. The Buddhist monks can tell you about the statue, the center, and the types of celebrations they have. New Jersey’s Buddhist Vihara and Meditation Center 4299 Route 27 Princeton NJ 08540 http://www.njbv.org/index.html

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Washington Princeton Battlefield (Princeton, NJ): On January 3, 1777, the peaceful winter fields and woods of Princeton Battlefield were transformed into the site of what is considered to be the fiercest fight of its size during the American Revolution. During this desperate battle, American troops under General George Washington surprised and defeated a force of British Regulars. Coming at the end of "The Ten Crucial Days" which saw the well-known night crossing of the Delaware River and two battles in Trenton, the Battle of Princeton gave Washington his first victory against the British Regulars on the field. The battle extended over a mile away to the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). Located on Mercer Road (Princeton Pike); 1.5 miles south of Princeton University and 3.8 miles north of Interstate 295/95. http://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/parks/princeton.html

New Hope, PA This town is very cute and quaint and looks a lot like New England (Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, and Connecticut), without travelling all the way there! The cool thing about this town is that you can park your car in New Jersey, and walk across a bridge over the Delaware River and be in Pennsylvania! There is great food and cute boutiques! To get to this town, going with people who have a car or renting a car is the best option, as NJ Transit does not go there.

Salon Gratitude (New Hope, PA—great stylists at a reasonable price) 43 N Main St. New Hope, PA 18938 (215) 862-4420 http://www.salongratitude.com/ **There are free walking tours for Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C. Please see below for more information. Philadelphia Walking Tours (food, bike, and walking--Free) 20 N 3rd St Philadelphia PA 19106 (267) 712-9512 http://www.freetoursbyfoot.com/philadelphia-tours/ New York Walking Tours (Free bike, bus, ghost, and food tours) Manhattan New York, NY (646) 450-6831 http://www.freetoursbyfoot.com/new-york-tours/ Washington DC Free tours (walking, ghost, and food) 1740 18th Street Northwest #304 Washington, DC 20009 Phone: (202) 370-1830 24


E-mail: info@dcbyfoot.com http://www.freetoursbyfoot.com/washington-dc-tours/

New York City Food Tour (New York City, NY): This is a tour of a specified part of the city (i.e., Chelsea Marketplace, East Village, Chinatown, etc.) where you can sample the best types of food there depending on the tour. This is lunch/dinner and entertainment. It’s about 3-4 hours and is approximately = $50. http://foodtoursofny.com Phone: 347-559-0111 email@foodtoursofny.com “All Students: 10% off discount. Email us from your student email account for discount code. Be sure to show your valid student ID to your tour guide.” New York Bronx Zoo: Is one of the world's largest metropolitan zoos, with some 4,000 animals representing about 650 species from around the world. This is a large tourist attraction. Notable animals: Nala, Shani, Adamma, M'wasi, SukariExhibits: Jungle World, Monkey House, Madagascar, and more. Approximate cost is $40. New York Bronx Zoo 2300 Southern Blvd Bronx, NY 10460 (718) 367-1010 http://www.bronxzoo.com/

Philadelphia (about 45 min away from campus)

There are many activities that happen in Philly. Festivals, events, restaurant week, and independent film festivals are all seasonal activities, and is something that you can Google. You can visit http://www.visitphilly.com/events/ to look for great things to do in Philly.

Philadelphia's Magic Gardens (PMG) is a mosaicked visionary art environment, gallery, and community arts center that preserves, interprets, and provides access to Isaiah Zagar's unique mosaic art environment and his public murals. Cost is $7 for adults; $5 for Students & Seniors; $3 for ages 6-12, FREE for children 5 and under. Philadelphia Magic Gardens 1020 South S Philadelphia, PA 19147 (215) 733-0390 http://www.phillymagicgardens.org/

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Nightlife Senior Nights: This is an activity available to those who are 21+ and you must contact Student Government to get on the contact list to be able to participate. The senior class council plans about 1 senior night a month (usually 4 a semester) that occurs on either a Tuesday or Friday night. It costs $10 and then that covers the bus ride and entrance fee to an area bar who offers a promotion for the group that night. Havana Restaurant (New Hope, PA): This is a great restaurant with live music and entertainment. This restaurant will also turn into a night club on the weekends (21+).

