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FULL SIZE PATTERN SHEET INSIDE

Inspiring and Informing Quilters since 1993

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● COMMUNITY ● INSPIRATION ● CREATIVE ● STYLE ● DESIGN

FABULOUS FLORALS Take a look at the antique quilts inspired by nature

PRINT PERFECT

MAKE

❤ Village playmat ❤ Sweet valentine quilt ❤ Patchwork holdall

Create stunning fabric designs using lino printing

PLUS Stuart Hillard talks about fusibles, interfacings and stabilisers

WINTER ROSES Make a statement with this dramatic quilt

OVER

of gorgeous giveaways! UK ONLY

'I WAIT FOR THE FABRICS TO TELL ME WHAT'S NEXT' Meet the NYC based artist and quilt designer Victoria Findlay Wolfe

CRAFT GROUP

£100

FEB 2017 £4.99


Space to create With an extra-large 210mm (8.3�) of working space to the right of the needle any quilting or large sewing project can be handled easily. Our Square Feed Drive System (SFDS) ensures smooth uniform handling on all types of fabric. Packed with useful features and a huge variety of stitches, Brothers new long-arm range is the ideal choice.

1100 A powerful and versatile machine to meet demanding g sewing needs from dress making to quilting. Includes es 140 stitches, 10 button hole styles, 5 lettering styles and an automatic thread cutter.

1300 Includes all the great features of the 1100 plus 182 c stitches, upper and lower case lettering, fully automatic thread tension and multi-directional sewing for large decorative stitches.

0Q 1800Q Includes an extra large wide table, 232 stitches as well as our ICAPs system to ensure uniform stitching across varying fabric thicknesses, and the useful pivot function allowing the fabric to be turned while the needle is down

brothersewing.co.uk


There are so many things that I love about the quilt world, but the one that always makes me slightly emotional are the friendships. Despite the internet connecting us in ways that I could never have imagined when I was young, it is still not easy for us adults to go and make friends. I am quite a shy person, and look at the way my daughter can go to a playground and start chatting and then playing with other children, and wonder at what age we lose that ability. Quilt making seems to bring out that childish inquisitiveness in us. ‘How did you make it’, ‘who is it for’, ‘what are you making next’ - it gives us a connection that takes us back to the easy ‘how old are you and what’s your favourite colour’ conversations. Quilt groups are often at the core of quilting as a social activity, giving us somewhere to sew and chat with other makers. Successes are much more fun when you have people rooting for you, and the not so good parts of life are much easier if you know you have support behind you. And the committees of groups are often the unsung heroes. I don’t envy the social secretary whose job it is to find speakers and teachers who are new, appeal to the tastes of the group and are available on the required days. Or the treasurer who has to number crunch when they would probably rather be quilting, and the chair who needs to bring everyone together and possibly ends up doing much more than they thought the role would entail. So with this in mind, when Khurshid Bamboat got in touch to say her group was celebrating their 30th anniversary I thought you too may be interested in the story. I was pleased to read how the group collect their history through an archive so it can be shared with others, ensuring that the group will continue to run for many more years to come. Another thing groups are wonderful at is raising money for charity. Through exhbitions and raffles so many worthy causes are supported. Project Linus is a name many quilters know, and many groups donate quilts to the cause. In this issue we meet Simone McGee and discover how she got into quilting, and how her group goes about donating to Linus. If you don’t already make quilts for the charity, hopefully it will inspire you to get involved in 2017.

e m o c l e w

Enjoy the issue!

Our contributors this month include...

Khurshid Bamboat

Khurshid says 'I have always loved textiles, and did City & Guilds Parts 1 and 2 in Embroidery as there were no Patchwork & Quilting courses at that time. I went on to learn how to dye fabric with Leslie Morgan over 19 years ago and am still with her at Committed to Cloth. I love discharge and printing my own fabric and have a fascination with text and the written word.  It has taken me years to 'loosen up’ and am always ready to try new techniques and different ideas.'

Debbie von Grabler-Crozier

Debbie learnt to sew when she was about eight years old on her nana’s old Singer sewing machine – a treasure that she still has today. Jump forward to the present day and she has made a career out of sewing and writing patterns and couldn’t love her day job more! Originally trained as a scientist, she gave all that up when her son was born and has been writing ever since. Now published regularly across four continents, in her spare time she enjoys crochet and physics. sallyandcraftyvamp.blogspot.co.uk You can follow us on Facebook and Pinterest (Popular Patchwork Magazine), and Twitter (@Pop_Patchwork)


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Subscribe to Popular Patchwork and enjoy great savings on the shop price! See pg 68

CONTENTS PROJECTS

FEATURES

REGULARS

14 WINTER ROSES

26 FLORAL QUILTS

6 NEWS AND REVIEWS

Create Amanda Ogden’s impressive quilt with eight-point star blocks and an on-point setting

Anne Williams takes a look at British antique quilts inspired by nature

22 PATCHWORK

40 DULWICH QUILTERS -

Paper-pieced hexagons and fabric flowers make this storage bucket perfect to fill with treats

Member Khurshid Bamboat reflects on the history of the group, and shares the story of their 2016 celebrations

FLOWER BUCKET

30 CUDDLE BUGS

A charming pre-printed centre panel from Makower makes this quilt easy to stitch

36 PATCHWORK HOLDALL

Raid your remnants box to make this spacious patchwork holdall

40 JEWELLED CURVES

Suzanne Fisher has sewn plain fabrics together in curved pieces to create a lovely, jewel-like quilt

50 STAGGERED PLACEMATS

Cheer up meal times with Louisa Goult’s bright and simple placemats

60 VILLAGE PLAYMAT

Use this versatile design from Mandy Munroe to create your own village – perhaps a little helper would like to help with the layout!

