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January 2017 £4.20

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T H E P R AC T I C A L MAG A Z I N E F O R A R T I S TS BY A R T I S TS – S I N C E 1 9 3 1

2017

Dramatic landscapes in oils

pull-out guide to open competitions: dates for your diary

Improve your skills with Ben Taffinder’s palette-knife techniques

l WATERCOLOUR Choose the right paper Use the colours in nature l Advice on how to paint better images l l

l HOW TO OVERCOME

ACRYLICS

Paint stories from your imagination with Nicola Slattery

GOUACHE How to create colourful still lifes with Wendy Jacob

PASTEL

Richard Suckling demonstrates how to achieve light & atmosphere

ARTISTS’ BLOCK !



 


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TA01_p3_5Contents_TA04p3_4_Contents 21/11/2016 10:47 Page 5

WELCOME

incorporating ART & ARTISTS

First established 1931 ISSN 0004-3877 Vol 132 No. 1 ISSUE 1037

from the editor

Publishing Editor: Sally Bulgin PhD Hon VPRBSA Deputy Editor: Deborah Wanstall

Want to comment on something you’ve read, or seen?

Advertising sales: Anna-Marie Brown 01778 392048 annamarieb@warnersgroup.co.uk Advertisement copy: Sue Woodgates: 01778 392062 suewoodgates@warnersgroup.co.uk Online Editor: Dawn Farley Design: Brenda Hedley Subscriptions & Marketing Manager: Wendy Gregory Subscriptions: Liza Kitney and Nicci Salmon subscriptions@tapc.co.uk 01580 763673/01580 763315 Accounts: 01778 391000 creditcontrol@warnersgroup.co.uk Events Manager: Caroline Griffiths Subscription orders should be sent to: The Artist, Circulation Dept, Caxton House, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD. Tel: 01580 763673 Rates are: UK – £39.99 (includes Northern Ireland); EC member countries – €67; USA – $80 (air freight); Canada – $92 (air freight). All other countries £50 (air freight). Payments by credit card are taken in sterling at £50. Foreign currency prices include bank charges. Periodicals postage paid at Rahway, NJ. US subscribers only: Send address corrections to The Artist, c/o Mercury Airfreight International Ltd, 365 Blair Road, Avenel, NJ 07001 News-trade distribution by: Warners Group Publications plc. Tel: 01778 391000 All material copyrighted; reproduction forbidden without permission. Publication of an article or inclusion of an advertisement does not necessarily imply that TAPC is in agreement with the views expressed, or represents endorsement of products, materials or techniques. TAPC does not accept responsibility for errors, omissions or images received in good faith.

artist is printed by Warners Midlands PLC, The Maltings, Manor Lane, Bourne, Lincolnshire PE10 9PH and published every four weeks by THE ARTISTS’ PUBLISHING COMPANY LTD artist Caxton House, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD Telephone 01580 763673 Fax 01580 765411 Advertising 01778 392048 www.painters-online.co.uk

Email me at theartistletters@tapc.co.uk, or visit our website at www.painters-online.co.uk/forum

rtists’ block can be debilitating and painful, as Paul Talbot-Greaves acknowledges in his article on pages 44 to 46, in which he offers suggestions and strategies based on his own experiences to help overcome these difficult but very normal periods in an artist’s life. During these unwelcome down times it’s important to renew the hunger to paint and one of the best and easiest ways to do so, as Paul suggests, is to visit galleries or exhibitions of artist’s work that will inspire you. My latest ‘must-see’ exhibition was Paul Nash at Tate Britain, one of the greatest British painters of his generation, which was quite a contrast to the blockbuster Abstract Expressionism, at the RA, which I talked about in our November issue, but no less inspiring. Paul Nash is probably our most popular modern landscapist. He sought ‘the expression of a truly contemporary spirit’ in his work, as he experimented with cubism, which led him towards abstraction, and surrealism, which for someone interested in the history of art and development of artistic language, makes him all the more fascinating. But he also aimed to capture the emotion and ‘compelling magic’ of place, which is why his work is so enduring and relevant to today’s artists. There are certainly many compelling, haunting images in this exhibition, covering 40 years of Nash’s work. I loved the visionary, brooding nightscapes in watercolour and ink in the first gallery, and the powerful use of black and tonal contrast to express his despair at the destruction of war in The Ypres Salient at Night of 1918, as well as his use of geometric forms and compositional structures to unify many of his compositions. It’s interesting to see how he plays with perspective, strange juxtapositions of objects and a subdued tonal palette. I was also intrigued to follow how he created a series of dreamlike landscapes from photographs of two fallen elms in a field in Gloucester. So, as well as being art historically important, there’s much here to lift any artist out of a period of artist’s block. Another easy way to overcome artist’s block is to immerse yourself in the articles in this issue. Try cover artist Ben Taffinder’s palette-knife techniques to create bold, sculptural landscapes in oils (pages 14-17); follow Nicola Slattery’s approach and paint from your imagination (pages 1821); take Charles Williams’ advice on strategies for starting a new work (pages 22-25); challenge yourself to use a new medium and paint pastel landscapes with Richard Suckling (pages 26-28), gouache still lifes with Wendy Jacob (pages 51-53) or sketch urban landscapes in marker pens with James Hobbs (pages 48-50); and that’s just for starters. Finally, make sure you note the details and closing date of March 31 and enter our 2017 open competition, with fantastic prizes and the chance to see your work exhibited and publicised in this magazine and via our social media channels (see pages 8-9 for full details). It’s amazing what a successful submission to an open competition can do for an artist’s confidence. We look forward to seeing your work!

A

THIS MONTH’S COVER Best wishes

Sally Bulgin Publishing Editor

Ben Taffinder Kynance, oil on canvas, 391⁄2⫻311⁄2in (100⫻80cm). See pages 14 to 17

Let us know what you think at • theartistletters@tapc.co.uk • www.painters-online.co.uk/forum • www.facebook.com/paintersonline • twitter.com/artpublishing

artist January 2017

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29 32

CONTENTS FEATURES 14 Bold marks in the landscape FC IN CONVERSATION Ben Taffinder reduces his oil paintings to ‘blocks of light forming a strong design of shapes’ with a palette knife, as Caroline Saunders finds out

18 Imagined narratives FC MASTERCLASS Susie Hodge talks to Nicola Slattery, winner of the The Artist Award at the 2016 Royal Society of British Artists’ annual exhibition, about her approach to her subject matter and working methods

72 Adebanji Alade’s motivational tips Never give up!

PRACTICALS 22 Making a start In the first of Charles Williams’ new six-part series he deals with the question of how and where to start your painting

26 Pastel: a beautiful medium FC Create expressive pastel paintings that glow with colour and light, with advice from Richard Suckling

22 29 How to overcome the dreaded block Overcome a bout of painter’s block and revitalise your work with help from Paul Talbot-Greaves

32 Impressive blocks of colour Robert Dutton says Derwent’s XL Graphite and Charcoal Blocks positively invite you to try them

41 Get in the mood for rain Mike Barr shows you how to achieve atmospheric rain-soaked cityscapes

44 Discover subjects through sketching and drawing Paul Weaver underlines the importance of sketching as he explains why it plays a vital role in the creative process

48 Be bold with marker pens

41 4

artist January 2017

James Hobbs urges you to add marker pens to your drawing kit – the results will be looser and more energetic

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NEXT MONTH IN FEATURES u

51 Vibrant still lifes in gouache FC

48 47

MASTERCLASS

Prizewinner in last year’s The Artist Open Competition, Bryan Evans demonstrates the techniques behind his dramatic watercolour paintings of Glasgow city scenes

Wendy Jacob explains how to invigorate your still lifes and make them compelling viewing t

54 The A-Z of colour

IN CONVERSATION

Nick Andrew reveals how he uses acrylics and bold, vigorous brushwork to recreate the light and atmosphere of secluded landscapes and riverscapes

N is for the colours found in nature, says Julie Collins

56 A watercolour paper to suit you Ian Sidaway begins a three-part guide to choosing watercolour papers

59 Improve your figure painting In her final article in this series, Ann Witheridge explains why placing the figure in a well-painted background can change the dynamic and focus of the painting

62 Be adventurous Terry Jarvis’ tips and advice will set you on the road to watercolour success

PLUS 6 Your views 11 The Art World 35 The Artist guide to open competitions and exhibitions 2017 65 Books 66 Exhibitions 68 Courses and holidays showcase

EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS

PRACTICALS u In the second of his three-part series on watercolour paper choices, Ian Sidaway shows how to test the various surfaces and select the right type for your style of painting

l Advice from Paul Talbot-Greaves on how to use your smartphone or tablet to help you create successful watercolours l Follow Adele Wagstaff as she paints a reclining nude with advice on composition and how to describe the form and features in oils l How to express the effect of rain and reflections in urban scenes by Adebanji Alade l Achieve texture in your still lifes of fruit and vegetables in acrylics with advice from Alison Rankin l Robert Dutton shows how to capture the true nature of the landscape in winter, in acrylics and mixed media

Ken Howard OBE, RA studied at Hornsey School of Art and the Royal College of Art. He is a member of the NEAC, ROI, RWS, RWA and RBA. He exhibits extensively and has won numerous awards.

Jason Bowyer NEAC, RP, PS studied at Camberwell School of Art and the Royal Academy Schools. He is the founder of the NEAC Drawing School and exhibits his work widely.

Bernard Dunstan RA studied at Byam Shaw School of Art and the Slade School. He taught at the Camberwell and Byam Shaw Schools of Art among others. He exhibits widely including in the annual exhibitions of the NEAC, of which he is a member, and RA.

David Curtis ROI, RSMA has won many awards for his en plein air and figurative paintings in both oils and watercolours. He has had several books published on his work as well as DVD films, and exhibits his work extensively.

PLUS l Julie Collins’ A to Z of watercolour continues: O is for opaque colours l Don’t miss our FREE 24-page 2017 Inspirational Art Courses and Holidays guide

And much more! Don’t miss out: our February issue is on sale from December 30 artist January 2017

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YOUR

VIEWS X

Letters, emails and comments

Email theartistletters@tapc.co.uk or write to The Editor, The Artist, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD

STAR LETTER

Released from denial Charles Williams’ excellent ‘Musings’ about guilt (The Artist, November 2016) have made me realise an even deeper problem – denial. For me this is personal as at the ripe old age of 71 I realise that for most of my life I have been in denial about Charles’ wonderful phrase: ‘doing art.’ Despite having always loved art and had lots of early encouragement I was hugely put off by some of the artists I met in the mid-1960s. My fault, I’m sure, but that experience certainly got me thinking and searching and eventually led me to respond to a call to full-time Christian ministry and, lo and behold, become a vicar. Yes, that was a ‘calling’ but I now realise there was also a ‘vocation’ to do art and I just could not work the two together. So the art was suppressed, denied and, dare I say it, I even prayed it would be taken away. But it wouldn’t go! Wherever I went it kept popping up its head, saying ‘I’m real. I’m genuine. I’m a part of you – just let me come out and be encouraged.’ OK, I’ll never be a Picasso or a Monet but the denial is over and I’m painting like never before. l’m hugely grateful that my mother gave me a subscription to The Artist in 1994 – which I’ve kept up ever since – as that has kept me sane, with so many wonderful, inspiring articles. And Charles has made me realise that the way I feel is the way so many 'art do-ers' feel – so I’m not alone. Thank you so much. William Mather, by email This month’s star letter writer will receive a selection from our lucky dip bag, which could include art materials, books and DVDs worth approximately £50.

Copyright issue I use a significant amount of printed matter in my mixed-media work – for example parts of editorial, titles and advertisements that I have cut from newspapers and magazines. These printed items are then obscured by paint to create wonderful textures. I also use a technique of transferring type (described in The Artist October 2015 issue) in which the type is seen back to front. Am I breaching any copyright by using this method in my own work? Edward Robinson, by email Susie Hodge replies: ‘It might depend on how much of the advertisement or editorial is prominent, but I imagine you are using broken words, similar to Kurt Schwitters’ 'Mertz,' which all began with Picasso and Braque's Synthetic Cubism, so there’s quite a historical precedent. A friend of mine uses a similar technique; his work has been in the RA Summer Exhibition and is currently on the wall in a

tube station, as well as represented in galleries. I think someone would have complained if he was in breach of copyright. However, if anything slanderous can be read in such a work there might be problems.’

Missing the magic I am reluctantly being forced to work indoors on a commission for a big landscape picture. I started in watercolour en plein air on a sunny morning, taping together pieces of watercolour paper as the picture expanded from my focal point of a local village set among rolling hills and forest, to a length of 280cm by the afternoon. I decided to ‘improve’ the composition by carrying on in the studio with acrylics. But how anyone can prefer this to painting outside is now truly beyond me. The more effort I apply the more I find I miss the water’s flow, the intrinsic light and energy that helps me to make

spontaneous decisions and atmospheric effects, prompting and guiding me to follow its direction. I suddenly feel isolated. Outdoors I am always a part of a big machine that drives my painting, among friends who constantly feed me ideas, inspiration and solace. When I work inside it is from an assemblage of separate visual details which, I find, I have not properly observed despite having made accurate on-site sketches. Presumably this is why pictures painted from photos always look dead to plein-air artists. Compared to the draining effect of a closed room and burdening my memory, energy resources and imagination with the task of creating an authentic feel of reality, the so-called difficulties of changing light and weather are nothing but an empowering tonic. Studio painting is not for me – give me the great outdoors any day. Once you know what real effects feel like, you’re hooked and there’s no going back. John Owen, by email

Unexpected stimulus As I am in the habit of ordering new art materials online I normally bin catalogues and printed advertisements. However, I should like to congratulate Jackson’s on the design and quality of their latest catalogue, which arrived with the December 2016 issue of The Artist. It seems to me to be presented in such an artistic and painterly way that it's very difficult to ignore. It is stimulating and encouraging and just a quick look through it has nudged my recent painter’s block out of the way with ideas for new colourways, techniques, textures and materials. I would recommend readers give it a look, not give it to the bin! Anne Harrison, by email

Finding harmony May I just say how interesting and useful I found Kelly Medford’s article ‘Colour harmony in the split primary palette’ in the December 2016 issue. I work in oils and find the placement and balance of colour in a painting by far the most challenging and elusive of all the skills. I would welcome more such articles. Mick Yates, by email

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TA01 PatchingsCall17_v4_Layout 1 18/11/2016 15:00 Page 54

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Open Art Competition 2017 in partnership with patchings Art Centre

CALL fOR eNtRIeS OVeR £16,500 WORtH Of pRIzeS OVER 40 INDIVIDUAL PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO SELECTED ARTISTS COMPRISING: £5,000 purchase prize Award

Three prizes of £200 worth of paper

Selected by guest judge Ken Howard OBE, RA for a work up to the value of £5,000

£500 Caran d’Ache/Jakar Awards

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Two prizes of £250 worth of art materials

£1,700 exhibition Awards

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£2,600 Award One prize of a showcase feature on a selected artist in Leisure Painter magazine www.painters-online.co.uk

£100 Highly Commended Award

£300 pro Arte Awards Two prizes of brushes to the value of £150 each www.proarte.co.uk

£1,000 Royal talens Awards Four prizes of £250 worth of art materials www.royaltalens.com

Selected artists from the 2017 The Artist category will be awarded a mixed exhibition at Patchings Art Centre in 2018, worth £1,700

£500 Clairefontaine Awards

A subscription to Leisure Painter worth £100

Two prizes of £250 worth of art products selected from the Clairefontaine Graphic & Fine Art range

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£100 Highly Commended Award

£900 Derwent Awards

of a gift voucher worth £450 to be used at Patchings Art Centre, Notts

£600 St Cuthberts Mill Awards

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Three prizes of £200 worth of watercolour paper

A subscription to The Artist worth £100 www.painters-online.co.uk

Three prizes of £300 worth of art materials www.pencils.co.uk

£500 great Art Awards

£450 patchings Award

£600 premium Art Brands Awards

£500 Sennelier Awards Two prizes of £250 worth of Sennelier art materials www.globalartsupplies.co.uk

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£400 Winston Oh Award

Three prizes of Batsford art books to the value of £150 each

Two prizes of £250 worth of art materials from Europe’s largest art materials’ supplier

One prize of Daniel Smith watercolours worth £350 and one prize of Pan Pastels worth £250

A painting course up to £400 of your choice, sponsored by Winston Oh

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David Curtis ROI, RSMA Guest Judge: Ken Howard OBE, RA

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Liz Wood, artist and co-owner of Patchings Art Centre

£450 Batsford Awards

JuDgeS Sally Bulgin, editor The Artist (All art materials prizes are quoted at the rrp)

£600 Canson Awards

How to enter & conditions The competition is open to artists worldwide. Only original work will be considered and paintings based on reference photographs must have been taken by the artist or used with the permission of the photographer. Photography, except where incorporated into collage, is not acceptable. 1 The entry fee of £16 covers up to

THREE entries of two-dimensional works in any media; only ONE work

per entrant will be accepted for exhibition in the Leisure Painter category. 2 No entry should be larger than 120x150cm WHEN FRAMED (canvases do not need to be framed). 3 ONLINE digital entries must be sent via our website at www.paintersonline.co.uk clicking through the links entitled TA&LP/Patchings 2017 Competition.

4 BY POST colour photos or prints (no

correct return postage) for the results and return of your entry. 6 Send your entry/ies with the nonrefundable entry fee of £16, payable 5 Each entry must be clearly marked to TAPC, to: TA&LP/ Patchings 2017 with your name and address and title Competition, 63/65 High Street, of the work and placed in an envelope Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD, to arrive to which you must affix the entry by the closing date of March 31, 2017. coupon, right. Place into a larger envelope for posting, with a stamped 7 Entries will be judged after March 31, addressed envelope large enough to 2017 and selected works called for accommodate your entries (with the exhibition. These must be framed larger than A4) must be sent to the address on the entry coupon (right).


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OPEN ART COMPETITION 2017 ENTRY FORM FOR POSTAL ENTRIES (Online entries: please see point 3 in entry details, below left) DEADLINE: March 31, 2017 Please accept my work for consideration for the 2017 competition. I confirm that my entry is original. I have read and understand the rules and agree to allow The Artist and/or Leisure Painter to publish, republish and repurpose my work in print and digital formats including but not limited to magazines, promotion materials, websites, databases and as part of downloadable digital products. Affix to envelope holding entry/ies and send with stamped addressed envelope and payment of £16, (make cheques payable to TAPC), to TA&LP Patchings 2017, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD by the closing date of March 31, 2017. Or, please charge my

The Artist Purchase Prize 2016 Andrew Hird Embankment Pier & Waterloo, oil, 9x11in (23x28cm). t

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be accepted for loss or damage in (canvases excepted) ready for transit, incoming or outgoing, exhibition from July 13 to August 20, whilst on the competition premises 2017 at Patchings Art Centre. or during the exhibition. Originals 8 Successful entrants will be notified in selected andsubmitted for final late April about delivering their work exhibition must be fully insured between June 16 and July 2, 2017 to by the artist. Patchings Art Centre, Nottinghamshire. 10 Original works must be left with the 9 All care will be taken with organisers throughout the exhibition. entries but no responsibility can

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Jan TAW _Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:39 Page 9

THE ART WORLD NEWS, VIEWS, INFORMATION AND SPECIAL EVENTS IN THE ART WORLD

compiled by Deborah Wanstall

p

Paul Nash (1889–1946) Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917, oil on canvas, 24⫻20in (61⫻51cm)

LANDSCAPE – A PERSONAL RESPONSE This major review of Paul Nash’s work comprises over 160 oils, watercolours, photographs and assemblages, with books and archive material, from early symbolist landscapes, to the World War paintings and post-war

www.painters-online.co.uk

landscapes, and his involvement with abstraction and surrealism. Paul Nash is at Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG until March 5. Admission is £16.50, concessions £14.50. Telephone 020 7887 8888. www.tate.org.uk

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STAND IN THE ARTIST’S FOOTPRINTS During an artistic career of just 15 years, Joan Eardley concentrated on two very different themes in her work: children and the slums of Glasgow’s Townhead area; and the fishing village of Catterline. This exhibition features paintings from the gallery’s own collection alongside previously unpublished archive material and loans from private collections. New research has identified the exact locations of many of her works – using the detailed and annotated maps of Townhead and Catterline it is possible to track her movements and pinpoint exactly where she was standing. Joan Eardley: A Sense of Place is at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art , 75 Belford Road, Edinburgh EH4 3DR until May 21. Admission is £9, concessions £7. Telephone 0131. www.nationalgalleries.org u Joan Eardley (1921–63) Catterline in Winter, 1963, oil on board, 47⫻511⁄2in (121⫻131cm).

NOCTURNAL VISIONS Eastbourne’s Towner Gallery brings together the works of 60 artists who have explored the nocturnal in their work. This exhibition covers over 200 years of painting, drawing and printmaking, with key works by John Constable, Caspar David Friedrich (left), JMW Turner, Rose Wylie, Emil Nolde, Edvard Munch, Samuel Palmer, Eileen Cooper, Craigie Aitchison, Patrick Caulfield, Julian Opie, William Blake and Marc Chagall among the artists represented. Towards Night is at Towner Art Gallery, Devonshire Park, College Road, Eastbourne BN21 4JJ until January 25. The gallery is open from 10am to 5pm, Tuesday to Sunday. Admission is free. Telephone 01323 434670; www.townereastbourne.org.uk t

Caspar David Friedrich (1774–1840) Winter Landscape, 1811, oil on canvas, 123⁄4⫻173⁄4in (32.5⫻45cm)

STEP BACK IN TIME Popular works in the Russell-Cotes collection of 20th-century paintings are put under the spotlight, with a particular focus on paintings in tempera. During the 1920s and ‘30s the curators focused on works by local artists such as Henry Lamb, Bernard Gribble, Leslie Moffatt Ward and Eustace Nash. The collection also includes works by Evelyn Dunbar, Graham Sutherland, CRW Nevinson, Eric Gill, Edward Bawden and Laura Knight, and has sculptures, ceramics and miniatures. Meeting Modernism: 20th Century Art in the Russell-Cotes Collection is at Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum, East Cliff Promenade, Bournemouth BH1 3AA until April 24. Admission is £6. Russell-Cotes is open Tuesday to Sunday, 10am to 5pm. Telephone 01202 451858. www.russellcotes.com u

Eustace P Nash (1886–1969) The Darkened Bus Station, watercolour on paper, 151⁄2⫻193⁄4in (39⫻50cm)

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PRIVATE TREASURES Treasures from the private collections of trustees and benefactors, in the form of Victorian and early 20th-century British oils and watercolours, are on show in the Watts Gallery, near Guildford. The lenders of these works are not only sharing their favourites, each has a unique story attached to it – one that tells how the collector came to acquire the work and their relationship with it. Among the artists included are Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt, Edward Burne-Jones, Frederick Sandys, John Singer Sargent, Walter Crane and Alan Beeton (right). Untold Stories: British Art from Private Collections is at the Watts Gallery, Down Road, Compton, Guildford, Surrey until February 19. Admission is £9.50, students £4.75. The gallery is open from 11am to 5pm, Tuesday to Sunday. Telephone 01483 810235. www.wattsgallery.org.uk u Alan Beeton (1880–1942) Marguerite Kelsey, c1936, oil on canvas, 35⫻383⁄4in (89⫻98.5cm)

EDITOR’S GALLERY CHOICE This month’s editor’s choice from our website gallery is by Judit Matthews, who comments:

‘I worked from a photograph of a lovely open view in Hungary, in the Matra mountain range. It was in the summer time but as I am preparing for my art group’s winter exhibition (Tadworth Art Group) I decided to use wintery colours and add a little smoke line above the chimney. ‘I used a dip pen and Winsor & Newton black ink to start with, then Daler-Rowney FW acrylic ink in antelope brown, followed by pigment pens and watercolour for the aqua colours and greys. I enjoy drawing patterns in my work. It gives interest and, in my opinion, makes it a bit more abstract.’ www.juditmatthews.artweb.com u Judit Matthews Winter’s Coming, mixed media, 12⫻153⁄4in (30⫻40cm). On show in our online gallery at www.painters-online.co.uk

To upload images of your own work and receive valuable feedback, go to our website and click on the link to the gallery. This is a free service.

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January 2017

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I N C O N V E R S AT I O N

Bold marks in the landscape Caroline Saunders discovers how Ben Taffinder creates his distinctive palette-knife oil paintings, which he ‘pares back to the bare essentials’

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t is clear to see that Ben Taffinder really enjoys the physical and sculptural quality of the painting process. He has developed a new way of seeing, retranslating the world around him by describing light alone, which he finds tremendously liberating. He is drawn to degrees of abstraction and compositions with strong contrasts. ‘By using palette knives I am able to describe the differences in light on the planes of an object with a minimum of marks. I exaggerate these gradations in order to strengthen form and make it feel physically believable.

Out and about ‘Working en plein air has to fit around the weather a bit,’ says Ben. ‘Some light drizzle on un-thinned oil isn't a

problem but there is a limit!’ Once he starts painting en plein air he keeps going until it's done or the light has totally gone. Ben enjoys the high contrasts and intensified colour that bright light releases. He revisits many places each year, with May and June his favourite months to paint. ‘Colour suddenly surges out of the land, the sun feels warm on your skin and the world comes alive again. I have to hurry to get as much down as possible. The mood of a place can change at different speeds throughout the day, with the most rapid flux at the beginning and end. Although challenging to work at these times it can be the most rewarding because I know I don’t have long to get it down, which results in instinctive, fluid marks

and ultimately a less controlled expression. Being forced to work fast, usually between 40 minutes and a few hours on a piece, gets a more direct, spontaneous response. Something that to me feels truer.’ Looking for the ultimate composition Ben might follow the line of shade cast by a field boundary towards a convergence of land and water, marked by whitewashed buildings in the distance. ‘I try to stay sensitive to structure created by light, its interlocking planes and shapes and the way they direct my eyes. Subtle colour harmonies in some instances and complementary relationships are included too. A deep foreground and high horizon give a depth of perspective. I sometimes paint from the boat, too. The biggest challenge I face is managing my physical and mental state in order to work as effectively as possible.’ Occasionally Ben makes charcoal or graphite sketches in the studio to loosen up before painting on location. ‘Fast fluid drawings based on the subject counter the temptation to tighten up a painting too soon. I am always fighting my instincts to describe the outline of form and make every boundary a clear one.’ In the winter months he can be found in his studio, a former grain store, working from studies made on brighter days.

t Cattle Grazing near Zennor, oil on panel, 121⁄2⫻15in (32⫻38cm). ‘Zennor is a part of Cornwall where the colour within the landscape feels very closely tied – the pasture, granite walls, farm buildings and even the livestock all seem to be made from the same substance. I was forced to work very fast here whilst the cattle were nearby. Yellow ochre and a little crimson warm the pasture against cobalt sea and shadows.’

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Kynance, oil on canvas, 391⁄2⫻311⁄2in (100⫻80cm). ‘I started this by blocking in all the darker planes of rock and the distant sea with a deep indigo as a base, and then the lighter planes of rock and the cliff tops with an orange/ochre to burn through later layers. I was pleased with the strength of the rock formations on the right-hand side. I hope you can feel the direction of the grain of the beautiful serpentine stone plunging into the sands.’ u

Two values To simplify, Ben reduces the work to blocks of light forming a strong design of shapes. Beginning with just two values, a mid-tone warm ground (possibly terracotta/ochre), which radiates through light areas and a dark shade (often close to indigo) that correlates with the deepest shade he can see. ‘Even if it's only the first of many layers it gives me the scope to develop strong contrasts.’ He then starts working the darker areas up – relative to the deepest shade – and continues this process over the whole piece right through to any highlights. ‘More thinly layered paint might be used in places to allow colour to come through, like with the orange/ochre that burns through the green pasture here in Cornwall.’ Ben mixes up a colour that seems to run through the whole piece – basically the colour of the light itself. ‘Outdoor light is often a mid-cobalt blue greyed with degrees of magenta, yellow ochre and Naples yellow. When included in every part of the work, sometimes only in tiny amounts, it ties the whole thing together.’ Regularly making adjustments Ben scrapes away or goes over the painting until it is all texturally cohesive. With studio work he tries different values or colour intensity layered on top many times to push or pull different parts of

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Felled Beech Trees, oil on panel, 141⁄4⫻161⁄4in (36⫻41cm). ‘This is a good example of high contrast pushing me to describe the light falling on the subject rather than any distinct formal outline of the subject itself. A primarily dark composition with a cool temperature frames a central shaft of warm light as it falls across bare earth and timber. When the colour, intensity and value are right only the simplest of marks is needed to connect us to the feeling of the place.’

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I N C O N V E R S AT I O N t Lane from Priests Cove, Cape Cornwall, oil on canvas, 351⁄2⫻233⁄4in (90⫻60cm). ‘The study for this studio canvas was painted in late afternoon sun. I was attracted to this composition by the angular line my eye took following the contrasts of the lane up to the horizon. It was autumn and the bracken and rough grasses on the cliffs were turning a reddish ochre, which fired off a powder blue sky. I exaggerated this, using more crimson and orange to warm the temperature of the light.’

components of most work being: Naples yellow, yellow ochre, magenta and cobalt. Using a limited palette of primaries gives the whole work a common language although sometimes I do like some alien colour – like a field of oil seed rape.’ Ben uses Lukas painting butter to give extra body to the oil. A higher viscosity allows a more sculptural approach and can help at times when he wants to keep colour clean. Another area of paint can be totally covered without inadvertent mixing, thereby maintaining definition between marks. Working wet-on-wet the painting butter allows the paint to move and dry as one as much as possible – with extremely thick impasto different colours dry at slightly different paces, even when mixed with equal amounts of medium. ‘There may be light crinkling over time in some darker areas, but I don't find this at odds to my objective. The work often has gnats, pollen and dust stuck to it anyway. A quicker drying time is handy as it enables me to send most work to the framers within a couple of months of completion.’

Influences

the work, manipulating it until it feels right. ‘Heavily built-up areas, just like high contrasting values or intense colour tend to draw the painting forward whereas smooth, homogenised, subtle areas sink back.’

Tools of the trade An old ferret box containing the necessary equipment – paint, spirit, rags and knives, a large palette, sometimes with pure colour left over from last time – is taken on location, plus a light aluminium easel and a small selection of prepared stretched cotton canvases. All canvases are pre-

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prepared in a mid-tone warm ground of oil and spirit. He mostly uses a palette knife with an 8cm blade. Wet work is transported on a flat rack in his van. Attracted to oil paint due to its thickness and integrity, Ben likes the relatively low cost of Daler-Rowney Georgian oils as ‘there’s nothing more inhibiting than being afraid to use materials.’ His palette includes titanium white, Naples yellow, cadmium yellow hue, yellow ochre, crimson alizarin, magenta, cobalt blue hue, cerulean blue, Vandyke brown. ‘I only mix with white sparingly and normally prefer Naples yellow instead. The main

‘I am most heavily influenced by Joan Eardley, Kyffin Williams, Nicolas De Stael and Richard Diebenkorn. Diebenkorn for his vivid colour and eye for composition – constructing calm open spaces with bright light. Kyffin Williams for the sombre, earthy palette and attention to tonal values in his Welsh landscapes, so reminiscent of the Cornish moors in the darker part of the year. Nicolas De Stael’s deconstructed work is constantly intriguing; initially for the second or two my brain takes to link the image to a reality, then to make sense of what the triggers for that recognition are in terms of colour interaction with simplified composition, lastly to understand how this was achieved. These works continue to help me understand the underlying TA fabric of my own perception.’

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St Mawes Waterfront, oil on canvas, 471⁄4⫻391⁄2in (120⫻100cm). ‘Painted from a very quick study made on the pier, I simplified the main components, which give an abstract quality to the strengthened composition. The grey blue colour of the natural light is present in some degree in every part of the work. The dog-leg angle of the sea wall is a shape I'm often attracted to because it pulls your eye across the canvas and back to the horizon. I kept this line quite hard while making the houses less distinct, to act as a sunlit whole.’

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Photo by Mike Newman/Ocean-Image.com

Ben Taffinder graduated in fine art, specialising in sculpture, from Falmouth art school. He went on to make commissioned sculptures and installations for four years before painting full-time. Ben is represented by The Harbour Gallery, Portscatho, Truro, www.theharbour gallery.co.uk; Trelissick Gallery, Truro, www.trelissickgallery.co.uk; the Market House Gallery, Marazion, Penzance, www.markethouse gallery.co.uk. www.bentaffinder.co.uk

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MASTERCLASS

Imagined narratives Nicola Slattery works more from imagination than direct observation and her works have a calm, meditative air. She tells Susie Hodge how her style continues to evolve and has words of encouragement for those who fear rejection

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think I first decided I wanted to be an artist when I was in primary school and did a series of drawings about people's jobs,’ says Nicola Slattery. ‘Art school was a great experience in many ways and introduced me to printmaking, but it did little to help me learn how to make a living from art. I moved to Oxford to join the Oxford Printmakers Co-op and it was there that I started to learn some

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of the basics of selling art through a process of trial and error. I put on several group and solo exhibitions and basically did all I could to put my art in front of anyone I could – a technique I continue with to this day! ‘I learnt that not everyone would like what they saw and at first it was quite difficult to be on the receiving end of negative criticism, even when gently put. But I began to realise that I did not

need everyone to like my work just as long as some people could relate to it and enough people liked it enough to buy. Income from sales of work was supplemented by running some occasional weekend and other short art courses which I enjoyed and I still run four or five weekend courses each year because I enjoy the intense artistic interaction with a group of like-minded artists.