Havana Restaurant 105 S Main St. New Hope, PA 18938 (215) 862-9897 http://www.havananewhope.com/ Rho (Trenton, NJ for 21+): This is a restaurant and bar on the waterfront, and at night turns into a club. Sometimes, they will even have Latin night where you can take a dance class (typically Salsa). They also have Happy Hour (inexpensive food and drinks for a few hours on certain days. Rho Restaurant 50 Riverview Plaza Trenton, NJ 08611 http://www.rhowaterfront.com/#!nightlife/c1rf0 609-393-7300

Sports

New Jersey predominantly divided in between sports teams that favor either Philadelphia or New York. Baseball is a big event on the east coast and Philadelphia and New York are seen as rivals. You can make your own decision as to what team you like or want to support! Baseball: Philadelphia Phillies: http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=phi New York Mets: http://newyork.mets.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=nym New York Yankees: http://newyork.yankees.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=nyy Trenton Thunder is a minor league baseball team which is close to TCNJ. To look at their schedule of games, please visit: http://www.milb.com/index.jsp?sid=t567

Football: Philadelphia Eagles: http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/ 26


New York Giants: http://www.giants.com/ New York Jets: http://www.newyorkjets.com/

Grocery stores

If you’re tired of the food on campus and want to make your own, below are some good grocery stores: Halo Farm (Amazing ice cream, milk, and juices, Ewing, NJ) 970 Spruce St. Trenton, NJ 08638 (609) 695-3311 http://www.halofarm.com/

Trenton Farmers Market (Ewing, NJ—right across from Halo Farm—they also sell loose-leaf tea) 960 Spruce Street Trenton, NJ 08648 609-695-2998 Open All year Tuesday-Saturday: 9AM to 6PM Sunday 10AM to 4PM http://www.thetrentonfarmersmarket.com/ Shoprite (Ewing, NJ—off of Olden Ave.) 1750 N. Olden Ave. Ewing Township, NJ 08638 (609) 219-0202 http://www.shoprite.com/pd/stores/NJ/Ewing/ShopRite-of-Ewing/B728665

Asian Food (Plainsboro, NJ—about 20 min from Ewing) 660 Plainsboro Road Plainsboro, NJ 08536 (609) 799-1828 http://www.asianfoodmarkets.com/ Big Bear Natural Foods (Ewing, NJ—off of Olden Ave.) 17 Arctic Pkwy Ewing Township, NJ 08638 (609) 392-7221 http://www.bigbearnaturalfoods.com/

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Trader Joes (local, organic foods in Princeton) 3528 Brunswick Pike Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 897-0581 http://www.traderjoes.com/ Whole Foods (more upscale local/organic foods Princeton) 3495 U.S. 1 Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 799-2919 http://wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/princeton

Shopping

There are several malls you can shop at while studying in New Jersey:

Quakerbridge Mall (closest mall to TCNJ—it is quite large and has several good options) 150 Quakerbridge Mall Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (609) 799-8177 http://www.simon.com/mall/quaker-bridge-mall Nassau Park Pavilion (large strip mall with Target, Wal-Mart, Best Buy, etc.) Quakerbridge Rd. Princeton, NJ 08540 (877) 225-5337 http://www.ddr.com/property/assets/A20296_competitionaerial.pdf

Mercer Mall (DSW shoes, AT&T, Verizon, etc) US Highway 1 & Mercer Mall US Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 http://www.federalrealty.com/properties/mercer/

Market Fair Mall (Barnes and Noble, Lens Crafters, Anthropologie, Gap, etc.) 3535 U.S. 1 Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 452-7777 http://www.marketfairmall.com/directory Outlet Collection (many stores at discounted prices) 651 Kapkowski Road Elizabeth, NJ 07201 http://www.jerseygardens.com/ 28


Religious and Spiritual Centers There are over 300 worship sites near the College, including: Christianity Baptist Jerusalem Baptist Church—150 N. Clinton Ave, Trenton Central Baptist Church—2015 Pennington Rd., Ewing Galilee Baptist—440 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd, Trenton Union Baptist Church—301 Pennington Ave., Trenton Shiloh Baptist Church—340 Calhoun St., Trenton Westside Bible Baptist —1302 W. State St., Trenton

Methodist Grant Chapel AME Church— 261 Mercer St., Trenton Greater Mount Zion AME Church—42 Pennington Rd., Trenton Mount Zion AME Church—135 Perry St., Trenton St. Paul AME Zion Church—308 N Willow St., Trenton Cadwalader-Asbury Methodist—-910 Stuyvesant Ave., Trenton