70 SWEET VALENTINE

Rows of sugar sweet candy hearts make this Valentine quilt something special

80 QUILTED LEAVES PART TWO

Join us in this quilt-along to make a wholecloth designed by Greta Fitchett using different quilting techniques

30 YEARS AND COUNTING

The latest quilting news

12 TAKE ME HOME

This month the team pick their favourite sewing related items on a theme of black, white and grey

20 MEET THE…

This issue we meet Simone McGee, a Project Linus volunteer

56 PENROSE PATCHWORK

66 STUART’S SURGERY

84 VICTORIA FINDLAY WOLFE

68 SUBS OFFER!

On a recent visit to NYC, Mandy Munroe met up with Victoria at her new quilt shop on 38th street

75 GET CREATIVE -

Lindsey and Stuart Malin share their mathematical adventures into Penrose patchwork design

INTERVIEW

This month a reader gets advice on fusibles, interfacings and stabilisers Subscribe to Popular Patchwork today

CARVE OUT A DESIGN

SKILL LEVELS To help you decide what to make each month check our skill level indicator next to our projects. Novice Beginner Intermediate Experienced Advanced

We put every effort into checking project instructions and try to ensure their accuracy. Projects may not be photocopied except for your own personal use and you may not teach projects from the magazine without the permission of the publisher and the designer.

Elizabeth Betts shares her technique for using Softcut to print onto fabric

88 SHOW & TELL

Our readers share stories and pictures of their quilts and quilted projects

90 BOOKSHELF

A closer look at what’s hot off the press in the world of patchwork, quilting and textiles

92 WHAT’S ON IN YOUR AREA A great selection of events and activities for you this month

97 NEXT ISSUE

A preview of what we have coming up in our March issue

98 LET’S VISIT

This month we head to Leicester


NEWS & REVIEWS THE STORY OF SILK STUDY DAY On 1st April, the Silk Museum in Macclesfield is organising a study day, in partnership with the University of Chester, to explore the magic of silk, its uses and its histories. There will be talks by textile artist Yvette Hawkins; Dr Katherine Wilson, a historian of luxury textiles who will talk about the colourful history of the trade in Europe; and a practical workshop organised by Emily Wilkinson, an artist and writer. Participants will also have a tour of the Silk Museum's fascinating displays which show how silk is made, from cocoon to loom, and also reveal the importance of silk manufacturing to the history of Macclesfield. There will even be some hidden gems from the collection out on display. The Silk Museum will be closed to the public for the day, so attendees will have exclusive access to the stunning exhibits. Tickets cost £20 and include lunch and refreshments. For more information, or to book a place call 01625 613210.

HUES OF BLUE Avalon by Blank Quilting is new in at Sew Hot. Inspired by Japanese prints, this beautiful collection of quilting weight cottons feature patterns in shades of indigo blue with white accents. There are sixteen prints in the collection, together with a panel made up of fifteen patterned squares, making this range versatile and fun to work with. Avalon is £12/metre, the panel is £7.20. Available from Sew Hot sewhot.co.uk 0330 111 3690

WIN! WE HAVE ONE PANEL TO GIVE AWAY!

NEW YEAR, NEW SIZZIX QUILTING DIE 2017 is here and Sizzix have launched a brand new quilting die for your new year making. The Sizzix Bigz Plus Q Die – Signature Block, 6in Assembled by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, is very much in-keeping with the popular geometric trend. Use this die to produce beautiful geometric patchwork quilts, cushions and home décor projects. The die will work perfectly with the changing colour palettes over the next few months, giving you multiple project opportunities. You can read more about Victoria’s work on page 84.

6 February 2017

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NEWS & REVIEWS

COURSE PICKS This month we are featuring our pick of machine appliqué classes.

WIN! WE HAVE FIVE 28MM CUTTERS TO GIVE AWAY!

READY TO ROLL A good rotary cutter makes all the difference when a clean sharp cut is required and Trimits have the perfect tools for the job! Quick, easy and accurate, they can be used for cutting curved or straight lines on fabrics, leather, vinyl and paper. Available in two sizes, the Trimits 28mm rotary cutter is excellent for smaller projects and thinner fabrics (JE20 - RRP £4.44). For multiple layers of thicker materials, the 45mm rotary cutter is the one to choose. Its ergonomic shape makes it comfortable to work with and a useful replacement blade is conveniently stored in the handle (JE25 RRP £7.80). Both cutters include a blade safety cover. Trimits replacement blades are available, two per pack 28mm, (JE20A RRP £2.99) and one per pack 45mm (JE25A RRP £1.80). For stockist information email groves@stockistenquiries.co.uk

WIN! HOW TO ENTER

Visit popularpatchwork.com click on WIN! in the bar at the top, then select the competition you wish to enter and fill in your details. Good Luck! 