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t Book of Cats, acrylic on wood panel, 153⁄4⫻153⁄4in (40⫻40cm). The painting evolved from T. S. Eliot's poem about the enigmatic cat who is known by the name ‘Hidden Paw.’ The ambiguity of the subject is a perfect fit with Nicola's mysterious, atmospheric style u Hat Trick, acrylic on wood panel, 153⁄4⫻153⁄4in (40⫻40cm). ‘I liked the idea of a hat that keeps producing white rabbits and this was painted shortly before Easter!’ Deep colours and the figure's non-committal expression add to the enigmatic mood

BOTTOM RIGHT Crown of Birds, acrylic on wood panel, 153⁄4⫻153⁄4in (40⫻40cm). Nicola says: ‘This is simply a response to the birds I see in my garden.’ Which goes to demonstrate how fertile her imagination is. The colours and decorative effects create the notion of a story, something further occurring in the image, away from the elements we can see

Figurative narrative ‘All my work is from imagination and I nearly always work in my studio.Very occasionally I will go outside to sketch and draw. I use lots of reference material – I collect images and ideas that slowly cook away in the back of my mind. I often get a strong visual image in my head, which I then try to recreate, usually in paint, but I sometimes return to printmaking. Once the image is out of my head I think about composition, palette and so on but I try not to let 'the rules' get in the way. Perspective has its place but it needs to be kept in perspective!' Nicola's style seems natural and uncontrived, her imagery is ethereal, soft and contemplative, in the traditions of artists such as Marc Chagall or Odilon Redon. ‘Developing a distinct style is a challenge for many artists. It's easy to fall into the trap of following other artists you admire. I was lucky to develop a style early in my career – the nature of my printmaking limited to some extent what was possible and this later helped when I began to drift back into painting. I'm not too concerned with artistic conventions and I always knew I wasn't trying to create photorealism. There are always elements of a story in my head about the image I'm creating and so my work is often characterised as being “figurative narrative.” The style continues to evolve, but it is a gradual and unconscious process.’ So how does she begin? ‘A composition can sometimes develop in

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MASTERCLASS weeks and occasional abandonment, with the cathartic experience of painting over the offending image that simply will not come right. Often this frees me up and the next attempt is often much easier and successful. ‘I usually paint one picture at a time, but sometimes I leave a troublesome work to start another, and return to it in a different frame of mind. I can often then see what needs to done or if not I chuck in the towel and start again. I've often advised a student I've been teaching to leave it and begin something new. I think life is too short to struggle with a poor painting for very long and the feeling of being released from a dud can be so liberating that this feeling of uplift finds its way into the next work, especially if begun without too much delay.’ Once a work is finished Nicola advises to leave it. ‘I have occasionally altered work after several months, but it is possible to overdo the thing and spontaneity and life can be lost. ‘A few of my smaller paintings start at 20⫻20cm but most are around 40⫻40cm; my largest to date was around 120⫻240cm for a couple of collectors who bought many pieces of my work in the 1990s and helped my early career in many ways. I've since met other collectors who buy a painting because they like it, the work speaks to their soul and they will forgo buying a new kitchen or a foreign holiday in order to own something that feeds their mind and spirit.’

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Magician’s Cat, acrylic on wood panel, 153⁄4⫻153⁄4in (40⫻40cm)

Speaking to the soul

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Two Butterflies and a Moth, acrylic on wood panel, 193⁄4⫻233⁄4in (50⫻60cm)

a day and take me by surprise. But usually they take several days, even weeks. This will involve knowing what to leave out, which is usually just as important as what to put in.

Working methods ‘I work on wood panels primed in white. This is then given another priming coat in a colour, which I can then draw on, either with pencil or often with chalk. I do use an underpainting technique that involves building up layers of colour and which I teach on my weekend art courses. I paint with good-

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quality heavy body acrylics. They have a consistency like butter at warm room temperature and can be kept workable on a stay-wet palette for weeks. I make mine out of old plastic ice cream tubs with kitchen towel on the base, onto which a piece of greaseproof paper sits and the paints go on this – just half a teaspoon or so. This is the mixing place and when a painting session ends the lid goes on and the paint is still soft and usable when next needed. ‘Some paintings develop quickly and without anguish, others have a different process that can involve reworking over

So how does Nicola work to commission? ‘I don't do many. At the outset I explain that the work will inevitably be the picture that I have in my head. There is always lots of artistic licence in my work and I can only work to a commission if this is understood at the outset. Thankfully all have been happy with their finished pieces but sometimes there is a difficult initial period when the customer first sees the work and they have to come to terms with the image, which is never going to be identical to the one in their mind’s eye. Usually the work will grow on them and I've often had people get back to me after several weeks or even months to say how much they now love the work. These difficulties don't arise with work sold in exhibitions where what you see is what you get. It is however still surprising how many people will see an image that slowly works its way into their heads and they will get back to me months later desperate to buy it, only to find it is sold.’

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Three Cups, acrylic on wood panel, 233⁄4⫻311⁄2in (60⫻80cm)

Wise recollections Nicola is extremely open about all her experiences and has an exceptionally healthy attitude towards the business side of being an artist. Her words will be of encouragement to many: ‘Back in the 1980s, I had a solo exhibition at Somerville College in Oxford and someone wrote in the visitors' book “not my cup of tea.” About two days later, a student in her final year bought a small painting for about £45, which doubled my income for the month! (The painting would probably be priced at about £1,000 now). In the 1990s at the private view of an exhibition I had no sales and just one person turned up to see my work, and the gallery owner was particularly frosty. His mood and mine changed a few days later when he phoned to say that five fairly large works had sold for a total of nearly £10,000. An art fair I attended about ten years ago was a total washout, with very few visitors and even fewer sales. It cost me over a

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£1,000 and took up three days. Three months later, one of the very small number of people I met at the fair phoned with a £5,000 commission and bought another piece of work for £1,000. These three experiences and many like them have taught me that there are many ups and downs to exhibiting. The same applies to entering art competitions and it is very easy to become discouraged and feel rejected. But it is only by putting your work 'out there' for others to see and respond to that you will get any feedback. What is really important is that you never allow the feedback to rule you. Van Gogh didn't change his style or approach in the face of rejection or lack of sales and I firmly believe the only critic that really matters to an artist is themself. My husband frequently gives me his opinion on particular works and it's always especially satisfying to find that the work he liked the least is the first TA one to sell in an exhibition!’

Nicola Slattery has a a BA in Fine Art (Hons) from Coventry Art School. She has exhibited in many group and solo exhibitions, including with the New English Art Club and Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. A member of the Royal Society of British Artists, she won The Artist Award in 2016. She is represented by the Fosse Gallery, Stow-on-the-Wold; Langham Gallery, London WC1 and Mandell’s Gallery, Norwich. Her work is in many collections, including the Ruth Borchard Self Portrait Collection. Her next exhibition is at the Edmund Gallery, Bury St Edmunds, from July 7 to 20. For details of her exhibitions and weekend art courses, see www.nicolaslattery.com

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B E G I N N I N G S , M I D D L E S & E N D S : PA R T 1 O F 6

Making a start Charles Williams begins a new series in which he considers the various stages in making paintings. This month he deals with the question of where and how to start

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here are lots of books on how to paint and draw. I have written two myself, and I hope they are useful. They emerged from 20 or more years of teaching in adult, further and higher education, in private classes, in clubs and in the New English Art Club School of Drawing, as well as from often bitter personal experience. This kind of book often deals with technique alone; how to mix paint, what to buy, and so on. Winston Churchill wrote an essay on painting called ‘Painting as a Pastime’ in which he used military metaphors to describe and encourage: keep your darkest colours in reserve, he might say; attack the painting on all fronts. The military analogy for most books and articles on how to paint would be ‘tactics’ – advice on the small scale. In these articles I want to look at strategy. The larger considerations.

Beginning: media One of the most frequent questions I am asked in more or less all the educational contexts in which I teach is ‘where do I start?’ There are two types of answer. One type of answer is technical; different media have different imperatives. Watercolour, for example, is transparent and you paint on white paper, usually, because coloured paper overcomes watercolour’s strength. Where you start depends on where the darkest colours are in the picture you are painting. These are lightly washed in, which is the origin of the oft-heard phrase in watercolour painting, ‘work from light to dark’. You start light and gradually get darker. With oil paint, which is more opaque, you can paint on a coloured ground and paint light colours over dark ones, so the question of where you start is not so much determined by the medium as by the process of developing the tonal and colour ranges of the painting. It’s much more up to you, in other words. Acrylic works like either, and you have to choose how to handle it, either loose and thin like watercolour or thick and opaque like oil.

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Prudy, watercolour on Two Rivers denim paper, 103⁄4⫻51⁄2in (27⫻14cm). Painted on coloured paper with thin washes of watercolour and white gouache to make the highlights. You can see how the paper overwhelms the colour of the paint, making it more of a tonal painting

Beginning: the subject The other type of answer is to do with subject matter. I was reminded of this the other day when one of my degree students began a painting using the blotting technique of 18th-century British artist and writer Alexander Cozens. This is to take a blank sheet of paper and drip, blot and splash paint lightly across it, to make a random set of forms. You then look carefully at the shapes you have made, and try to discern recognisable forms and space in the apparent mess, and then work over the image, or use it as a sketch for a painting. You can see Cozens’ work in Tate Britain.

We talked about it, and came to the conclusion that, while the random application of runny paint across a canvas might seem extremely improvisational – anything at all might emerge from the mesh of shapes and tones, like a Rorschach blot – in fact Cozens was quite specific about what he was trying to achieve. Cozens wanted to paint Sublime, Romantic landscapes, with trees, mountains, possibly water, which started in the mid-ground. It would be relatively easy to see such organic forms in the blotches of ink he deployed across the etching plate, paper or canvas. He wasn’t looking for shocking spatial distortion or objects picked out in great detail, nor even portraits with landscape backgrounds, like the Mona Lisa. Leonardo da Vinci puts forward a similar method of invention when he suggests looking for landscapes in the lichen and decay on a garden wall. The landscape behind the Mona Lisa is an invention; it’s not a real place. Renaissance artists had books of drawings and notes of landscape and architecture details, often drawn by apprentices and juniors, from which to compose their backgrounds.

Ground colours Renaissance paintings were to a large extent determined by the way they were painted. The commissioning process would include quite specific elements, how much lapis lazuli, which saints and so on. In the 19th century artists had different determinants – rather than fulfilling a set brief, an Impressionist might see themselves as responding in an almost scientific manner to a particular set of visual phenomena, not making something to order but following a personal project. The result would be unknown at the beginning – to capture what this scene looked like, in a way that accorded not with a prescribed style or tradition, but according to the latest ideas about how we see. This meant, for example, starting with

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PRACTICAL

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Brown Sketch, watercolour on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 6⫻31⁄2in (15⫻9cm). Emulating Alexander Cozens’ approach, loosely applied washes were allowed to dry. I then tried to read landscape shapes. It looks to me like a distant tower on a promontory across the water, with a big shadow in the foreground

a white ground, so that the colours would stand out clearly. It seems to have been a generally held 19thcentury view that white was ‘neutral’, and Cézanne’s later, ‘unfinished’ oils and watercolours exemplify this. This neutrality of white seems to extend right through modernist ideas about colour and the support – Jackson Pollock’s skeins of whiplash drips hover above white backgrounds, Mondrian deployed his gridded primaries against a white surface. White seems to be the beginning of every modernist work. Francis Bacon, who probably wouldn’t call himself a modernist, used the colour of artist’s linen as the starting point of his paintings. I think that he had the back of the supports primed, but the work was started on what looks like raw, unprimed linen. This gives an excitingly casual immediacy to the paintings, as if he couldn’t care less, but at the same time a rather tasteful, look-at-my-expensive-materials feel. What it also does is echo Old Master techniques. A close inspection of Goya’s paintings,

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Night On The Water, watercolour and gouache on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 43⁄4⫻2in (12⫻5cm). Not quite Cozens, perhaps, but you get the idea…

Green Sketch, watercolour on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 43⁄4⫻2in (12⫻5cm). Again, random blobs of very thin paint were applied. Note the use of good quality paper – you have to take this seriously

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Clouds Over The Sea, watercolour on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 43⁄4⫻2in (12⫻5cm). Notice that you no longer see the green colour of the underpainting, or rather you don’t notice it. And that’s the point

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B E G I N N I N G S , M I D D L E S & E N D S : PA R T 1 O F 6 t Sketch at the House of Lords, ink, pencil and wash on cartridge paper, 6⫻101⁄4in (15⫻26cm). The House of Lords were thinking about having an artist in residence, and half-adozen artists were asked to sketch at a crossbenchers’ summer party. The thing to notice here is how I have just gone straight in: do something and then do something with it, rather than get anxious about making the first move

‘As your first marks deface the perfect whiteness, all you can think of is how you have ruined the beautiful white surface’ for example, reveals that he used an earth red ground on which to paint. You can see it beneath thin layers of neutral greys and browns. Courbet, famously, used a black ground, and you can see that too, making his paintings duller as time goes on. Ken Howard RA uses the most extraordinary underpainting – when I visited his wonderful studio a few years ago I noticed a few bare

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Ashvem Sketch, watercolour on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 6⫻71⁄2in (15⫻19cm). This is a scene in a train station. It was done to work out how to handle the space, who to put in it and so on

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canvases that I thought were in shadow until I realised that it was a perfectly chosen grey-brown ground. These ‘Old Master’ techniques serve two purposes. One is to make a mid- or dark-tone on which to deploy oil paint, which means that the very light tones can be dealt with later on in the process. This is difficult when you are painting directly onto a white ground,

because the highest possible tone is all you can see. White. The other purpose is to get over the horrible problem of fear of the white canvas. It’s a yawning cavern of perfect whiteness that you can only spoil. As your first marks deface the perfect whiteness, all you can think of is how you have ruined the beautiful white surface, whereas I imagine painting on

u The Train Station, watercolour on Saunders Waterford Smooth 300lb (600gsm), 8⫻61⁄4in (20⫻16cm). The finished painting

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Nathan, pencil on Saunders Waterford Smooth 140lb (300gsm), 6⫻31⁄2in (15⫻9cm). You may not be able to see it now, but this too was started with scribbly tones, rather than careful lines

u A House on Stalisfield Green, watercolour on Arches Smooth 300gsm, 171⁄2⫻61⁄4in (9⫻16cm). This painting started out with loose washes in grey indicating broad areas of tone. It’s not my favourite painting, but you can see that detail is perfectly possible with this approach

Ken Howard’s prepared ground is like painting into space.

Get something down If you are engaged in the kind of work in which the process might be expected to surprise you, like painting from life or in the landscape, setting up a still life and painting it, or just in work where you intend to explore and develop images, then I recommend the first thing you do in starting a painting, watercolour or oil, even in starting a drawing, is to make a mess. Get over it. Even if I am sketching something quickly, the first thing I will do is very roughly establish the general shape of the darker areas, before looking at specific lines, edges and shapes, in order to see what I am dealing with. With watercolour, the medium associated most with anxiety – you can’t make a mistake, you are using expensive white paper, it looks too pale and nothing like the real colours – this is possible if you use very light grey washes to start the painting. As the painting progresses the washes will disappear, because the colour and the

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tonal distribution will overpower them. It feels risky, but in fact it’s the reverse. In oil, it doesn’t matter anyway, because you can always rub or scrape off what you don’t like. If you keep the idea of the painting in your head it will dominate the end result, and if you are trying to paint from life, the image in your head intervenes between what you are painting and what you have painted. Better to have something on the canvas or paper that you can get to grips with. It may not be very good, but it’s what you have actually done, not what you think you might do. The main function is to improve your morale. You have made a mess, you might as well fix it, as opposed to holding your breath through the entire process, hoping you don’t put a foot wrong, until you do and it’s all over… TA Next month: more strategies for beginning paintings, strategies that might appeal to people who are uncomfortable with the idea of making a mess, and might like to know what they’re doing before they start. Cowards, in other words!

Charles Williams NEAC RWS Cert.RAS is a painter, writer and lecturer. He has exhibited in the UK, USA and Europe and is the author of Basic Drawing and Basic Watercolour, both published by Robert Hale. Currently engaged in a PhD on narrative and improvisation in painting, Charles continues to make and show paintings, sculpture and drawing. www.charleswilliamartist.com

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Pastel: a beautiful medium Richard Suckling invites you to follow him as he creates a pastel painting filled with light, atmosphere and colour

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astels are my primary medium and I sing their praises to anyone who will listen. Misunderstood and often under-valued, pastel is a remarkable and beautiful medium that can be manipulated in many different ways to produce paintings that easily hold their own against oil and watercolour. Pastel really chose me; over the years I have dabbled with all media but it was with pastel that I found my feet as a painter. Initially they can seem awkward to use and can be problematical to control, but it can be done. I trained originally as an illustrator, I predominantly drew with pen and ink,

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occasionally adding watercolour washes. When I decided to become a painter, finding a medium was not easy and there were several false starts. However, I found myself drawn to pastel. Firstly, for me nothing has the intensity and iridescence to match the colours of artist-quality soft pastels. Secondly, the fact that the colours are effectively ready mixed ready to go, pick and paint, with no mixing to slow the process. Last, but not least, was the fact that pastel painting is all about the mark making. Pastel has allowed me to move seamlessly from drawing to painting successfully as it offers the best of both worlds.

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Spanish Interior (Sierra de Aitana), pastel on primed board, 103⁄4⫻103⁄4in (27⫻27cm). Small, swift and unfussy paintings can sometimes have a freshness that can be more difficult to achieve on larger works. Here a limited palette encapsulates the arid heat of the subject matter

Supports for pastels My way of working with pastel is very much dependent on the surface, and there is a huge and sometimes confusing choice. I used traditional pastel papers for my early work but I quickly found they were unable to cope with the way I wished to work. Having

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PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION Morning Shimmer, Mounts Bay

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STAGE ONE

Using Caran d’Ache pastels, I sketched in the basic bones of the composition on Sennelier La Carte pastel card in salmon. At this stage I was just trying to capture the rhythm of the sea and sky on that morning

STAGE TWO TOP RIGHT Using Unison pastels, I laid in broad areas of colour and tone, linking the sky and sea, but keeping the details fairly loose, using greys and various blue violets. There was plenty of hand blending and brushing back at this stage. The painting was kept deliberately loose to allow for changes and protect the tooth being over filled u

FINISHED PAINTING

tried many surfaces, I currently use two types. Sennelier La Carte pastel card is a luxurious textured surface to work on and will hold many layers of pastel. I use the darker colours in the range, especially the salmon red. This surface is wonderful but it has one major drawback in that it is for dry media only and will not tolerate any liquid at all. Whilst pastel is a dry medium, it can be

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liquefied with water for under-painting for some great effects so, when I am using pastel in a more experimental way, I tend to use Art Spectrum Pastel Primer instead. This comes in large pots and can be applied to mountboard or thin MDF, using rollers and/or brushes, creating an ideal surface that will take a bit of a drubbing with whatever you throw at it! It comes

in various colours or can be tinted with acrylic paint to create a base colour of your choice. I apply the primer with decorating brushes as I particularly like the brushmarks it leaves in the surface. Whatever the surface I decide on at the start of a painting, I find the square format is perfect for me. On the rare occasions I step out of the box, it tends to be for a wide panoramic shape.

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Morning Shimmer, Mounts Bay, pastel on Sennelier La Carte pastel card in salmon, 193⁄4⫻193⁄4in (50⫻50cm). I began to define the shapes and pattern, whilst intensifying the colours. At this stage, I used my smart phone to check the tonal contrast, converting the image to greyscale. I kept the lower portion of the painting deliberately semi-abstract to lead the eye into the picture. I then added the yacht in the distance and the final flourishes to the highlights to complete the painting

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PA S T E L on the pastel, letting it run, granulate and merge. Gouache can be flicked, splattered and brushed on at this stage and these marks show through the subsequent pastel layers. These wet mixed-media paintings are left to dry between stages so I tend to have others on the go at the same time. I build my pastels up in layers, adding more marks and details as I go, brushing back areas if they become overworked. The tricky part for me can be when to stop, but as this was covered by Haidee-Jo Summers in her article in the September 2016 issue, I know I am not alone! You have to judge when the painting is at the stage where some elements still remain loose and abstract, whilst as a whole it still captures the feel of the subject. My ultimate goal when painting is to record that initial impression of the scene, not each and every detail, but the colour, light and movement seen at first glance.

Fixing and framing

Boat Caught in the Light, pastel on primed board, 121⁄2⫻121⁄2in (32⫻32cm). Liquefying early layers of pastel and adding gouache in places helped to achieve a real sense of luminosity p

Choice brands

Working process

My choice of soft pastels is Unison; all my work is made using these wonderful pastels. I have tried many brands of soft pastel over the years but Unison have such a perfect palette of colours and the perfect blend of softness with strength so that they do not crumble too easily. I use the standard size and larger sticks. I always remove the labels as it gives me the opportunity of using the whole stick for mark making. They are stored in a Jackson’s large pastel case arranged by colour group and tone. I also use Caran d’Ache pastel pencils for the initial under drawing and very fine marks at the end. When painting on the primed surface, gouache is also used in combination with the pastel, in the early to midstages of the painting. Gouache combines perfectly with pastel as it is wonderfully opaque and dries to a matt, almost chalky, finish. As with any medium, there are unspoken rules: smudge or don’t smudge, fix or don’t fix, etc. I like to experiment and push the boundaries as long as the final painting is sound and will last.

I work from photographic reference and on-site sketches in fountain pen. Increasingly I also use my smartphone to capture moments of interest when I am out and about – it’s a surprisingly effective tool for collecting reference. I also use it during the painting process to convert the picture to greyscale to check the tonal range and to photograph the painting in order to post images of it online. As far as subject matter goes, I paint what I love. Having moved to Newlyn over three years ago, Cornish seascapes and landscapes figure heavily. I take a sketchbook with me on holiday and when visiting friends, so the subject matter can be based on what I see on my travels. With an idea for a painting I first sketch the composition loosely using pastel pencils, mainly in a dark plum or dark ochre colour. I then add broad swathes of pastel, as a kind of pastel ‘wash’, which I will smudge and rub into the surface using the heel of my hand, fingers, brushes and, depending on the surface, wet wipes. On the primed surfaces, I spray water

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The beauty of pastel is that, behind glass, the painting will remain as fresh and unchanged as the day it was painted, without fading or discolouring. I no longer use fixative and use customised frames, which have spacers to keep the painting away from the glass; this negates the need for window-cut mounts. This way of framing has great practical and commercial advantages as the painting looks more like an oil painting behind glass and any slight droppage of pastel does not land on the pristine white mount, thus TA ruining the presentation.

Richard Suckling studied at Cambridge School of Art and worked as an illustrator for a number of years. He is represented by Church House Designs, Congresbury, www.churchhousedesigns.co.uk; The Cottage Gallery, Wedmore, www.thecottagegallery.co.uk; Out of the Blue, Marazion, www.outoftheblue gallery.com; and Beyond the Sea Gallery, Padstow, www.beyondthesea .co.uk. www.richardsuckling.co.uk

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How to overcome the dreaded block Paul Talbot-Greaves reveals how he deals with bouts of painter’s block and shares his tips for shaking off the blues and getting back to painting with renewed vigour

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o I suffer painter’s block? Absolutely! I’m an artist – it’s normal. That doesn’t make it any easier though. I’ve painted happily for many years and suffered many blocks but the worst was a few years ago, when my work was criticised unfairly after a disastrous exhibition. I took it badly and personally; at the time I couldn’t see what my customers could see. That sent me into a low spiral that turned out to be both the worst and best block I’ve ever experienced. I shut myself away in my studio with a stack of materials for about 12 months and just let it all out. Standing in front of my easel holding a brush dripping in paint, tears streaming down my face and not knowing how to begin after 20 years of painting was just about the lowest point. But the fact is there was nowhere to go but through it, so I had to progress. I read books, I visited exhibitions and I looked, studied and painted. Out of those low moments there gradually came a renewed energy, with solid knowledge and an eagerness to express myself on paper more than ever. My painting was finally reborn. It doesn’t mean that it’s like that every time. You might experience a shortlived block and, by stepping back and taking the challenge head on, you may get over it pretty quickly.

favourite painter. It won’t happen. Usually criticism is not about your style anyway. Someone may say your colours are drab or your trees look a bit wooden (yes I was once told that!). Try to see it from their view and only if you agree with what they say, make any necessary changes to those areas. Above all, be yourself when you paint.

Dealing with block Block is really a form of self-criticism. It shouldn’t be destructive but it usually is. Block is when you find yourself not painting or disliking what you are doing. Simply continuing isn’t always helpful, so the first thing you can do is tell yourself that it is ok to not paint. That’s very hard for a professional painter to absorb, but sometimes the brain just needs to recharge. I once wrote two books in one year. I had tight deadlines to meet and I churned out 85,000 words and 350 illustrations. After that I was burned out and didn’t touch a brush for months.

What if it’s not working?

Dealing with criticism Criticism can induce painter’s block and it can hurt, but as hard as it can be, never ignore it completely because whilst it may be someone’s opinion, there will be an element of truth in what they say. If it happens to you, ask them to clarify their thoughts. Whatever you do to overcome the pain of criticism, never try to reinvent your style. Your style is your style, just as your face is your face. You will not be able to change it, so don’t bolt the door and attempt to turn yourself into your

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During your down time you need to renew the hunger to paint. Without imposing pressure on yourself, visit galleries and exhibitions or watch a live painting demonstration. Read books and just immerse yourself with inspiration. When you feel ready to paint again it is important to have a plan of action. Think about how you’d like your work to look – for example more colourful or bolder. I recommend you review your work; look through at least 12 months of paintings or drawings and pick out the bits you like and those you don’t. Make a list of areas in which you wish to make improvements, and then begin experimenting. In these moments I don’t ever strive to create exhibition paintings, I just look for answers. It may mean thrashing through numerous sheets of paper, trying different techniques just to paint a more convincing rock, for example. Do look at, and learn from, other artists’ work but don’t try to emulate them, as that is not going to do you any favours. You must strive to paint the way you do because in the end this will allow you to paint with conviction and energy.

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Lakeland, acrylic on canvas 6⫻6in (15⫻15cm). This painting was a breakthrough piece after a particularly difficult struggle with painter’s block and subsequent raft of experimentation. I worked small to maintain better control of drying and workability with acrylic

If you find you really can’t get back into where you were before the block happened, you might try shifting your methods. Take a painting class in a different medium or try completely changing your subject. One subject that pulled me out of a block was painting a whole series of mugs. I’d paint one a day in different lighting and from different angles, even though I consider myself a landscape painter. I became really excited by coffee mugs and I learned a lot! Start a sketchbook and try various drawing media. Set yourself a study time and aim to do three or more drawings per week. You might try working on a different scale – smaller

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DEMONSTRATION Sunshine and Ice

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STAGE ONE

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Using flow improver, I diluted cerulean blue, burnt sienna, dioxazine purple, yellow ochre and permanent sap green and brushed them loosely on a piece of watercolour paper using a 40mm synthetic flat brush

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STAGE THREE

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Continuing into the road I mixed ultramarine, dioxazine purple and burnt sienna on the paper using a 30mm flat brush and allowed the colours to run and blend. Countless artist blocks and subsequent methods of rejuvenating my work have brought about a sense of confidence that allows me to absorb and enjoy all the painting, even the imperfections

rather than larger, for example. Once the spark of creativity is reignited you’ll be eager to continue. If you really don’t feel like painting, then don’t. Try looking for new subjects and paint them in your head instead, as

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STAGE TWO

Using slightly creamier paint I began to build up the main shapes in the painting. Starting with the shadows, I mixed cobalt turquoise and lamp black for the grass verge, adding yellow ochre here and there, then with a mix of burnt sienna and ultramarine I sculpted the shape of the wall

STAGE FOUR

Next I reshaped the grass verge and decided to darken the right-hand wall. Standing back from the painting I noticed the lit part of the road was too light, so I remixed dioxazine purple and burnt sienna and applied the colour as a glaze. I always try to achieve the appropriate balance of colours, shapes and values before I add any detail

just the thought of creating something can be extremely powerful – I usually find I feel the need to return home and paint at some point when I’m out on a walk. Experiment with your composition and take photographs or

make sketches from new angles. Whatever you do to get over your block, step back, open your mind, have faith, have patience and when you’ve finally climbed the step, enjoy the TA journey.

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PRACTICAL

Paul Talbot-Greaves has been painting for over 20 years and teaches watercolour and acrylic painting in his home county of west Yorkshire. He also runs workshops and demonstrates to art societies throughout the north. Paul can be contacted by email: information@talbotgreaves.co.uk or through his website: www.talbotgreaves.co.uk

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FINISHED PAINTING

Sunshine and Ice, acrylic on paper 101⁄2⫻101⁄2in (27⫻27cm). Working with thicker paint I applied the reflections to the ice using cobalt blue,

cerulean blue and titanium white, all mixed with matt medium to give a little transparency. I applied the colour with a 1⁄2in synthetic/sable blend short bright in quite an expressive manner. Continuing with matt

medium I added it to yellow ochre and ultramarine then with a small 1⁄8in flat I painted the lighter stones in the wall and finished the painting with a few fencing details

Your challenge Whether you are struggling with artist’s block or just stuck for what to paint, why not try out some of my methods for reigniting your creativity or for improving your work, then have a go at creating a painting from my photograph of sunshine and snow (right). Take a good-quality photograph of your work and email a copy, no larger than 2MB, to dawn@tapc .co.uk together with a brief description (in no more than 100 words) about the process you used. Each month all entries will be uploaded to PaintersOnline and I will select the work of one lucky artist for appraisal. Have fun, good luck and happy painting.

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TEST REPORT

Impressive blocks of colour Robert Dutton takes a closer look at Derwent’s XL Graphite and Charcoal Blocks and discovers that these impressive new media positively invite you to try them

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or artists like myself who are looking for a bold, new and versatile drawing and painting media, Derwent’s new XL Charcoal and Graphite Blocks, will inspire creative exploration. XL Graphite Blocks contain clay, graphite, coloured pigment and binders of the finest quality; the Charcoal Blocks contain charcoal, rather than graphite. As you paint and draw they just inspire confidence. There are six chunky versatile blocks of pure colour and tone in each set, packaged in handysized robust tins. The

Graphite set consists of: very soft, soft, burnt umber, dark Prussian and dark olive; the Charcoal set has blocks of ochre, sanguine, Mars violet, sepia, black and white. The blocks are also sold individually.

Using the blocks The XL Graphite blocks can be used both dry and wet to create interesting tones and marks. In Light Between the Winter Storm Clouds – East Yorkshire (below left) you can see how well they flow and mix together on HP watercolour paper. On other dampened watercolour papers they create a soft creamy strip of rich pigment which, when dry, can be reworked with other layers of contrasting colours over the top. Fabulous! Colours on the surface can be lifted out or quite simply blended again with other XL Block colours to further extend richly layered studies. XL Blocks can be used on their flat sides or edges for large areas of colour with very little dusting. Papers with tooth (surface texture) are the perfect support for this amazing and versatile medium. By using different strokes and pressure during application, an infinite variety of creative mark making is possible, from deep and strong colour to more delicate marks. All XL Blocks work exceptionally well on pastel paper – I particularly liked the way they worked on all ten colours of Canson Mi-Teintes Touch 350gsm pastel paper. Tints are easy to create by mixing the white XL Charcoal with any of the five other colours in the range.

Inspirational

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Light Between the Winter Storm Clouds – East Yorkshire, Derwent XL Graphite and Charcoal Blocks on Canson Moulin du Roy HP 140lb (300gsm), 211⁄2⫻201⁄2in (54.5⫻52cm). Derwent's versatile Charcoal XL Blocks mixed beautifully in layers in both dry and wet areas throughout the painting

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Derwent XL Blocks lift easily to reveal clean paper or underlying washes if using watercolour or ink in mixedmedia work. When correcting using an eraser on a good-quality watercolour sheet, the XL Charcoal and Graphite lift cleanly. Use an eraser to softly blend one colour into another, or use your fingers, to create lovely soft and moody atmospheric effects. The XL Blocks have a ‘biscuity’ feel to them when used dry and, being very opaque, layered colours soon create rich tones. As a drawing tool the media can also be sprayed with fixative to further darken tones when required

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u First Winter Snows at Lingmell, Wasdale, Derwent XL Charcoal and Graphite blocks with watercolour, acrylic ink and pastel on Canson Moulin du Roy NOT 140lb (300gsm), 201⁄2⫻211⁄2in (52⫻54.5cm). Being heavily pigmented, Derwent XL Blocks are capable of transferring an extensive range of tones. Here Derwent XL Graphite Blocks in burnt umber, raw umber and dark Prussian, in combination with Derwent XL Charcoal in ochre and sepia, underpin good solid key colours and values. A white XL Charcoal block was mixed with these colours to further extend the tones. By working XL Graphite and Charcoal colours into wet passages of watercolour paint and acrylic ink, lots of sumptuous colour layers were created

t Winter Solitude – Brothers Water, Cumbria, Derwent XL Graphite and XL Charcoal Blocks with mixed media on Canson Moulin du Roy Not 140lb (300gsm), 22⫻30in (56⫻76cm). Derwent XL Blocks were the perfect tool to both draw and paint with at the same time, over and through dry and wet washes of acrylic ink. Graphite dust was sprinkled into the wet acrylic ink in chosen areas, and pushed into the watercolour paper with a Derwent XL Graphite Block in soft – further fabulous expressive marks were made as I did this

and, like soft pastel, can easily be worked in layers. Without doubt XL Blocks can help you to express your ideas in new and innovative ways. When working with them I make exciting discoveries all the time; the new-found freedom really assists my creativity – I like to use them liberally, very often on a large scale, and boy do they encourage that. I love the way they glide across and into the paper, especially through wet passages on watercolour paper. If you’re prepared to let go of any preconceptions and allow a more experimental outcome, you will most certainly be rewarded for Derwent XL Blocks will take you on an exciting TA journey of creative discovery.

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Key advantages of Derwent XL Graphite and Charcoal Blocks l Value for money robust, high density blocks that really last. l Firm to the touch with no crumbling or fracturing. l Can be used for broad strokes or delicate lines. l Naturally watersoluble, colours can be layered successfully, intermixed and work wonders with other dry and painting media. l Blocks come in metal tins for easy storage and reduced mess. l Liberating and engaging to use, they inspire creative exploration.