Lutheran Abiding Presence Lutheran Church—2220 Pennington Rd., Ewing The Advent Lutheran Church—937 Broad St., Trenton Bethany Lutheran Church—1125 Parkside Ave, Trenton Episcopal St. Luke’s Episcopal Church— 1620 Prospect St., Ewing Trinity Cathedral—801 W State St., Trenton Catholic Church of the Incarnation —1545 Pennington Rd., Ewing Other Covenant Presbyterian —471 Parkway Ave., Trenton Full Gospel Pentecostal Church— 101 W Ingham Ave., Trenton Grace Cathedral Fellowship—1217 Calhoun St., Trenton Miracle Pentecostal Church—7 Summer St., Trenton Mount Sinai Seventh Day Adventist Church—35 Arlington Ave., Trenton

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Jewish Adath Israel Congregation—1958 Lawrenceville Rd., Lawrenceville Har Sinai Temple - 2421 Pennington Rd., Pennington Young Israel of Lawrenceville—2556 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville

Hindu Durga Mandir - 4240 Route 27, Princeton Radha Krishna Temple—357 Lawrence Station Rd., Lawrencevillle

Islam Masjid As-Saffat Mosque—25 Oxford St., Trenton Masjidul Taqwa—1001 E. State St., Trenton, NJ Islamic Center of Ewing, 685 Parkway Ave, Ewing

Campus Organizations

Schedules subject to change. Visit websites for verification All events are held in the Spiritual Center unless otherwise noted. Canterbury House—Episcopalian Ministry http://religiousandspirituallife.pages.tcnj.edu/groups/canterbury-house-the-episcopal-church-at-tcnj/ Worship—Wednesday at 5pm Mindfulness Meditation—Tuesday & Thursday: 12:00-12:30pm Catholic Campus Ministries http://www.tcnj.edu/~ccm/ Saturdays: 5:00pm Sundays: 11:00am and 7:30pm Monday, Tuesday, Friday: 11:30am; Wednesday: 7:30pm Chabad Center for Jewish Life http://www.tcnjew.com/ 44 Chauncey Ave, Ewing, NJ (edge of TCNJ campus) Check website for service schedule Circle of Compassion http://religiousandspirituallife.pages.tcnj.edu/groups/circle-of-compassion/ Dinner Meetings—Monday: 7:00pm Mindfulness Meditation—Tuesday & Thursday: 12:00-12:30pm Gospel United Ministries http://www.tcnj.edu/~gospel/ Praise Dance Rehearsal—Monday: 9:00pm Choir Rehearsal—Tuesday: 8:00pm Drama Rehearsal—Saturday: 5:00pm

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Textbooks

The easiest way to purchase textbooks is at the TCNJ bookstore located in the Brower Student Center, where new and used books are for sale. You can get up to 50% cash back, when you sell your textbooks back to the bookstore at the end of term. Books must include all original materials (CDs, workbooks, etc.). Finals week is the best time to get most cash back. Sell early! Returning textbooks: A full refund will be given in your original form of payment if textbooks are returned during the first week of classes with original receipt. ii. With proof of a schedule change and original receipt, a full refund will be given in your original form of payment during the first 30 days of classes. iii. No refunds on unwrapped loose leaf books or activated eBooks. iv. Textbooks must be in original condition. v. No refunds or exchanges without original receipt. i. You can look online to look up your textbooks at http://tcnj.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId =10001&storeId=26551&langId=-1 E-textbooks: Is a digital, downloadable version of the physical textbook. It will work on both PC and Mac platforms, and can be used on up to (2) computers. The look and layout are identical to the actual textbook. You can highlight, annotate, and take notes directly in your e-Textbook. You can organize books and course materials; find words, terms, and phrases with keyword search. You can also rent textbooks; however, you will need to have a credit card on file to do so. http://www.half.com/ and http://www.amazon.com/ are among the most popular websites to obtain the least expensive books in various conditions (brand new, like new, used, to very used) and you can sell them after you’re done using them! You can also ask your fellow classmates to share books or buy them from your friends at a used price. This is an inexpensive and convenient way to obtain textbooks.