CALL OUT FOR JOURNAL QUILTS On the 18th and 19th March, Mimram Quilters will be holding their 12th exhibition at the Welwyn Civic Centre in Hertfordshire. They are inviting entries into their Journal Quilt competition which has the theme of ‘Celebration’. Quilts must be A4 sized (11¾ x 8¼ in, vertical or horizontal orientation), and must be a ‘quilt’, i.e. three layers quilted together. However, the colour, design, and technique (appliqué, picture, wholecloth, patchwork, embellished) are all yours to choose. It is £3 to enter, which includes the cost of returning your quilt, and the deadline is mid-February so get sewing! For more information, or to request an entry form contact Michèle Clarke on 01462 790577 or email mikindex@mikindex.co.uk

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INTRODUCTION TO MACHINE APPLIQUÉ WITH JEMMA DELL Free-motion appliqué is a great way to use your sewing machine creatively. It is not difficult and you don’t even need to be ‘artistic’ to get some great results! In this class you will be taken through the process to create your own appliquéd picture, including sources of inspiration and choosing fabrics, as well as how to use your machine to create a fabulous, unique picture. At Backstitch, Cambridgeshire. £30 Saturday 11th March, 10am till 1pm backstitch.co.uk MACHINE APPLIQUÉ Enjoy a lovely fun day designing your own 'garden of flowers'. Choose some lovely scraps of fabric and then learn how to arrange your flowers and leaves before bonding them to your background fabric. You will then learn how to use a variety of machine stitches to decorate and secure the edges of the shapes. As well as being fun, this is a great class for building confidence in using your sewing machine. At Simply Stitch, West Yorkshire. £30 Friday 21st April, 10am till 4pm simplystitch.co.uk MACHINE APPLIQUÉ FOR BEGINNERS This class is ideal for those who want to know the basic principles of appliqué in order to incorporate their own designs into their projects. Whether you want to sew motifs onto bunting or clothing, take the first step to creating a whole quilt of appliquéd blocks, or simply learn a little more about your machine - this class is the perfect place to start. As well as teaching the technique itself, we focus on how to sew around the appliqué shapes neatly including those tricky curves and corners - using all the most popular stitches. At Exeter Sewing Machine Company, Devon. £45 Friday 3rd March, 10am till 4pm exetersewing.co.uk

February 2017 7


NEWS & REVIEWS

NEWS & REVIEWS NEW QUILTING TEMPLATES Take the hard work out of creating stars, circles and hearts of different sizes izes with these shaped transparent templates that make the task of drawing and cutting g very quick and simple. Perfect for appliqué, craft, dressmaking and homeware projects, s, they include marking points for easy positioning and a ¼in seam allowance. Made from om durable acrylic and using laser-cut technology for smooth and accurate cutting, each set fits neatly on a ring for safe keeping and comes in a zip-lock pouch for extra xtra protection in storage. The heart set includes 4 templates (1, 1.5, 2, and 3in) the circle 4 templates (1, 1.5, 2 and 3in) and the star set includes 3 templates lates (1, 1.5 and 2in). All three sets are RRP £15 Heart (NL4149), Circle (NL4148) 8) and Stars (NL4150). You can learn more by watching demonstrations as well ll as discovering quilting tips and project ideas on the Sew Easy YouTube channel annel – youtube.com/seweasy. Sew Easy specialist patchwork and quilting products are available nationwide from craft, hobby and sewing suppliers. For stockist st information email groves@stockistenquiries.co.uk.

FROM THE PP ARCHIVES Issue: April 2011 Being the February issue, we went through the back issues to find something with a heart theme and we fell in love with this cushion from nearly six years ago. Using Liberty fabric, the clever piecing gives the cushion an antique feel, however we thought it would also be interesting to make it with batik fabrics and a dark background for a vibrant effect.

VILLAGE HABERDASHERY ON THE MOVE By the time we go to print, North London’s Village Haberdashery will have moved into their new premises at West Hampstead Square. In 2015 they successfully completed a crowdfunding campaign in order to raise the funds to fit out the new space, which will be a 1,500 square foot paradise for modern makers. Owner Annie Barker says ‘we aim to inspire everyone who walks through the door to make something amazing, so the shop will be buzzing with a wider range of classes, inspiration in every corner and a huge selection of products for even more crafts’. thevillagehaberdashery.co.uk

FOR MORE QUILTING INSPIRATION OR TO GET INVOLVED WITH SWAPS AND DISCUSSIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.POPULARPATCHWORK.COM / YOU CAN ALSO FIND US ON: FACEBOOK: POPULARPATCHWORK / TWITTER: POP_PATCHWORK / PINTEREST: POPPATCHWORK

8 February 2017

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easy

Wide angle white LED lighting User fr ien LCD sc dly reen

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An optional quilting kit is available for the DKS100 & DKS30 which includes a large extension table

The world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer


NEWS & REVIEWS

NEWS & REVIEWS

BAG RETREAT Pattern designer Samantha Hussey, of Sewing Patterns by Mrs H, is running a fantastic bag sewing retreat for sewists of all levels. The retreat will run from Friday 7th to Sunday 9th April, allowing you plenty of sewing g and socialising time at the beautiful venue of the Ty Newydd Hotel, just outside of Aberdare in the picturesque valleys of South Wales. Samantha a will be there at your beck and call to guide you through all the stages and give advice on those tricky areas such as choosing interfacings, using rivets, adding zips and much more. There will be three Mrs H patterns to make, or you can choose to work on a pattern of your choice if you prefer.. The retreat costs £300 per person if sharing a room, or £345 for a room to o yourself. This includes accommodation at the hotel for two nights, two three-course dinners, two breakfasts, two lunches and as much tea or coffee as you can drink, all weekend long. For more information and booking, go to the special Retreat page on the Mrs H website mrs-h.com/retreat

GET YOUR FABRIC FIX Launched in January 2017, Forever Fabric is a new must-visit destination for fabric addicts. Set up by Fiona Pullen, founder of The Sewing Directory, she says ‘I was regularly scouring social media and manufacturer and designer’s websites to see what new fabric collections were due to be released when I had the idea of bringing all that information into one place, and Forever Fabric was born.’ Visit the website to find out about new and forthcoming collections from your favourite fabric designers and manufacturers, and where and when you will be able to buy them. There will be previews of new collections months in advance helping you to plan future projects or stash purchases. foreverfabric.com

10 February 2017

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Lewis & Irene threaded with love

Beautiful fabrics, for all your sewing, quilting and crafting projects British designed, fresh and contemporary fabrics using only the best pre-shrunk, quality cottons with a super soft feel Available from all good fabric shops and stores Please see our new website for the latest collections www.lewisandirene.com

Facebook: @lewisandirene Instagram: lewisandirenefabrics


TAKE ME HOME Each month the Popular Patchwork team share some of their favourite sewing related treats, this month we have selected black, white and grey products.