Robert Dutton teaches mixed-media drawing and painting holidays at a number of venues throughout the UK. For more information about Robert’s art holidays, tuition and work visit www.rdcreative.co.uk. To see Robert in action visit http://rdcreative.co.uk/film

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&

Antibes

Polignana a Mare

Hoi An

Painting Holidays with well-known artists Every year we offer a different selection of hand-picked en plein air painting holidays with well-known artists for eight to 14 students. Destinations are chosen for their variety of subject matter and hotels for their location and character. Each holiday is accompanied by a travel director who takes care of all the arrangements and makes sure that everyone is well looked after.

Private garden in Belgium

Work Alongside - Masterclass Painting Holidays for experienced and intermediate students Hoi An, Vietnam with Peter Brown NEAC, ROI May 9 – 21, 2017 £3,875

Amsterdam with Ken Howard OBE, RA June 25 – July 5, 2017 £4,995

Tutored Painting Holidays

Udaipur

for intermediate and confident beginner students Secret Gardens & Villages in Belgium & Holland with Pamela Kay NEAC, RBA, RWS June 11 – 24, 2017 £3,995

Polignana, Puglia, Italy with Richard Pikesley PNEAC, RWS September 5 – 14, 2017 £2,995

Antibes, South of France with Lachlan Goudie ROI September 16 – 23, 2017 £3,295

Udaipur and Pushkar Camel Fair, India with Hazel Soan Amsterdam

October 16 – 31, 2017 £7,995

For full details contact 01825 714310 art@spencerscott.co.uk www.spencerscotttravel.com Spencer Scott Travel Services have been offering painting holidays in association with The Artist and Leisure Painter magazines since 1990. These holidays are fully ATOL protected under CAA Licence 3471


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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 de@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Griffin Art Prize 2017 Venue: Griffin Gallery, The Studio Building, 21 Evesham Street, London W11 4AJ. ☎ 020 8424 3239 Details: Opportunity for emerging artists, supported by Winsor & Newton, Liquitex and Conté à Paris. Competition is open to any UKbased artist whose primary activity is painting or drawing and has graduated with a BA, MA or PhD from a recognised institution since 2010. Up to four works to be submitted at a cost of £15, tbc. First round digital submission only. The judges will be looking for excellence and innovation in painting and drawing. Paintings should not exceed 98⫻118in (250⫻300cm). The winner will have sole use of a large studio and art materials from the supporting brands with which to produce work for a one-person show at the Griffin Gallery. There will also be a small allowance to help meet expenses. The residency at Griffin Gallery will be from February to April 2018. Full details will be published in April 2017, tbc. Please check website for updates: www.griffingallery.co.uk Exhibition dates: shortlist exhibition, November 2 to December 15. Registration deadline: July 2. Contact: The Griffin Gallery, address above; applications must be made online at www.griffinartprize.co.uk

potential of forests as sites for art, both in and about the environment. Proposals can be for work in any discipline or medium, temporary or permanent, sitespecific or for touring to more than one location. Five artists will be selected to receive a £2,000 Research and Development fee to develop their proposals over a sixmonth period, culminating in an exhibition. During the exhibition one artist will be selected to receive a £30,000 commissioning budget to realise their proposal. Exhibition dates: November 2017. Submissions deadline: February 2017, dates tbc. Contact: To enter please visit jerwoodopenforest.org and for more information contact the project managers, Parker Harris: jof@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

DECEMBER Shenzhen International Watercolour Biennial Details: International biennial watercolour exhibition to be held at the Shenzen Art Museum, Guangdong, China, then touring. Awards of over £50,000. All details to be confirmed. Exhibition dates: December 2017 to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: July 2017, tbc. Contact: www.shenzhenbiennial.com

Royal Institute of Oil Painters (ROI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The ROI invites submission of oil paintings for its annual open exhibition. Acrylics framed as oils are accepted. Numerous awards and prizes. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six framed works, up to four may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 30 to December 10. Registration deadline: August 25, 12 noon. Handing-in days: October 7, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Jerwood Open Forest Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN, followed by commission in one of England’s Public Forest Estates . Details: This is a call for bold, broadthinking proposals that explore the

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BIENNIALS and other open competitions and exhibitions to look out for in 2018. Note: some 2018 competitions have 2017 submission deadlines The Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour (RSW) Venue: The Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. Details: 137th annual winter exhibition of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour. Works in water-based media only. Up to four works may be submitted at a cost of £10 per work plus £30 hanging fee per work, tbc. Prizes and awards. Patron: HRH Prince Charles, Duke of Rothesay. Charity No: SC007247. www.rsw.org.uk Exhibition dates: January 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: October 2017, tbc. Contact: For full details and to submit online, see www.rsw.org.uk or send C5 sae to Lesley Nicholl, c/o Robb Ferguson, Regent Court, 70 West Street, Glasgow G2 2QZ

artist January 2017

Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) seeks submissions of work displaying the highest standards of skill, expression and concept of draughtsmanship for its annual open exhibition. Artists over the age of 18 may enter up to six works in any medium, of which three can be original framed prints. Up to four works will be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Online submission for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Prizes include the Alfred Daniels Personal Favourite Award of six prizes of £100 each; The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine; and many other cash and arts materials prizes, tbc. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300 per work, tbc, unframed prints, £120, tbc. Confirmation of dates, terms and conditions at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: March to April 2018, tbc. Entry deadline: December 2017, tbc. Handing-in: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual prize to highlight and encourage the skills and techniques involved in creating representational painting, with a strong focus on paintings created from direct observation. Open to artists born or resident in the UK. Prizes total £30,000, with a first prize of £15,000, five runners-up prizes and a Young Artist award. Up to four original paintings may be submitted. Entry £15 per work, £8 per work for students. Exhibition dates: Spring 2018. Submissions deadline: Winter 2017. Contact: Enter online via www.lynnpainterstainersprize. org.uk or send SAE for entry pack to LPS 2018, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; email: lps@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Pastel Society (PS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Pastel Society seeks the best in contemporary pastel, combining traditional skills with creative originality. Acceptable media are pastels including oil pastels, charcoal, pencil, Conté, sanguine or other dry media. Many prizes and awards, including Caran d’Ache Sponsor’s Award and £5,000 Zsuzsi Roboz Prize for artists under the age of 35; The

Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. Artists must be aged 18 or over. Up to six works may be submitted; up to four may be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All works must be for sale, minimum price: £300. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Regional handing-in points. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Full terms and conditions available at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: February to March 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: November 2017, tbc. Handing-in day: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Columbia Threadneedle Prize: Figurative Art Today Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Columbia Threadneedle Prize promotes excellence in representational art. Artists of any nationality, aged 18 or over on January 1, 2016, currently living or working in the UK or Europe may enter. Up to six works may be submitted, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Paintings, drawings, original prints, sculpture, mixed-media constructions, smallscale installations and reliefs are accepted. Artists are encouraged to submit fresh, intriguing figurative or representational works that are strong and topical observations on, or interpretations of, the world around us. Works must have been completed after January 1, 2015 and must not have been exhibited in any other prize competition, in the UK or elsewhere. Online submission in the first instance at www.registration mallgalleries. org.uk. All works must be for sale, minimum price £300 or £120 for unframed prints. First prize, £20,000 plus a solo exhibition in the Threadneedle Space at the Mall Galleries; five shortlisted artists will each receive £1,000; Visitor’s Choice Award of £10,000. All details tbc, see www.mallgalleries.org.uk or columbiathreadneedleprize.com Exhibition dates: February 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: September 2017, tbc. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Exhibition dates: January to February 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: December 2017, tbc. Contact: Royal Cambrian Academy, address as above. Entry forms will be available to download from: www.rcaconwy.org

Jerwood Painting Fellowships Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1, and on tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Three outstanding painters will be awarded a bursary of £10,000 and one year of critical and professional development support from mentors. During the Fellowship year each artist will also work towards a body of new work, which will be exhibited as part of the Jerwood Visual Arts programme at Jerwood Space, London, before touring within the UK. Online entry only. Exhibition dates: 2018, tba. Entry deadline: February 2017, tba. Contact: Enter online at www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Painting Fellowships coordinator at Parker Harris: ☎ 01372 462190

John Moores Painting Prize Venue: The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. ☎ 0151 478 4199. Details: Biennial open exhibition open to artists working with paint. Entries must be original, new or recent paintings within a set size, designed to hang on walls. No preference given to levels of experience or particular practices of painting. First prize, £25,000, four prizes of £2,500 and Visitor’s Choice prize of c£2,000, tbc. Entry fee, £25 per artist, tbc. Full details at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker Exhibition dates: July to November 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: November 2017, tbc. Contact: Register online at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker or by post. Forms are available from The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. Abbreviations tbc = to be confirmed tba = to be advised

Royal Cambrian Academy Open Exhibition 2018 Venue: Royal Cambrian Academy, Crown Lane, Conwy LL32 8AN. ☎ 01492 593413 Details: Open exhibition for artists and students aged 18 and over who live and work in Wales. All media, 2D or 3D, including painting, sculpture, ceramics and photography. No age limit. Up to two works may be submitted. All works must be for sale. Entry fee £15 per work, £25 for two, tbc. See website for full details.

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DATE CHANGES Information was correct at time of going to press but details and dates may change; please check with the organisers

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A SPECIAL

artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

PULLOUT and KEEP GUIDE

Cowbridge Halls. Unaccepted work must be collected 3-4.30pm on the same day. Contact: Download entry forms and see full details on website: www.hertfordartsociety.co.uk/ calendar/annual-open-exhibition, or contact exhibition secretary: janet.benge@talktalk.net

OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

MAY Bath Society of Artists

Compiled by Deborah Wanstall

PLEASE NOTE These listings are in chronological order according to the month in which the event will run. Submission and handing-in dates are highlighted in blue

MARCH Royal Watercolour Society Contemporary Watercolour Competition 2017 Venue: Bankside Gallery, 48 Hopton Street, London SE1 9JH. ☎ 020 7928 7521 Details: Annual open competition for work made in any water-based medium on a paper support; accepted media are gouache, acrylic paint, ink and watercolour. The RWS aims to encourage a strong personal vision and an innovative approach. A maximum of six paintings may be submitted, all of which must have been completed in the last four years, maximum size 391⁄2⫻391⁄2in 100⫻100cm when framed. Fee is £14 per work, £37 for three, £46 for four, £55 for five, £59 for six; students may submit up to sthree works for £15. First prize, David Gluck Memorial Award, £750; David Gluck & RWS Award, £250; RWS Award, £500; The Artist Award of an article in a future issue of the magazine; many other art materials prizes. Online entry in first instance. Download application pack and enter at: www.banksidegallery.com www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk Exhibition dates: March 3 to 15. Submissions deadline: January 16, 12 noon. Handing-in: February 26 and 27, 11am to 5pm. Contact: Royal Watercolour Society: www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk ☎ 020 7928 7521

Details: Artists working in all media may enter up to three 2D or six 3D works. Entry fees are £13 per 2D work or £13 per two 3D works; digital submission in first instance. Please consult the application pack for full details. Exhibition dates: March 16 to April 8. Submissions deadline: February 1, 4pm. Handing-in day: March 12, 10.30am to 1pm. Contact: Download application packs from www.rbsa.org.uk or send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA.

Grosvenor Museum Open Art Exhibition Venue: The Grosvenor Museum, 27 Grosvenor Street, Chester CH1 2DD. ☎ 01244 972197 Details: The Grosvenor Museum’s 12th open art exhibition. Work may be in any visual arts medium, except giclée prints, installation, performance or work requiring electricity. Three-dimensional work is welcome. Maximum size in any dimension, 72in (182cm),

including frame. Up to three works may be submitted, fee £8 per work. First prize, £1,000; second prize of £500, third prize of £250, Visitors’ Choice prize, £100. For full details, see www.westcheshiremuseums. co.uk or contact Samantha Belsham (see below). Exhibition dates: March 9 to June 21. Handing-in days: February 24 and 25. Contact: For entry forms contact Samantha Belsham, The Grosvenor Museum, address as above. Email samantha.belsham@ cheshirewest.gov.uk

APRIL Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI), of the best in modern and traditional contemporary watercolour painting. Acceptable media are watercolour or water-soluble

media, including acrylic, ink or gouache painted on paper or a paper-based support, but not water-soluble oils. Artists over the age of 18 may submit up to six works, up to four may be selected. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Paintings must be framed in a light-coloured mount under glass and no larger than 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Online submission for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Numerous prizes and awards, including the Leathersellers’ Prize of £1,000 awarded to an artist aged between 18 and 30; the Matt Bruce Memorial Award for the most outstanding use lof light and colour, £500; the Schmincke Award and many other prizes. All work must be for sale, minimum price £450. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: April 6 to 22. Submissions deadline: January 6, 12 noon. Handing-in days: February 11, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

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Venue: Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1 1RU. ☎ 01207 407 3222 Details: Sixteenth annual international open submission exhibition for all artists. Work must be original in concept, design and execution. The artist must demonstrate compositional and drawing skills and the ability to use coloured pencil. Entries must not have been shown in any previous UKCPS exhibition. Each work must comprise at least 50 per cent dry coloured pencil; the remaining 50 per cent of the work may, if preferred, contain less than 50 per cent of any other medium. Awards include Best in Show, £400; Reserve best in show, £300; Best pure coloured pencil; President’s Award. Up to two works may be submitted at a fee of £20 per work. For full details, and to enter, go to: www.cp-society.uk/2017london/index.php Exhibition dates: April 25 to May 6. Closing date for online entries: February 3. Handing-in: April 24. Contact: If unable to submit online, send sae for entry form to Liz Ridley, 63 Hilden Park Road, Hildenborough, Tonbridge, Kent TN11 9BW, tel: 01732 834335. Exhibition queries, email: london2017@ukcps.co.uk

Hertford Open

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Open All Media Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353

United Kingdom Coloured Pencil Society (UKCPS)

Andrew Hird Embankment Pier & Waterloo, oil, 9⫻11in (23⫻28cm). The Artist Purchase Prize Winner in The Artist Open Competition 2016, in partnership with Patchings Art Centre

Venue: Cowbridge Halls, Cowbridge, Hertford Hertfordshire SG14 1PG. Details: 65th annual open exhibition. Any media accepted, excluding photographs; up to six 2D or 3D works may be submitted. All works must be labelled according to the instructions on the submission form. Works for hanging must be in appropriate frames with strung ‘D’ rings on the reverse. £5 submission fee per artist and £3 handling fee per work. Prizes include best abstract, best work in show, best 3D and best watercolour. Exhibition dates: April 30 to May 13. Handing-in day: April 22, 10am, at

artist January 2017

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Venue: Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath. ☎ 01225 477233 Details: 112th annual open exhibition of works in all media except photographs; two works may be submitted. Exhibition dates: May 20 to July 15. Handing-in day: May 13, 10.30am to 4pm at the Victoria Art Gallery. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.victoriagal.org.uk or www.bsartists.co.uk, collect from gallery or send A5 sae to Vivienne Bolton, ‘Lamorna’, 5 Bath Road, Norton St Philip, near Bath, Somerset BA2 7LW.

Royal Society of Portrait Painters (RP) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The RP seeks submissions of new and traditional artistic models and perspectives in portraiture from artists aged 18 and over. All media accepted, including original prints but excluding sculpture. Prizes include the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture, £10,000, plus the society’s gold medal for the most distinguished painting in the exhibition; the de Laszlo Foundation Award, £3,000 plus a silver medal for the most outstanding portrait by an artist aged 35 or under; The Prince of Wales’s Award for Portrait Drawing, £2,000; the Changing Faces Prize, a £2,000 commission to produce a portrait of a person with a disfigurement for the Changing Faces collection; the Burke’s Peerage Foundation Award, £2,000 for the most classically inspired portrait in the exhibition. A maximum of three works may be submitted, up to three may be selected, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Work must have been completed in the last three years and not previously exhibited in London. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: May 4 to 19. Submissions deadline: January 20, 12 noon.

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Handing-in days: January 25, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Prize Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353 Details: Artists working in all media, except photography, may enter. Please consult the application pack for details of prizes, fees and full terms and conditions. Exhibition dates: May 18 to June 10. Submissions deadline: Tba. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: For application pack, send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. Packs may be downloaded six weeks before the closing date from www.rbsa.org.uk

Staffordshire Open Venue: Shire Hall Gallery, Market Square, Stafford ST16 2LD. ☎ 01785 278345 Details: Competition for artists born, living, working or studying in Staffordshire. All work should be for sale. Up to two works may be entered in all media, including painting, sculpture, photography, film and animation, tbc. For updates please check with Shire Hall Gallery or visit: www.staffordshire.gov.uk/arts Exhibition dates: May, tbc. Handing-in: April, tbc. Contact: Shire Hall Gallery, address as above.

Society of Portrait Sculptors Venue: La Galleria Pall Mall, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London SW1 4UY. Details: The society’s 54th annual open exhibition, FACE2017, is open to all artists. The initial selection will be based on photographs. Up to two works may be submitted which may be of a head, bust or figure, human or animal, in 3D or bas relief. Three images of each work to be submitted with entry form by email, or download entry form and post with qood-quality images either on a CD or as printed photographs to the address below. First prize is the society’s prize of £1,000 for the best three-dimensional human portrait; runner-up receives the Heatherley Prize of £500; the Tiranti Prize for best exhibit from a portrait sculptor aged 30 or younger, £500; Olin-Stones Award for best bas relief sculpture, £500. Entry: £35 per work for those aged 31 and over on March 21, or £25 per work for those aged 30 and under on March 21, 2017. Exhibition dates: May 15 to 20. Entry deadline: February 10. Works accepted from initial selection to be submitted for judging on March 21.

artist January 2017

Contact: Download entry forms, which include details of how and where to submit exhibits, from www.portrait-sculpture.org or contact Robert Hunt, Honorary Secretary, Society of Portrait Sculptors, 50A Hyde Street, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 7DY. ☎ 01962 860904

Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait Prize 2017 Venue: Piano Nobile King’s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9AG ☎ 020 7229 1099 Details: Self-portrait competition intended to reflect and celebrate the traditions that inform the Borchard Collection, by encouraging the development of these ideas into British art of the 21st century. Open to amateur and professional artists living and working in the UK. One work may be submitted in any recognised medium, including drawing, painting, print and mixed media. Photographs, sculpture and film are not eligible. Entry fee, £20. Digital submission. First prize, £10,000. Full details of how and what to enter can be found at: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter Exhibition dates: May, tbc Submissions deadline: April 7. Contact: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter

JUNE Wildlife Artist of the Year Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Tenth year of the David

Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) annual competition open to all amateur and professional artists aged 17 or over on February 20, 2017. Up to five works, completed within the last five years, may be submitted; all must be for sale. All media accepted except photography, film and digital images. Entries must correspond with one of the following seven categories: Animal Behaviour; Urban Wildlife; Hidden World; Wings, Feathered or Otherwise; Into the Blue; Vanishing Fast, and Earth’s Beautiful Creatures. All works must be for sale. Online submission preferred, or post entry form and images on CD to DSWF at the address below. £25 per work, concessions £10. First prize, £10,000; runner-up, £1,000; other category winners, £500 each and The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. For full details and online submission, see www.davidshepherd.org Exhibition dates: June 27 to July 2. Submissions deadline: February 20. Handing-in day: tba. Contact: Entry forms can be downloaded from: www.david shepherd.org, or contact David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, Saba House, 7 Kings Road, Shalford, Guildford, Surrey GU4 8JU. ☎ 01483 272323

BP Portrait Award Venue: National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE. ☎ 020 7306 0055 Details: Competition aimed at encouraging artists to focus on and develop portraiture within their work. Entrants must be aged over 18, but there is no upper age limit. Open to artists from around

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the world. Work must be predominantly painted in oil, tempera or acrylic and must be on a stretcher or board, preferably framed and unglazed. No watercolours, works on paper or pastels will be considered, nor will work previously submitted for the competition. The painting should be based on a sitting or study from life and the human figure must predominate. One entry per person, cost £40. Digital selection in first instance. First prize £30,000 plus a commission worth £5,000; BP Travel Award open to all entrants; BP Young Artist Award for the best portrait painted by an artist under 30 on January 1, 2017. Exhibition dates: June 22 to September 24, then tours. Closing date for entry: January 26, 23.59pm. Handing in: March 6 to 10. Contact: Full details and entry forms available online at www.npg.org.uk/bp

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Venue: Royal Academy of Arts, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD. ☎ 020 7300 5929/5969 Details: Established in 1769, the annual Summer Exhibition is the largest open submission exhibition in the world. Valuable prizes include the £25,000 Charles Wollaston Award. Up to two works may be submitted; handling fee, £25 per work. The initial round of selection will be from digital images. Please see website for full details: https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 20. Submission deadline: February 15, 11.59pm.

Alice Boggis-Rolfe Canoes on The Dordogne, oil, 141⁄4⫻193⁄4in (36⫻50m). Winner of the Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award at the 2016 Royal Institute of Oil Painters’ exhibition

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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 de@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Griffin Art Prize 2017 Venue: Griffin Gallery, The Studio Building, 21 Evesham Street, London W11 4AJ. ☎ 020 8424 3239 Details: Opportunity for emerging artists, supported by Winsor & Newton, Liquitex and Conté à Paris. Competition is open to any UKbased artist whose primary activity is painting or drawing and has graduated with a BA, MA or PhD from a recognised institution since 2010. Up to four works to be submitted at a cost of £15, tbc. First round digital submission only. The judges will be looking for excellence and innovation in painting and drawing. Paintings should not exceed 98⫻118in (250⫻300cm). The winner will have sole use of a large studio and art materials from the supporting brands with which to produce work for a one-person show at the Griffin Gallery. There will also be a small allowance to help meet expenses. The residency at Griffin Gallery will be from February to April 2018. Full details will be published in April 2017, tbc. Please check website for updates: www.griffingallery.co.uk Exhibition dates: shortlist exhibition, November 2 to December 15. Registration deadline: July 2. Contact: The Griffin Gallery, address above; applications must be made online at www.griffinartprize.co.uk

potential of forests as sites for art, both in and about the environment. Proposals can be for work in any discipline or medium, temporary or permanent, sitespecific or for touring to more than one location. Five artists will be selected to receive a £2,000 Research and Development fee to develop their proposals over a sixmonth period, culminating in an exhibition. During the exhibition one artist will be selected to receive a £30,000 commissioning budget to realise their proposal. Exhibition dates: November 2017. Submissions deadline: February 2017, dates tbc. Contact: To enter please visit jerwoodopenforest.org and for more information contact the project managers, Parker Harris: jof@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

DECEMBER Shenzhen International Watercolour Biennial Details: International biennial watercolour exhibition to be held at the Shenzen Art Museum, Guangdong, China, then touring. Awards of over £50,000. All details to be confirmed. Exhibition dates: December 2017 to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: July 2017, tbc. Contact: www.shenzhenbiennial.com

Royal Institute of Oil Painters (ROI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The ROI invites submission of oil paintings for its annual open exhibition. Acrylics framed as oils are accepted. Numerous awards and prizes. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six framed works, up to four may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 30 to December 10. Registration deadline: August 25, 12 noon. Handing-in days: October 7, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Jerwood Open Forest Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN, followed by commission in one of England’s Public Forest Estates . Details: This is a call for bold, broadthinking proposals that explore the

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BIENNIALS and other open competitions and exhibitions to look out for in 2018. Note: some 2018 competitions have 2017 submission deadlines The Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour (RSW) Venue: The Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. Details: 137th annual winter exhibition of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour. Works in water-based media only. Up to four works may be submitted at a cost of £10 per work plus £30 hanging fee per work, tbc. Prizes and awards. Patron: HRH Prince Charles, Duke of Rothesay. Charity No: SC007247. www.rsw.org.uk Exhibition dates: January 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: October 2017, tbc. Contact: For full details and to submit online, see www.rsw.org.uk or send C5 sae to Lesley Nicholl, c/o Robb Ferguson, Regent Court, 70 West Street, Glasgow G2 2QZ

artist January 2017

Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) seeks submissions of work displaying the highest standards of skill, expression and concept of draughtsmanship for its annual open exhibition. Artists over the age of 18 may enter up to six works in any medium, of which three can be original framed prints. Up to four works will be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Online submission for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Prizes include the Alfred Daniels Personal Favourite Award of six prizes of £100 each; The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine; and many other cash and arts materials prizes, tbc. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300 per work, tbc, unframed prints, £120, tbc. Confirmation of dates, terms and conditions at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: March to April 2018, tbc. Entry deadline: December 2017, tbc. Handing-in: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual prize to highlight and encourage the skills and techniques involved in creating representational painting, with a strong focus on paintings created from direct observation. Open to artists born or resident in the UK. Prizes total £30,000, with a first prize of £15,000, five runners-up prizes and a Young Artist award. Up to four original paintings may be submitted. Entry £15 per work, £8 per work for students. Exhibition dates: Spring 2018. Submissions deadline: Winter 2017. Contact: Enter online via www.lynnpainterstainersprize. org.uk or send SAE for entry pack to LPS 2018, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; email: lps@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Pastel Society (PS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Pastel Society seeks the best in contemporary pastel, combining traditional skills with creative originality. Acceptable media are pastels including oil pastels, charcoal, pencil, Conté, sanguine or other dry media. Many prizes and awards, including Caran d’Ache Sponsor’s Award and £5,000 Zsuzsi Roboz Prize for artists under the age of 35; The

Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. Artists must be aged 18 or over. Up to six works may be submitted; up to four may be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All works must be for sale, minimum price: £300. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Regional handing-in points. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Full terms and conditions available at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: February to March 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: November 2017, tbc. Handing-in day: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Columbia Threadneedle Prize: Figurative Art Today Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Columbia Threadneedle Prize promotes excellence in representational art. Artists of any nationality, aged 18 or over on January 1, 2016, currently living or working in the UK or Europe may enter. Up to six works may be submitted, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Paintings, drawings, original prints, sculpture, mixed-media constructions, smallscale installations and reliefs are accepted. Artists are encouraged to submit fresh, intriguing figurative or representational works that are strong and topical observations on, or interpretations of, the world around us. Works must have been completed after January 1, 2015 and must not have been exhibited in any other prize competition, in the UK or elsewhere. Online submission in the first instance at www.registration mallgalleries. org.uk. All works must be for sale, minimum price £300 or £120 for unframed prints. First prize, £20,000 plus a solo exhibition in the Threadneedle Space at the Mall Galleries; five shortlisted artists will each receive £1,000; Visitor’s Choice Award of £10,000. All details tbc, see www.mallgalleries.org.uk or columbiathreadneedleprize.com Exhibition dates: February 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: September 2017, tbc. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Exhibition dates: January to February 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: December 2017, tbc. Contact: Royal Cambrian Academy, address as above. Entry forms will be available to download from: www.rcaconwy.org

Jerwood Painting Fellowships Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1, and on tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Three outstanding painters will be awarded a bursary of £10,000 and one year of critical and professional development support from mentors. During the Fellowship year each artist will also work towards a body of new work, which will be exhibited as part of the Jerwood Visual Arts programme at Jerwood Space, London, before touring within the UK. Online entry only. Exhibition dates: 2018, tba. Entry deadline: February 2017, tba. Contact: Enter online at www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Painting Fellowships coordinator at Parker Harris: ☎ 01372 462190

John Moores Painting Prize Venue: The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. ☎ 0151 478 4199. Details: Biennial open exhibition open to artists working with paint. Entries must be original, new or recent paintings within a set size, designed to hang on walls. No preference given to levels of experience or particular practices of painting. First prize, £25,000, four prizes of £2,500 and Visitor’s Choice prize of c£2,000, tbc. Entry fee, £25 per artist, tbc. Full details at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker Exhibition dates: July to November 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: November 2017, tbc. Contact: Register online at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker or by post. Forms are available from The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. Abbreviations tbc = to be confirmed tba = to be advised

Royal Cambrian Academy Open Exhibition 2018 Venue: Royal Cambrian Academy, Crown Lane, Conwy LL32 8AN. ☎ 01492 593413 Details: Open exhibition for artists and students aged 18 and over who live and work in Wales. All media, 2D or 3D, including painting, sculpture, ceramics and photography. No age limit. Up to two works may be submitted. All works must be for sale. Entry fee £15 per work, £25 for two, tbc. See website for full details.

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DATE CHANGES Information was correct at time of going to press but details and dates may change; please check with the organisers

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A SPECIAL

artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

PULLOUT and KEEP GUIDE

Cowbridge Halls. Unaccepted work must be collected 3-4.30pm on the same day. Contact: Download entry forms and see full details on website: www.hertfordartsociety.co.uk/ calendar/annual-open-exhibition, or contact exhibition secretary: janet.benge@talktalk.net

OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

MAY Bath Society of Artists

Compiled by Deborah Wanstall

PLEASE NOTE These listings are in chronological order according to the month in which the event will run. Submission and handing-in dates are highlighted in blue

MARCH Royal Watercolour Society Contemporary Watercolour Competition 2017 Venue: Bankside Gallery, 48 Hopton Street, London SE1 9JH. ☎ 020 7928 7521 Details: Annual open competition for work made in any water-based medium on a paper support; accepted media are gouache, acrylic paint, ink and watercolour. The RWS aims to encourage a strong personal vision and an innovative approach. A maximum of six paintings may be submitted, all of which must have been completed in the last four years, maximum size 391⁄2⫻391⁄2in 100⫻100cm when framed. Fee is £14 per work, £37 for three, £46 for four, £55 for five, £59 for six; students may submit up to sthree works for £15. First prize, David Gluck Memorial Award, £750; David Gluck & RWS Award, £250; RWS Award, £500; The Artist Award of an article in a future issue of the magazine; many other art materials prizes. Online entry in first instance. Download application pack and enter at: www.banksidegallery.com www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk Exhibition dates: March 3 to 15. Submissions deadline: January 16, 12 noon. Handing-in: February 26 and 27, 11am to 5pm. Contact: Royal Watercolour Society: www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk ☎ 020 7928 7521

Details: Artists working in all media may enter up to three 2D or six 3D works. Entry fees are £13 per 2D work or £13 per two 3D works; digital submission in first instance. Please consult the application pack for full details. Exhibition dates: March 16 to April 8. Submissions deadline: February 1, 4pm. Handing-in day: March 12, 10.30am to 1pm. Contact: Download application packs from www.rbsa.org.uk or send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA.

Grosvenor Museum Open Art Exhibition Venue: The Grosvenor Museum, 27 Grosvenor Street, Chester CH1 2DD. ☎ 01244 972197 Details: The Grosvenor Museum’s 12th open art exhibition. Work may be in any visual arts medium, except giclée prints, installation, performance or work requiring electricity. Three-dimensional work is welcome. Maximum size in any dimension, 72in (182cm),

including frame. Up to three works may be submitted, fee £8 per work. First prize, £1,000; second prize of £500, third prize of £250, Visitors’ Choice prize, £100. For full details, see www.westcheshiremuseums. co.uk or contact Samantha Belsham (see below). Exhibition dates: March 9 to June 21. Handing-in days: February 24 and 25. Contact: For entry forms contact Samantha Belsham, The Grosvenor Museum, address as above. Email samantha.belsham@ cheshirewest.gov.uk

APRIL Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI), of the best in modern and traditional contemporary watercolour painting. Acceptable media are watercolour or water-soluble

media, including acrylic, ink or gouache painted on paper or a paper-based support, but not water-soluble oils. Artists over the age of 18 may submit up to six works, up to four may be selected. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Paintings must be framed in a light-coloured mount under glass and no larger than 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Online submission for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Numerous prizes and awards, including the Leathersellers’ Prize of £1,000 awarded to an artist aged between 18 and 30; the Matt Bruce Memorial Award for the most outstanding use lof light and colour, £500; the Schmincke Award and many other prizes. All work must be for sale, minimum price £450. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: April 6 to 22. Submissions deadline: January 6, 12 noon. Handing-in days: February 11, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

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Venue: Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1 1RU. ☎ 01207 407 3222 Details: Sixteenth annual international open submission exhibition for all artists. Work must be original in concept, design and execution. The artist must demonstrate compositional and drawing skills and the ability to use coloured pencil. Entries must not have been shown in any previous UKCPS exhibition. Each work must comprise at least 50 per cent dry coloured pencil; the remaining 50 per cent of the work may, if preferred, contain less than 50 per cent of any other medium. Awards include Best in Show, £400; Reserve best in show, £300; Best pure coloured pencil; President’s Award. Up to two works may be submitted at a fee of £20 per work. For full details, and to enter, go to: www.cp-society.uk/2017london/index.php Exhibition dates: April 25 to May 6. Closing date for online entries: February 3. Handing-in: April 24. Contact: If unable to submit online, send sae for entry form to Liz Ridley, 63 Hilden Park Road, Hildenborough, Tonbridge, Kent TN11 9BW, tel: 01732 834335. Exhibition queries, email: london2017@ukcps.co.uk

Hertford Open

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Open All Media Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353

United Kingdom Coloured Pencil Society (UKCPS)

Andrew Hird Embankment Pier & Waterloo, oil, 9⫻11in (23⫻28cm). The Artist Purchase Prize Winner in The Artist Open Competition 2016, in partnership with Patchings Art Centre

Venue: Cowbridge Halls, Cowbridge, Hertford Hertfordshire SG14 1PG. Details: 65th annual open exhibition. Any media accepted, excluding photographs; up to six 2D or 3D works may be submitted. All works must be labelled according to the instructions on the submission form. Works for hanging must be in appropriate frames with strung ‘D’ rings on the reverse. £5 submission fee per artist and £3 handling fee per work. Prizes include best abstract, best work in show, best 3D and best watercolour. Exhibition dates: April 30 to May 13. Handing-in day: April 22, 10am, at

artist January 2017

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Venue: Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath. ☎ 01225 477233 Details: 112th annual open exhibition of works in all media except photographs; two works may be submitted. Exhibition dates: May 20 to July 15. Handing-in day: May 13, 10.30am to 4pm at the Victoria Art Gallery. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.victoriagal.org.uk or www.bsartists.co.uk, collect from gallery or send A5 sae to Vivienne Bolton, ‘Lamorna’, 5 Bath Road, Norton St Philip, near Bath, Somerset BA2 7LW.