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Bedding and furniture

All rooms and apartments are furnished, except for sheets, towels, toilet paper and other accessories. We encourage you to order your bedding online (Extra Long Twin sized bedding, regular sized pillows, etc.) so that you will have it once you arrive. Stores such as Wal-Mart, Target, and Ikea have Twin extra-long bedding. Once you order your supplies, please email iss@tcnj.edu so that we can keep an eye out for your items. You can ship your ordered materials to: Target: http://www.target.com/ Wal-Mart: http://www.walmart.com/ Ikea: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/ Center for Global Engagement Your name The College of New Jersey 2000 Pennington Road Ewing, NJ 08628

Sports and recreation TCNJ Campus TCNJ has many sports teams which you can support, such as football and soccer, to name a couple. There are also male and female sports. Admittance to any of the TCNJ sporting events is free for students with a valid student ID. Attending these sporting events can be a great way to connect with other students and get a taste of TCNJ culture and pride. For more information and schedule of games, go to http://www.tcnjathletics.com/sports/2003/4/23/philosophy.aspx Intramural sports: The Recreation Center offers a variety of intramural sports teams that you are able to join or create a new team to compete against other TCNJ students. These teams usually have a small fee associated with them. For more information on intramurals please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~intramur/club-sports.php Physical Enhancement Center: The center is small, but has cardio equipment and weights. 30 minute reservations are required for the cardio equipment. You just need to bring your TCNJ ID and sign in at the front desk to use the equipment. The center is open 7 AM – 10 PM. Please visit http://www.tcnj.edu/~intramur/pec.php for more information. Travers Wolfe (fitness classes): The fitness center offers a wide array of classes taught by trained instructors who are all certified in their respective specialties. Please see http://tcnjfitnesscenter.weebly.com/index.html for more information.

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Outdoor activities Princeton Canoe & Kayak 483 Alexander St. Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 452-2403 http://www.canoenj.com/prince1.htm Crusader Paintball 225 Lincoln Hwy #101 Fairless Hills, PA (21 ) 949-4600 $45 for a half day rental $90 for whole day http://www.crusaderpaintball.com/ Six Flags (large amusement park with rides): Tickets are about $70 with tax 1 Six Flags Blvd Jackson, NJ 08527 (732) 928-2000 http://www.sixflags.com/greatAdventure/index.aspx Jersey Shore at Belmar Beach (Located in Monmouth County, NJ): Perfect for relaxing, boogie boarding, surfing. Beach badges are required from 9AM to 5PM, but you can go after hours. Beach badges are $7/day. There is nightlife here.

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Rest and relaxation (R&R) Massage, Acupuncture and Acupressure: Hua Kang Health Center 1400 Parkway Ave Ewing Township (609) 883-8388 http://www.huakanghealthcenter.com/ Chiropractic services: Back in Action Chiropractic 1330 Parkway Ave. Lower Level suite 11 Ewing, NJ 08628 (609) 434-0318 http://drdorishahn.com/

Transportation Transportation can be difficult, though; there is public transportation to/from Trenton, Princeton, and Philadelphia. For more information on public transportation, please see below.

Please note: The #601 bus has a bus stop called The College of New Jersey which arrives behind the Student Brower Center. NJ Transit Student Discount: Full-time TCNJ students are eligible to receive a rail, bus, or light rail monthly pass at 25% off of the regular monthly pass price, when they enroll online through NJ Transit's Quik-Tik program. Please check out this link for more information: https://jedi.tcnj.edu/webteam/njtransit/ New Jersey Transit: http://www.njtransit.com/hp/hp_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=HomePageTo

Trenton Transit Center: You can take the NJ Transit bus from TCNJ campus to the Trenton Transit Center. This is the area that will connect you to transportation to areas 34


such as Philadelphia (SEPTA) and New York and consists of trains (including Amtrak, but is more expensive), and buses. Trenton Transit Center: http://www.njtransit.com/rg/rg_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=TrainStationLookupFrom&s elStation=148

Loop bus: The loop bus is a bus that goes from TCNJ to various parts of town i.e., Princeton, Hamilton Train Station, Mercer Mall, Quakerbridge Mall, etc.). For the schedule and more information please go to: http://tcnjsfb.weebly.com/loop-busschedule.html

Car rental: Sometimes you may need to rent a car to go to the more remote areas while traveling. Here are a couple options: Enterprise Rent-A-Car 1571 N. Olden Ave. Trenton, NJ 08638-3203 (609) 695-0990 http://www.enterprise.com/car_rental/wls.do?gpbr=1721 Avis Rent a Car 1735 N Olden Ave. Ewing Township, NJ 08638 (609) 912-9382 http://www.avis.com/car-rental/avisHome/home.ac Bicycle Registration Program and Property Marker: Community members are encouraged to register their bicycle with the TCNJ PD. The Department makes available, upon request, a free engraving tool which members of the Community can use to mark their property. These programs provide a visual deterrent and aid in the recovery of stolen property.

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Getting to know campus

Places of interest on campus 1.