SEWING PRINT £14.50

We couldn’t agree more! oflifeandlemons.co.uk

12 February 2017

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QUILTING WORLD take me home

£2.99

£12.00

£14.00

GLORIOUSLY GEOMETRIC

TRANSPARENT BAG

CLASSIC FABRICS

Get graphic myfabrichouse.co.uk

Store your sewing supplies paperchase.co.uk

For a stylish quilt fabricinspirations.co.uk

£12.95

£58.00

£7.99

BLACK, WHITE, BOLD AND BRIGHT!

METRO BUNDLE

PICK UP A PATTERN

Quilts that pop kalquilts.com

A classic palette oakshottfabrics.com

Make a quilt that stands out searchpress.com

£3.15

£59.00

£13.00

STARGAZING FABRIC

BAMBOO LADDER

TOP TYPE FABRIC

A print that’s out of this world cookesquilting.com

Ideal for storing quilts ovohome.com

Versatile blenders sewhot.co.uk

per fq

per fq

www.popularpatchwork.com

for 8 fq

for 7 fq

per m

February 2017 13


QUILT PROJECT winter roses

winter roses Create this impressive quilt with eight-point star blocks and an on-point setting. DESIGNED AND MADE BY AMANDA OGDEN AMANDAJANETEXTILES.COM

This pretty quilt uses lots of red and cream, focusing on the rose fabric in the centre of each block. I have used several different fabrics in each colour grouping to add liveliness to the quilt, but if you want your quilt more uniform you can stick to a single fabric pattern in each group. Fat quarters sizes must be 18 x 21in.

Amanda Ogden

CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

1 2 3 4 5 6

From Fabric A – red roses – cut thirty-two 31⁄2in squares.

From Fabric B – cream fabric(s) with small red print(s) – cut 128 squares each 31⁄2in.

From Fabric C – red fabric(s) with dots or similar – cut sixtyfour 43⁄8in squares. From Fabric D – pale red – cut thirty-two 43⁄8in squares.

From Fabric E – cream fabric(s) printed in white – cut thirty-two 43⁄8in squares.

From Fabric F – black – cut four 14in squares. Sub-cut each square across both diagonals into four triangles, to yield sixteen triangles. You will need fourteen of these for the side setting triangles of the quilt.

7

From Fabric F – black – cut two 71⁄4in squares. Sub-cut each square once across a diagonal into two triangles, to yield four

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triangles for the corners of the quilt. Label these so they do not get confused with the side triangles.

8 9 10

From Fabric F – black – cut seven 31⁄4in x width of fabric strips for the outer border. Join them together end to end.

From Fabric G – stripe – cut six 2in x width of fabric strips for the inner border. Join them together end to end. From the binding fabric cut seven 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips.

MAKING THE BLOCKS

1

Make one block to begin with, making the quarter-square triangle units first, as follows. Take two matching Fabric C (red dot) 43⁄8in squares and place them on the table right side up. Place one Fabric D (pale red) 43⁄8in square right side down on top of one of the red dot squares. Place one Fabric E (cream/white print) 43⁄8in square right side down on top of the other red dot square. Mark a line from corner to corner on each pair of squares and pin the fabrics together. Fig 1.

February 2017 15


SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 152.5 x 183cm (60 x 72in) MATERIALS Fabric A: two fat quarters of red fabric with a mediumsized print of roses for the block centres Fabric B: five fat quarters of cream fabric printed with small motifs in red for the squares at the corner of each block Fabric C: four fat quarters or one yard/metre of red fabric with a dot pattern for the star points Fabric D: two fat quarters or half a yard/metre of pale red fabric (chambray or narrow stripe) for the inside triangles in each block Fabric E: two fat quarters or half a yard/metre of cream fabric printed in white for the outside triangles in each block Fabric F: 1.5m (11⁄2yd) of black fabric for the side setting and corner triangles and the outer border Fabric G: 35cm (3⁄8yd) of red/white striped fabric for inner border 173 x 203cm (68 x 80in) of wadding 173 x 203cm (68 x 80in) of backing fabric 50cm (1⁄2yd) of binding fabric Suitable threads for piecing and quilting WHERE TO BUY Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

Fig 1 Making half-square triangle units

Fig 2 Cutting the units apart

Fig 3 Making the quarter-square triangle units

Fig 4 Trimming the units

16 February 2017

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QUILT PROJECT winter roses

2

7

3

8

Machine sew exactly 1⁄4in away from the line on both sides (use a 1⁄4in foot if you have one). Cut along the marked line with a rotary cutter or scissors. Fig 2. Press each line of stitching to set the seam, then open up each half-square triangle unit and press the seam towards the darker fabric.