Royal Society of Portrait Painters (RP) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The RP seeks submissions of new and traditional artistic models and perspectives in portraiture from artists aged 18 and over. All media accepted, including original prints but excluding sculpture. Prizes include the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture, £10,000, plus the society’s gold medal for the most distinguished painting in the exhibition; the de Laszlo Foundation Award, £3,000 plus a silver medal for the most outstanding portrait by an artist aged 35 or under; The Prince of Wales’s Award for Portrait Drawing, £2,000; the Changing Faces Prize, a £2,000 commission to produce a portrait of a person with a disfigurement for the Changing Faces collection; the Burke’s Peerage Foundation Award, £2,000 for the most classically inspired portrait in the exhibition. A maximum of three works may be submitted, up to three may be selected, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Work must have been completed in the last three years and not previously exhibited in London. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: May 4 to 19. Submissions deadline: January 20, 12 noon.

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Handing-in days: January 25, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Prize Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353 Details: Artists working in all media, except photography, may enter. Please consult the application pack for details of prizes, fees and full terms and conditions. Exhibition dates: May 18 to June 10. Submissions deadline: Tba. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: For application pack, send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. Packs may be downloaded six weeks before the closing date from www.rbsa.org.uk

Staffordshire Open Venue: Shire Hall Gallery, Market Square, Stafford ST16 2LD. ☎ 01785 278345 Details: Competition for artists born, living, working or studying in Staffordshire. All work should be for sale. Up to two works may be entered in all media, including painting, sculpture, photography, film and animation, tbc. For updates please check with Shire Hall Gallery or visit: www.staffordshire.gov.uk/arts Exhibition dates: May, tbc. Handing-in: April, tbc. Contact: Shire Hall Gallery, address as above.

Society of Portrait Sculptors Venue: La Galleria Pall Mall, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London SW1 4UY. Details: The society’s 54th annual open exhibition, FACE2017, is open to all artists. The initial selection will be based on photographs. Up to two works may be submitted which may be of a head, bust or figure, human or animal, in 3D or bas relief. Three images of each work to be submitted with entry form by email, or download entry form and post with qood-quality images either on a CD or as printed photographs to the address below. First prize is the society’s prize of £1,000 for the best three-dimensional human portrait; runner-up receives the Heatherley Prize of £500; the Tiranti Prize for best exhibit from a portrait sculptor aged 30 or younger, £500; Olin-Stones Award for best bas relief sculpture, £500. Entry: £35 per work for those aged 31 and over on March 21, or £25 per work for those aged 30 and under on March 21, 2017. Exhibition dates: May 15 to 20. Entry deadline: February 10. Works accepted from initial selection to be submitted for judging on March 21.

artist January 2017

Contact: Download entry forms, which include details of how and where to submit exhibits, from www.portrait-sculpture.org or contact Robert Hunt, Honorary Secretary, Society of Portrait Sculptors, 50A Hyde Street, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 7DY. ☎ 01962 860904

Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait Prize 2017 Venue: Piano Nobile King’s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9AG ☎ 020 7229 1099 Details: Self-portrait competition intended to reflect and celebrate the traditions that inform the Borchard Collection, by encouraging the development of these ideas into British art of the 21st century. Open to amateur and professional artists living and working in the UK. One work may be submitted in any recognised medium, including drawing, painting, print and mixed media. Photographs, sculpture and film are not eligible. Entry fee, £20. Digital submission. First prize, £10,000. Full details of how and what to enter can be found at: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter Exhibition dates: May, tbc Submissions deadline: April 7. Contact: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter

JUNE Wildlife Artist of the Year Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Tenth year of the David

Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) annual competition open to all amateur and professional artists aged 17 or over on February 20, 2017. Up to five works, completed within the last five years, may be submitted; all must be for sale. All media accepted except photography, film and digital images. Entries must correspond with one of the following seven categories: Animal Behaviour; Urban Wildlife; Hidden World; Wings, Feathered or Otherwise; Into the Blue; Vanishing Fast, and Earth’s Beautiful Creatures. All works must be for sale. Online submission preferred, or post entry form and images on CD to DSWF at the address below. £25 per work, concessions £10. First prize, £10,000; runner-up, £1,000; other category winners, £500 each and The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. For full details and online submission, see www.davidshepherd.org Exhibition dates: June 27 to July 2. Submissions deadline: February 20. Handing-in day: tba. Contact: Entry forms can be downloaded from: www.david shepherd.org, or contact David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, Saba House, 7 Kings Road, Shalford, Guildford, Surrey GU4 8JU. ☎ 01483 272323

BP Portrait Award Venue: National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE. ☎ 020 7306 0055 Details: Competition aimed at encouraging artists to focus on and develop portraiture within their work. Entrants must be aged over 18, but there is no upper age limit. Open to artists from around

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the world. Work must be predominantly painted in oil, tempera or acrylic and must be on a stretcher or board, preferably framed and unglazed. No watercolours, works on paper or pastels will be considered, nor will work previously submitted for the competition. The painting should be based on a sitting or study from life and the human figure must predominate. One entry per person, cost £40. Digital selection in first instance. First prize £30,000 plus a commission worth £5,000; BP Travel Award open to all entrants; BP Young Artist Award for the best portrait painted by an artist under 30 on January 1, 2017. Exhibition dates: June 22 to September 24, then tours. Closing date for entry: January 26, 23.59pm. Handing in: March 6 to 10. Contact: Full details and entry forms available online at www.npg.org.uk/bp

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Venue: Royal Academy of Arts, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD. ☎ 020 7300 5929/5969 Details: Established in 1769, the annual Summer Exhibition is the largest open submission exhibition in the world. Valuable prizes include the £25,000 Charles Wollaston Award. Up to two works may be submitted; handling fee, £25 per work. The initial round of selection will be from digital images. Please see website for full details: https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 20. Submission deadline: February 15, 11.59pm.

Alice Boggis-Rolfe Canoes on The Dordogne, oil, 141⁄4⫻193⁄4in (36⫻50m). Winner of the Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award at the 2016 Royal Institute of Oil Painters’ exhibition

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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 Receiving days: To be advised. Please check website for full details. Contact: Entry forms will be available to download from January 4; see https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk ☎ 020 7300 5969/5929

Not the Royal Academy Venue: Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, 124–126 The Cut, Waterloo, London SE1 8LN. ☎ 020 7620 1322/4 Details: The 27th year of this annual salon des refusés exhibition of paintings: oils, watercolours, pastels and drawings. Work must have been submitted to the current Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and be for sale. Paintings should be framed to a high standard; metal frames not acceptable. On-the-spot selection by the directors of the gallery. For more details see www.nottheroyalacademy.com Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 19. Handing-in days: Late May–early June, tba. Dates depend on when works may be collected from the RA. Contact: Ann Leeson or Nicholas Dawton at Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, as above.

New English Art Club (NEAC) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The NEAC seeks work that demonstrates excellence in both concept and draughtsmanship. Artists over the age of 18 may submit paintings, drawings, pastels and original framed prints, not photography or sculpture. Work must have been completed in the last two years and not previously exhibited in London. Up to six works may be submitted, up to five may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300, framed prints £180, unframed prints £120. Prizes include the Zsuzsi Roboz Prize awarded by the Alfred Teddy Smith and Zsuzsi Roboz Art Trust, £5,000 and the Dorreen McIntosh Prize, £5,000; Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 16 to 25. Registration deadline: February 24, 12 noon. Handing-in day: April 8, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Museum and Art Gallery, the Derbyshire Open, now in its 35th year, attracts amateur and professional artists of all ages competing for a range of prizes and a place in the museum collection. Top prize worth £750. Entry information should be available to download in April from www.derbyshire.gov.uk/leisure/bu xton_museum Exhibition dates: June 24 to September 1. Handing-in day: June 9 and 10. Contact: Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, as above. ☎ 01629 533540

JULY The Artist and Leisure Painter Open Art Competition 2017 in partnership with Patchings Art Centre Venue: Patchings Art Centre, Oxton Road, Calverton, Nottinghamshire. ☎ 0115 965 3479 Details: Organised by The Artist and Leisure Painter in partnership with Patchings Art Centre. The exhibition, in two separate categories, is open to all professional and amateur artists; any 2D media accepted. Prize awards worth over £16,500, including The Artist Purchase Prize up to £5,000. Selected and additional highly commended

works are also shown on the Patchings Art Centre website, with a People’s Choice prize. Up to three works may be submitted for either category; just one work will be accepted for exhibition in the Leisure Painter category, maximum size (framed) 471⁄4⫻59in (120⫻150cm). Entry fee of £16 per artist covers three works. Entries to be submitted online, via www.painters-online. co.uk or send photos or prints with the coupon. Full details and entry form on pages 8 and 9. Exhibition dates: July 13 to August 20. Submissions deadline: March 31. Contact: Entry coupons and full details appear in the January (pages 8–9), February and March issues of The Artist and Leisure Painter magazines (to order, phone 01580 763673).

Buxton Spa Prize Venue: Green Man Gallery, Hardwick Hall, Hardwick Square South, Buxton, Derbyshire. Details: Open art competition to celebrate the culture, natural beauty and heritage of the town of Buxton. Artists of all ages and abilities are invited to paint en plein air in the town in May and June; the location is drawn by ballot after registering for the event. Any 2D media accepted and up to two completed works may be submitted for exhibition, £25 for first work, £40 for two; £20

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Tabernacle Art Competition and Exhibition Venue: MOMA (Museum of Modern Art), Y Tabernacl, Heol Penrallt, Machynlleth, Powys SY20 8AJ. ☎ 01654 703355 Details: One entry per person on the theme ‘Legend’. Art competition packs will be available from February. Twodimensional works in any media are accepted, plus low-relief collages provided that these are contained in a frame and can be wall-mounted. Maximum size 36⫻48in (91.5⫻122cm). No minimum size. Entry fee: £10 for adults, £3 for under-18s. Work must be for sale. The exhibition coincides with the Machynlleth Festival. Exhibition dates: July 8 to August 31. Handing-in days: June 24 to 30, 10am to 4pm. Contact: To apply for the competition pack, telephone 01654 703355; or email info@momawales.org.uk with your postal address. www.momawales.org.uk

Artsdepot Open

Derbyshire Open Venue: Buxton Museum & Art Gallery, Terrace Road, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 6DA. Details: Organised by Derbyshire County Council with sponsorship from the Friends of Buxton

to enter Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize or £15 if also entering the Buxton Spa Prize. First prize, £5,000; second prize, £1,000 and third prize, £500. One sketchbook may be submitted for the Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize of £2,000. This year’s judges include Harold Riley, Ken Howard OBE, RA and Peter Brown. For full details see www.buxtonspaprize.co.uk Exhibition dates: July 1 to August 14. Registration: Online from April 1 or in Buxton on May 5. Contact: Buxton Spa Prize, c/o The Old Hall Hotel, The Square, Buxton Spa, Derbyshire SK17 6BD.

Nick Derry Red Kites, acrylic, 35⫻271⁄4in (89⫻69cm). Winner of the Hawk and Owl Trust’s Roger Clarke Award at the 2016 Society of Wildlife Artists’ annual exhibition,

artist January 2017

Venue: Apthorp Gallery, Artsdepot, 5 Nether Street, Tally Ho Corner, North Finchley, London N12 OGA. ☎ 020 8369 5454 Details: A diverse and vibrant annual exhibition celebrating the work of artists from Barnet, north London, and beyond. Submissions are invited from emerging and established artists. Up to three works may be submitted, which must have been completed within the last three years. £10 per work; Young Artists £3 per work, tbc. All media accepted. Please refer to website for updates: www.artsdepot.co.uk Exhibition dates: July to September, dates tbc. Application deadline: early June, tbc. Handing-in: early July, tbc. Contact: Download application forms from www.artsdepot.co.uk or contact the box office between 10am and 4pm, Monday to Saturday. ☎ 020 8369 5454

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Society of Women Artists (SWA) Venue: Mall Galleries, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: 156th annual exhibition, open to non-members. Up to four works may be submitted in many media, both wall hung and threedimensional. Entry fee is £15 per work, £8 for young artists. Major new prize: The SWA £2,000 Fine Art Award, also a special prize for a young artist (age limit 35) and The Artist Editor’s Choice Award. Works may be submitted digitally for preselection. For full details, see www.society-women-artists.org.uk Exhibition dates: July 4 to 9. Digital submissions deadline: March 23, 12 noon.. Handing-in day: June 6, 10am to 5pm. Contact: For entry forms email Rebecca Cotton at: rebeccacottonswa@gmail.com

Clifton Arts Club (CAC) Venue: The Undercroft, Victoria Methodist Church, Whitleladies Road, Bristol BS8 1NU. Details: Open exhibition of original works of art. Non-members may enter up to four works. Prizes include £300 prize for excellence and £100 Member prize. At the time of going to press most details still had to be confirmed; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July/August. Handing-in day: July, tbc. Contact: Download details and entry form from: www.cliftonartsclub. co.uk, or contact Submissions Secretary, Clifton Arts Club, 12 Ridgeway Road, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9EU. ☎ 01275 392141

Guild of Aviation Artists Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The 47th Aviation Painting of the Year annual summer exhibition. Any aviation subject accepted, modern and historical, in any hand-applied medium including sculpture. Up to four works may be submitted by nonmembers. All details relating to submission advice and costs will be published on the website, www.gava.org.uk. Awards and trophies include a £1,000 Aviation Painting of the Year Award and the £1,000 FlyPast Fellows Award for Excellence. Submission at the Mall Galleries. Exhibition dates: July 17 to 22. Handing-in day: May 14. Contact: Entry form and submission details available to non-members, on receipt of £5 from Administration, Guild of Aviation Artists, Studio 100 Rye House, 113 High Street, Ruislip HA4 8JN; admin@gava.org.uk; www.gava.org.uk ☎ 01252 302233

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NEWA: National Exhibition of Wildlife Art Venue: Gordale Garden Centre Gallery, Burton, Wirral CH64 8TF. Details: A selected exhibition open to both professional and amateur artists. Up to four 2D and 3D works, depending on size, may be submitted on the subject of wildlife. All work must be for sale. Art materials and monetary prizes. Entry fee, £36; commission of 30 per cent on sales. Collection points around the UK. NEWA supports wildlife causes. Demonstrations will be held throughout the exhibition. Exhibition dates: July 14 to 30. Registration deadline: June 1, tbc. Handing-in: Personal delivery July 11, earlier from collection points. Contact: Registration forms available from www.newa-uk.com or from Dennis Oakes, NEWA, 3 Brian Avenue, Irby, Wirral CH61 3UX. ☎ 07748 533 448

Details: A selected exhibition of small works sourced by open selection from artists across Scotland and further afield. Includes new paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints, photographs, film and architecture. At the time of going to press details had not been confirmed. Full details of submissions procedure and dates will be available from the website in due course, so please keep checking: www.royalscottishacademy.org Exhibition dates: July to August, dates tbc. Submissions deadline: Tba. Contact: Download entry forms when available from: www.royalscottishacademy.org The Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

AUGUST

Café Gallery Annual Open

Clevedon Art Club

Venue: Café Gallery, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA. ☎ 020 7237 1230. Details: Artists at all stages of their careers are invited to enter. Up to three works may be submitted, tbc. For submission requirements and all other details, please check the website on a regular basis: www.cgplondon.org Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Submission dates: Late June to early July, tbc. Contact: Email admin@cgplondon.org ☎ 020 7237 1230

Venue: The Science Block Atrium, Clevedon Community School, Valley Road, Clevedon, Somerset. Details: 61st open exhibition of circa 300 works. Open to all artists working in any media except digital. Up to four paintings and or sculpture may be submitted. Details to be finalised, please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: August, tbc. Handing-in days: August, tbc. Contact: Entry details will be available from the website: www.clevedonartclub.co.uk ☎ Sue Bryant, 01275 879556; or Steve Jenkins, 01454 776311.

Great Sheffield Art Show Venue: The Octagon Centre, Sheffield University, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2QU. Details: Art show/sale for amateur and semi-professional artists of over 2,000 paintings. Up to six works may be submitted. All work must be framed, maximum size 391⁄4⫻391⁄4in (1⫻1m), larger work subject to consultation. Any media accepted, excluding photographs. Hanging fee £4 per work, tbc. Tickets to the private view can also be downloaded. All details to be confirmed. Application forms available from: www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Closing date for submissions: tba. Handing in: tba. Contact: The Great Sheffield Art Show, 287 Ringinglow Road, Sheffield, S11 7PZ; mikefearne@hotmail.com. ☎ 0770 3301075; 0114 225 9989.

Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition (RWA) Venue: The Lower Galleries, the Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

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artist January 2017

National Eisteddfod of Wales Visual Arts Exhibition Venue: Bodedern, Anglesey. Details: Open to those born in Wales or who have one parent born in Wales or any other person who has resided or worked in Wales for the three years prior to the Eisteddfod dates, or any person able to speak or write Welsh. A mixed exhibition of contemporary fine art and applied art. Awards include the Gold Medal for Fine Art plus £5,000; the Gold Medal for Craft and Design plus £5,000; and the Young Artist Scholarship of £1,500. Entry £20; up to six jpgs may be submitted. Exhibition dates: August 4 to 12. Closing date for entries: March 1. Contact: Robyn Tomos, Eisteddfod Office, 40 Parc Tŷ Glas, Llanishen, Cardiff CF14 5DU. https://eisteddfod.wales ☎ 0845 4090 300

World Illustration Awards 2017 Venue: Embankment Galleries, South Wing, Somerset House, London WC2. Details: The Association of Illustrators invites entries from illustrators working in any

medium, context or geographical location for their annual competition. Work must be entered either as a New Talent or a Professional entry and must have been created since January 2016. Exhibition dates: August 1 to 28, then tours for 12 months from October, tba. Submissions deadline: February 6. Contact: See full terms and conditions and enter online at: www.theaoi.com/awards ☎ +44 020 7759 1012

SEPTEMBER International Print Biennale Venue: Northern Print and other venues, tbc. Details: Open to all British and international artists. Entries are invited that are interpretations of contemporary print processes, including 2D, 3D, video, installation and site-specific work. Artists are asked to submit a current CV, artist’s statement and up to ten images or documentation of their recent work. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: Spring, tbc. Contact: For further detals and to apply please visit www.internationalprintbiennale.o rg.uk or contact the project coordinators Parker Harris: ipb@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Derwent Art Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Derwent Art Prize aims to reward excellence by showcasing the very best works created in pencil by British and international artists. Artists can submit up to six 2D or 3D works created with any pencil or coloured pencil as well as watersoluble, pastel, graphite or charcoal pencils. Prizes worth £12,500. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: June 1. Contact: Entries should be made online at www.derwentartprize.com; for more information contact the Derwent Art Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: derwent@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Jerwood Drawing Prize Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 followed by nationwide tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Largest and longestrunning annual open submission exhibition for drawing in the UK. Open to professional and nonprofessional artists at any stage of their careers. First prize of £8,000;

second prize, £5,000 and two student awards of £2,000 each. Regional collection points. Up to three works may be submitted. Entry, which is by pre-registration only, opens in April. Exhibition dates: September to October, dates tbc. Closing date for registration: June, dates tbc. Handing-in day: late June/early July, dates tbc. Contact: Register online via: www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Drawing Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: jdp@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Exeter Contemporary Open Venue: Exeter Phoenix, Bradninch Place, Gandy Street, Exeter EX4 3LS. ☎ 01392 667058 Details: All media including drawing, painting, sculpture and photography. £1,500 in prizes. Entry is £20 per artist, concessions £15; a maximum of four works may be submitted. Finalists will be selected by a panel. Full details should be available on the website from April. Exhibition dates: September 15 to November 4. Handing-in days: June 12. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www. exeterphoenix.org.uk/category/art address as above.

Royal West of England Academy Autumn Exhibition Venue: Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1PX. ☎ 0117 973 5129 Details: 165th annual open exhibition of works by emerging and established artists. Acceptable media are painting, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, architecture and photography. All works must be for sale. For more information on submission and handing-in dates, please visit the RWA website: www.rwa.org.uk Submissions can be made at www.rwasubmissions.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 30 to November 19. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Apply online at www.rwa.org.uk Royal West of England Academy, address as above.

Society of Equestrian Artists Open Exhibition (SEA) Venue: To be advised. Details: The Horse in Art open exhibition. Entry fee: £12 per work. All details tbc. Please check the society’s website for updates. www.equestrianartists.co.uk. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Submissions deadline: tba. Handing-in: tba. Contact: Secretary, Society of Equestrian Artists, sec@equestrianartists.co.uk

www.equestrianartists.co.uk ☎ 0300 0110 185

OCTOBER

Sunday Times Watercolour Competition

Society of Graphic Fine Art (SGFA)

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: A competition to uphold the finest traditions of British watercolour painting. Open to professional and amateur artists. Prizes total £18,000. Entry is £15 per work. www.sundaytimeswatercolour.org Exhibition dates: September, dates tbc. Entry deadline: June, dates tbc. Contact: Enter online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk. For any queries, please contact: watercolour@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Venue: The Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1. ☎ 020 7407 3222 Details: DRAW 17, the 98th annual open exhibition of contemporary and traditional drawings, paintings and prints showing evidence of drawing by hand. Many prizes awarded. Non-members can submit up to three works, £15 per work. www.sgfa.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 2 to 14. Application deadline: July 21. Handing-in days: Menier Gallery, October 1; earlier if using Art Moves (London or regional). Contact: See website for full details www.sgfa.org.uk enquiries@sgfa.org.uk

Society of Wood Engravers (SWE) Venue: Touring exhibition, venues to be advised. Details: 79th annual exhibition open to all forms of relief printmaking. Up to two unframed works may be submitted, fee £40 for one work, £45 for two. Exhibition dates: From September, tbc. Handing-in day: Early July, tbc. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www.woodengravers.co.uk Venue: Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, Co Durham. ☎ 01833 690606

New Light Details: Biennial exhibition open to all northern artists producing skills-based, wall-hung art. Entrants must have been born, received an arts degree, or work in the north of England. Awards include Valeria Sykes Prize, £10,000 and Sponsor’s Choice, £2,500, and a prize for artists under the age of 40 to include cash, mentoring scheme and exhibition opportunities. Exhibition will tour. All details tbc. Exhibition dates: Autumn 2017, dates tbc. Closing date: tba. Contact: Call for entries opens in spring 2017, tbc. Check website for details: www.newlight-art.org.uk

Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Sculptors and Gravers (RMS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of miniature art. Up to five works may be submitted. Full conditions and schedules at: www.royalminiature-society.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 19 to October 1, tbc. Handing-in day: Early September, tbc. Contact: Executive Secretary, 89 Rosebery Road, Dursley, Gloucestershire GL11 4PU; info@ royal-miniature-society.org.uk

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Chelsea Art Society Venue: Chelsea Old Town Hall, King’s Road, Chelsea, London SW3. Details: Annual open exhibition, showing work in all media: paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. Prizes for different categories of work. Up to three works may be submitted – oils, pastels, watercolours, drawings, prints and sculptures. Submission fee, £12 per work; all works must be for sale. Prizes include the Julian Barrow Memorial Prize. All info tbc, please check website for details: www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 26 to 30. Handing-in day: October 23, 8.30am to 3pm. Contact: Entry forms should be available from May. To obtain forms, email Heather WillsSandford, Honorary Secretary, at: chelseaartsociety@gmail.com. If you do not have access to email, write to the Honorary Secretary at Chelsea Art Society, 50 Bowerdean Street, London SW6 3TW. www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk ☎ 020 7731 3121

Royal Society of Marine Artists (RSMA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Submissions of painting and sculpture are invited that involve the sea and the marine environment, for example portraits of persons connected with the sea, shipping, creeks, wildlife, beaches – anything that moves with tidal waters. Accepted media are oil, acrylic, watercolour, original prints of any media, pastels, sculpture or drawings. Artists aged over 18 may submit a maximum of six works; up to three may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for

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sale, minimum price £300, unframed prints £120, framed prints from a limited edition not exceeding 50, £200. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 5 to 14. Registration deadline: June 30, 12 noon. Handing-in day: August 5, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Society of Botanical Artists (SBA) Venue: The Westminster Gallery, Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, London SW1. Details: Annual open exhibition; this year’s theme is ‘Changing Seasons’. Entries are accepted in all media, including ceramics, glass, jewellery and 3D work. Please check website for full details. Exhibition dates: October 13 to 21. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: SBA, 1 Knapp Cottages, Wyke, Gillingham, Dorset SP8 4NQ; www.soc-botanical-artists.org. pam@soc-botanical-artists.org ☎ 01747 825718

Society of Wildlife Artists (SWLA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Any work depicting wildlife subjects is admissible, botanical and domestic animals are not. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six works in any medium, including painting, sculpture and original prints; up to six may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. Work previously exhibited in London is not admissible. Prizes include £1,000 Birdwatch Artist of the Year Award, the Curwen Studio Prize and SWLA bursaries of up to £750. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org.u k. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £200, unframed prints £95. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk. Exhibition dates: October 19 to 29. Registration deadline: July 21, 12 noon. Handing-in days: August 26, 10am to 5pm. Contact: The Mall Galleries, as above

The National Open Art Competition Venue: To be confirmed. Details: Entries are invited from artists aged 15 and over on September 1, 2017. Up to four works may be entered: paintings, drawings, original prints, miniatures, photography and wallhung installations. Fee, £20 per work. All work must be new, maximum size 60⫻60⫻12in (153⫻153⫻30cm) including frame. Works made up of more than one piece, eg triptychs, must not exceed the maximum size when displayed on a wall. Works must be

Kathryn Maple Sandy Shoes, watercolour, 361⁄4⫻431⁄4in (92⫻110cm). Winner, Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 2016 for sale, a commission of 50 per cent is charged, of which five per cent is given to a children’s charity. Initial selections made from online digital submissions. The exhibition will be in London in October/ November, dates tba, and at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, dates tba. Many prizes and awards. For full details and to register, including details of the children’s competition, visit www.nationalopenart.org/register. php. Open for submissions from March 1. Exhibition dates: October/November dates, tbc. Submissions deadline: July 9. Handing-in days: August 23 to 26 at Chichester Brinsbury College, Pulborough, RH20 1DL. Contact: Amanda Kings. ☎ 07986 697 693

NOVEMBER

South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts (SWAc)

September: www.ragm.org.uk ☎ 01788 533201

Venue: Exeter Castle, Castle Street, Exeter EX4 3PU. Details: Eighteenth annual open exhibition for artists from the south west region of England. All media will be considered; up to four works may be submitted. Cost £15 per work, tbc; all must be for sale. Giclée prints not accepted. Prizes and awards to include new Young Artist’s Award. Digital submission. All details tbc. See website for full details: www.southwestacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 14 to 25. Submissions deadline: August, tbc. Contact: Conditions of entry and submission forms will be available to download from www.southwestacademy.org.uk the South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts, 3 Birchy Barton Hill, Exeter EX1 3ET.

ING Discerning Eye

Rugby Open Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts (RGI) Venue: To be advised. Details: Annual exhibition established 1861 to promote contemporary art in Scotland. Open to all artists. Accepted media are painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media and sculpture. Full details will be available by August; online submission at: www.royalglasgowinstitute.org. Prizes in 2016 included the City of Glasgow College Purchase Prize, £8,000 and Walter Scott Prize, £5,000. Exhibition dates: November, tbc. Handing-in days: September 30, tbc. Contact: RGI Kelly Gallery, 118 Douglas Street, Glasgow G2 4ET; www.royalglasgowinstitute.org email: theroyalglasgowinstitute@ gmail.com

Venue: Rugby Museum and Art Gallery, Little Elborow Street, Rugby CV21 3BZ. ☎ 01788 533201 Details: Annual exhibition for artists living and/or working within 15 miles of the art gallery. Up to three original works, created no earlier than one year before the exhibition, can be entered. Acceptable media are painting, sculpture, drawing, print, photography, film/video and craft. Performance and installation are not acceptable. Fee, £5 per work, £12 for three works, tbc. Prizes and awards. Exhibition dates: November to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: late October, tbc. Contact: Details and application forms should be available from end

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Two artists, two critics and two collectors select from an open submission, and invite established artists to exhibit. Cash and purchase prizes. Maximum size of work 20in (51cm) including frame or stand. Up to six works may be entered, which must be for sale. Regional handing-in points. The submission fee is £10 per work. www.discerningeye.org/exhibition /intro/intro.php Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: September, dates tbc. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; de@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

ING Discerning Eye Drawing Bursary Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Open to UK artists. Up to five artists will be shortlisted for the bursary. £1,500 will be awarded to the winner, and £150 to each runner-up. Entry cost is £3 per artist. Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: October, dates bc. Contact: Apply online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE Drawing Bursary 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ;

artist January 2017

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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 Receiving days: To be advised. Please check website for full details. Contact: Entry forms will be available to download from January 4; see https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk ☎ 020 7300 5969/5929

Not the Royal Academy Venue: Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, 124–126 The Cut, Waterloo, London SE1 8LN. ☎ 020 7620 1322/4 Details: The 27th year of this annual salon des refusés exhibition of paintings: oils, watercolours, pastels and drawings. Work must have been submitted to the current Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and be for sale. Paintings should be framed to a high standard; metal frames not acceptable. On-the-spot selection by the directors of the gallery. For more details see www.nottheroyalacademy.com Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 19. Handing-in days: Late May–early June, tba. Dates depend on when works may be collected from the RA. Contact: Ann Leeson or Nicholas Dawton at Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, as above.

New English Art Club (NEAC) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The NEAC seeks work that demonstrates excellence in both concept and draughtsmanship. Artists over the age of 18 may submit paintings, drawings, pastels and original framed prints, not photography or sculpture. Work must have been completed in the last two years and not previously exhibited in London. Up to six works may be submitted, up to five may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300, framed prints £180, unframed prints £120. Prizes include the Zsuzsi Roboz Prize awarded by the Alfred Teddy Smith and Zsuzsi Roboz Art Trust, £5,000 and the Dorreen McIntosh Prize, £5,000; Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 16 to 25. Registration deadline: February 24, 12 noon. Handing-in day: April 8, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Museum and Art Gallery, the Derbyshire Open, now in its 35th year, attracts amateur and professional artists of all ages competing for a range of prizes and a place in the museum collection. Top prize worth £750. Entry information should be available to download in April from www.derbyshire.gov.uk/leisure/bu xton_museum Exhibition dates: June 24 to September 1. Handing-in day: June 9 and 10. Contact: Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, as above. ☎ 01629 533540

JULY The Artist and Leisure Painter Open Art Competition 2017 in partnership with Patchings Art Centre Venue: Patchings Art Centre, Oxton Road, Calverton, Nottinghamshire. ☎ 0115 965 3479 Details: Organised by The Artist and Leisure Painter in partnership with Patchings Art Centre. The exhibition, in two separate categories, is open to all professional and amateur artists; any 2D media accepted. Prize awards worth over £16,500, including The Artist Purchase Prize up to £5,000. Selected and additional highly commended

works are also shown on the Patchings Art Centre website, with a People’s Choice prize. Up to three works may be submitted for either category; just one work will be accepted for exhibition in the Leisure Painter category, maximum size (framed) 471⁄4⫻59in (120⫻150cm). Entry fee of £16 per artist covers three works. Entries to be submitted online, via www.painters-online. co.uk or send photos or prints with the coupon. Full details and entry form on pages 8 and 9. Exhibition dates: July 13 to August 20. Submissions deadline: March 31. Contact: Entry coupons and full details appear in the January (pages 8–9), February and March issues of The Artist and Leisure Painter magazines (to order, phone 01580 763673).

Buxton Spa Prize Venue: Green Man Gallery, Hardwick Hall, Hardwick Square South, Buxton, Derbyshire. Details: Open art competition to celebrate the culture, natural beauty and heritage of the town of Buxton. Artists of all ages and abilities are invited to paint en plein air in the town in May and June; the location is drawn by ballot after registering for the event. Any 2D media accepted and up to two completed works may be submitted for exhibition, £25 for first work, £40 for two; £20

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Tabernacle Art Competition and Exhibition Venue: MOMA (Museum of Modern Art), Y Tabernacl, Heol Penrallt, Machynlleth, Powys SY20 8AJ. ☎ 01654 703355 Details: One entry per person on the theme ‘Legend’. Art competition packs will be available from February. Twodimensional works in any media are accepted, plus low-relief collages provided that these are contained in a frame and can be wall-mounted. Maximum size 36⫻48in (91.5⫻122cm). No minimum size. Entry fee: £10 for adults, £3 for under-18s. Work must be for sale. The exhibition coincides with the Machynlleth Festival. Exhibition dates: July 8 to August 31. Handing-in days: June 24 to 30, 10am to 4pm. Contact: To apply for the competition pack, telephone 01654 703355; or email info@momawales.org.uk with your postal address. www.momawales.org.uk

Artsdepot Open

Derbyshire Open Venue: Buxton Museum & Art Gallery, Terrace Road, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 6DA. Details: Organised by Derbyshire County Council with sponsorship from the Friends of Buxton

to enter Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize or £15 if also entering the Buxton Spa Prize. First prize, £5,000; second prize, £1,000 and third prize, £500. One sketchbook may be submitted for the Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize of £2,000. This year’s judges include Harold Riley, Ken Howard OBE, RA and Peter Brown. For full details see www.buxtonspaprize.co.uk Exhibition dates: July 1 to August 14. Registration: Online from April 1 or in Buxton on May 5. Contact: Buxton Spa Prize, c/o The Old Hall Hotel, The Square, Buxton Spa, Derbyshire SK17 6BD.