Eickhoff Hall—biggest dining center on campus as well as the location of the Health Center

2.

Brower Student Center (aka the Stud)—ATMs are located here, Lion’s Den (smaller dining center, and where you buy tickets to events on the TCNJ campus).

3.

Library—there is a computer lab downstairs and this area is known to have the best coffee on campus.

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4.

Green Hall— if you lose your ID card and need to get a new one, you can go to Student Accounts. Also, Green Hall 111 is where the Center for Global Engagement office is located!

5.

TCNJ Loop around campus-- Many people will run, walk, or ride their bike around the campus for exercise. The loop is approximately 1.74 miles (2.8 kilometers). There are also nice sporadic bamboo gardens throughout it.

6.

Lakes Ceya and Silva-- This is a nice area where you can sit, have a picnic, do homework, or simply reflect.

Recycle and reuse at TCNJ The concept of recycling varies from not only country to country but from state to state. Below are some tips on how to recycle at TCNJ. “Single Stream” recycling—This means that all recyclables can be added to the same container. However, to do so effectively, you need to rinse out the bottles otherwise it may not be accepted. Unacceptable items: paper coffee cups, pizza boxes, textbooks, cereal boxes (and other wax coated cardboard), tissues, paper towels, paper food plates, plastic bottles #3-7 (Naked Juice bottles), Pyrex glass, food items, any cans or bottles that still have liquid in them.

Health Insurance TCNJ Health insurance coverage: International Students MUST have the following health insurance http://studenthealthinsurance.pages.tcnj.edu/ . They are not permitted to opt out of this coverage. TCNJ requires that all full-time students have adequate health insurance to cover medical emergencies and hospitalization. This means that international students must also enroll in the TCNJ’s Student Health Insurance Plan. The cost of the TCNJ Student Insurance Plan was approximately $400 in fall 2013 or $560 in spring 2014 in the 20132014 academic years. The plan covers the requirements as well as including a $300 limit per policy on prescription drugs (price subject to change). The College acquired health insurance covers or defrays the cost of laboratory testing, x-rays and prescription medicine that must be obtained through off campus providers. Please also note that the College-acquired health insurance provides a Dental and Vision discount plan, but because eye care and dental care are quite expensive in the US, it is advisable to have these services be performed before you arrive in the US. Student FirstChoice website: You can set up your health insurance account by going to: http://www.firststudent.com/schools/TheCollegeofNewJersey/my_account.htm 37


Housing and Residence Halls First Year Experience housing (freshman—housing guaranteed): The First Year Experience (FYE) is a comprehensive program of academic and co-curricular activities promoting the successful transition of entering students to college life at TCNJ. Faculty, staff and students working together to cultivate the intellectual, social and civic development that creates a challenging, yet supportive environment. Major FYE program components include Freshman Orientation, Summer Readings, Welcome Week, First Seminar, Residential Life Learning Communities, and Civic Engagement. For more information, visit: http://fye.pages.tcnj.edu/ Sophomore (housing guaranteed): Activities are offered for bonding activities by your Community Advisor (CA). Junior and Senior: (not guaranteed housing)—if housing is guaranteed the students have a choice to live in either the apartments or townhouses. Apartments are 3 singles and 1 double with a full kitchen and a lounge area with a bathroom. Townhouses are made up of 10 singles. Japanese House (J-House): The Japanese House is an opportunity for students with proficiency in Japanese to live in a campus residential community where Japanese is the medium of communication. Students in the J-House learn about Japan and share their learning with others in the (campus) community through various Japan-related programs. You must apply to live in the J-House. International House (I-House): The goal of this housing option is to engage a community of domestic and international students in a variety of leadership and learning opportunities, including field trips, special events and house discussions that will help individuals learn more about other cultures as well as their own. Additionally, domestic students will pair up with international students to help them learn about the campus community and campus traditions. Participants will develop a greater understanding of American culture and history, including that of New Jersey, by participating in trips, discussions and other educational opportunities on campus and in the mid-Atlantic region. Students will learn cross-cultural communication skills, recognize their own cultural norms and values and take steps to bridge the communication gap that sometimes exist between different cultures. Students are expected to be engaged and active participants who willingly participate in and even create educational opportunities for the community. This includes attending community events, field trips and house meetings and developing programs and events for the greater campus community. In addition, all students living in the I-House will register for a pass/fail course, IDS-110. Domestic students must apply to live in the I-House. For more information on housing, please visit: http://housing.pages.tcnj.edu/