Sew the units together in rows, pressing the seams towards the quarter-square units each time. Now sew the rows together, matching seams neatly, and press. Check the block is 91⁄2in square. Fig 6. Using the same process, make a total of thirty-two blocks.

Place a Fabric C/D half-square triangle unit right side up on the table. Place a Fabric C/E half-square triangle unit right side down on top of the other unit, with the red dot triangle on top of the pale red triangle. Mark a line from corner to corner as shown in Fig 3 and then pin the units together.

4

Machine sew exactly 1⁄4in away from the line on both sides. Ensure that the seam allowances of the square beneath are facing in the opposite direction to the seam allowances of the square above, to avoid too much bulk in the centre of the block. Cut along the marked line. Press the quarter-square triangle units and trim to 31⁄2in square, keeping the diagonal lines at the corners. Fig 4.

5 6

Repeat the process to create another two quarter-square triangle units. These four units are needed for one block.

To assemble one block, lay out the following units, as shown in Fig 5: One 31⁄2in square of Fabric A (centre of block) Four 31⁄2in squares of Fabric B (corners of block) Four quarter-square triangle units, with the light red triangles touching the centre square

ASSEMBLING THE QUILT

1

If you have used a mixture of fabrics in each colour group, lay out the thirty-two blocks as shown in Fig 7, to check that you are happy with how the blocks look. If you wish, label each block with a number written on masking tape. Lay out the black side setting triangles and the corner triangles too.

2

Begin by joining the blocks themselves into Rows 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7, as shown in Fig 7. Press alternate row seams in opposite directions.

3

Now, beginning with Row 1, which has a single block, add a black setting triangle to the sides of the block. When sewing these triangles to the block, align the right-angled corner of the triangle with the base of the block as shown in Fig 8. Press towards the dark triangle. Fig 9 shows the two setting triangles sewn in place. Continue in this way to add setting triangles to the ends of each row of blocks. Leave the smaller corner triangles unsewn for the moment.

Row 1

Row 2

Row 3

Row 4

Fig 5 Sewing the rows of a block together Row 5

Row 6

Row 7

Row 8

Fig 6 A finished block

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Fig 7 Laying out the blocks

February 2017 17


QUILT PROJECT winter roses

4

clean flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the quilt top, centrally and right side up. The backing and wadding are larger than the quilt top. Pin, tack or spray baste the layers together.

ADDING THE BORDERS

2

Sew the rows of blocks and setting triangles together, matching the block seams neatly. Now sew the four smaller triangles to each corner of the quilt. Trim the edges of the quilt so the sides are straight and the corners are right-angled.

1

The quilt has two borders – an inner striped fabric one cut at 2in wide and an outer one in black cut at 31⁄4in wide. Fig 10. Measure the height of your quilt and from the long strip of striped fabric you prepared earlier, cut two strips to fit the height of your quilt. Sew these to the sides of the quilt and press the seams. Measure the width of the quilt, including the two borders just added, and cut two strips to this measurement. Sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt and press.

2

Measure the new height of your quilt and from the long strip of black fabric you prepared earlier, cut two strips to fit the height of your quilt. Sew these to the sides of the quilt and press the seams. Measure the width of the quilt, including the two borders just added, and cut two strips to this measurement. Sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt and press.

Quilt as desired. When you have finished quilting, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges and square up the quilt ready for binding.

3

To bind the quilt, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges. Join the binding strips together at right angles, pressing the seams open to reduce bulk. Trim away the ‘ears’ and fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Working from the right side and starting part-way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the quilt and sew in place, folding a mitre at each corner. Before completing your stitching, neaten the short raw end of the starting piece and insert the ending piece into it. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

4

Add a label, including at least your name, location and the date the quilt was made.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

1

Press your quilt top and backing and remove any stray threads. Layer the quilt by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a

Fig 8 Sewing a setting triangle to a block

Fig 9 Two setting triangles sewn to a block for Row 1

Fig 10 Adding the borders

18 February 2017

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Meet the...

Project Linus Volunteer At Popular Patchwork we love hearing how our readers dedicate their time and skills to charity. One of the most well known quilt causes is Project Linus, and for the last few years Simone McGee (seated in the photo below) has got in touch every twelve months with news about how her group has contributed to the project. So when we read her latest letter we decided to find out more about the quilts they donate, and hopefully inspire more readers to support this wonderful charity.

"Run by volunteers, the organisation aims to provide a sense of security and comfort to sick and traumatised babies, children and teenagers through the gift of new handmade patchwork quilts and knitted/crocheted blankets." Where do you live, and how long have you been quilting? I come originally from Los Angeles in California and married my English husband in 1982 and we moved to Binfield in Berkshire in 1986.  It was here I joined the Binfield Quilters. I had always been interested in needlecraft, knitting and needlepoint, but even though I'm an American, I had never made a patchwork quilt before!  I decided to study for the City & Guilds in Patchwork and Quilting for four years and this led to a job teaching quilting to adults at Bracknell and Wokingham college.

How long have you been involved with Project Linus? I know lots of quilters locally and we get together on a weekly basis to quilt and chat.  I first heard about Project Linus from Phyllis, one of the quilters and I decided to contact them to see if we could help.  Project

20 February 2017

Linus started in America and was named after the character in the Peanuts cartoon strip who always walks around with a comfort blanket. Run by volunteers, the organisation aims to provide a sense of security and comfort to sick and traumatised babies, children and teenagers through the gift of new handmade patchwork quilts and knitted/ crocheted blankets. This scheme also gives makers across the UK the opportunity to contribute to their community as each group will donate their quilts and blankets to charities that are local to them.