Nick Derry Red Kites, acrylic, 35⫻271⁄4in (89⫻69cm). Winner of the Hawk and Owl Trust’s Roger Clarke Award at the 2016 Society of Wildlife Artists’ annual exhibition,

artist January 2017

Venue: Apthorp Gallery, Artsdepot, 5 Nether Street, Tally Ho Corner, North Finchley, London N12 OGA. ☎ 020 8369 5454 Details: A diverse and vibrant annual exhibition celebrating the work of artists from Barnet, north London, and beyond. Submissions are invited from emerging and established artists. Up to three works may be submitted, which must have been completed within the last three years. £10 per work; Young Artists £3 per work, tbc. All media accepted. Please refer to website for updates: www.artsdepot.co.uk Exhibition dates: July to September, dates tbc. Application deadline: early June, tbc. Handing-in: early July, tbc. Contact: Download application forms from www.artsdepot.co.uk or contact the box office between 10am and 4pm, Monday to Saturday. ☎ 020 8369 5454

CONTINUED

Society of Women Artists (SWA) Venue: Mall Galleries, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: 156th annual exhibition, open to non-members. Up to four works may be submitted in many media, both wall hung and threedimensional. Entry fee is £15 per work, £8 for young artists. Major new prize: The SWA £2,000 Fine Art Award, also a special prize for a young artist (age limit 35) and The Artist Editor’s Choice Award. Works may be submitted digitally for preselection. For full details, see www.society-women-artists.org.uk Exhibition dates: July 4 to 9. Digital submissions deadline: March 23, 12 noon.. Handing-in day: June 6, 10am to 5pm. Contact: For entry forms email Rebecca Cotton at: rebeccacottonswa@gmail.com

Clifton Arts Club (CAC) Venue: The Undercroft, Victoria Methodist Church, Whitleladies Road, Bristol BS8 1NU. Details: Open exhibition of original works of art. Non-members may enter up to four works. Prizes include £300 prize for excellence and £100 Member prize. At the time of going to press most details still had to be confirmed; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July/August. Handing-in day: July, tbc. Contact: Download details and entry form from: www.cliftonartsclub. co.uk, or contact Submissions Secretary, Clifton Arts Club, 12 Ridgeway Road, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9EU. ☎ 01275 392141

Guild of Aviation Artists Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The 47th Aviation Painting of the Year annual summer exhibition. Any aviation subject accepted, modern and historical, in any hand-applied medium including sculpture. Up to four works may be submitted by nonmembers. All details relating to submission advice and costs will be published on the website, www.gava.org.uk. Awards and trophies include a £1,000 Aviation Painting of the Year Award and the £1,000 FlyPast Fellows Award for Excellence. Submission at the Mall Galleries. Exhibition dates: July 17 to 22. Handing-in day: May 14. Contact: Entry form and submission details available to non-members, on receipt of £5 from Administration, Guild of Aviation Artists, Studio 100 Rye House, 113 High Street, Ruislip HA4 8JN; admin@gava.org.uk; www.gava.org.uk ☎ 01252 302233

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NEWA: National Exhibition of Wildlife Art Venue: Gordale Garden Centre Gallery, Burton, Wirral CH64 8TF. Details: A selected exhibition open to both professional and amateur artists. Up to four 2D and 3D works, depending on size, may be submitted on the subject of wildlife. All work must be for sale. Art materials and monetary prizes. Entry fee, £36; commission of 30 per cent on sales. Collection points around the UK. NEWA supports wildlife causes. Demonstrations will be held throughout the exhibition. Exhibition dates: July 14 to 30. Registration deadline: June 1, tbc. Handing-in: Personal delivery July 11, earlier from collection points. Contact: Registration forms available from www.newa-uk.com or from Dennis Oakes, NEWA, 3 Brian Avenue, Irby, Wirral CH61 3UX. ☎ 07748 533 448

Details: A selected exhibition of small works sourced by open selection from artists across Scotland and further afield. Includes new paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints, photographs, film and architecture. At the time of going to press details had not been confirmed. Full details of submissions procedure and dates will be available from the website in due course, so please keep checking: www.royalscottishacademy.org Exhibition dates: July to August, dates tbc. Submissions deadline: Tba. Contact: Download entry forms when available from: www.royalscottishacademy.org The Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

AUGUST

Café Gallery Annual Open

Clevedon Art Club

Venue: Café Gallery, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA. ☎ 020 7237 1230. Details: Artists at all stages of their careers are invited to enter. Up to three works may be submitted, tbc. For submission requirements and all other details, please check the website on a regular basis: www.cgplondon.org Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Submission dates: Late June to early July, tbc. Contact: Email admin@cgplondon.org ☎ 020 7237 1230

Venue: The Science Block Atrium, Clevedon Community School, Valley Road, Clevedon, Somerset. Details: 61st open exhibition of circa 300 works. Open to all artists working in any media except digital. Up to four paintings and or sculpture may be submitted. Details to be finalised, please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: August, tbc. Handing-in days: August, tbc. Contact: Entry details will be available from the website: www.clevedonartclub.co.uk ☎ Sue Bryant, 01275 879556; or Steve Jenkins, 01454 776311.

Great Sheffield Art Show Venue: The Octagon Centre, Sheffield University, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2QU. Details: Art show/sale for amateur and semi-professional artists of over 2,000 paintings. Up to six works may be submitted. All work must be framed, maximum size 391⁄4⫻391⁄4in (1⫻1m), larger work subject to consultation. Any media accepted, excluding photographs. Hanging fee £4 per work, tbc. Tickets to the private view can also be downloaded. All details to be confirmed. Application forms available from: www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Closing date for submissions: tba. Handing in: tba. Contact: The Great Sheffield Art Show, 287 Ringinglow Road, Sheffield, S11 7PZ; mikefearne@hotmail.com. ☎ 0770 3301075; 0114 225 9989.

Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition (RWA) Venue: The Lower Galleries, the Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

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artist January 2017

National Eisteddfod of Wales Visual Arts Exhibition Venue: Bodedern, Anglesey. Details: Open to those born in Wales or who have one parent born in Wales or any other person who has resided or worked in Wales for the three years prior to the Eisteddfod dates, or any person able to speak or write Welsh. A mixed exhibition of contemporary fine art and applied art. Awards include the Gold Medal for Fine Art plus £5,000; the Gold Medal for Craft and Design plus £5,000; and the Young Artist Scholarship of £1,500. Entry £20; up to six jpgs may be submitted. Exhibition dates: August 4 to 12. Closing date for entries: March 1. Contact: Robyn Tomos, Eisteddfod Office, 40 Parc Tŷ Glas, Llanishen, Cardiff CF14 5DU. https://eisteddfod.wales ☎ 0845 4090 300

World Illustration Awards 2017 Venue: Embankment Galleries, South Wing, Somerset House, London WC2. Details: The Association of Illustrators invites entries from illustrators working in any

medium, context or geographical location for their annual competition. Work must be entered either as a New Talent or a Professional entry and must have been created since January 2016. Exhibition dates: August 1 to 28, then tours for 12 months from October, tba. Submissions deadline: February 6. Contact: See full terms and conditions and enter online at: www.theaoi.com/awards ☎ +44 020 7759 1012

SEPTEMBER International Print Biennale Venue: Northern Print and other venues, tbc. Details: Open to all British and international artists. Entries are invited that are interpretations of contemporary print processes, including 2D, 3D, video, installation and site-specific work. Artists are asked to submit a current CV, artist’s statement and up to ten images or documentation of their recent work. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: Spring, tbc. Contact: For further detals and to apply please visit www.internationalprintbiennale.o rg.uk or contact the project coordinators Parker Harris: ipb@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Derwent Art Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Derwent Art Prize aims to reward excellence by showcasing the very best works created in pencil by British and international artists. Artists can submit up to six 2D or 3D works created with any pencil or coloured pencil as well as watersoluble, pastel, graphite or charcoal pencils. Prizes worth £12,500. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: June 1. Contact: Entries should be made online at www.derwentartprize.com; for more information contact the Derwent Art Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: derwent@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Jerwood Drawing Prize Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 followed by nationwide tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Largest and longestrunning annual open submission exhibition for drawing in the UK. Open to professional and nonprofessional artists at any stage of their careers. First prize of £8,000;

second prize, £5,000 and two student awards of £2,000 each. Regional collection points. Up to three works may be submitted. Entry, which is by pre-registration only, opens in April. Exhibition dates: September to October, dates tbc. Closing date for registration: June, dates tbc. Handing-in day: late June/early July, dates tbc. Contact: Register online via: www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Drawing Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: jdp@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Exeter Contemporary Open Venue: Exeter Phoenix, Bradninch Place, Gandy Street, Exeter EX4 3LS. ☎ 01392 667058 Details: All media including drawing, painting, sculpture and photography. £1,500 in prizes. Entry is £20 per artist, concessions £15; a maximum of four works may be submitted. Finalists will be selected by a panel. Full details should be available on the website from April. Exhibition dates: September 15 to November 4. Handing-in days: June 12. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www. exeterphoenix.org.uk/category/art address as above.

Royal West of England Academy Autumn Exhibition Venue: Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1PX. ☎ 0117 973 5129 Details: 165th annual open exhibition of works by emerging and established artists. Acceptable media are painting, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, architecture and photography. All works must be for sale. For more information on submission and handing-in dates, please visit the RWA website: www.rwa.org.uk Submissions can be made at www.rwasubmissions.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 30 to November 19. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Apply online at www.rwa.org.uk Royal West of England Academy, address as above.

Society of Equestrian Artists Open Exhibition (SEA) Venue: To be advised. Details: The Horse in Art open exhibition. Entry fee: £12 per work. All details tbc. Please check the society’s website for updates. www.equestrianartists.co.uk. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Submissions deadline: tba. Handing-in: tba. Contact: Secretary, Society of Equestrian Artists, sec@equestrianartists.co.uk

www.equestrianartists.co.uk ☎ 0300 0110 185

OCTOBER

Sunday Times Watercolour Competition

Society of Graphic Fine Art (SGFA)

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: A competition to uphold the finest traditions of British watercolour painting. Open to professional and amateur artists. Prizes total £18,000. Entry is £15 per work. www.sundaytimeswatercolour.org Exhibition dates: September, dates tbc. Entry deadline: June, dates tbc. Contact: Enter online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk. For any queries, please contact: watercolour@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Venue: The Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1. ☎ 020 7407 3222 Details: DRAW 17, the 98th annual open exhibition of contemporary and traditional drawings, paintings and prints showing evidence of drawing by hand. Many prizes awarded. Non-members can submit up to three works, £15 per work. www.sgfa.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 2 to 14. Application deadline: July 21. Handing-in days: Menier Gallery, October 1; earlier if using Art Moves (London or regional). Contact: See website for full details www.sgfa.org.uk enquiries@sgfa.org.uk

Society of Wood Engravers (SWE) Venue: Touring exhibition, venues to be advised. Details: 79th annual exhibition open to all forms of relief printmaking. Up to two unframed works may be submitted, fee £40 for one work, £45 for two. Exhibition dates: From September, tbc. Handing-in day: Early July, tbc. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www.woodengravers.co.uk Venue: Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, Co Durham. ☎ 01833 690606

New Light Details: Biennial exhibition open to all northern artists producing skills-based, wall-hung art. Entrants must have been born, received an arts degree, or work in the north of England. Awards include Valeria Sykes Prize, £10,000 and Sponsor’s Choice, £2,500, and a prize for artists under the age of 40 to include cash, mentoring scheme and exhibition opportunities. Exhibition will tour. All details tbc. Exhibition dates: Autumn 2017, dates tbc. Closing date: tba. Contact: Call for entries opens in spring 2017, tbc. Check website for details: www.newlight-art.org.uk

Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Sculptors and Gravers (RMS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of miniature art. Up to five works may be submitted. Full conditions and schedules at: www.royalminiature-society.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 19 to October 1, tbc. Handing-in day: Early September, tbc. Contact: Executive Secretary, 89 Rosebery Road, Dursley, Gloucestershire GL11 4PU; info@ royal-miniature-society.org.uk

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Chelsea Art Society Venue: Chelsea Old Town Hall, King’s Road, Chelsea, London SW3. Details: Annual open exhibition, showing work in all media: paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. Prizes for different categories of work. Up to three works may be submitted – oils, pastels, watercolours, drawings, prints and sculptures. Submission fee, £12 per work; all works must be for sale. Prizes include the Julian Barrow Memorial Prize. All info tbc, please check website for details: www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 26 to 30. Handing-in day: October 23, 8.30am to 3pm. Contact: Entry forms should be available from May. To obtain forms, email Heather WillsSandford, Honorary Secretary, at: chelseaartsociety@gmail.com. If you do not have access to email, write to the Honorary Secretary at Chelsea Art Society, 50 Bowerdean Street, London SW6 3TW. www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk ☎ 020 7731 3121

Royal Society of Marine Artists (RSMA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Submissions of painting and sculpture are invited that involve the sea and the marine environment, for example portraits of persons connected with the sea, shipping, creeks, wildlife, beaches – anything that moves with tidal waters. Accepted media are oil, acrylic, watercolour, original prints of any media, pastels, sculpture or drawings. Artists aged over 18 may submit a maximum of six works; up to three may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for

www.painters-online.co.uk

sale, minimum price £300, unframed prints £120, framed prints from a limited edition not exceeding 50, £200. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 5 to 14. Registration deadline: June 30, 12 noon. Handing-in day: August 5, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Society of Botanical Artists (SBA) Venue: The Westminster Gallery, Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, London SW1. Details: Annual open exhibition; this year’s theme is ‘Changing Seasons’. Entries are accepted in all media, including ceramics, glass, jewellery and 3D work. Please check website for full details. Exhibition dates: October 13 to 21. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: SBA, 1 Knapp Cottages, Wyke, Gillingham, Dorset SP8 4NQ; www.soc-botanical-artists.org. pam@soc-botanical-artists.org ☎ 01747 825718

Society of Wildlife Artists (SWLA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Any work depicting wildlife subjects is admissible, botanical and domestic animals are not. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six works in any medium, including painting, sculpture and original prints; up to six may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. Work previously exhibited in London is not admissible. Prizes include £1,000 Birdwatch Artist of the Year Award, the Curwen Studio Prize and SWLA bursaries of up to £750. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org.u k. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £200, unframed prints £95. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk. Exhibition dates: October 19 to 29. Registration deadline: July 21, 12 noon. Handing-in days: August 26, 10am to 5pm. Contact: The Mall Galleries, as above

The National Open Art Competition Venue: To be confirmed. Details: Entries are invited from artists aged 15 and over on September 1, 2017. Up to four works may be entered: paintings, drawings, original prints, miniatures, photography and wallhung installations. Fee, £20 per work. All work must be new, maximum size 60⫻60⫻12in (153⫻153⫻30cm) including frame. Works made up of more than one piece, eg triptychs, must not exceed the maximum size when displayed on a wall. Works must be

Kathryn Maple Sandy Shoes, watercolour, 361⁄4⫻431⁄4in (92⫻110cm). Winner, Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 2016 for sale, a commission of 50 per cent is charged, of which five per cent is given to a children’s charity. Initial selections made from online digital submissions. The exhibition will be in London in October/ November, dates tba, and at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, dates tba. Many prizes and awards. For full details and to register, including details of the children’s competition, visit www.nationalopenart.org/register. php. Open for submissions from March 1. Exhibition dates: October/November dates, tbc. Submissions deadline: July 9. Handing-in days: August 23 to 26 at Chichester Brinsbury College, Pulborough, RH20 1DL. Contact: Amanda Kings. ☎ 07986 697 693

NOVEMBER

South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts (SWAc)

September: www.ragm.org.uk ☎ 01788 533201

Venue: Exeter Castle, Castle Street, Exeter EX4 3PU. Details: Eighteenth annual open exhibition for artists from the south west region of England. All media will be considered; up to four works may be submitted. Cost £15 per work, tbc; all must be for sale. Giclée prints not accepted. Prizes and awards to include new Young Artist’s Award. Digital submission. All details tbc. See website for full details: www.southwestacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 14 to 25. Submissions deadline: August, tbc. Contact: Conditions of entry and submission forms will be available to download from www.southwestacademy.org.uk the South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts, 3 Birchy Barton Hill, Exeter EX1 3ET.

ING Discerning Eye

Rugby Open Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts (RGI) Venue: To be advised. Details: Annual exhibition established 1861 to promote contemporary art in Scotland. Open to all artists. Accepted media are painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media and sculpture. Full details will be available by August; online submission at: www.royalglasgowinstitute.org. Prizes in 2016 included the City of Glasgow College Purchase Prize, £8,000 and Walter Scott Prize, £5,000. Exhibition dates: November, tbc. Handing-in days: September 30, tbc. Contact: RGI Kelly Gallery, 118 Douglas Street, Glasgow G2 4ET; www.royalglasgowinstitute.org email: theroyalglasgowinstitute@ gmail.com

Venue: Rugby Museum and Art Gallery, Little Elborow Street, Rugby CV21 3BZ. ☎ 01788 533201 Details: Annual exhibition for artists living and/or working within 15 miles of the art gallery. Up to three original works, created no earlier than one year before the exhibition, can be entered. Acceptable media are painting, sculpture, drawing, print, photography, film/video and craft. Performance and installation are not acceptable. Fee, £5 per work, £12 for three works, tbc. Prizes and awards. Exhibition dates: November to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: late October, tbc. Contact: Details and application forms should be available from end

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Two artists, two critics and two collectors select from an open submission, and invite established artists to exhibit. Cash and purchase prizes. Maximum size of work 20in (51cm) including frame or stand. Up to six works may be entered, which must be for sale. Regional handing-in points. The submission fee is £10 per work. www.discerningeye.org/exhibition /intro/intro.php Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: September, dates tbc. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; de@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

ING Discerning Eye Drawing Bursary Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Open to UK artists. Up to five artists will be shortlisted for the bursary. £1,500 will be awarded to the winner, and £150 to each runner-up. Entry cost is £3 per artist. Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: October, dates bc. Contact: Apply online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE Drawing Bursary 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ;

artist January 2017

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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 Receiving days: To be advised. Please check website for full details. Contact: Entry forms will be available to download from January 4; see https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk ☎ 020 7300 5969/5929

Not the Royal Academy Venue: Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, 124–126 The Cut, Waterloo, London SE1 8LN. ☎ 020 7620 1322/4 Details: The 27th year of this annual salon des refusés exhibition of paintings: oils, watercolours, pastels and drawings. Work must have been submitted to the current Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and be for sale. Paintings should be framed to a high standard; metal frames not acceptable. On-the-spot selection by the directors of the gallery. For more details see www.nottheroyalacademy.com Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 19. Handing-in days: Late May–early June, tba. Dates depend on when works may be collected from the RA. Contact: Ann Leeson or Nicholas Dawton at Llewellyn Alexander Gallery, as above.

New English Art Club (NEAC) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The NEAC seeks work that demonstrates excellence in both concept and draughtsmanship. Artists over the age of 18 may submit paintings, drawings, pastels and original framed prints, not photography or sculpture. Work must have been completed in the last two years and not previously exhibited in London. Up to six works may be submitted, up to five may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300, framed prints £180, unframed prints £120. Prizes include the Zsuzsi Roboz Prize awarded by the Alfred Teddy Smith and Zsuzsi Roboz Art Trust, £5,000 and the Dorreen McIntosh Prize, £5,000; Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 16 to 25. Registration deadline: February 24, 12 noon. Handing-in day: April 8, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Museum and Art Gallery, the Derbyshire Open, now in its 35th year, attracts amateur and professional artists of all ages competing for a range of prizes and a place in the museum collection. Top prize worth £750. Entry information should be available to download in April from www.derbyshire.gov.uk/leisure/bu xton_museum Exhibition dates: June 24 to September 1. Handing-in day: June 9 and 10. Contact: Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, as above. ☎ 01629 533540

JULY The Artist and Leisure Painter Open Art Competition 2017 in partnership with Patchings Art Centre Venue: Patchings Art Centre, Oxton Road, Calverton, Nottinghamshire. ☎ 0115 965 3479 Details: Organised by The Artist and Leisure Painter in partnership with Patchings Art Centre. The exhibition, in two separate categories, is open to all professional and amateur artists; any 2D media accepted. Prize awards worth over £16,500, including The Artist Purchase Prize up to £5,000. Selected and additional highly commended

works are also shown on the Patchings Art Centre website, with a People’s Choice prize. Up to three works may be submitted for either category; just one work will be accepted for exhibition in the Leisure Painter category, maximum size (framed) 471⁄4⫻59in (120⫻150cm). Entry fee of £16 per artist covers three works. Entries to be submitted online, via www.painters-online. co.uk or send photos or prints with the coupon. Full details and entry form on pages 8 and 9. Exhibition dates: July 13 to August 20. Submissions deadline: March 31. Contact: Entry coupons and full details appear in the January (pages 8–9), February and March issues of The Artist and Leisure Painter magazines (to order, phone 01580 763673).

Buxton Spa Prize Venue: Green Man Gallery, Hardwick Hall, Hardwick Square South, Buxton, Derbyshire. Details: Open art competition to celebrate the culture, natural beauty and heritage of the town of Buxton. Artists of all ages and abilities are invited to paint en plein air in the town in May and June; the location is drawn by ballot after registering for the event. Any 2D media accepted and up to two completed works may be submitted for exhibition, £25 for first work, £40 for two; £20

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Tabernacle Art Competition and Exhibition Venue: MOMA (Museum of Modern Art), Y Tabernacl, Heol Penrallt, Machynlleth, Powys SY20 8AJ. ☎ 01654 703355 Details: One entry per person on the theme ‘Legend’. Art competition packs will be available from February. Twodimensional works in any media are accepted, plus low-relief collages provided that these are contained in a frame and can be wall-mounted. Maximum size 36⫻48in (91.5⫻122cm). No minimum size. Entry fee: £10 for adults, £3 for under-18s. Work must be for sale. The exhibition coincides with the Machynlleth Festival. Exhibition dates: July 8 to August 31. Handing-in days: June 24 to 30, 10am to 4pm. Contact: To apply for the competition pack, telephone 01654 703355; or email info@momawales.org.uk with your postal address. www.momawales.org.uk

Artsdepot Open

Derbyshire Open Venue: Buxton Museum & Art Gallery, Terrace Road, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 6DA. Details: Organised by Derbyshire County Council with sponsorship from the Friends of Buxton

to enter Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize or £15 if also entering the Buxton Spa Prize. First prize, £5,000; second prize, £1,000 and third prize, £500. One sketchbook may be submitted for the Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize of £2,000. This year’s judges include Harold Riley, Ken Howard OBE, RA and Peter Brown. For full details see www.buxtonspaprize.co.uk Exhibition dates: July 1 to August 14. Registration: Online from April 1 or in Buxton on May 5. Contact: Buxton Spa Prize, c/o The Old Hall Hotel, The Square, Buxton Spa, Derbyshire SK17 6BD.

Nick Derry Red Kites, acrylic, 35⫻271⁄4in (89⫻69cm). Winner of the Hawk and Owl Trust’s Roger Clarke Award at the 2016 Society of Wildlife Artists’ annual exhibition,

artist January 2017

Venue: Apthorp Gallery, Artsdepot, 5 Nether Street, Tally Ho Corner, North Finchley, London N12 OGA. ☎ 020 8369 5454 Details: A diverse and vibrant annual exhibition celebrating the work of artists from Barnet, north London, and beyond. Submissions are invited from emerging and established artists. Up to three works may be submitted, which must have been completed within the last three years. £10 per work; Young Artists £3 per work, tbc. All media accepted. Please refer to website for updates: www.artsdepot.co.uk Exhibition dates: July to September, dates tbc. Application deadline: early June, tbc. Handing-in: early July, tbc. Contact: Download application forms from www.artsdepot.co.uk or contact the box office between 10am and 4pm, Monday to Saturday. ☎ 020 8369 5454

CONTINUED

Society of Women Artists (SWA) Venue: Mall Galleries, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: 156th annual exhibition, open to non-members. Up to four works may be submitted in many media, both wall hung and threedimensional. Entry fee is £15 per work, £8 for young artists. Major new prize: The SWA £2,000 Fine Art Award, also a special prize for a young artist (age limit 35) and The Artist Editor’s Choice Award. Works may be submitted digitally for preselection. For full details, see www.society-women-artists.org.uk Exhibition dates: July 4 to 9. Digital submissions deadline: March 23, 12 noon.. Handing-in day: June 6, 10am to 5pm. Contact: For entry forms email Rebecca Cotton at: rebeccacottonswa@gmail.com

Clifton Arts Club (CAC) Venue: The Undercroft, Victoria Methodist Church, Whitleladies Road, Bristol BS8 1NU. Details: Open exhibition of original works of art. Non-members may enter up to four works. Prizes include £300 prize for excellence and £100 Member prize. At the time of going to press most details still had to be confirmed; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July/August. Handing-in day: July, tbc. Contact: Download details and entry form from: www.cliftonartsclub. co.uk, or contact Submissions Secretary, Clifton Arts Club, 12 Ridgeway Road, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9EU. ☎ 01275 392141

Guild of Aviation Artists Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The 47th Aviation Painting of the Year annual summer exhibition. Any aviation subject accepted, modern and historical, in any hand-applied medium including sculpture. Up to four works may be submitted by nonmembers. All details relating to submission advice and costs will be published on the website, www.gava.org.uk. Awards and trophies include a £1,000 Aviation Painting of the Year Award and the £1,000 FlyPast Fellows Award for Excellence. Submission at the Mall Galleries. Exhibition dates: July 17 to 22. Handing-in day: May 14. Contact: Entry form and submission details available to non-members, on receipt of £5 from Administration, Guild of Aviation Artists, Studio 100 Rye House, 113 High Street, Ruislip HA4 8JN; admin@gava.org.uk; www.gava.org.uk ☎ 01252 302233

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NEWA: National Exhibition of Wildlife Art Venue: Gordale Garden Centre Gallery, Burton, Wirral CH64 8TF. Details: A selected exhibition open to both professional and amateur artists. Up to four 2D and 3D works, depending on size, may be submitted on the subject of wildlife. All work must be for sale. Art materials and monetary prizes. Entry fee, £36; commission of 30 per cent on sales. Collection points around the UK. NEWA supports wildlife causes. Demonstrations will be held throughout the exhibition. Exhibition dates: July 14 to 30. Registration deadline: June 1, tbc. Handing-in: Personal delivery July 11, earlier from collection points. Contact: Registration forms available from www.newa-uk.com or from Dennis Oakes, NEWA, 3 Brian Avenue, Irby, Wirral CH61 3UX. ☎ 07748 533 448

Details: A selected exhibition of small works sourced by open selection from artists across Scotland and further afield. Includes new paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints, photographs, film and architecture. At the time of going to press details had not been confirmed. Full details of submissions procedure and dates will be available from the website in due course, so please keep checking: www.royalscottishacademy.org Exhibition dates: July to August, dates tbc. Submissions deadline: Tba. Contact: Download entry forms when available from: www.royalscottishacademy.org The Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

AUGUST

Café Gallery Annual Open

Clevedon Art Club

Venue: Café Gallery, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA. ☎ 020 7237 1230. Details: Artists at all stages of their careers are invited to enter. Up to three works may be submitted, tbc. For submission requirements and all other details, please check the website on a regular basis: www.cgplondon.org Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Submission dates: Late June to early July, tbc. Contact: Email admin@cgplondon.org ☎ 020 7237 1230

Venue: The Science Block Atrium, Clevedon Community School, Valley Road, Clevedon, Somerset. Details: 61st open exhibition of circa 300 works. Open to all artists working in any media except digital. Up to four paintings and or sculpture may be submitted. Details to be finalised, please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: August, tbc. Handing-in days: August, tbc. Contact: Entry details will be available from the website: www.clevedonartclub.co.uk ☎ Sue Bryant, 01275 879556; or Steve Jenkins, 01454 776311.

Great Sheffield Art Show Venue: The Octagon Centre, Sheffield University, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2QU. Details: Art show/sale for amateur and semi-professional artists of over 2,000 paintings. Up to six works may be submitted. All work must be framed, maximum size 391⁄4⫻391⁄4in (1⫻1m), larger work subject to consultation. Any media accepted, excluding photographs. Hanging fee £4 per work, tbc. Tickets to the private view can also be downloaded. All details to be confirmed. Application forms available from: www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk; please check website for updates. Exhibition dates: July, tbc. Closing date for submissions: tba. Handing in: tba. Contact: The Great Sheffield Art Show, 287 Ringinglow Road, Sheffield, S11 7PZ; mikefearne@hotmail.com. ☎ 0770 3301075; 0114 225 9989.

Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibition (RWA) Venue: The Lower Galleries, the Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. ☎ 0131 225 6671

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artist January 2017

National Eisteddfod of Wales Visual Arts Exhibition Venue: Bodedern, Anglesey. Details: Open to those born in Wales or who have one parent born in Wales or any other person who has resided or worked in Wales for the three years prior to the Eisteddfod dates, or any person able to speak or write Welsh. A mixed exhibition of contemporary fine art and applied art. Awards include the Gold Medal for Fine Art plus £5,000; the Gold Medal for Craft and Design plus £5,000; and the Young Artist Scholarship of £1,500. Entry £20; up to six jpgs may be submitted. Exhibition dates: August 4 to 12. Closing date for entries: March 1. Contact: Robyn Tomos, Eisteddfod Office, 40 Parc Tŷ Glas, Llanishen, Cardiff CF14 5DU. https://eisteddfod.wales ☎ 0845 4090 300

World Illustration Awards 2017 Venue: Embankment Galleries, South Wing, Somerset House, London WC2. Details: The Association of Illustrators invites entries from illustrators working in any

medium, context or geographical location for their annual competition. Work must be entered either as a New Talent or a Professional entry and must have been created since January 2016. Exhibition dates: August 1 to 28, then tours for 12 months from October, tba. Submissions deadline: February 6. Contact: See full terms and conditions and enter online at: www.theaoi.com/awards ☎ +44 020 7759 1012

SEPTEMBER International Print Biennale Venue: Northern Print and other venues, tbc. Details: Open to all British and international artists. Entries are invited that are interpretations of contemporary print processes, including 2D, 3D, video, installation and site-specific work. Artists are asked to submit a current CV, artist’s statement and up to ten images or documentation of their recent work. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: Spring, tbc. Contact: For further detals and to apply please visit www.internationalprintbiennale.o rg.uk or contact the project coordinators Parker Harris: ipb@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Derwent Art Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Derwent Art Prize aims to reward excellence by showcasing the very best works created in pencil by British and international artists. Artists can submit up to six 2D or 3D works created with any pencil or coloured pencil as well as watersoluble, pastel, graphite or charcoal pencils. Prizes worth £12,500. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Closing date: June 1. Contact: Entries should be made online at www.derwentartprize.com; for more information contact the Derwent Art Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: derwent@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Jerwood Drawing Prize Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 followed by nationwide tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Largest and longestrunning annual open submission exhibition for drawing in the UK. Open to professional and nonprofessional artists at any stage of their careers. First prize of £8,000;

second prize, £5,000 and two student awards of £2,000 each. Regional collection points. Up to three works may be submitted. Entry, which is by pre-registration only, opens in April. Exhibition dates: September to October, dates tbc. Closing date for registration: June, dates tbc. Handing-in day: late June/early July, dates tbc. Contact: Register online via: www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Drawing Prize coordinator at Parker Harris: jdp@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

Exeter Contemporary Open Venue: Exeter Phoenix, Bradninch Place, Gandy Street, Exeter EX4 3LS. ☎ 01392 667058 Details: All media including drawing, painting, sculpture and photography. £1,500 in prizes. Entry is £20 per artist, concessions £15; a maximum of four works may be submitted. Finalists will be selected by a panel. Full details should be available on the website from April. Exhibition dates: September 15 to November 4. Handing-in days: June 12. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www. exeterphoenix.org.uk/category/art address as above.

Royal West of England Academy Autumn Exhibition Venue: Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1PX. ☎ 0117 973 5129 Details: 165th annual open exhibition of works by emerging and established artists. Acceptable media are painting, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, architecture and photography. All works must be for sale. For more information on submission and handing-in dates, please visit the RWA website: www.rwa.org.uk Submissions can be made at www.rwasubmissions.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 30 to November 19. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Apply online at www.rwa.org.uk Royal West of England Academy, address as above.