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Off campus housing The College of New Jersey offers single family homes to eligible students. These properties are located off campus and are managed by the TSC Corporation. All new students must contact The Office of Residence Assignments at (609) 771-2301 to register for housing. The cost for off-campus housing options is equal to the room rental cost for living on campus. Since kitchens are provided in all units, a board cost has not been included. Students may opt to purchase a Gold Club card for dining on campus by contacting the Office of Student Accounts at (609) 771-2705. Kriegman and Smith: This is a company that owns a lot of apartment complexes in Ewing. You can visit their website at http://www.kriegmanandsmith.com/ http://www.craigslist.org is another website that is used to look for housing. Timing to find a good house, apartment, or room is important. The ideal time for starting a housing search is 1-2 months before each term. Different housing includes various utilities in rent, and often water, gas, garbage, and sewage; this leaves the tenant to pay for electricity and internet/TV (if desired). Security deposits are typically the first month’s rent. Remember to give at least 30 days’ notice if choosing to move out to not jeopardize the deposit. Please note: If you go to visit a room or apartment that is for rent, never go alone. It is important to keep safety in mind when looking for a place to live, so always take a friend or colleague with you!

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Short-term, temporary, or emergency housing Springhill Suites by Marriott-Ewing (recommended) 1000 Charles Ewing Rd. in Ewing (1.8 miles from TCNJ). 609-530-0900 Marriott Courtyard Ewing/Hopewell 360 Scotch Road in Ewing (2.5 miles from TCNJ). 609-771-8100 Marriott Trenton Lafayette Yard 1 West Lafayette St. in Trenton (4 miles from TCNJ). 609-421-4000 Element Ewing-Hopewell by Westin 1000 Sam Weinroth Rd. E. in Ewing (2.9 miles from TCNJ). 609-671-0050 https://www.airbnb.com/ is company that provides a platform for individuals referred to as “hosts”, generally private parties, to rent unoccupied living space and other short-term lodging to guests. This is another inexpensive way to travel, as you are essentially paying to stay in people’s homes.

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Meal plans Carte Blanche meal plans are by far the most popular among students living on campus. They offer students flexibility & variety at a great value. Carte Blanche meal plans contain three main components: Access to The Atrium at Eickhoff - CB meal plans give you unlimited access to The Atrium at Eickhoff either all day, or from 11:00am to close, depending on the plan you choose. Stop in as many times as you want for a full meal, or just for a snack. Click here to read about the amazing selection at The Atrium at Eickhoff. Carte Blanche points - CB points give you flexibility around campus, as these can be used at any one of our eight retail locations (click here to go to our Locations page). These can also be used to pay for a visiting friend or family member to enter The Atrium at Eickhoff. 1 point = $1. For students living on campus, points carry over from fall to spring; however, any remaining points are forfeited at the end of the spring semester. Meal Equivalency - Giving you even more flexibility, Meal Equivalency allows a Carte Blanche meal plan holder to dine at The Lion's Den, The Education Cafe, The Library Cafe, The Rathskellar, and KinetiCart from 11:00a.m. - 1:30p.m., and the first $6.93 is covered by your meal plan. If a purchase goes over the Meal Equivalency amount, the balance can be covered by Carte Blanche points, Get It points, cash or credit card.

On campus students: Meal plans are selected through the housing selection process. Please do not use the link below to choose a plan.

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Commuter students: For more details on how CB Plans work for commuters, and to sign up for a CB plan, please visit http://housing.pages.tcnj.edu.

Immigration Regulations Due to FERPA regulations, TCNJ cannot release information to parents and family; therefore it is always important to keep them up to date on your academic and living situations. International students should be aware that the Patriot Acts gives special permission to employees of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). At their request, college officials are required to release information to Homeland Security about any F-1 or J-1 students who are currently studying at or have previously studied at TCNJ.

Responsibilities of International Students: As an international student, you must always remember that your immigration status is your responsibility and that you are in charge of maintaining it. Some things you need to be aware of: i. Credit and Enrollment requirements: You must be enrolled as a full-time student. Undergraduate students must complete at least 12 credits every semester; graduate students are ordinarily required to complete 9 credits in order to considered full-time ii.