How do you go about making the quilts and what fabrics are used? It’s really down to each individual quilter how she goes about making the quilt and what fabric to use, though our policy is that the quilts should be made from scraps and fragments – they are a great way of using up the stash! We tend to use 100% cottons as they are more

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QUILTING WORLD meet the... Linus volunteer

ABOUT PROJECT LINUS HISTORY This volunteer organisation was started in the United States, when on Christmas Eve 1995, Karen Loucks saw a newspaper article about how a sick little girl had found such comfort from her security blanket while undergoing intensive chemotherapy treatment. Having just learnt to crochet, Karen decided to start making blankets for a local children’s cancer charity in Denver, and soon began to share her creations in emails to her friends. These then appeared on websites, and word soon spread around the knitting and quilting communities who all wanted to get involved, so they had to get organised! WHY LINUS? Project Linus is named after the Peanuts comic strip character who took his security blanket with him wherever he went. PROJECT LINUS IN THE UK In March 2000, Ann Salisbury-Jones brought the charity to the UK, who together with her sewing group, started making quilts for a local cancer charity. Thanks to the internet, word quickly spread and groups within the Quilters’ Guild of the British Isles soon came on board. With support and publicity from places including Popular Patchwork and Women’s Weekly magazines and Creative Exhibitions who run the Festival of Quilts, the charity was soon inundated with quilts and blankets from all over the UK. durable and will withstand regular washing. We are very lucky to have a couple of generous benefactors – Hereford-based quilting shop Doughty’s have donated fabric and wadding right from the beginning when we first became involved with Linus. Also, Tony from Winbourne Fabrics has kindly donated fabric over the years.

Can you share any stories of prolific makers? Most of the ladies in our group contribute, but the prolific ones are Phyllis Gray, Sandra Garner, Betty Thomas and Jane Hiscock. 

Are the quilts given labels? We are provided with labels to sew into the quilts by Project Linus.

Who do you hand the quilts over to? Our local representative is Val Lillie and she delivers the quilts to many places in our local community, including children's hospital wards, paediatric and neonatal intensive care units, as well as bereaved children and children in foster care and women’s refuges - in fact any child who she has been told needs a hug. Once a year we get Val down to our meeting, have a nice lunch and deliver the quilts to her.  She has lots of stories to tell and brings along photographs of the children and their treasured quilts – you can just tell by their faces how much love and comfort they gain from our creations.

How many quilts have you given in total? We started making for Project Linus about ten years ago, and in that time we have delivered 600 quilts and 80 knitted blankets.

What advice would you give to someone reading this and thinking about getting involved? For anyone interested in getting involved in this wonderful charity, I suggest they have a look at the Project Linus website where they can find contact details for the coordinator in their local area. If they belong to a quilting group all the better, they can get their friends involved, if not, Linus also welcome donations from individuals.

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WHAT SIZES AND DESIGNS OF QUILTS ARE MADE? Many people associate Project Linus with baby quilts, but quilts are made and given out to all ages, from premature babies to teenagers starting out of their own. Quilts for very premature babies only need to be 18in square, while teenagers may need full-size quilts - sizes around 24in to 48in are very popular. In some cases, the final user determines the size of the quilt, for instance teenagers in wheelchairs will need lap quilts, while autistic children may need weighted quilts to help them keep calm. When it comes to the designs and colours, the brighter the better for most quilts, though those for premature babies should ideally be in calming colours. Football teams, racing cars and wild animals or dinosaurs are popular with boys, while girls often like pink. Local coordinators will know if there are any specific needs in their area, such as if a new baby unit or women’s refuge is about to open. WHO ARE THE COORDINATORS? There are coordinators for most areas for the UK, all of which are volunteers who either cover their own expenses or raise funds by giving talks to local groups. They may also get donations from local businesses such as the Waitrose community support programme and Rotary clubs. Some of these coordinators have set up groups to help with the growing amount of work involved, and some also run beginner workshops or Linus Workshop Days. HOW CAN I FIND MY LOCAL COORDINATOR AND GET INVOLVED? Visit the website, projectlinus.org.uk where there is a list of contacts for the coordinators throughout the UK. They will be able to tell you of the sewing and fundraising events in your area, where to find inspiration to make quilts and blankets, and how to donate your creations to this fantastic charity.

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See pattern sheet for patchwork flower bucket templates


HOME ACCESSORIES PROJECT patchwork flower bucket

patchwork flower bucket Paper-pieced hexagons and fabric flowers make a perfect storage bucket to fill with treats. DESIGNED AND MADE BY HELEN PHILIPPS THIS PROJECT IS AN EDITED EXTRACT FROM MODERN VINTAGE GIFTS BY HELEN PHILLIPS

Hexagons are a traditional English paper-piecing shape and are always fun to make and use. This little bucket is perfect for adding pretty embellishments, such as fabric flowers, buttons, beads, bows or tags.

Helen Philipps PIECING THE PATCHWORK

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Trace the hexagon template from the Pattern Sheet onto thin card and cut it out. Draw around the template onto scrap paper forty times and cut out the shapes. Use the card template to cut out forty fabric scraps but this time cutting out the shapes 1⁄4in larger all round.

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Place a paper template in the middle of a fabric shape, wrong side up. Fold the fabric edges over the paper neatly and tack in place. Repeat for all the fabric shapes.

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Lay out twenty fabric-covered hexagons in a nice arrangement for the front of the bag, in five columns each with four hexagons. Sew them together by placing the hexagons right sides together and whip stitching the seams. Once complete, trim the patchwork to 61⁄2in wide x 71⁄2in high. Repeat this process to create the bag back from the remaining twenty hexagons.