Society of Equestrian Artists Open Exhibition (SEA) Venue: To be advised. Details: The Horse in Art open exhibition. Entry fee: £12 per work. All details tbc. Please check the society’s website for updates. www.equestrianartists.co.uk. Exhibition dates: September, tbc. Submissions deadline: tba. Handing-in: tba. Contact: Secretary, Society of Equestrian Artists, sec@equestrianartists.co.uk

www.equestrianartists.co.uk ☎ 0300 0110 185

OCTOBER

Sunday Times Watercolour Competition

Society of Graphic Fine Art (SGFA)

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: A competition to uphold the finest traditions of British watercolour painting. Open to professional and amateur artists. Prizes total £18,000. Entry is £15 per work. www.sundaytimeswatercolour.org Exhibition dates: September, dates tbc. Entry deadline: June, dates tbc. Contact: Enter online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk. For any queries, please contact: watercolour@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Venue: The Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1. ☎ 020 7407 3222 Details: DRAW 17, the 98th annual open exhibition of contemporary and traditional drawings, paintings and prints showing evidence of drawing by hand. Many prizes awarded. Non-members can submit up to three works, £15 per work. www.sgfa.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 2 to 14. Application deadline: July 21. Handing-in days: Menier Gallery, October 1; earlier if using Art Moves (London or regional). Contact: See website for full details www.sgfa.org.uk enquiries@sgfa.org.uk

Society of Wood Engravers (SWE) Venue: Touring exhibition, venues to be advised. Details: 79th annual exhibition open to all forms of relief printmaking. Up to two unframed works may be submitted, fee £40 for one work, £45 for two. Exhibition dates: From September, tbc. Handing-in day: Early July, tbc. Contact: Application forms will be available to download from: www.woodengravers.co.uk Venue: Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, Co Durham. ☎ 01833 690606

New Light Details: Biennial exhibition open to all northern artists producing skills-based, wall-hung art. Entrants must have been born, received an arts degree, or work in the north of England. Awards include Valeria Sykes Prize, £10,000 and Sponsor’s Choice, £2,500, and a prize for artists under the age of 40 to include cash, mentoring scheme and exhibition opportunities. Exhibition will tour. All details tbc. Exhibition dates: Autumn 2017, dates tbc. Closing date: tba. Contact: Call for entries opens in spring 2017, tbc. Check website for details: www.newlight-art.org.uk

Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Sculptors and Gravers (RMS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of miniature art. Up to five works may be submitted. Full conditions and schedules at: www.royalminiature-society.org.uk Exhibition dates: September 19 to October 1, tbc. Handing-in day: Early September, tbc. Contact: Executive Secretary, 89 Rosebery Road, Dursley, Gloucestershire GL11 4PU; info@ royal-miniature-society.org.uk

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Chelsea Art Society Venue: Chelsea Old Town Hall, King’s Road, Chelsea, London SW3. Details: Annual open exhibition, showing work in all media: paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. Prizes for different categories of work. Up to three works may be submitted – oils, pastels, watercolours, drawings, prints and sculptures. Submission fee, £12 per work; all works must be for sale. Prizes include the Julian Barrow Memorial Prize. All info tbc, please check website for details: www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 26 to 30. Handing-in day: October 23, 8.30am to 3pm. Contact: Entry forms should be available from May. To obtain forms, email Heather WillsSandford, Honorary Secretary, at: chelseaartsociety@gmail.com. If you do not have access to email, write to the Honorary Secretary at Chelsea Art Society, 50 Bowerdean Street, London SW6 3TW. www.chelseaartsociety.org.uk ☎ 020 7731 3121

Royal Society of Marine Artists (RSMA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Submissions of painting and sculpture are invited that involve the sea and the marine environment, for example portraits of persons connected with the sea, shipping, creeks, wildlife, beaches – anything that moves with tidal waters. Accepted media are oil, acrylic, watercolour, original prints of any media, pastels, sculpture or drawings. Artists aged over 18 may submit a maximum of six works; up to three may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org. uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for

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sale, minimum price £300, unframed prints £120, framed prints from a limited edition not exceeding 50, £200. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: October 5 to 14. Registration deadline: June 30, 12 noon. Handing-in day: August 5, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Society of Botanical Artists (SBA) Venue: The Westminster Gallery, Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, London SW1. Details: Annual open exhibition; this year’s theme is ‘Changing Seasons’. Entries are accepted in all media, including ceramics, glass, jewellery and 3D work. Please check website for full details. Exhibition dates: October 13 to 21. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: SBA, 1 Knapp Cottages, Wyke, Gillingham, Dorset SP8 4NQ; www.soc-botanical-artists.org. pam@soc-botanical-artists.org ☎ 01747 825718

Society of Wildlife Artists (SWLA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Any work depicting wildlife subjects is admissible, botanical and domestic animals are not. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six works in any medium, including painting, sculpture and original prints; up to six may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. Work previously exhibited in London is not admissible. Prizes include £1,000 Birdwatch Artist of the Year Award, the Curwen Studio Prize and SWLA bursaries of up to £750. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries.org.u k. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £200, unframed prints £95. Full terms and conditions from: www.mallgalleries.org.uk. Exhibition dates: October 19 to 29. Registration deadline: July 21, 12 noon. Handing-in days: August 26, 10am to 5pm. Contact: The Mall Galleries, as above

The National Open Art Competition Venue: To be confirmed. Details: Entries are invited from artists aged 15 and over on September 1, 2017. Up to four works may be entered: paintings, drawings, original prints, miniatures, photography and wallhung installations. Fee, £20 per work. All work must be new, maximum size 60⫻60⫻12in (153⫻153⫻30cm) including frame. Works made up of more than one piece, eg triptychs, must not exceed the maximum size when displayed on a wall. Works must be

Kathryn Maple Sandy Shoes, watercolour, 361⁄4⫻431⁄4in (92⫻110cm). Winner, Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 2016 for sale, a commission of 50 per cent is charged, of which five per cent is given to a children’s charity. Initial selections made from online digital submissions. The exhibition will be in London in October/ November, dates tba, and at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, dates tba. Many prizes and awards. For full details and to register, including details of the children’s competition, visit www.nationalopenart.org/register. php. Open for submissions from March 1. Exhibition dates: October/November dates, tbc. Submissions deadline: July 9. Handing-in days: August 23 to 26 at Chichester Brinsbury College, Pulborough, RH20 1DL. Contact: Amanda Kings. ☎ 07986 697 693

NOVEMBER

South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts (SWAc)

September: www.ragm.org.uk ☎ 01788 533201

Venue: Exeter Castle, Castle Street, Exeter EX4 3PU. Details: Eighteenth annual open exhibition for artists from the south west region of England. All media will be considered; up to four works may be submitted. Cost £15 per work, tbc; all must be for sale. Giclée prints not accepted. Prizes and awards to include new Young Artist’s Award. Digital submission. All details tbc. See website for full details: www.southwestacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 14 to 25. Submissions deadline: August, tbc. Contact: Conditions of entry and submission forms will be available to download from www.southwestacademy.org.uk the South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts, 3 Birchy Barton Hill, Exeter EX1 3ET.

ING Discerning Eye

Rugby Open Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts (RGI) Venue: To be advised. Details: Annual exhibition established 1861 to promote contemporary art in Scotland. Open to all artists. Accepted media are painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media and sculpture. Full details will be available by August; online submission at: www.royalglasgowinstitute.org. Prizes in 2016 included the City of Glasgow College Purchase Prize, £8,000 and Walter Scott Prize, £5,000. Exhibition dates: November, tbc. Handing-in days: September 30, tbc. Contact: RGI Kelly Gallery, 118 Douglas Street, Glasgow G2 4ET; www.royalglasgowinstitute.org email: theroyalglasgowinstitute@ gmail.com

Venue: Rugby Museum and Art Gallery, Little Elborow Street, Rugby CV21 3BZ. ☎ 01788 533201 Details: Annual exhibition for artists living and/or working within 15 miles of the art gallery. Up to three original works, created no earlier than one year before the exhibition, can be entered. Acceptable media are painting, sculpture, drawing, print, photography, film/video and craft. Performance and installation are not acceptable. Fee, £5 per work, £12 for three works, tbc. Prizes and awards. Exhibition dates: November to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: late October, tbc. Contact: Details and application forms should be available from end

Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Two artists, two critics and two collectors select from an open submission, and invite established artists to exhibit. Cash and purchase prizes. Maximum size of work 20in (51cm) including frame or stand. Up to six works may be entered, which must be for sale. Regional handing-in points. The submission fee is £10 per work. www.discerningeye.org/exhibition /intro/intro.php Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: September, dates tbc. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; de@parkerharris.co.uk. ☎ 01372 462190

ING Discerning Eye Drawing Bursary Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Open to UK artists. Up to five artists will be shortlisted for the bursary. £1,500 will be awarded to the winner, and £150 to each runner-up. Entry cost is £3 per artist. Exhibition dates: November, dates tbc. Handing-in days: October, dates bc. Contact: Apply online at: www.parkerharris.co.uk or send sae for entry pack to DE Drawing Bursary 2017, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ;

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artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017 de@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Griffin Art Prize 2017 Venue: Griffin Gallery, The Studio Building, 21 Evesham Street, London W11 4AJ. ☎ 020 8424 3239 Details: Opportunity for emerging artists, supported by Winsor & Newton, Liquitex and Conté à Paris. Competition is open to any UKbased artist whose primary activity is painting or drawing and has graduated with a BA, MA or PhD from a recognised institution since 2010. Up to four works to be submitted at a cost of £15, tbc. First round digital submission only. The judges will be looking for excellence and innovation in painting and drawing. Paintings should not exceed 98⫻118in (250⫻300cm). The winner will have sole use of a large studio and art materials from the supporting brands with which to produce work for a one-person show at the Griffin Gallery. There will also be a small allowance to help meet expenses. The residency at Griffin Gallery will be from February to April 2018. Full details will be published in April 2017, tbc. Please check website for updates: www.griffingallery.co.uk Exhibition dates: shortlist exhibition, November 2 to December 15. Registration deadline: July 2. Contact: The Griffin Gallery, address above; applications must be made online at www.griffinartprize.co.uk

potential of forests as sites for art, both in and about the environment. Proposals can be for work in any discipline or medium, temporary or permanent, sitespecific or for touring to more than one location. Five artists will be selected to receive a £2,000 Research and Development fee to develop their proposals over a sixmonth period, culminating in an exhibition. During the exhibition one artist will be selected to receive a £30,000 commissioning budget to realise their proposal. Exhibition dates: November 2017. Submissions deadline: February 2017, dates tbc. Contact: To enter please visit jerwoodopenforest.org and for more information contact the project managers, Parker Harris: jof@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

DECEMBER Shenzhen International Watercolour Biennial Details: International biennial watercolour exhibition to be held at the Shenzen Art Museum, Guangdong, China, then touring. Awards of over £50,000. All details to be confirmed. Exhibition dates: December 2017 to January 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: July 2017, tbc. Contact: www.shenzhenbiennial.com

Royal Institute of Oil Painters (ROI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The ROI invites submission of oil paintings for its annual open exhibition. Acrylics framed as oils are accepted. Numerous awards and prizes. Artists aged over 18 may submit up to six framed works, up to four may be selected. Maximum size 941⁄2in (2.4m) in the largest dimension. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under35s, £10 per work. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: November 30 to December 10. Registration deadline: August 25, 12 noon. Handing-in days: October 7, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Jerwood Open Forest Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN, followed by commission in one of England’s Public Forest Estates . Details: This is a call for bold, broadthinking proposals that explore the

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BIENNIALS and other open competitions and exhibitions to look out for in 2018. Note: some 2018 competitions have 2017 submission deadlines The Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour (RSW) Venue: The Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 2EL. Details: 137th annual winter exhibition of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour. Works in water-based media only. Up to four works may be submitted at a cost of £10 per work plus £30 hanging fee per work, tbc. Prizes and awards. Patron: HRH Prince Charles, Duke of Rothesay. Charity No: SC007247. www.rsw.org.uk Exhibition dates: January 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: October 2017, tbc. Contact: For full details and to submit online, see www.rsw.org.uk or send C5 sae to Lesley Nicholl, c/o Robb Ferguson, Regent Court, 70 West Street, Glasgow G2 2QZ

artist January 2017

Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Royal Society of British Artists (RBA) seeks submissions of work displaying the highest standards of skill, expression and concept of draughtsmanship for its annual open exhibition. Artists over the age of 18 may enter up to six works in any medium, of which three can be original framed prints. Up to four works will be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Online submission for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Prizes include the Alfred Daniels Personal Favourite Award of six prizes of £100 each; The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine; and many other cash and arts materials prizes, tbc. All work must be for sale, minimum price £300 per work, tbc, unframed prints, £120, tbc. Confirmation of dates, terms and conditions at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: March to April 2018, tbc. Entry deadline: December 2017, tbc. Handing-in: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual prize to highlight and encourage the skills and techniques involved in creating representational painting, with a strong focus on paintings created from direct observation. Open to artists born or resident in the UK. Prizes total £30,000, with a first prize of £15,000, five runners-up prizes and a Young Artist award. Up to four original paintings may be submitted. Entry £15 per work, £8 per work for students. Exhibition dates: Spring 2018. Submissions deadline: Winter 2017. Contact: Enter online via www.lynnpainterstainersprize. org.uk or send SAE for entry pack to LPS 2018, Parker Harris Partnership, PO Box 279, Esher, Surrey, KT10 8YZ; email: lps@parkerharris.co.uk ☎ 01372 462190

Pastel Society (PS) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Pastel Society seeks the best in contemporary pastel, combining traditional skills with creative originality. Acceptable media are pastels including oil pastels, charcoal, pencil, Conté, sanguine or other dry media. Many prizes and awards, including Caran d’Ache Sponsor’s Award and £5,000 Zsuzsi Roboz Prize for artists under the age of 35; The

Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. Artists must be aged 18 or over. Up to six works may be submitted; up to four may be accepted. Maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. All works must be for sale, minimum price: £300. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registrationmallgalleries. org.uk. Regional handing-in points. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work, tbc. Full terms and conditions available at: www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: February to March 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: November 2017, tbc. Handing-in day: January 2018, tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Columbia Threadneedle Prize: Figurative Art Today Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The Columbia Threadneedle Prize promotes excellence in representational art. Artists of any nationality, aged 18 or over on January 1, 2016, currently living or working in the UK or Europe may enter. Up to six works may be submitted, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in any dimension. Paintings, drawings, original prints, sculpture, mixed-media constructions, smallscale installations and reliefs are accepted. Artists are encouraged to submit fresh, intriguing figurative or representational works that are strong and topical observations on, or interpretations of, the world around us. Works must have been completed after January 1, 2015 and must not have been exhibited in any other prize competition, in the UK or elsewhere. Online submission in the first instance at www.registration mallgalleries. org.uk. All works must be for sale, minimum price £300 or £120 for unframed prints. First prize, £20,000 plus a solo exhibition in the Threadneedle Space at the Mall Galleries; five shortlisted artists will each receive £1,000; Visitor’s Choice Award of £10,000. All details tbc, see www.mallgalleries.org.uk or columbiathreadneedleprize.com Exhibition dates: February 2018, tbc. Registration deadline: September 2017, tbc. Handing-in days: tbc. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Exhibition dates: January to February 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: December 2017, tbc. Contact: Royal Cambrian Academy, address as above. Entry forms will be available to download from: www.rcaconwy.org

Jerwood Painting Fellowships Venue: Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1, and on tour. ☎ 020 7654 0179 Details: Three outstanding painters will be awarded a bursary of £10,000 and one year of critical and professional development support from mentors. During the Fellowship year each artist will also work towards a body of new work, which will be exhibited as part of the Jerwood Visual Arts programme at Jerwood Space, London, before touring within the UK. Online entry only. Exhibition dates: 2018, tba. Entry deadline: February 2017, tba. Contact: Enter online at www.jerwoodvisualarts.org, or by contacting the Jerwood Painting Fellowships coordinator at Parker Harris: ☎ 01372 462190

John Moores Painting Prize Venue: The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. ☎ 0151 478 4199. Details: Biennial open exhibition open to artists working with paint. Entries must be original, new or recent paintings within a set size, designed to hang on walls. No preference given to levels of experience or particular practices of painting. First prize, £25,000, four prizes of £2,500 and Visitor’s Choice prize of c£2,000, tbc. Entry fee, £25 per artist, tbc. Full details at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker Exhibition dates: July to November 2018, tbc. Submissions deadline: November 2017, tbc. Contact: Register online at www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ walker or by post. Forms are available from The Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EL. Abbreviations tbc = to be confirmed tba = to be advised

Royal Cambrian Academy Open Exhibition 2018 Venue: Royal Cambrian Academy, Crown Lane, Conwy LL32 8AN. ☎ 01492 593413 Details: Open exhibition for artists and students aged 18 and over who live and work in Wales. All media, 2D or 3D, including painting, sculpture, ceramics and photography. No age limit. Up to two works may be submitted. All works must be for sale. Entry fee £15 per work, £25 for two, tbc. See website for full details.

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DATE CHANGES Information was correct at time of going to press but details and dates may change; please check with the organisers

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A SPECIAL

artist OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

PULLOUT and KEEP GUIDE

Cowbridge Halls. Unaccepted work must be collected 3-4.30pm on the same day. Contact: Download entry forms and see full details on website: www.hertfordartsociety.co.uk/ calendar/annual-open-exhibition, or contact exhibition secretary: janet.benge@talktalk.net

OPEN COMPETITIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2017

MAY Bath Society of Artists

Compiled by Deborah Wanstall

PLEASE NOTE These listings are in chronological order according to the month in which the event will run. Submission and handing-in dates are highlighted in blue

MARCH Royal Watercolour Society Contemporary Watercolour Competition 2017 Venue: Bankside Gallery, 48 Hopton Street, London SE1 9JH. ☎ 020 7928 7521 Details: Annual open competition for work made in any water-based medium on a paper support; accepted media are gouache, acrylic paint, ink and watercolour. The RWS aims to encourage a strong personal vision and an innovative approach. A maximum of six paintings may be submitted, all of which must have been completed in the last four years, maximum size 391⁄2⫻391⁄2in 100⫻100cm when framed. Fee is £14 per work, £37 for three, £46 for four, £55 for five, £59 for six; students may submit up to sthree works for £15. First prize, David Gluck Memorial Award, £750; David Gluck & RWS Award, £250; RWS Award, £500; The Artist Award of an article in a future issue of the magazine; many other art materials prizes. Online entry in first instance. Download application pack and enter at: www.banksidegallery.com www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk Exhibition dates: March 3 to 15. Submissions deadline: January 16, 12 noon. Handing-in: February 26 and 27, 11am to 5pm. Contact: Royal Watercolour Society: www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk ☎ 020 7928 7521

Details: Artists working in all media may enter up to three 2D or six 3D works. Entry fees are £13 per 2D work or £13 per two 3D works; digital submission in first instance. Please consult the application pack for full details. Exhibition dates: March 16 to April 8. Submissions deadline: February 1, 4pm. Handing-in day: March 12, 10.30am to 1pm. Contact: Download application packs from www.rbsa.org.uk or send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA.

Grosvenor Museum Open Art Exhibition Venue: The Grosvenor Museum, 27 Grosvenor Street, Chester CH1 2DD. ☎ 01244 972197 Details: The Grosvenor Museum’s 12th open art exhibition. Work may be in any visual arts medium, except giclée prints, installation, performance or work requiring electricity. Three-dimensional work is welcome. Maximum size in any dimension, 72in (182cm),

including frame. Up to three works may be submitted, fee £8 per work. First prize, £1,000; second prize of £500, third prize of £250, Visitors’ Choice prize, £100. For full details, see www.westcheshiremuseums. co.uk or contact Samantha Belsham (see below). Exhibition dates: March 9 to June 21. Handing-in days: February 24 and 25. Contact: For entry forms contact Samantha Belsham, The Grosvenor Museum, address as above. Email samantha.belsham@ cheshirewest.gov.uk

APRIL Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Annual open exhibition of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI), of the best in modern and traditional contemporary watercolour painting. Acceptable media are watercolour or water-soluble

media, including acrylic, ink or gouache painted on paper or a paper-based support, but not water-soluble oils. Artists over the age of 18 may submit up to six works, up to four may be selected. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Paintings must be framed in a light-coloured mount under glass and no larger than 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Online submission for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Numerous prizes and awards, including the Leathersellers’ Prize of £1,000 awarded to an artist aged between 18 and 30; the Matt Bruce Memorial Award for the most outstanding use lof light and colour, £500; the Schmincke Award and many other prizes. All work must be for sale, minimum price £450. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: April 6 to 22. Submissions deadline: January 6, 12 noon. Handing-in days: February 11, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

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Venue: Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1 1RU. ☎ 01207 407 3222 Details: Sixteenth annual international open submission exhibition for all artists. Work must be original in concept, design and execution. The artist must demonstrate compositional and drawing skills and the ability to use coloured pencil. Entries must not have been shown in any previous UKCPS exhibition. Each work must comprise at least 50 per cent dry coloured pencil; the remaining 50 per cent of the work may, if preferred, contain less than 50 per cent of any other medium. Awards include Best in Show, £400; Reserve best in show, £300; Best pure coloured pencil; President’s Award. Up to two works may be submitted at a fee of £20 per work. For full details, and to enter, go to: www.cp-society.uk/2017london/index.php Exhibition dates: April 25 to May 6. Closing date for online entries: February 3. Handing-in: April 24. Contact: If unable to submit online, send sae for entry form to Liz Ridley, 63 Hilden Park Road, Hildenborough, Tonbridge, Kent TN11 9BW, tel: 01732 834335. Exhibition queries, email: london2017@ukcps.co.uk

Hertford Open

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Open All Media Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353

United Kingdom Coloured Pencil Society (UKCPS)

Andrew Hird Embankment Pier & Waterloo, oil, 9⫻11in (23⫻28cm). The Artist Purchase Prize Winner in The Artist Open Competition 2016, in partnership with Patchings Art Centre

Venue: Cowbridge Halls, Cowbridge, Hertford Hertfordshire SG14 1PG. Details: 65th annual open exhibition. Any media accepted, excluding photographs; up to six 2D or 3D works may be submitted. All works must be labelled according to the instructions on the submission form. Works for hanging must be in appropriate frames with strung ‘D’ rings on the reverse. £5 submission fee per artist and £3 handling fee per work. Prizes include best abstract, best work in show, best 3D and best watercolour. Exhibition dates: April 30 to May 13. Handing-in day: April 22, 10am, at

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Venue: Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath. ☎ 01225 477233 Details: 112th annual open exhibition of works in all media except photographs; two works may be submitted. Exhibition dates: May 20 to July 15. Handing-in day: May 13, 10.30am to 4pm at the Victoria Art Gallery. Contact: Download entry forms from: www.victoriagal.org.uk or www.bsartists.co.uk, collect from gallery or send A5 sae to Vivienne Bolton, ‘Lamorna’, 5 Bath Road, Norton St Philip, near Bath, Somerset BA2 7LW.

Royal Society of Portrait Painters (RP) Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: The RP seeks submissions of new and traditional artistic models and perspectives in portraiture from artists aged 18 and over. All media accepted, including original prints but excluding sculpture. Prizes include the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture, £10,000, plus the society’s gold medal for the most distinguished painting in the exhibition; the de Laszlo Foundation Award, £3,000 plus a silver medal for the most outstanding portrait by an artist aged 35 or under; The Prince of Wales’s Award for Portrait Drawing, £2,000; the Changing Faces Prize, a £2,000 commission to produce a portrait of a person with a disfigurement for the Changing Faces collection; the Burke’s Peerage Foundation Award, £2,000 for the most classically inspired portrait in the exhibition. A maximum of three works may be submitted, up to three may be selected, maximum size 941⁄2in (240cm) in the largest dimension. Work must have been completed in the last three years and not previously exhibited in London. All work to be submitted online for preselection at www.registration mallgalleries.org.uk. Entry: £15 per work; under-35s, £10 per work. Download full terms and conditions from www.mallgalleries.org.uk Exhibition dates: May 4 to 19. Submissions deadline: January 20, 12 noon.

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Handing-in days: January 25, 10am to 5pm. Contact: Mall Galleries, as above.

Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ (RBSA) Prize Exhibition Venue: Royal Birmingham Society of Artists’ Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. ☎ 0121 236 4353 Details: Artists working in all media, except photography, may enter. Please consult the application pack for details of prizes, fees and full terms and conditions. Exhibition dates: May 18 to June 10. Submissions deadline: Tba. Handing-in day: Tba. Contact: For application pack, send sae to RBSA Gallery, 4 Brook Street, St Paul’s, Birmingham B3 1SA. Packs may be downloaded six weeks before the closing date from www.rbsa.org.uk

Staffordshire Open Venue: Shire Hall Gallery, Market Square, Stafford ST16 2LD. ☎ 01785 278345 Details: Competition for artists born, living, working or studying in Staffordshire. All work should be for sale. Up to two works may be entered in all media, including painting, sculpture, photography, film and animation, tbc. For updates please check with Shire Hall Gallery or visit: www.staffordshire.gov.uk/arts Exhibition dates: May, tbc. Handing-in: April, tbc. Contact: Shire Hall Gallery, address as above.

Society of Portrait Sculptors Venue: La Galleria Pall Mall, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London SW1 4UY. Details: The society’s 54th annual open exhibition, FACE2017, is open to all artists. The initial selection will be based on photographs. Up to two works may be submitted which may be of a head, bust or figure, human or animal, in 3D or bas relief. Three images of each work to be submitted with entry form by email, or download entry form and post with qood-quality images either on a CD or as printed photographs to the address below. First prize is the society’s prize of £1,000 for the best three-dimensional human portrait; runner-up receives the Heatherley Prize of £500; the Tiranti Prize for best exhibit from a portrait sculptor aged 30 or younger, £500; Olin-Stones Award for best bas relief sculpture, £500. Entry: £35 per work for those aged 31 and over on March 21, or £25 per work for those aged 30 and under on March 21, 2017. Exhibition dates: May 15 to 20. Entry deadline: February 10. Works accepted from initial selection to be submitted for judging on March 21.

artist January 2017

Contact: Download entry forms, which include details of how and where to submit exhibits, from www.portrait-sculpture.org or contact Robert Hunt, Honorary Secretary, Society of Portrait Sculptors, 50A Hyde Street, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 7DY. ☎ 01962 860904

Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait Prize 2017 Venue: Piano Nobile King’s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9AG ☎ 020 7229 1099 Details: Self-portrait competition intended to reflect and celebrate the traditions that inform the Borchard Collection, by encouraging the development of these ideas into British art of the 21st century. Open to amateur and professional artists living and working in the UK. One work may be submitted in any recognised medium, including drawing, painting, print and mixed media. Photographs, sculpture and film are not eligible. Entry fee, £20. Digital submission. First prize, £10,000. Full details of how and what to enter can be found at: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter Exhibition dates: May, tbc Submissions deadline: April 7. Contact: http://ruthborchard.org.uk/selfportrait-prize/how-to-enter

JUNE Wildlife Artist of the Year Venue: Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1. ☎ 020 7930 6844 Details: Tenth year of the David

Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) annual competition open to all amateur and professional artists aged 17 or over on February 20, 2017. Up to five works, completed within the last five years, may be submitted; all must be for sale. All media accepted except photography, film and digital images. Entries must correspond with one of the following seven categories: Animal Behaviour; Urban Wildlife; Hidden World; Wings, Feathered or Otherwise; Into the Blue; Vanishing Fast, and Earth’s Beautiful Creatures. All works must be for sale. Online submission preferred, or post entry form and images on CD to DSWF at the address below. £25 per work, concessions £10. First prize, £10,000; runner-up, £1,000; other category winners, £500 each and The Artist Award of a feature in the magazine. For full details and online submission, see www.davidshepherd.org Exhibition dates: June 27 to July 2. Submissions deadline: February 20. Handing-in day: tba. Contact: Entry forms can be downloaded from: www.david shepherd.org, or contact David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, Saba House, 7 Kings Road, Shalford, Guildford, Surrey GU4 8JU. ☎ 01483 272323

BP Portrait Award Venue: National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE. ☎ 020 7306 0055 Details: Competition aimed at encouraging artists to focus on and develop portraiture within their work. Entrants must be aged over 18, but there is no upper age limit. Open to artists from around

CONTINUED

the world. Work must be predominantly painted in oil, tempera or acrylic and must be on a stretcher or board, preferably framed and unglazed. No watercolours, works on paper or pastels will be considered, nor will work previously submitted for the competition. The painting should be based on a sitting or study from life and the human figure must predominate. One entry per person, cost £40. Digital selection in first instance. First prize £30,000 plus a commission worth £5,000; BP Travel Award open to all entrants; BP Young Artist Award for the best portrait painted by an artist under 30 on January 1, 2017. Exhibition dates: June 22 to September 24, then tours. Closing date for entry: January 26, 23.59pm. Handing in: March 6 to 10. Contact: Full details and entry forms available online at www.npg.org.uk/bp

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Venue: Royal Academy of Arts, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD. ☎ 020 7300 5929/5969 Details: Established in 1769, the annual Summer Exhibition is the largest open submission exhibition in the world. Valuable prizes include the £25,000 Charles Wollaston Award. Up to two works may be submitted; handling fee, £25 per work. The initial round of selection will be from digital images. Please see website for full details: https:// summer.royalacademy.org.uk Exhibition dates: June 13 to August 20. Submission deadline: February 15, 11.59pm.

Alice Boggis-Rolfe Canoes on The Dordogne, oil, 141⁄4⫻193⁄4in (36⫻50m). Winner of the Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award at the 2016 Royal Institute of Oil Painters’ exhibition

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TA01p41_43_Mike BarrSHORTER_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:10 Page 41

Get in the mood for rain Mike Barr believes that mood outweighs detail every time. Follow his tips and advice as he demonstrates an atmospheric rain-soaked cityscape in oils

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ainting rain in the city gives us a head start on mood. Some subjects are just naturally moody and rain is one of them, its hazy obscurity draws viewers in to its hidden mysteries. There is no other way to do this than get out there and take photos. I have thought about painting en plein air in the rain, but effects can be fleeting and lost forever if not photographed.

Using photographs You don't need a great camera and in fact lower resolution is often best. A blurry, unclear photo is perfect for capturing the mood of the rain. Also, you may not want to take really expensive equipment out into the elements. One of my favourite sayings is ‘say no to photographic slavery’ but it is the easiest thing in the world to fall into. I grapple with it every time I paint, whether it is from photographic reference or from real life. When we paint we continually have to remind ourselves that we are in charge and we can change things to make a better painting. I often start with a base photograph from which I take stuff away and add to from other photos – a selection of photos helps us find just what we are looking for. This is part of the fun and challenge of it all and doing a few preliminary thumbnail sketches will make all the difference.

Detail Paying too much attention to little details will not only sap the life out of your work, but out of you, too, and many reading this article will know what I mean. Just because there are 200 windows in your reference doesn't mean you have to paint them all. Suggest and imply – viewers will appreciate it and their imagination will take over where your brush left off. A painting that has details everywhere will have less or no focus at all. This is another aspect of painting that is easily

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forgotten once we are at the easel – it needs constant attention. Rainy mood is about things you can't see and viewers will be drawn to this. Let photographs take care of detail, but let paintings be all about the mood.

It’s all about grey Crack open the black paint; I can hear the protests now and have avoided black for too long myself, but I can tell you that black paint will be one of your best friends when painting the moodiness of rain. Used in conjunction with other colours including white, you will expand your grey horizons and the

The Delivery, oil on board193⁄4⫻193⁄4in (50⫻50cm). Here the focus is on the two figures. Note how simply they are painted – detail no, mood yes!

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rain is all about the greys. The darks of a rainy day are not the same darks as those of a sunny day; black will help you in this, so experiment. Limiting the colour will grow the mood. Arming yourself with 50 colours is not arming yourself for success, and I have seen many rain paintings left in ruins because they are too colourful. As

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TA01p41_43_Mike BarrSHORTER_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:10 Page 42

DEMONSTRATION Flinders Street Awash

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Reference photograph

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This subject is all about mood, so it didn’t matter that my reference photo was blurry. For the painting I used raw sienna, ultramarine, black, white, alizarin crimson, cadmium orange, yellow and viridian

STAGE ONE

The first stage of any of my paintings is rough placement guides to get the balance right. I draw with a brush using thinned paint, which leaves room for change. A pencil line, by contrast, almost demands obedience to it

‘A city scene with no people is sterile; mood can be enhanced by adding a person under an umbrella or some vehicles on the move’ in most paintings, less is more when it comes to mood. Six colours is about all you need, with perhaps a few cadmiums for highlights.

Exaggerate and get loose Sometimes, what's there in life is just not interesting enough, so the artist has to make the ordinary interesting. It is certainly one of the most enjoyable aspects of our profession. You can exaggerate the darks and make the lights shine; exaggerate the obscurity and lure the viewer into the mystery; exaggerate the buildings and make them look imposing, even if they aren't; exaggerate the figures to give them action and interest; or exaggerate the brushstrokes and bring the painting to life. Exaggerate – it's what artists do! I'd be a rich man if I had a fiver for every time I've heard an artist say they wish they could paint looser. Here are a few ways to help paint looser: l Draw with the brush and some thinned colour instead of a pencil – you will find a new freedom in your drawing and you will feel more like an artist, too. Being the part is all about feeling the part. When you put the shapes

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down in pencil you are forever trying to see the lines as the paint goes down, and this hampers flair. l Start with bigger brushes relative to the canvas size. It's amazing what a big brush can produce in such a short time and with such big results. Use smaller brushes at the end to add highlights. l Simplify the shapes. It takes a bit of doing, but once you get used to simplifying objects you are well on the way to painting looser.

Pay attention to Composition – if it doesn't look balanced in your reference, change it. Obscurity – rain is the perfect opportunity to add mystery in the unseen and partially hidden. Perspective – if you’re painting the city you can't avoid perspective so make it simple. Have one vanishing point and have all your horizontal brushstrokes generally pointing to it. It works. Scale – this is important in all painting but especially so when painting the city. Keep figures and vehicles in scale with each other and everything in scale with the surrounding buildings. Cars – simplify them greatly.

Windscreens and shadows under the car will make them work. Figures – they will make your painting work. If you have photos of figures in the rain then sketch them in a sketchbook as they are far easier to paint from sketches and you will have reference for future works.

Give it life I have seen many 'finished' paintings that still need the breath of life, and this can be as simple as adding a few birds in the sky. Signs of life, either human or otherwise, will stop your works looking like a depiction of the day after a nuclear holocaust. A city scene with no people is sterile; mood can be enhanced by adding a person under an umbrella or some vehicles on the move. Add some birds and a painting comes to life. Sometimes at the half-way point it is easy to think it is not working. Be patient. Almost every painting I do is, I feel, not working at some stage, but I know that if I press on it will more than likely come together. Push through this barrier and see what happens – stay TA positive!