All students are required to make normal, full-time progress toward degree completion and to complete within a specified time period. Extensions other than for medical reasons or other unavoidable academic reasons are not permitted.

iii. Full-time enrollment is a serious immigration matter. If you have any questions regarding your class credit hours and your immigration status, please contact the Center for Global Engagement. iv. To complete 1 credit hour, you must receive either a passing grade (A-D) or a P (pass). Withdrawal from a course or a grade option change to audit (AU) will not count as credit toward your full-time status. If for any reason you feel you’re unable to complete the required number of credit hours, please make an appointment to speak with one of our advisors to discuss your options. v. The following marks are not acceptable: 1. W Withdrawal 2. AU Audit vi. The following grades may jeopardize your immigration status: 1. F Fail 2. INC Incomplete work 3. U Unsatisfactory 42


If you need an extension, of your I-20, you will need to apply for an extension of your I-20 or DS-2019 BEFORE your document expires-- if you need more time to complete your program. Apply for an extension of your I-20 or DS-2019 at least 30 days prior to the expiration of your document. An extension request is submitted after your I-20 or DS-2019 has expired cannot be processed. Failure to complete your program of study on time or to obtain a timely program extension constitutes a reportable violation of immigration status. Contact the Center for Global Engagement IMMEDIATELY if there are any changes in your personal or academic situation or items that need to be updated on your I-20 or DS-2019, such as: • • • • • • •

Change of name or citizenship Change of school, major or degree level Withdrawal or termination due to academic or medical reasons Departure for research or study abroad Withdrawal for a personal leave of absence Transfer to another institution in the U.S. Changes in registration, such as wanting to take an on-line class or enroll at another university

Travel Visas may be necessary for travel to a third country. Those wishing to visit third countries should contact the consulate or embassy of the country to be visited to determine what documents are necessary for reentry. F-1 and J-1 visa holders: If you leave the U.S. at any time during your studies and intend to re-enter, you must be in possession of a valid I-20 or DS-2019 to present to immigration officials upon your return to the U.S. border. If your I-20 or DS-2019 has changed substantially, you should obtain a new one from the Center for Global Engagement reflecting the new information. To travel outside the U.S., you need a valid I-20 or DS-2019 form signed by a Designated School Official (DSO). This signature informs Customs and Border Protection officials you are maintaining your immigration status at TCNJ. The signature, located on page 3 of your I-20 or in the bottom-right corner of your DS-2019, is valid for 12 months. It is advisable, however, to get a new signature if the most recent endorsement is older than 6 months. Specifics for J-1 Students:  

The travel signature on your Form DS-2019 is valid for a maximum of one year. You may use your DS-2019 to enter the U.S. as long as you are a continuing, full-time student and all the information on it remains the same. If you are unable to maintain full-time matriculation, or if the information on your DS-2019 changes, contact an International Student advisor. Upon entry to the U.S., an immigration officer will issue an I-94 card to you that will indicate the date of entry and grant you J-1 status for duration of status (J-1 D/S). If your I-94 card indicates anything other than J-1 D/S, contact an Academic Services advisor immediately upon return.

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 

The Center for Global Engagement recommends that you make photocopies of your travel documents (DS-2019 and I-94 card) for safekeeping. If you are on post-completion academic training, see information on J-1 Academic Training

Re-Entry to the United States for J-1 Students: 1. The travel signature on your DS-2019 2. A valid passport (unless exempt from passport requirement) 3. A valid visa (unless exempt from the visa requirement or eligible for automatic revalidation of visa of 30 days or less to contiguous territory (see AM§ 4.10.2) 4. A valid Form DS-2019, signed for re-entry by the RO (Responsible Officer) 5. The Form I-94 which is issued upon entry will indicate the date of entry and grant you J-1 status for duration of status (J-1 D/S) 6. Proof of full-time enrollment at TCNJ in the form of a Certificate of Enrollment or a TCNJ official transcript from the Office of Records and Registration at Green Hall, Room 112. Specifics for F-1 Students:    

The travel signature on your Form I-20 is valid for a maximum of one year. You may use your I-20 to enter the U.S. as long as you are a continuing, full-time student and all the information on it remains the same. If you are unable to maintain full-time matriculation, or if the information on your I-20 changes, contact an International Student advisor. If you are returning to the U.S. after a leave of absence and/or an absence of more than 5 months, you must obtain a new I-20 prior to re-entry. Contact an International Student advisor if this applies to you. Upon entry to the U.S., a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officer will issue an I-94 card to you that will indicate the date of entry and grant you F-1 status for duration of status (F-1 D/S). If your I-94 card indicates anything other than F-1 D/S, contact an International Student advisor immediately upon return. The International Student recommends that you make photocopies of your travel documents (I20 and I-94 card) for safekeeping.