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Cut two 3 x 61⁄2in pieces of co-ordinating fabric. Sew one piece to the bottom of the front hexagon patchwork, and one to the bottom of the back patchwork. Each piece of patchwork should now be about 10 x 61⁄2in. Fig 1.

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5

Cut two lengths of lace to fit the width of the patchwork and slipstitch one in place just above the join on the front patchwork and one on the back.

ASSEMBLING THE BAG OUTER

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Iron a piece of fusible wadding to the wrong side of the bag front and the bag back. Place the front and back of the bag right sides together and sew together along the sides and bottom. To create depth to the bag, fold the bottom corners as shown in Fig 2, machine sew across the corners and trim excess fabric.

MAKING THE LINING

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Using the two pieces of striped lining fabric, make a lining bag in the same way as the bag outer but leave a small opening in the bottom for turning through. Turn the bag inside out and place the lining inside, with right sides are together. Sew round the top edge of the bag and lining. Pull the bag and lining out through the gap. Push the lining back into the bag and smooth out. Press the bag carefully and topstitch round the top edge. Fold the top of the bag down to show the striped lining.

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HOME ACCESSORIES PROJECT patchwork flower bucket

MAKING THE FLOWERS

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Using the template on the Pattern Sheet, cut out three 3in diameter circles from floral fabric. Cut each circle in half. Fold five of the semi-circles in half and sew along the straight edge. Fig 3. Turn right side out and press. Using white sewing thread, sew along the curved edge, pull to gather and then fasten off. Fig 4.

SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 15 x 20cm (6 x 8in) with top folded down MATERIALS Thin card for template and scrap paper for hexagon shapes Scraps of floral fabrics for bucket hexagon shapes 20cm (8in) square of co-ordinating fabric for bucket Two pieces 16.5 x 25.5cm (61⁄2 x 10in) of striped lining fabric for bucket lining 2.5 x 35.5cm (1 x 14in) approx. of lace trim for bucket Two pieces 16.5 x 25.5cm (61⁄2 x 10in) of lightweight fusible wadding Scraps of floral fabrics for flowers Scraps of felt fabrics for flowers Two buttons for flowers White sewing thread Glue gun (optional)

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Join the petals together by sewing them one by one onto a long piece of thread through the centre gathered edges as shown in Fig 5. Pull the thread tight and finish off securely. Cut a small circle of felt and glue or sew it to the back of the flower to secure the petals together. Finish by gluing or sewing a button to the flower centre. Make another flower like this. Glue or sew a flower to each side of the bucket to finish. Fig 6.

READER OFFER Modern Vintage Gifts © 2015 Helen Phillips by Interweave a division of F+W. To buy a copy for only £9.99 (a saving of £5 off the cover price) inc FREE UK P&P, ring 01206 255777, quoting ref MT416. Offer closes 09/03/17

WHERE TO BUY Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

Fig 3 Making a flower petal from a semi-circle folded in half

Fig 4 Sewing a gathering stitch

Fig 1 Adding the co-ordinating fabric to the patchwork Fig 2 Creating corners at the base of the bag

Fig 5 Sewing the petals together

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Fig 6 Fixing the flowers in place on the bag

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Floral Quilts Anne Williams takes a look at British antique quilts inspired by nature.

Red Manor House Appliqué Coverlet, maker unknown, 1840–1860. The central red house is surrounded by motifs of flowers, pot plants and domestic animals.

February is the month when love is in the air, and nothing goes together like romance and blooms. Flowers are also a favourite with quilters. From representational interpretations to more abstract renditions, you’ll find both historical and contemporary examples of floral-themed quilts. As gardening is a favourite British pastime perhaps it’s not surprising that botanical subjects are popular with artists from all disciplines. But then, who could fail to be inspired by the endless colour combinations and fascinating shapes and textures provided by nature’s bounty?

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Appliqué is the most common technique for floral quilts, with many historic examples from the 19th century. Flowers, wreaths, vines and urns are all popular motifs, often portrayed in stylistic shapes. As appliqué involves applying layers of fabric on top of a background it is not an economical method, especially if material has been ‘fussy cut’ to use a specific area of print for a particular motif. So these quilts were not thrifty utilitarian items, but rather decorative pieces made by ladies of leisure to showcase their skills, and perhaps also their fabric and thread collections.

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QUILTING WORLD floral quilts

Floral Bouquet Coverlet by Myfanwy Pryce, 1941. This rayon quilt has been fastidiously pieced and appliquéd. The stunning central bouquet has been sewn and embroidered by hand.

Gardeners’ Floral Coverlet by Myfanwy Pryce, c1951. The central bouquet of this coverlet is bordered by other floral images which represent the four seasons. The rayon background in pieced in a style reminiscent of log cabin arrangements.