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TA01p41_43_Mike BarrSHORTER_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:10 Page 43

PRACTICAL

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STAGE TWO

I began blocking in with sienna and ultramarine in a thinned mix and established a rough vanishing point. I like to get the sky in early to establish the mood and time of day. The Adelaide hills are just a blur in the distance, but already give the painting some depth. The road reflects the colour of the sky and I painted perspective lines in the buildings, making them look the part. The sky was painted with ultramarine and white, with added alizarin toward the horizon

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STAGE THREE

More detail was added, but note it is only implied detail – the cars are defined only by their windscreens, reflections and lights. The blaze of tail lights in the distance provides an interesting focal point

FINISHED PAINTING

Flinders Street Awash, oil on board, 193⁄4⫻193⁄4in (50⫻50cm). After leaving it for a day or so, I returned to the painting to add a few obscure figures and the obligatory birds

Mike Barr is a Fellow of the Royal South Australian Society of Arts and a member The Australian Guild of Realist Artists. Mike has won over 60 awards, most recently the Corporate First Prize at the 2016 Victor Harbor Rotary Art Show. You can find more of Mike’s work at www.mikebarrfineart.com

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TA01p44_46_PaulSHORTER_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:21 Page 44

Discover subjects through sketching and drawing Paul Weaver stresses the importance of regular sketching and explains why drawing plays a vital role in the creative process

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he word sketch implies a quick study, whilst ‘drawing’ suggests something more considered. Either way, I firmly believe we don’t see things fully until we draw them. Many times I’ve started sketching a view that I thought was straightforward, only to discover details I hadn’t noticed beforehand. So sketching and drawing engages you with a subject and hones your visual awareness. It is a way of understanding form, depth, perspective, texture, light and shade in visual terms. It is a way of gathering reference and testing compositions for potential paintings. Whether using pencil, pen, charcoal, palette knife or brush, drawing is the scaffolding that supports, informs and unifies the entire process.

with various tools, I also find that it provides great training for seeing and editing potential subjects for painting. The more you draw, the more you see.

Working in pen Pen drawing for me is very much about working in line. Of course, tone can be

Line and tone The fundamental language of drawing is line and tone. I use lines to find the shape, edges and proportions of forms, as well as to explore perspective and foreshortening, contours and texture. Tone is then used to develop a sense of mass, light, shade, depth and space. Line and tone can be one and the same. A line can have tonal variation, fading from light to dark and back again. Lines can be used to create tone by varying weights, layering, cross hatching or stippling, or built up to create solid masses or transitions from light to dark by scribbling, smudging and varying hand pressure on the page.

The sketchbook habit When sketching and drawing outdoors I prefer an A4 cartridge sketchpad; an off-white, 150gsm paper with a slight tooth gives the pencil some bite for effective shading. It also takes pen well and allows for washes and quick watercolours without wrinkling too much. A ring binding or stitched spine ensures pages don’t fall out when flexed or folded. I try to carry a sketchbook with me at all times. Regular drawing not only develops fluid line work and dexterity

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Sketching the same object in different media is a great way to develop a range of line and shading skills

developed by using water-soluble ink and wetting it with a brush, or the addition of ink and watercolour washes, but the basic technique is to build up tone with lines, dots and dashes. Following the contours of a shape with linear shading heightens our awareness of the surface and is a great way of describing undulations, hollows and rounded forms. I favour dip pens and brush pens; like pencils they are pressure sensitive and create expressive lines with a variety of weights in one stroke. Biros and pens with fixed nib widths are useful when a very precise, controlled line is needed. Sharpened sticks dipped in ink can produce wonderful scratchy lines with unpredictable blobs and runs, adding further mark-making potential. I start by lightly sketching the main proportions of a shape with fine, lostand-found lines and then move into shading as quickly as possible. I see 3D objects as masses of light and dark rather than forms that are ring-fenced with hard outlines. It is good practice go straight onto the paper without pencil guidelines. I don’t worry about lines being ‘wrong’; drawing is a corrective process and as long as the initial lines are kept light, they will be swallowed up and add to the calligraphy of the final form. I use pens with water-soluble ink when time is short, as they allow me to block in tone far more quickly than using cross-hatching alone. I simply lick my thumb and rub it over the drawing or use a brush and water if necessary, turning lines into a tonal wash instantly. This technique is great for sketching animals and figures as they don’t tend to stand still for very long!

Working in pencil Highly versatile and easy to edit, pencil is my first choice for sketching. I use 2B and 4B pencils, a craft knife and putty rubber. Soft B pencils are essential for shading and recording tone. With a craft knife rather than a sharpener, I shave

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TA01p44_46_PaulSHORTER_Layout 1 22/11/2016 10:03 Page 45

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION Harbour near Valencia, Spain I used pen and an A4 pad with 150gsm cartridge paper

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REFERENCE PHOTO

This photograph illustrates how l selected part of a complex scene for a more focused study

STAGE ONE TOP RIGHT I made the boats against the dark trees my subject, sketching in the key shapes and basic tones with a 0.2 pen

STAGE TWO RIGHT Once I had the composition down, I developed the tonal contrasts further, using cross hatching and varied line weights to sharpen up definition

COMPLETED SKETCH BELOW RIGHT The dark foliage is key to revealing the shape of the boats, but I used water-soluble pen to block it in, as I found line shading alone was too busy and distracting on the eye

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t

away the wood more on one side than the other, forming a point that can be angled to create different line weights, lost-and-found lines and block in tone with ease. When sharpened to an asymmetric point, the remaining wood on the other side of the pencil point acts as a brace, preventing the lead from breaking when shading, and the process of shading naturally keeps the point sharp! A putty rubber is gentle on the paper and can be used to lift out subtle highlights and negative shapes, as well as mistakes. A soft pencil is pressure sensitive, allowing me to shade and taper my lines. This gives the line form and depth, bringing it forward by making it thicker and darker or pushing it away by making it lighter and finer. Graphite can be smudged and blended with your fingers to soften tones and edges.

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TA01p44_46_PaulSHORTER_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:21 Page 46

SKETCHING

DEMONSTRATION Frenchay, Bristol I used pencil and an A4 pad with 150gsm cartridge paper REFERENCE PHOTO This demo was sketched outdoors on a bright September morning. I liked the shadows running across the road and the sunlit house made a strong focal point

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STAGE TWO

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Before the light could change I started blocking in tone and developing the distant trees and shadows on the building to reveal the sunlit form

As with pen, I plot in the main forms very lightly, checking distances and proportions before developing any tone. No amount of careful shading will hide a poor structure.

Measuring My work is representational so accurate perspective and proportions are important. When life drawing on larger A2 sheets I often work sight size, measuring heights, widths and negative spaces with the pencil held at arm’s length and one eye closed, then transferring these distances to the paper. When working A4 things usually need to be scaled down to fit the page. I start with a light, loose line drawing to

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artist January 2017

STAGE ONE

I established my eye level and then lightly roughed in the main shapes without any detail

COMPLETED SKETCH

To complete the sketch, foliage and the shadows on the road were roughed in with the side of the pencil; a few details were added to the house and passing figures placed to give scale

place the main shapes and then establish one small element in more detail, such as a window or fence post, to use as a ruler. This becomes a reference against which I check everything else. By looking at the subject and measuring this item with the pencil at arm’s length, I simply count how many fit the distance I want to check. I can then measure the height of the same object in my drawing and use that to give me the relative distances at the scale I’m drawing. All things considered, if I find my drawing is becoming tight and lacking creative energy, I let fly at the paper, go with my gut instinct and follow the ‘if it TA looks right it is right’ motto!

Paul Weaver won the Harold Riley Sketch Book Award in the 2016 Buxton Spa Prize. For further examples of Paul's work and details of his teaching DVDs, painting courses and holidays, please visit www.paulweaverart.co.uk

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TA01p48_50_James_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:34 Page 48

Be bold with marker pens James Hobbs urges you to try sketching with marker pens – they encourage you loosen up and make energetic marks to capture ‘the essence and structure of a subject’

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t's true; a thick black marker pen probably isn't the first drawing implement you are likely to turn to when you head out with your sketchbook. Dip into your drawing kit and the most likely media you will land on are pencils and thin black fineliners, or perhaps even a dip pen and ink – and often for a very good reason. These are probably best for the job in hand. There are, however, times when a marker pen can take our work in new directions, lead us to try new approaches and explore fresh themes. Each medium has its own strength, and marker pens encourage us to be bold, focus on the fundamentals, loosen up and take risks. I drew with pencils for years and have always enjoyed their organic, natural qualities. They are the high-fibre drawing option, biodegradable, ubiquitous, and easily sharpened. One of their advantages over pens is that you can see immediately how long it

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artist January 2017

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Café, marker pen and watercolour, 51⁄4⫻81⁄4in (13⫻21cm). Marker pens can be quickly built up to create a strong pattern of marks that work well with rich, saturated colours, in this case in watercolour

will last: a glance at a pen will never reveal how much ink it still contains. But I found pencils could lead to a tentative and less than emphatic approach that held my drawing back. My first move to marker pens was in part prompted by seeing some drawings owned by a neighbour which included, I was excited to discover, a small group of Frank Auerbach's works in marker pen. His drawings were small, energetic, bold and not easily read. (The Espresso Bar at the National Gallery, London, is the home of similar works by him.)

t River Exe, Devon, marker pen, 4⫻6in (10⫻15cm). Marker pens are excellent for making quick, decisive drawings in just a few lines. This scene was completed from the window of a moving train as it ran alongside the river

Vital marks Why are marker pens worth trying? Their strength is their assertiveness. There is no way to be tentative with a thick black pen. There is no way to erase them, and that encourages you to head for the best and most vital marks straight away. Detail is not their forte: they encourage us to go for the essence and structure of a subject.

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PRACTICAL Different types of pen and ink Pens come in a fantastic variety of sizes, tips and kinds of ink. The pens I have used for the drawings in this article include Letraset Promarkers (with dual bullet/chisel tips), Posca pens (opaque, water-based pigment ink pens) and Copic (refillable pens with replaceable nibs), which all come in a range of colours. Bullet nibs may be preferable to draw with, but the largest pen I have used is a Pentel chisel point measuring 14mm, a long way off the 0.1mm or thinner fineliners that are available. But the thickness of the pen you use does also, of course, depend upon the size of the paper you are working on. I tend to work in A5 or A6 sketchbooks. Have a good look at the labelling on pens when you are considering buying them. If you are intending to use watercolour with your drawing and want your drawings to remain fixed as you paint, choose a permanent ink. Permanence does not equate with archival quality. For a work that will be exhibited and more exposed to light, pigment-based inks are best.

That is not to say they are unable to convey a variety of lines and subtleties, but the intensity of blackness of their ink makes marker pens incapable of the nuances of refined shading with a pencil, for example. Tones can, however, be built up by layering marker pens in the range of greys that some are available in, and some artists even label their older pens that are running out of ink so they can be used for areas of a drawing where a softer approach is needed. We all have to find the way of working that suits us best, but I am intrigued by

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Trees, marker pen, 4⫻6in (10⫻15cm). I focused on the variety of patterns and textures of the foliage around me, loosening up with a series of quick marks that let the blackness of the ink overpower the whiteness of the paper. A single bullet-nibbed pen was used

q Hoxton Square, black and grey marker pens, 4⫻113⁄4in (10⫻30cm). A range of warm and cool grey pens, as well as colours, can add a fresh dimension to solely black and white work

how most people naturally draw with pens with widths of 0.5mm or 0.7mm, when they would never consider painting solely with small brushes. We should experiment with nibs as we do with brush types. Fine pens lead us to depict detail and time-consuming exactitude, the antithesis of the expression and energy that thicker marker pens encourage.

Loosen up There are times when it seems that the holy grail of drawing is photographic realism. One of the dangers of reading

too much into the ‘likes’ on the drawings you post on social media is that it is easy to be drawn into creating and posting relentlessly realist work. More expressive, bolder works may not garner as many online responses, but may nevertheless be best for your drawing. Exactitude may be exactly what you are after if you are, for instance, drawing someone's portrait, but working with a broader pen lets you free yourself up, and overlook the details. If you feel your work is too tight or laboured, a spell working boldly with

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MARKER PENS

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View from a Window, marker pen and watercolour, 6⫻81⁄4in (15⫻21cm). Areas of intense black can have the effect of accentuating areas of white, untouched paper. The edge of the block of flats on the left of this image, for instance, is suggested only by the sharp edge of the half-obscured trees

a broad nib can be a step towards a freer means of expression. For me that means forgoing a pencil underdrawing to place the image on the page. Working over a pencil drawing with ink can be a ball and chain on the vibrancy of an image, with all the energy and vitality of making marks turned into tentative tracing. Every mark on the paper may be impossible to remove, but that is the point: we have to adapt to every mark that is made. Each so-called ‘wrong’ mark is transformed by subsequent marks, rather than erasure. Images and subjects emerge from the page, and the human eye and brain are left to fill in the fine details that haven't been drawn. Having said that, things do not always work out well – I have plenty of less than successful images in my sketchbooks to prove it. But part of the enjoyment of drawing for me is the cut and thrust of portraying a subject so it

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Tip: Drawings in bold black ink show up particularly well on social media sites works on paper. At times it feels like a drawing is failing and then, with work, it is pulled back from the brink. I occasionally revisit images I have rejected as failed by adding a note of colour to them, or perhaps greys; there is nothing to lose. Taking risks with a drawing inevitably involves making mistakes and dealing with failure. My drawings fail most often, it seems to me, when the line overpowers the size of the paper. For me, the best drawings lead the eye on a journey around the surface, past a variety of types of mark and passages of interest to help create a sense of depth. A marker pen that is too thick for the paper size (I generally work at A5 and A6) or not used with such subtlety can overwhelm. A marker pen used too boldly can become its own enemy, just as a tentatively used pencil can. A thick black marker doesn't cost much. Slip a piece of paper behind the sheet you are drawing on in case the ink bleeds through on to the next page of the sketchbook. And then take some risks. It may not work out every time, TA but that is what drives us on.

James Hobbs is a freelance artist, journalist and author of Pen and Ink, published by Frances Lincoln, price £9.99, ISBN 9780711238046; Sketch Your World, published by Apple Press, price £12.99, ISBN 9781845435141; and Dream Draw Design My Garden, published by Rockport, price £16.00, ISBN 9781631590429. James has exhibited widely and is an Urban Sketcher (www.urbansketchers.org). For more information see www.jameshobbs.co.uk

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painting of objects or flowers is called a still life. It is a rewarding subject for research, helping to refine your competence in composition, colour and tone and providing a usefully static subject that can be studied for lengthy periods. All too often the objects chosen for a still life are random and ill considered and this lack of planning results in paintings of little interest to anyone. It does not have to be like this. All painters learn from those who have gone before and looking at still-life paintings of great artists will inspire you. If you are attracted to a painting try to work out why it interests you. Unpick the nuts and bolts of the

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Vibrant still lifes in gouache Wendy Jacob shares her tips for bringing vigour and excitement to your still-life paintings and make them compelling viewing composition. Probably several different elements will combine to thrill. Among these could be arresting subject matter or compelling and probably limited colour, a particular viewpoint or an unexpected juxtaposition of form. My preferred medium is gouache, which is opaque watercolour. I use Winsor & Newton Designer Colour in tubes, but there are other good makes

of gouache paint. I first used gouache to correct and paint over failed watercolour paintings, then I saw the exciting possibilities of the vibrant, dense colour and the opportunities the medium offered for alteration and rethinking a work that was already half completed. Gouache works on a large or small scale and is adaptable and forgiving. I love it.

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p Red Pear, gouache, 7⍝7in (18⍝18cm). Colour is the subject here, with an unusually red pear the starting point. The background colours are red, pink and orange; the small green plant brings an anomalous colour, sharpening the mood

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GOUACHE Subject matters The creative process starts with the choice of subject. Imagine your painting is telling a story in visual terms. Open your mind to shape, colour and form, choosing objects that attract you. Notice vegetable shapes, for example – bendy spring onions, bumpy broad beans, pears that lean in all directions, geometric cooking equipment counterbalancing the wobbly nature of the natural world, the mesh of sieves and wire baskets. Learn to look at the world with an eclectic eye, gathering a glossary of material to put in your paintings. Try to create a balance and be careful to put together objects, fruit or flowers that are fairly similar in size, as too great a change of scale within a painting is unlikely to work. Flowers are a popular subject but they do not always stay as still as you would like. Be prepared for your tulips to droop. Perhaps they look better like that, with a more rhythmic shape. Roses shed petals – maybe that is a metaphor you could use to effect. Notice that most artists arrange their flowers with

little or no stem showing between flowers and container.

Viewpoint The next stage is deciding how and where to place your still life. Which viewpoint will work best? Arranging it on the floor or a low table to give a bird’s-eye view will intrigue the viewer. Raising the subject to eye level eliminates the ellipse of a vessel; it will simplify and exaggerate the shapes and the spaces between, creating a dynamic image. Many still-life paintings are set on a table; this provides an excellent inner frame for the objects, holding them together within the confines of the table, which is then referring to the edges of the canvas or paper.

Light and colour Where is the light coming from? If you choose to paint a group of vessels, a single strong light source will give you a tonal range that describes the objects and dramatically enhances the threedimensional in your painting. Placing

your subject against the light – known as contre-jour – is a traditional way of achieving dramatic effect. If you are painting after dark, use a small lamp as a single light source to simplify the shadows. Your perception of colour changes during the day according to how the light falls on an object. Try putting an object near a window with the light to one side, make a small painting in the morning and then again in the afternoon. Often the late afternoon light will be the most dramatic. Mix your colour to be as close as possible to what you really see. The colour and tone will be different in the two paintings. Check your colour by putting a dab of mixed paint on a scrap of paper and holding it against the object or area you are painting. In the winter colours will look cool and often be grey, sombre and subdued, while in the summer the warm light gives a natural glow to your work. Colour is as much a part of the subject as the objects and is vital in planning your painting. Consider using coloured paper or patterned textiles when setting out to make an interesting and vibrant image. Limiting your colours and keeping them in a narrow tonal range makes for a harmonious painting. Colours will rarely be exactly as they come out of the tube or pan, and will vary at different points on the object or background depending where the light is falling.

Space Paint the objects within the space they inhabit. Air and space is implied by keeping in mind the relationship of one object to another, the spaces between objects and the area behind. Don’t paint the objects in isolation and then paint the background later, rather work over the whole painting, relating one edge and colour to the one next to it. Once you have decided what you would like to include in your painting make several small, quick drawings of alternative compositions, moving things around and changing your position until you find the most interesting and clear composition. Will it be a very spare composition against a simple backdrop, or a cornucopia with a landscape beyond, through a window or open door?

Interior Exterior, gouache, 133⁄4⫻11in (35⫻28cm). The still life on the table in the foreground leads the viewer to the landscape beyond the window

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A close-up of your subject will have immediate impact while a distant view will make the air and space a large part of the subject, intriguing the viewer and compelling them to look again and again. Sitting near your subject and its background is vital if you are making a closely observed painting. I often place my objects within a large cardboard box with two sides cut away to allow light to enter from one side. I cover the inside with fabric or coloured paper. The contained image is much easier to refer to. Alternatively, place a drawing board covered with cloth or paper on a small table or chair and lean against a wall, and set your still life against that. For a more expansive painting, you could look across a room to a door or window opening to a garden or landscape and invite the audience to enter the scene and inhabit the space. This will require more preliminary drawing and preparation, as you will need to edit

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extraneous detail to create a coherent composition.

In a nutshell Each painting should have a purpose. This could perhaps record the remains of a meal on the table or be an ordered and thoughtfully organised grouping of objects. Always keep your artist’s eye open for a subject to bewitch the viewer. Once you have decided what you would like to include in your painting make several small quick drawings of alternative compositions, moving things around and changing your position until you find the most interesting and clear composition and make the most of colour as a vital ingredient in the planning of your painting. A still-life painting is the painter’s equivalent of a poem. Ideas, descriptions and emotions are distilled into an intense and visionary experience in the best of still -life painting just as they are in a poem. TA

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Nasturtium and Inkpot, gouache, 8⫻8in (20⫻20cm). The stems of these flowers are hidden, emphasising their importance in the composition. Yellow and orange and their complementary blues and violets contribute to a harmonious painting

Wendy Jacob is a member and a past vice president of the Royal Watercolour Society. Her work has been selected for the Sunday Times Watercolour Competition, the RA Summer Exhibition, the New English Art Club and the ING Discerning Eye. www.wendyjacob.com

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THE A-Z OF COLOUR Julie Collins looks at the colours in nature and sets practical exercises to inspire you to learn how to use them

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Julie Collins studied at the University of Reading. Her work has been shown at the ING Discerning Eye, where she has won the regional award, and she has received many awards from the Royal Watercolour Society. In 2016 she won first prize in the Watercolour Award at the Royal West of England Academy. Julie has written six art books. For more details about her exhibitions and workshops, see www.juliecollins.co.uk

is for nature

very colour you need for your work can be seen in nature. And even more fascinating is the fact that nature organises birds and plants to have complementary colours. Then, if we look at landscape painting, working outside is so inspirational and you literally have colours first hand. You can paint a scene and, an hour later, the light will have changed, giving you a new set of colours to consider. Make a list of subjects to set you off thinking about the colours found in nature. I have started a short list here – see what you can add to it: trees, leaves, flowers, coral reef, shells, ocean, water, river, waterfall, stream, feathers, birds, animals, fur, insects, fish, sun, moon, stars, sunset, sunrise. There are so many more inspiring colours and subjects in nature. The examples I have painted here are the ones that have excited and inspired me.

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Pheasant Last November I was fortunate to be given a pheasant to paint from life. Much to my son’s horror, the pheasant hung in the garage for two weeks and was taken in and out of the studio each day to be drawn and painted. This was inspirational for me as the colours in this magnificent bird are fantastic. Right and below are two small watercolour studies I made where I had to ask myself which colours I could see in the bird feathers.

Colours and mixes used for pheasant studies

Winsor blue (red shade)

Winsor Red

Winsor blue (green shade) + raw sienna

Winsor violet + burn sienna

Burnt sienna + raw sienna

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Burnt sienna

Raw sienna

Winsor violet

Winsor blue (green shade)

Winsor blue (green shade) + burnt sienna

Raw sienna pale

Winsor violet + burnt sienna + Winsor green (yellow shade)

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Trees The silver birch tree painting, right, is inspired by nature as I am particularly fascinated by the colour in this tree. The colour in the silver birch dictated the background for the painting, as I wanted to complement the silver blue of the trees.

Background colours and mixes used for silver birch

Winsor red

Light red

New gamboge yellow

Winsor red 75% + light red 25%

Light red 75% + Winsor red 25%

New gamboge yellow + light red

Dark

Dark

Dark

Pale

Pale

Pale

Tree colours and mixes used Light red + French ultramarine blue Burnt sienna

Dark

French ultramarine blue

Pale

Burnt sienna + French ultramarine blue

Sky colours and mixes used Dark (bluer)

Pale (bluer)

Dark (browner)

Pale (browner)

Skies Skies are such a marvellous subject. I live by the sea, so I notice many sky changes every day. Here is one example of a sky made using a limited palette of just two colours – Indian red and Winsor blue (red shade)

Winsor blue (red shade)

Indian red

Winsor blue (red shade) + Indian red – use more blue

Winsor blue (red shade) + Indian red – half and half

Winsor blue (red shade) + Indian red – use more red

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W AT E R C O L O U R P A P E R : P A R T 1 O F 3

A watercolour paper to suit you In the first of a new three-part guide to watercolour papers, Ian Sidaway imparts some useful advice that will help you to choose a watercolour paper that works for you

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he complex alchemy that occurs when dilute watercolour washes meet paper should not be underestimated. The way the paint settles, the way it moves and dries, the ability to modify the wash once it is dry, the intensity of the colour once dry, the feel of the brush moving across the paper and the way in which the paint is sucked from it, the ability to vary marks and create textural effects, erase pencil marks, remedy mistakes and remove paint, the crispness of the brushstroke edges, the degree of lateral bleed and the time it takes a watercolour wash to dry will all vary from paper to paper. So, given that there are possibly hundreds of watercolour papers available, all with slightly different characteristics, it is small wonder that it can be difficult and confusing to choose the right one. What follows is not intended as an in-depth look at paper making but simply an overview of the most important factors.

Price The old adage that ‘a poor workman blames his tools’ holds true in most cases. Choose the wrong watercolour paper and you will find that the painting experience is one of frustration, and the results will fall far short of expectations. There is of course no wrong watercolour paper; today all papers are of very good quality and most do what the manufacturers say they do. But some papers are far easier to use than others. The trick is to match the paper to your ability and modus operandi. Even seasoned watercolour artists can struggle when using an unfamiliar paper – it has certainly happened to me. Do not be seduced by cost. The most expensive paper is not necessarily the best for you. From one popular art supply store a single 22⫻30in sheet of 300lb Arches paper costs £12.69; a same-size sheet of 250lb Bockingford

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costs £2.15. Both are very good papers, used by countless watercolour artists and many, not unreasonably, would say that the Arches is a far superior paper. But in use they behave very differently and whereas I have difficulties when using the Arches paper I have no such problems with the less expensive Bockingford. This, and the Atlantis watercolour paper sold in large sheets, are currently the two papers I use regularly. That said, do not be put off from trying expensive papers; the expense is relative.

Manufacturing processes Watercolour papers are made in two ways, the process and chemistry of which is not as straightforward as this brief description might imply. Mouldmade papers are manufactured on a cylinder mould machine using cellulose pulp usually extracted from wood, although cotton cellulose is added by some manufacturers. Handmade papers are also made using a mould, which is only a little larger than a single finished sheet. The cellulose pulp is invariably made from cotton or linen and, due to the shape of the cellulose fibres, is much stronger than wood cellulose. The surface finish is achieved by the texture of the mould screen mesh, the felt on which the paper dries and the rollers through which the paper is or isn’t passed. So-called machine-made papers are made on a fourdrinier machine. All papers are sized, if not they would behave like blotting paper and be impossible to work on. Surface or tub sizing is done by passing the sheet through a bath of size during manufacture, which leaves a thin skin over the paper surface. Internal sizing is achieved by mixing the sizing agents into the pulp before it is made into sheets. Sizing is very important as it affects the way the paint moves across the surface of the paper, the degree to which water penetrates the paper fibre,

the colour intensity once the paint is dry and the drying time. All of which have a direct influence on the work experience and process

Surface textures Watercolour papers are divided into three surface types. Rough surface papers are created by allowing handmade sheets to dry without pressing, whereas the Rough surface on mould-made papers is achieved by pressing the paper between rough drying felts. Rough sheets can be very rough and, despite sizing, can be very absorbent, which can help achieve smooth consistent flat washes. Granulation effects are easily achieved when coarse pigments settle into the paper texture. Textural effects are also easily produced using dry brush techniques, or techniques that only apply paint to the paper texture ‘peaks’. Due to absorption, removing paint by rewetting can be difficult, however these papers are tough and can withstand scrubbing. Washes on rough paper can take a long time to dry and due to absorption colours can lack intensity. The Cold Pressed or NOT finish is achieved by placing handmade papers in a mechanical press, whilst mouldmade papers are passed through feltcovered rollers. The slight texture that is left is conducive to most techniques and subjects; lack of heavy texture means pen, pencil and coloured pencil take smoothly to the surface. NOT surface papers are all-round papers, suitable for most subjects. Hot Pressed or HP papers have the smoothest surface, achieved on both handmade and mould-made papers by passing the paper between highly polished, heated metal rollers. These papers are often less absorbent than Rough or NOT papers. The paint dries on the surface, which helps colours retain their intensity once dry. However,

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PRACTICAL

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Paper surfaces

Left to right. Hot Pressed, NOT Rough

q Rough papers compared:

Left to right: Arches Aquarelle, Bockingford

‘Rough surface papers are created by allowing handmade sheets to dry without pressing, whereas the Rough surface on mould-made papers is achieved by pressing the paper between rough drying felts’ flat washes can be difficult to achieve as the paint tends to puddle and the surface can feel slippery when applying washes. Despite lack of surface texture, granulation effects can be amplified. Surfaces are easily scratched or damaged, which can show up when paint is applied. Because there is little absorption dry paint can often easily be lifted by rewetting and blotting. Linear drawing tools move easily across the paper surface and this is the paper of choice for very fine detailed work. Do not take paper surface descriptions at face value. Whilst it makes a certain degree of sense for manufacturers to describe a paper surface as Hot Pressed (HP), Not Hot

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Pressed (Cold Pressed or NOT), and Rough, for convenience, surfaces vary from one manufacturer to another and can also vary slightly according to their weight. Heavier weight papers by the same manufacturer of the same type are invariably slightly rougher. Papers are made with a so-called right side to work on; this is the side on which any watermark or embossed mark reads correctly, or the side that has the most random pattern or texture. That said, you can use either side, depending on personal preference.

Stretching To stretch or not to stretch, and how? There are countless step-by-step

descriptions of how to stretch paper and I am not about to describe the process again here. Suffice to say I would stretch all sheets of watercolour paper except the very heaviest. Wet fibres expand, causing the paper to cockle. The tension caused by stretching the paper makes sure that as the paper dries it becomes flat again. Whilst cockling is a natural process it makes wash control very difficult, leading to unwanted puddles and a heap of frustration – working on a flat surface makes the process much easier. But importantly flooding the paper or sponging water over its surface as part of the stretching process softens or dissolves the surface sizing slightly,

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W AT E R C O L O U R P A P E R : P A R T 1 O F 3

‘Colour will look more intense, vibrant and cool on intensely white papers; on duller or creamier papers the paint colour will look more subdued, less strident and warmer’

Paper colours Left to right: Bockingford NOT, Arches NOT, Saunders Waterford Rough, Saunders Waterford High White NOT, Botanical Ultra Smooth, Canson Montval

making the paper more receptive to the watercolour washes. So if using heavy-weight sheets un-stretched, you might find sponging the surface with clean water prior to paint application helpful. Paradoxically, the thinner papers are the most difficult to stretch as once wet they can cockle alarmingly; I can only say practice makes perfect.

Weight The thickness of paper is indicated by its weight, which is a measurement of the weight of a ream (500 sheets) indicated in pounds, or the weight of a square metre of a single sheet measured in grams, indicated as gsm. The metric measurement is a more precise measurement as a ream can vary in weight due to variation in the size of the sheets of paper. Standard machine weights are 90lb (190gsm), 140lb (300gsm), 260lb (356gsm), 300lb (638gsm), and 400lb (850gsm).

Colour The surface colour of choice for watercolour painting is white. In traditional transparent watercolour painting it is the amount of light that reflects back from the paper surface through the watercolour wash that dictates the colour or wash tone. A

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transparent wash with little added pigment will appear light in tone; a wash with a great deal of added pigment will appear darker in tone. High whites and highlights are usually achieved by preserving the white of the paper, done by keeping the desired area free of paint, either by masking or painting around it (some artists choose to use Chinese white or white gouache). However, some papers are lighter or whiter than others. The choice is personal. In general terms, colour will look more intense, vibrant and cool on intensely white papers; on duller or creamier papers the paint colour will look more subdued, less strident and warmer. The colour of a sheet is dictated by a number of factors, including the type of cellulose and water used to make the pulp, the temperature used to cook the pulp and the sizing. Optical brightening agents are sometimes used to lighten the paper colour.

Formats Paper can be bought in various formats – single sheets, rolls, pads and so on. I would always counsel buying single sheets. These offer much better value for money, most retailers offer discounts for quantity, they can easily be cut to

size and, if you decide that you do not like the characteristics of a certain brand, you will not be left with a pad of paper that you are reluctant to use. Whilst manufacturers aim for consistency within each type of paper there can be very slight differences in each batch or run of paper made. Some artists notice this, others do not, but for the most part this should not TA cause any problems.

Ian Sidaway studied graphic design. Throughout the 1980s and ‘90s he painted portraits to commission but now concentrates on the landscape. He is a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours. http://iansidaway.co.uk

Next month: Ten sheets of watercolour paper are put to the test

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I M P R O V E YO U R F I G U R E PA I N T I N G : 6 O F 6

Backgrounds Ann Witheridge brings her series to a close by showing you how the environment in which you place your figure can alter the mood and composition of your painting Ann Witheridge

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efore the 19th century figures were practically never painted by themselves or as subjects in their own right. Much like landscapes, they had to be imbued with historical, mythological, allegorical or religious themes. The Greek gods and the myths surrounding them offered the artists and, more relevantly, their patrons, a wonderful opportunity to display flesh under the guise of good taste and erudition. Even the biblical tales of Bathsheba and Susanna offered opportunity for nudity under the discreet umbrella of disseminating the Christian message. In the past the background and environment surrounding the figure were a necessary part of the painting; today we are free from the constraints of narrative.

The background as landscape There are many similarities between painting a figure and painting a landscape or still life. When we paint a landscape it is important to key the sky first. The whole mood and the colours we see are influenced by the sky, the time of day and the weather. Imagine the difference in the colours you see at sunrise, on a bright sunny day or a

u Adding an imagined background to the figure

Ann Witheridge Woodland Nymph, oil on canvas, 31⍝23in (78.5⍝58.5cm). With this painting, I worked alongside my students. They were doing a long project to push the pose and really understand the values and the gesture. I thought it would be fun to add a landscape from my imagination to give the painting more depth and to add a narrative. I added a copper urn in the foreground to emphasise the form and as a contrast to the trees

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Painting figures in the environment

Ann Witheridge In the Studio, oil on canvas, 16⫻12in (40.5⫻30.5cm). My girls were standing at my easel, painting and, as I had been painting all morning, I decided to paint them too. We had a lovely afternoon, all feeling we were accomplishing so much. The background is very loose, and the painting definitely says more about my girls, but without the easel and the paintings they stuck to the wall behind, it would have lost its narrative and balance q

Adding figures to the landscape

Ann Witheridge Morning Walk, oil on canvas, 5⫻11in (12.5⫻28cm). I find it easier to add a background to a figure painting than to add a figure to a landscape. I have always wanted to place a figure in a landscape and paint from life, but haven’t yet had the opportunity. However, I have done many paintings of my daughters in landscapes. They are obviously moving targets but you can still capture the idea, and painting them from life adds a freshness and vigour that you cannot achieve when painting from a photograph. The girls are just a silhouette against the morning light. Is the painting about the landscape or the figures? Very little information is given about the figures; I only used one brush with one tone. Conversely the landscape is relatively detailed in colour and information. And yet the painting is more a morning walk than it is a landscape

cloudy day. The colours or clouds may be so busy and seductive that little is needed in the landscape but a silhouette. Alternatively the sky may be grey and dull, so that the colours in the trees and buildings sing out and appear more intense. In figure painting the background is the equivalent of the sky, that is to say the background is equally important in figure painting. The flesh tones will appear very different according to the background; I personally prefer to set a model up in front of a cooler background. I think we generally find it easier to find warm colours than cools. If you have a cool colour in the background it is easier to see where you can also find them in the figure.