If you are on post-completion optional practical training, see information on Optional Practical Training. Re-Entry to the United States for F-1 Students: It is also recommended that you carry these items whenever traveling within the U.S. outside of the immediate New York City area. 1. An unexpired passport valid at least six months into the future 2. An unexpired I-20 with a travel signature less than one year old (signed by the DSO) the Form I20 may be used to enter the U.S. as long as the student is a continuing, full-time student and all the information on the I-20 remains true 3. The DSO signature on the Form I-20 has a usual validity period of one year but for students on OPT the validity period is 6 months. However, immigration officials at ports of entry often require that the Form I-20 bear a DSO certification for re-entry executed in the current term (if a student is re-entering during the academic year) or, if the student is returning from his/her annual vacation, executed in the term preceding the vacation 4. An unexpired F-1 visa stamp valid for further entries into the United States 44


5. Proof of full-time enrollment in the form of a Certificate of Enrollment or TCNJ transcript from the TCNJ Records and Registration Office at Green Hall 112 (or the registrar’s office for your school) 6. Proof of financial ability (i.e., documentation verifying your funding source as indicated in Section 8 of your I-20); this may include personal or family bank statements, affidavits of support, or copies of your fellowship or scholarship letter. Immigration documents: 1. Complete visa application form and pay visa fees. 2. Receipt for payment of the 1-901 SEVIS fee if applicable 3. Your passport must be valid for at least six months after your proposed date of entry into the US 4. You will need a 2″ x 2″ photograph. 5. Form I-20 or DS-2019 for the school or program you wish to attend. 6. Financial evidence detailing source and amount of funding. Consular and immigration officers exercise considerable discretion in determining whether financial support exists and is sufficient to cover your entire period of stay. Prepare documentation that is thorough, consistent, credible and varied. 7. Official academic transcripts, confirmation of enrollment, and proof of English language proficiency may also be requested. 8. Evidence of continuing ties to your home country (i.e. family, career, or property) Visa applicants are presumed to be “intending immigrants.” Your visa will be denied unless you satisfy the consular officer that you will return home. Unfortunately, there is no single explanation, document, or letter than can guarantee visa issuance.

Safety

While TCNJ and Ewing is considered to be safe, you should take the same precautions that you would in a large, metropolitan city. Please remember that if you ever feel unsafe, the best thing to do is to follow your instincts. b. Personal safety tips: When you are traveling to the surrounding areas, always be aware of your surroundings, and walk like you know where you are. When walking on the streets at night, be sure to walk with a friend or in a group in a lighted area. On the TCNJ campus, you will notice that there are telephone kiosks with blue lights on top of them. These kiosks have a red button that you can press which will connect you directly to Campus police and someone will respond within 30 seconds.

Campus police

The College of New Jersey maintains its own police department, providing law enforcement and security services 24 hours, 7 days a week. Our Police Department currently employs twenty-four men and women to provide for the College community’s safety as well as the security of all property on campus. They are located in the Administration Services Building. c. Personal possessions: To ensure that nothing gets stolen from you, you should keep your apartment, door room/house door locked at all times. 45


d. If you live on the ground floor of an apartment building, don’t leave your windows open at night or when you’re not home. If you do want/need to leave your windows open for ventilation, it’s a good idea to open your windows only a few inches and block them with a board so that no one can open them further and crawl in.  If you keep valuables such as jewelry and cash in your home, make sure they are well hidden. Don’t carry large amounts of cash. Also, while at the Trenton Transit Center, do not pull your cash out in front of everyone—keep it inconspicuous.  Keep your passport in a safe place, and only carry it on you when you absolutely need it. If your passport is stolen, report the theft to your Embassy in the U.S.  If you own or use a car, never leave anything valuable in it. If you must, put valuables in the trunk, hide them under a seat, or cover them before you leave your car.  Avoid parking on dark streets. The best place to park is under a street light or in an area that has more people around it.

Personal boundaries In the U.S., it is illegal for one person to force another person to have sex with them no matter the situation. If you are on a date with someone who wants to have six and you do not want to, tell them NO. If someone forces you to have sex, it’s considered rape or sexual assault. TCNJ has rules against touching someone against their will. Please refer to the Student Conduct section of this handbook.

Reporting options All of the following options are available to you, and can be pursued individually or simultaneously.  You can make a police report you can call 609-771-2345 (or 9-1-1) or in the Administrative Services 104.  If the other person is a student, you can file a Student Code of Conduct complaint through to http://conduct.pages.tcnj.edu/

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