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Likewise the props – scarves and drapes can help you find corresponding colours and contrasting textures and edges in the figure. The background and props can help you find geometric patterns and shapes to abstract from or intensify the forms of the figure. Values too, whether keyed down or dramatic, can aid the figure. A painting can be more bland if the background is one value – say dark and the figure is light. It is always more compelling to have variety, so that the background appears lighter when the figure is dark and darker when the figure is light, giving more form and a greater sense of volume to the figure. This variety of values in the relationship to the figure also helps manipulate the edges, so

that some edges melt into the background and others are crisper.

The focus It is easier to paint a figure without any attention to the background. However, it is a great exercise and discipline to add a background and props, using the props to enhance the figure. The focus of your painting is the figure, so how can we use the background to enhance and not detract from it? Often it is easier to say too much than too little, to over analyse all the fabric folds, and yet the role of the painter is to be selective and to make the necessary decisions and edits. You don’t need to be a slave to the background; some painters add the heaters and the tape to the images,

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u India Amos At the Barre, pastel on Fabriano paper, 141⁄2⫻131⁄2in (37⫻34cm). ‘This drawing was made at the Central School of Ballet in London. I wanted to convey the grand sense of space in the room and the beautiful shapes made by the dancers within that space. To create a focus I placed the central figure against the window to give a contre-jour effect, which emphasised the lovely contour of her figure. I used Degas' technique of cropping the background figures to enhance the sense of the figures moving into and out of the picture frame. Altogether these techniques help convey the way in which the dancers moved around their rehearsal space.'

being utterly literal, but surely the painting is not about the heaters. The role of the artist is to guide the viewer and arrest their attention, not overinform them. A well-painted background can completely change the dynamic and focus of the painting. A well-proportioned, anatomically accurate figure study is hard enough. Ironically, adding an environment can direct attention away from the technical correctness of the figure to the environment of the painting as a whole, so the painter can be broader with the figure. Use the environment to make you think differently about the figure – placing and designing within a context that balances. Figure painting is a wonderful art form. It offers so many possibilities for the painter in terms of understanding proportion, gesture, anatomy and composition. It can also open up so many dialogues in terms of flesh tones, balance, background and narrative. It is no wonder that figure painting was so much part of the foundation of artists’ education and practice; for what we learn and gain from painting the figure, whether stand-alone or in an environment, with drapery or in a setting, can be used for any sort of painting, from abstract, concept, still life, fashion and so much more. A knowledge and grasp of figure painting is the cornerstone to an artist’s fuller TA artistic dialogue.

Ann Witheridge founded London Fine Art Studios. She has taught figure drawing and painting for over 15 years and written for art periodicals over the course of her teaching. India Amos has been working with Ann for six years and is head of figure drawing and coordinates all the models at London Fine Art Studios. For more information see www.londonfineartstudios.com

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p

Using the drapery to readjust your approach to the figure

Ann Witheridge Kimono, oil on canvas, 10⫻12in (25.5⫻30.5cm). In this sketch I tried to simplify the figure as much as her kimono, reducing both to four patterns of value and colour. It is surprisingly much harder to simplify your value and colour range. I tried to keep the colour notes on the figure as blocky as those on the kimono; my variety is with the handling of the edges rather than of values or chroma

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Be adventurous Knowing how to paint the right marks in the right place at the right time will set you on the path to creating a great watercolour. Terry Jarvis explains all

W

e all want to paint great watercolours but after producing a successful work we sometimes find that the next one fails miserably. The tones are wrong, the drawing is not what it could be, the composition is not up to scratch, and so on. So what happened? Sometimes we become slack, sometimes it is our ego prancing around, telling us we have reached the pinnacle of success. An old friend used to say that ‘ego’ stands for ‘edge the good stuff out.’

Keep learning Your goal must be to continually strive to paint better images, images that tell the viewer a story. Each time you lift a brush, be ready to learn – it will keep you grounded. There is no substitute for hard work: challenge yourself to go somewhere new in your painting experience, something you may have felt a little insecure about trying – a mood or atmosphere, a subject matter.

Whatever it is, embrace the fear factor and have a go! You will find that you will come out the other end having developed as an artist.

Material details For me watercolour is the most expressive medium and I can always find a bucket of water, wherever I am; watercolours dry quickly, travel lightly and safely. Make sure your equipment is at the ready – there is nothing worse than battling with worn brushes. I use Schmincke watercolours and have a selection of HP, NOT and Rough paper in a variation of weights and sizes. I sketch with a 2B pencil; it’s not hard enough to make a dent in your paper, but will make a distinctive mark. Always draw lightly, so that you do not have to erase heavy pencil marks before you place your washes. Use a kneadable eraser, you can dab it over your drawing to reduce heavy graphite marks, and knead it into

sharper edges or larger blobs. I draw every day, putting down ideas, shapes, compositions and value sketches, and write down how I feel about the subject – the more you draw, the better you get.

Watercolour techniques There are four major marks that we have at our disposal to make a great watercolour work. Wet-in-wet: Place a watery wash then, while still very wet, place another watery wash of another colour into it. You will get an explosion of soft uncontrolled edges. Damp-into-wet: Place a creamy wash over a watery wash that has dried so that the shine has dropped off. This will give a soft-edged controlled mark, not explosive like wet-in-wet. Graduated wash: Place a watery wash to halfway, pick up the bead of water that will be there, then add another watery wash to the edge of the last wash while it is still damp. You will have a beautiful soft transition of colour. Dry brush: hard, sharp-edged marks that are usually placed in your work towards the end of the painting or move a wash around a section to leave some white paper. Paper must be dry.

Points to remember: • Watercolours dry lighter, and acrylics dry darker. You may have to adjust your tones as your painting dries. • Start with your lightest tones, finish with your darker tones. • Start soft and wet, finish with harder and dryer marks. • Make your marks in the right sequence.

To sum up, to paint a great watercolour, you should:

Parking Lot – Simi – Greek Islands, watercolour, 111⁄2⫻151⁄2in (29⫻39cm). I often tutor art holidays on the Greek islands and this group of boats reminded me of a parking lot! The boats gleamed in the sunlight against a strong background that pushed them forward. The light, colour and arrangement of masts and ropes was wonderful – it’s moments like these that a voice inside me says ‘give me a brush!’ p

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1 Write down how you feel about the subject you want to paint. 2 Make a great drawing and establish your composition. 3 Have artist-quality paints, paper and brushes at the ready. 4 Consider your tones – how dark or how light things are and how they relate to each other.

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p Frosty Morning – Australia, watercolour, 133⁄4⫻213⁄4in (35⫻55cm). I loved every moment as the early morning light streamed through and across the frozen ground. The challenge in the plein-air painting was to capture the coolness of the frost juxtaposed with the warm morning sunshine – complementary colours connected with a good tonal range will always do it! t Sorting the Catch – Greek Islands, watercolour, 151⁄2⫻111⁄2in (39⫻29cm). To tell the story of the fisherman sorting his catch of the day it was important to link him to the boats in the background. Finding the texture in the old carpet under his tray was a challenge I enjoyed too. Notice there are cooler colours in the background for recession, and warm colours and stronger tones in the foreground to draw the fisherman forward

5 Consider colour temperature. Cool colours recede and give depth (cerulean is a very cool blue); warm colours advance and will draw a foreground forward. 6 Consider the edges in your painting. Soft edges recede, harder edges advance. 7 Think about consistency as you mix washes and always consider how damp your paper is before you make your mark. 8 Consider your timing; for instance, when do you place a stronger wash onto a watery paper surface?

Be an adventurer I consider plein-air painting the best way to paint and it’s the quickest way I know to develop as an artist. A good way to do this is to go on a painting tour – this is an opportunity you will remember for the rest of your life and it will certainly give you confidence and experience. When is a watercolour finished? Usually when you start to fiddle. Happy painting – may your TA washes be many!

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Terry Jarvis exhibits widely; he has won many awards and his work is held in collections worldwide. He regularly tutors workshops in his home country of Australia and artist holidays. He will be in Tuscany at the Watermill in Posara from July 1 to 8; find out more at http://watermill.net. www.terryjarvis.com.au

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TA01p65_Books shorter_Layout 1 16/11/2016 14:52 Page 71

ART BOOKS & DVDS Reviewed by Henry Malt

Drawing Masterclass: Trees

Glyn Macey’s World of Acrylics

Colour Mixing Guide: Oils

Denis John-Naylor Books on trees do not come along with great frequency, so this is welcome on that basis alone. It is also magnificently comprehensive and covers not only most of the tree species you will find in Britain, but also, more generally, shapes and structures. Denis John-Naylor explains and demonstrates ways of dealing with much of the detail: foliage, both as cover and individual leaves, bark, trunks, branches and twigs. The result will aid you whether you want to make a portrait of a tree, have it as a major landscape feature, or simply include a distant line of trees. The only drawback is a slight coarseness to the illustrations, which can obscure detail. Although the book is about drawing, much of the description and analysis could be applied to any medium and the demonstrations dealing with how a picture builds up are particularly useful. It’s definitely worth a look. Search Press £12.99, 112 pages (P/B) ISBN 9781782210931

Glyn Macey Glyn’s enthusiasm for his subject, and his medium, and his dynamic style of working and vibrant colours can only inspire and encourage you to try something similar yourself. His second, this book is as much about that way of working as it is about painting in acrylics itself. This is a sensible approach, as to restrict such a performer to dry schoolroom lessons would be to miss the point entirely. That said, you can learn a lot from working with this. The exercises and demonstrations are all there, but the layout tells you immediately to prepare for something different. There are no serried ranks of only-slightly-different-stage illustrations. Artworks, ideas and colours all leap off every page. It’s a total immersion, but some careful design work keeps everything clear. Search Press £15.99, 144 pages (P/B) ISBN 9781782211174

Julie Collins Colour mixing guides tend to fall into the category of either very simple or exhaustingly complicated. This is one of the former. At only 48 pages, there’s no room for every possible combination of colours and nuance of tint, but the tradeoff is that you won’t have to search through pages of almost identical blotches to find what you want. Julie Collins also condenses the apparatus of theory and practice into what we might call packed-lunch size sections. Her look at primary, secondary and tertiary colours is easy to understand and she also deals with warm and cool colours and the importance of tone. The final and main section is a straightforward catalogue of mixes organised by the predominant colour and showing the effect of tinting with white. Search Press £6.99, 48 pages (P/B) ISBN 9781782210566

Lessons in Classical Painting

Pen & Ink

Learn Drawing Quickly Sharon Finmark Hot on the heels of Hazel Soan’s volume on oils comes this from Sharon Finmark, and the evidence so far bodes well for the series. The idea of quick instruction for busy people may stick in the throats of those who have spent a lifetime studying and it’s certainly true that there is no substitute for practice and experience. However, it’s also worth blowing away the mystique with which insiders can all too often surround their pet subject. Even if you don’t believe that drawing is something that can be taught, there’s much to like in this short and concise volume. Quite apart from the variety of media and subject matter, from flowers to figures by way of landscapes and still lifes, short lessons and exercises completed without loitering can bring freshness to your work that adds a welcome reboot. Batsford £9.99, 112 pages (H/B) ISBN 9781849943109

Juliette Aristides Juliette Aristides uses classical methods and artists as an aid to study. Her approach is that of the atelier method: working in the studio of a master, in the manner of an apprentice, to learn the craft as well as the art and to gain a solid grounding in technique. Her books require reading as well as looking but repay a lot of hard (if enjoyable) work. The tone is nicely balanced for part- rather than full-time students. In this sort of book, quality of reproduction is paramount and Watson Guptill don’t let us down. The mixture of old master works and contemporary interpretations provides a level of contemporary relevance that ensures the reader is never out of touch. Watson Guptill £20, 240 pages (H/B) ISBN 978-1607747895

James Hobbs Books on pen & ink have tended to concentrate on traditional approaches. The subtitle of this vibrant, fresh and stimulating volume is ‘contemporary artists, timeless techniques’ and it carries an intriguing promise. Can a classic medium be brought up to date? You bet it can. The inclusion of many different contributors requires careful curation and James Hobbs has done an excellent job. The whole has a homogeneity that provides a clear narrative. The book is divided into nearly 200 short sections covering every aspect of drawing, both technical and creative, from colour and washes to spaces and viewpoints. It’s an exciting offering that promises and provides much and is a joy to handle. Frances Lincoln £9.99, 208 pages (P/B) ISBN 9780711238046

Some of the books reviewed here can be purchased from our online bookshop: visit www.painters-online.co.uk/store and click on the link for books www.painters-online.co.uk

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January Exhibitions _Exhibitions for Vivien 21/11/2016 09:18 Page 62

EXHIBITIONS

GALLERY OPENING TIMES AND EXHIBITION DATES CAN VARY; IF IN DOUBT, PHONE TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT

LONDON

Flowers

☎ 020 7930 6844

Griffin Gallery

By Popular Demand; revisits past winners of the Columbia Threadneedle Prize Visitors’ Choice Award. FBA Futures; January 9 to 20.

90 York Way N1. ☎ 020 7229 1099 William Coldstream and Euan Uglow; until January 14.

The National Gallery

Trafalgar Square WC2. ☎ 020 7747 2885 Beyond Caravaggio; until January 15. Australia’s Impressionists; until March 26.

Piccadilly W1. ☎ 020 7300 8000 Abstract Expressionism; until January 2. Intrigue: James Ensor by Luc Trumans; until January 29.

National Portrait Gallery

Saatchi Gallery

Bankside Gallery

82 Kingsland Road E2. ☎ 020 7920 7777 Small is Beautiful; until January 7.

British Museum

21 Evesham Street W11. ☎ 0208 424 3203 Griffin Art Prize; open selection competition, until December 23.

48 Hopton Street SE1. ☎ 020 7928 7521 Mini Picture Show; December 9 to January 22. Great Russell Street WC1. ☎ 020 7930 027 French portrait drawings from Clouet to Courbet; until January 29.

Dulwich Picture Gallery

College Road SE21. ☎ 020 8693 5254 Adriaen van de Velde: Dutch Master of Landscape; until January 15.

Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art

39a Canonbury Square N1. ☎ 020 7704 9522 War in the Sunshine: The British in Italy 1917–18; January 13 to March 19.

Guildhall Art Gallery

Guildhall Yard EC2. ☎ 020 7332 3700 Victorians Decoded: Art and Telepathy; until January 22.

Llewellyn Alexander

124 The Cut, Waterloo SE1. ☎ 020 7620 1322 Christmas Exhibition; Pamela Kay, John Yardley, Geoffrey Wynne, Lisa Graa Jensen, until January 7.

Mall Galleries The Mall SW1.

St Martin’s Place WC2. ☎ 020 7306 0055 Picasso Portraits; until February 5.

The Queen’s Gallery

Buckingham Palace. ☎ 020 7766 7301 (tickets) Portrait of the Artist; images of artists in the Royal Collection, until April 17.

Piano Nobile

Tate Britain

Millbank SW1. ☎ 020 7887 8888 The Turner Prize 2016; until January 2. Paul Nash; until March 5.

Royal Academy of Arts

Duke of York’s HQ, King’s Road SW3. ☎ 020 7811 3070 Painters’ Painters; until February 28.

Tate Modern Bankside SE1. ☎ 020 7887 8888 The EY Exhibition: Wifredo Lam; until January 8.

.

REGIONS BATH Victoria Art Gallery Bridge Street. ☎ 01225 477244 Peter Brown: A Painter’s Travels; new oil paintings, December 3 to February 19.

BIRMINGHAM Royal Birmingham Society of Artists

4 Brook Street, St Paul’s Square. ☎ 0121 236 4353 Members and Associates Exhibition; until December 24.

BOURNEMOUTH Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum

Estorick Collection, London

East Cliff Promenade. ☎ 01202 451858 Meeting Modernism: 20th Century Art in the RussellCotes Collection; until April 24.

BRISTOL Royal West of England Academy

Queen’s Road, Clifton. ☎ 0117 9735129 Strange Worlds: the Vision of Angela Carter; December 10 to March 19.

CALVERTON Patchings Art Centre

Oxton Road. ☎ 0115 965 3479 Barn@Christmas; watercolours, until December 24.

CHELTENHAM The Wilson

Sydney Carline Destruction of an Austrian Machine in the Gorge of the Valley of Brenta, 1918, oil on canvas 373⁄4⫻431⁄2in (96⫻110.5cm)

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Clarence Street. ☎ 01242 237431 The Last Word in Art?; with David Hockney, Richard Hamilton, Tracey Emin, Jeremy Deller, Ian Hamilton Finlay, until January 8.

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January Exhibitions _Exhibitions for Vivien 22/11/2016 09:36 Page 63

CHICHESTER Pallant House Gallery

9 North Pallant. ☎ 01243 774557. The Mythic Method: Classicism in British Art 1920–1950; until February 19.

EASTBOURNE Towner Art Gallery

College Road. ☎ 01323 434670 Towards Night; , until January 22.

EXETER Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery

Yves Klein; Edward Krasiński; Cécile B Evans; until March 5.

Walker Art Gallery

William Brown Street. ☎ 0151 478 4199 Looking North; until February 26.

MANCHESTER Manchester Art Gallery

Moseley Street, ☎ 0161 235 8888 The Edwardians; until December 31.

MARGATE Turner Contemporary

Queen Street. ☎ 01392 265858 Hiroshige’s Japan; woodblock prints, until April 16.

Rendezvous. ☎ 01843 233000 JMW Turner: Adventures in Colour; until January 8.

FALMOUTH

MIDDLESBROUGH

Falmouth Art Gallery

Municipal Buildings, The Moor. ☎ 01326 313863 Man-Made in Cornwall: the Paintings of Tony Giles; until January 23.

GUILDFORD

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

Watts Gallery

Down Lane, Compton. ☎ 01483 810235 Untold Stories: British Art from Private Collections; until February 19.

HASTINGS Jerwood Gallery

Rock-a-Nore Road. ☎ 01424 728377 In Focus: Stanley Spencer – A Panorama of Life; until January 8.

Laing Art Gallery

New Bridge Street. ☎ 0191 278 1611 Out of Chaos: Art, Identity and Migration; until February 26.

NOTTINGHAM Djanogly Gallery

KENDAL

Nottingham Lakeside Arts. ☎ 0115 8467777 Victor Pasmore: Towards a New Reality; focuses on the period from 1930 to 1969, until February 19.

☎ 01539 722464

Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery

Abbot Hall Art Gallery People on Paper; some of the finest drawings in the Arts Council collection, includes early drawings by Peter Blake and Howard Hodgkin, until December 17.

Lenton Road. ☎ 0115 8761400 Nottingham Castle Open; until January 8.

KINGSBRIDGE

Ashmolean Museum

Harbour House Gallery

The Promenade. ☎ 01548 854708 Dave Roper: Artist in Residence; mixed-media plaques and sculptures, January 17 to 28.

LIVERPOOL Tate Liverpool

Albert Dock. ☎ 0151 702 7400

Bankside Gallery, London

mima

Centre Square. ☎ 01642 931232 Winifred Nicholson: Liberation of Colour; until February 12.

OXFORD

Anita Klein Peeling an Orange, linocut, 12⫻12in (30⫻30cm)

SHERBORNE Jerram Gallery

Half Moon Street. ☎ 01935 815261 Christmas Exhibition; until December 23.

STOW ON THE WOLD Fosse Gallery

The Manor House, The Square. ☎ 01451 831319 Gallery Artists; until December 31.

WORCESTER City Museum and Art Gallery

Foregate Street. ☎ 01905 616979 Worcester Society of Artists’ 69th Annual Exhibition; December 3 to January 21.

WORKSOP The Harley Gallery

☎ 01904 687687 Flesh; includes circle of Rembrandt, Peter Paul Rubens, Edgar Degas, Francis Bacon and Jenny Saville, until March 19.

SCOTLAND EDINBURGH The Mound. ☎ 0131 624 6200 Turner in January 2017; January 1 to 31.

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

75 Belford Road. ☎ 0131 624 6200 Joan Eardley: A Sense of Place; December 3 to May 21.

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

1 Queen Street. ☎ 0131 624 6200 BP Portrait Award 2016; until March 26.

PENZANCE

YORK

Penlee House Gallery and Museum

Exhibition Square.

The Mound. ☎ 0131 225 6671. The David Mitchie Gift; until January 13.

Morab Road. ☎ 01736 363625 Crafts for Christmas; until January 7.

www.painters-online.co.uk

York Art Gallery

CARDIFF Albany Art Gallery 74b Albany Road, ☎ 029 2048 7158 Christmas Exhibition; until December 31.

CONWY Royal Cambrian Academy

Scottish National Gallery

Mansfield Road, Welbeck. ☎ 01909 501 700 Sophie Ploeg: Identity and Dress; new work by 2013 BP Portrait Travel Award winner, until January 8.

Beaumont Street. ☎ 01865 278002 Lui Dan: New Landscapes and Old Masters; oils, until December 26.

WALES

Crown Lane. ☎ 01492 593413 Christmas Art and Craft; offthe-wall exhibition and sale of work by RCA artists, until January 2.

NEWTOWN Oriel Davies Gallery The Park. ☎ 01686 625041 Imaginary Worlds: Illustration Now; works in all media selected from open submission, until February 25.

MACHYNLLETH MOMA Wales

Royal Scottish Academy

Heol Penrallt. ☎ 01654 703355 Christmas Selection; original works by Welsh artists, until January 21.

To submit details of an exhibition for possible listing here, email Deborah Wanstall at deborah@tapc.co.uk or telephone 01580 763673

artist

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River Cruises 2017 THE ART OF THE TULIP

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF VINCENT VAN GOGH

SKETCHING ON THE DANUBE

April 20 - April 28, 2017 Artist: Margaret Best

April 27 - May 5, 2017 Artist: Sandee Ewasiuk

October 15 - October 23, 2017 Artist: Barry Coombs

Explore the culture, history and the art of the tulip, in the historical gardens at the Low Countries.

Experience the inspiration and works of this creative genius from the comfort of your ship.

Refine your artistic skills on the spectacular Danube visiting some of the great cities of Europe.

Amsterdam to Amsterdam Including:

Garden tours of the Winter Garden, Leiden Hortus Botanicus, Ruben’s House, the famed Keukenhof, and the Museum of the Black Tulop.

Exclusive escorted tours to Kinderdijk, Dordrecht, Borinage, Rijksmuseum, Maison Van Gogh, Vincentre Museum, Van Gogh Museum and other key places in Van Gogh’s life.

Somerset, Exmoor National Park, North Devon Coast, North Cornwall, Lake District, Wye Valley, Provence, France & The Western Algarve, Portugal with all-inclusive holidays

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Amsterdam to Amsterdam Including:

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Destinations include: Melk, Vienna, Budapest, Bratislava and Dürnstein.

Wildlife Painting Workshops with Cate Wetherall One to One, One Day or Weekend Workshops Learn how to create realistic portraits, painting with pastels or oils Small confidence-building classes from beginners to advanced All materials, lunch and plenty of refreshments included.

Available dates updated regularly on the website www.wildandtame.co.uk phone or email Cate for more details cate@wildandtame.co.uk 07702 060113

Focus on personal creative expression and development on locations with special artistic interest.

HIGHLIGHTS • Individualized art instruction with engaging artists

• Unique Exclusive Excursions • Small Groups • All Abilities Welcome

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LIMITED SPACE - BOOK TODAY: www.visiontravel.ca/sandieharman Email: sandie.harman@visiontravel.ca www.facebook.com/AIRculturalex +1 416-407-1830 or +1 705-657-7196

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ARTNET MASTERCLASS

THE ARTIST’S DIRECTORY OF COURSES, MATERIALS & SERVICES

ART COURSES & HOLIDAYS

FIONA PEART

Rachel Clark

LIFE DRAWING & PAINTING CLASSES Widely acclaimed & exhibited artist Rachel Clark has run life drawing classes in London since 1976. “Regardless of experience, everyone will gain from her skillful teaching. The small supported and structured classes maximise individual tuition and growth”. Saturdays - Weekends - One week - Private or Corporate tuition

Informative and lively demonstrations and workshops for art societies and clubs. Ring 01451 820014 or email fiona@fionapeart.com www.fionapeart.com

www.rachelclark.com T: 07528 674 389

ART MATERIALS

Dulwich Art Group Residential Painting holiday in Hereford 2nd -9th September 2017 • Enhance your painting skills with professional support • Landscape and or Life Painting with our model • Stay in a beautiful small stately home • Enjoy a house party with a private chef • Eat well and enjoy the good company of fellow artists • Excellent location - just walk out and paint

More info www.dulwichartgroup.co.uk/abbey-dore or call us on 0207 274 2300

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THE SKY’S THE LIMIT Suppliers of the finest art materials VISIT OUR ONLINE SHOP

WHEN IT COMES TO ADVERTISING WITH THE ARTIST

HOLIDAYS Courses from April to November International tutors All materials included All equipment included All meals Airport transfers Private en suite rooms

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Viktoria Prischedko, Igor Sava, Ekaterina Ziuzina, Pablo Ruben, Sue Bradley, Arnold Lowrey, Tony Hogan, Anna Ivanova, Olga Litvinenko, Eugen Chisnicean, Direk Kingnok, Michal Jasievicz, Joe Dowden, Claire Warner, Les Darlow, Anne Kerr, Robert Dutton, Antonio Giacomin.

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THE ARTIST’S DIRECTORY OF COURSES, MATERIALS & SERVICES To advertise contact Anna-Marie Brown Telephone 01778

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Email: annamarieb@warnersgroup.co.uk

ART COURSES & HOLIDAYS

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PA I N T E R S O N L I N E

and Daylight Competition PaintersOnline, the online home of Leisure Painter and The Artist, has teamed up with Daylight to offer you the chance to win one of two Artist Easel Lamps worth £89(rrp) each

ENTER NOW To win one of two Artist Easel Lamps from Daylight please visit

www.painters-online.co.uk

The Daylight Artist Easel Lamp offers a simple solution for all artists working at an easel and is ideal for work up to A1-size surfaces or smaller. The lamp has a unique clamp-lock system which keeps the lamp firmly attached to the easel, and the flexible arm allows the light to be positioned exactly where it is needed. Key features l Unique clamp-lock system keeps the lamp firmly in position l Attaches to easels or tables up to 3cm thick l 18cm flexible arm to direct the light exactly where it is needed l Wide shade with reflective coating for maximum light spread

the home of and magazines, and click on the links to competitions. Closing date for entries is February 4, 2017. Winners will be selected at random from all online entries. Powerful 20W energy saving Daylight bulb for true colour matching l Lamp brightness: 2,970 Lux at 30cm (12in.) For more information visit www.daylightcompany.co.uk l

When completing your details please make sure you opt in to receive our great regular email newsletters so that we can keep you up to date with what’s new at PaintersOnline, including the latest features, images in the galleries, new competitions and other great offers.

January 2017

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A D E B A N J I ’ S M O T I V AT I O N A L T I P S : 1 S T O F 1 3

Never give up! Adebanji Alade’s new year-long series begins with words of encouragement and advice on how to overcome periods of self-doubt

W

e creative people sometimes get into a rut or hole. Once in a while we think really weird thoughts like ‘Will my work gain the recognition it deserves?,’ or ‘Will I really make it as a successful professional artist?’ This can get really gruesome and we might begin to despair as to whether all the efforts we have been putting in to become successful will really amount to anything. These thoughts can be really depressing, but they are not really deadly until you begin to believe there is no solution – and give up.

‘Everyone goes through periods of self-doubt. I call these periods the storms of the creative career’ There is hope Everyone goes through periods of selfdoubt. I call these periods the storms of the creative career. What really matters is not what has happened but how we react to what has happened. There is a way out! What can really help is to set realistic goals. Please make them realistic and give them a reasonable time frame. All must have an element of excitement and be a bit of a challenge! Something that can get you really focused. Once you have set that goal, I want you to see yourself achieving that particular goal every day. Write it out, starting with the end in mind. Say things that start with I am, I will! These give no room for doubt or excuses; they make you committed to the goal. When you do this, it would be good to visualise yourself achieving it and not only let it happen in your mind, feel it in your soul – let it reverberate through your whole system and this will put you on solid ground for development and the fortitude to overcome the dry patches and doubts when they come. Because they will come. You must be ready to do anything and everything possible to achieve your

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goal. This way, when the doubts come, you will be able to overcome them; because you have immersed yourself in working it out you will become unstoppable. This takes time but no time spent planning how to work on your goal is wasted. Once your strategy is in place and you are immersed in working it out, I can guarantee that only time will separate you from achieving your goals and never giving up.

Artistic journey Some people get so wrapped up in their goal they forget that it’s not just about the destination but also about the journey and what you are becoming while immersing yourself in your work plan. If you have spent a sufficient amount of time working on a particular aspect of your development there is no way you will not produce astounding results in the long run. Don’t allow day-to-day setbacks put you off. Just never, ever give up. Keep on believing in yourself and what you are going to become. Another trap is the fear of failure, it’s a terrible thing too, so don’t let that get a grip. We creative people suffer from fear of failure because our work is constantly in the public eye, whether on social media on in real life galleries. Without

some thick skin you might get trapped into what I call the artist fear factor. It’s dangerous; those are times you don’t want to do anything, not because you can’t but because you feel the threat of fear, bullying you out of doing great things. We have got to focus and do what is right. I have personal experience of this and it hit me hard. Whilst trying to become a member of Royal Institute of Oil Painters (ROI) I was selected for the open annual exhibition in 2007 and, from then until 2015 when I became a full member, I faced disappointment after disappointment. I would have given up but I believed I could do it; I set membership as a goal and worked hard, visualised it and just never gave up. There were times when I lost hope but it got to a stage when failure became fun and I just enjoyed the process of submitting, exhibiting and not being elected – until it finally happened. I‘d like to encourage you to never give up on your artistic goals. Keep at it and remain focused and you’ll find that it’s just a matter of time until your goal is reached...and then you’ll set new ones. One new thing you can try out this month is to see if you can stop losing focus by sketching something from life every day. Let’s see how you do and try to use a drawing pen, not a pencil, and avoid correcting mistakes. Enjoy this new challenge and don’t forget, never, TA ever give up!

Adebanji Alade

I decided not to give up here. The rains started and I had no umbrella, so I moved under a dark arch and had to lie down flat to paint in order to see the light and continue painting

studied fine art in Nigeria and has a diploma in portraiture from Heatherley’s School of Fine Art, where he teaches in the Open Studio. He has exhibited widely and won many awards. Adebanji is a member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and a council member of the Chelsea Art Society; he tutors workshops and gives demonstrations for art societies and also offers private coaching. For more details see www.adebanjialade.co.uk; www.adebanjialade. blogspot.com; www.sketchinspiration.com

www.painters-online.co.uk


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& in association with Patchings Art Centre & Jackson’s Art Supplies

Art Club of the Year COMPETITION 2017 CALL FOR ENTRIES A

ll UK art clubs are invited to submit a total of five twodimensional works that you feel represent your club along with a written profile, including details about your club’s history, members and activities. We will select our top ten clubs to exhibit their five entries at the Patchings Art, Craft & Photography

Festival (July 13 to 16) and through to July 28. An overall club winner and two runners up will be selected by well-known artist and tutor, Hazel Soan, and visitors will be asked to vote for their favourite club for the People’s Choice Award. All work entered will be featured on our website at www.painters-online.co.uk

Prizes We are delighted to announce exclusive sponsorship by Jackson’s Art Supplies

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TWO RUNNERS UP £250 worth of Jackson’s art materials vouchers for each club PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD £100 worth of Jackson’s art materials vouchers for the club with the most public votes

Judges Hazel Soan, artist and tutor Liz Wood, artist, tutor and co-owner of Patchings Art Centre Sally Bulgin, editor The Artist Ingrid Lyon, editor Leisure Painter

Art Club of the Year judge, the artist and tutor, Hazel Soan in her studio Janet Singer Poppies & Scuttle, pastel, 28x26in. (71x66cm), one of the five entries submitted by last year’s winners, Leicester Sketch Club

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FIRST PRIZE £500 worth of Jackson’s art materials vouchers, £100 towards the cost of a workshop or demonstration to club members and a profile about the club published in our magazines, on PaintersOnline and through our social media channels

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HOW TO ENTER & CONDITIONS OF ENTRY The competition is open to art clubs across the UK. Only online entries can be accepted. Only original work will be considered and paintings based on reference photographs must have been taken by the artist or used with the permission of the photographer. Photography, except where incorporated into collage, is not acceptable. 1 The non-refundable entry fee of £20 covers the FIVE entries per art club of two-dimensional work in any media. 2 No entry should be larger than 120x150cm WHEN FRAMED (canvases do not need to be framed).

3 To enter, first register your club at www.painters-online.co.uk via ‘login/register’ and add your club profile to the biography area of the club account. Please include a name of your main contact when registering. Then upload your digital entries via the link on the Competitions page. Payment will be added automatically to your basket; please remember to pay before you leave the website. 4 Upload your entries with the nonrefundable entry fee of £20 by the closing date of March 31, 2017. 5 Entries will be judged after March 31, 2017 when selected work will be called for exhibition. All work must be framed (canvases

excepted) ready for exhibition from July 13 to 28, 2017 at Patchings Art Centre, Nottinghamshire. 6 Successful art clubs will be notified in late April about delivering their work between June 16 and July 2, 2017 to Patchings Art Centre. 7 All care will be taken with entries but no responsibility can be accepted for loss or damage in transit, incoming or outgoing, whilst on the competition premises or during the exhibition. Originals selected and submitted for final exhibition must be fully insured by the artist. 8 Original works must be left with the organisers throughout the exhibition.


CREATE COLOURS MADE IN SWITZERLAND

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The Artist - January 2017