"February is the month when love is in the air, and nothing goes together like romance and blooms. Flowers are also a favourite with quilters. From representational interpretations to more abstract renditions, you’ll find both historical and contemporary examples of floral-themed quilts." The maker of the mid-19th century Red Manor House Appliqué Coverlet is unknown. However, they must have been an adept seamstress to create this complex frame design, with each square featuring a different appliqué pattern, presumably inspired by the maker’s surroundings. The edges of the designs, which include flowers, pot plants and domestic animals, have all been finished with hand embroidered herringbone stitch, so it would have been a timeconsuming undertaking to complete this project. There are also some gorgeous examples of 19th-century album-style quilts, with straight-set appliquéd blocks a common layout, frequently bordered with complementary vines or swags. Often these quilts used bold colours, with red and white, or red, white and green popular combinations. (Red became fashionable at this time due the introduction of colourfast Turkey red fabric.) Simplified leaves and flowers were popular motifs, as demonstrated in the late 19th-century North Country Appliqué quilt (on page 28), in which nine red and green floral wreaths have been arranged in a three-by-three layout and bordered with a matching winding stem. The basket design was another much-loved design, and indeed is still

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a popular choice today. The early 20th-century Baskets Quilt (on page 28), is a striking Turkey red and white design of thirty pieced basket blocks set on-point, with another basket at each outer corner. The baskets in this example haven’t been further adorned, but sometimes appliquéd flower arrangements are applied after piecing. However, a floral theme has been added in the hand-quilted rose motifs in the alternating plain white blocks and the sinuous border pattern. The Jubilee quilt (on page 29), made by Mrs Mills in 1887 to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, is a tour de force of patchwork using opulent velvets and silks. The central chrysanthemums have been pieced using a variation of the log cabin technique, with the more traditional log cabin blocks surrounding them highly decorated with a range of embroidered stitches. The fans of the outer border are also elaborately embellished, with designs including flowers, animals and figures. The quilt was given to Thomas Machell, the Mills’ landlord, in lieu of rent. Thomas was a tailor and draper and it’s thought that the quilt was made from surplus fabrics. Such lavish materials would have been very expensive at the time, so a quilt like this would have been an indicator of the owner’s wealth and status.

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The Victorian era was a time of fancy patchwork using a range of materials, but by the 20th century cotton was the quilters fabric of choice. Although, in the mid-20th century when modern synthetic fabrics were in vogue some makers incorporated these materials in their quilt tops. Myfanwy Pryce, a Welsh romantic novelist, used rayon (also known as art silk) in both her Floral Bouquet Coverlet and her Gardeners’ Floral Coverlet (on page 27). The designs are clearly heavily influenced by her love of gardens and flowers. The central bouquets beautifully capture the depth of colour and texture of a floral arrangement, and are accentuated wonderfully by the sheen of the textured rayon backgrounds. Artificial fabrics might not always be appropriate, but perhaps we should be more experimental with manufactured fabrics when trying to capture the richness of the garden in our own quilts. anne-williams.co.uk

FLORAL THEMES Even if you don’t have your own outside plot which you can observe through the seasons, a trip to a garden or park will offer loads of inspiration. Don’t forget your camera, and sketchbook and pencils so you can capture and jot down the things which catch your eye. We tend to overlook the garden in the winter months, but it’s a great time to observe the sculptural outlines of trees, shrubs and hedges, which can be a wonderful resource for both quilt designs and quilting patterns. At any time of year, the garden can be a glorious show of colours, with combinations offering ready-made schemes for quilts. Or look closely at individual flowers, or even just petals, and you might see an inspiring range of shades. Also look for interesting textures which you might be able to use in your work, perhaps in quilting motifs or embellishments… Look for flowers, leaves, grasses and other plants which could be used for representational or stylised designs. Use the macro setting on your camera to get up really close and you’ll see fabulous natural patterns which might provide ideas for more abstract designs or quilting patterns.

Above left: North Country Appliqué, maker unknown, 1880–1890. This appliqué design features nine red and green floral wreaths bordered by a matching winding stem on a white background. It is densely hand quilted with a bellows pattern. Left: Baskets Quilt, maker unknown, 1900–1925. This Turkey red and white design includes thirty on-point blocks, plus a basket block in each corner. The plain white blocks have been quilted with rose motifs.

28 February 2017

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QUILTING WORLD floral quilts

"The quilt was given to to Thomas Machell, the Mills’ landlord, in lieu of rent.. Thomas was a tailor and draper and it’s thought that the quilt was made from surplus fabrics. Such lavish materials would have been very expensive at the time, so a quilt like this would have been an indicator of the owner’s wealth and status." THE QUILTERS’ GUILD COLLECTION We would like to thank The Quilters’ Guild of the British Isles for permission to publish these images of quilts from their Collection. You can explore other historic and contemporary quilts in the Collection at quiltmuseum.org.uk

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Above: Jubilee Quilt by Mrs Mills, 1887. Made in silks and velvets, and beautifully embellished with hand embroidery, the exquisite chrysanthemum designs in the quilt centre have been constructed in a log cabin style. It was made to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee – the chrysanthemum is known as the ‘golden flower’.

Images © The Quilters’ Guild Collection

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QUILT PROJECT cuddle bugs

cuddle bugs A charming pre-printed centre panel makes this quilt easy to stitch DESIGNED BY HEIDI PRIDEMORE, MADE BY HILARY GOODING MAKOWERUK.COM

Stars and hearts combine with an adorable pre-printed panel to make a cuddly quilt, perfect for a little one who loves the hungry caterpillar.

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CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS From Fabric A fussy cut one panel 23 x 43in.

From Fabric B (big red hearts) cut: Three 31⁄2in x width of fabric strips. Sew the strips together end to end with diagonal seams and cut two 31⁄2 x 43in strips Two 31⁄2 x 23in strips One 51⁄2in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into four 51⁄2in squares, for border cornerstones

From Fabric C (small hearts) cut: Five 3in x width of fabric strips and sub-cut into sixty-four 3in squares Five 11⁄2in x width of fabric strips and sub-cut into 128 11⁄2in squares Four 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips. Sew the strips together end to end with diagonal seams and cut two 21⁄2 x 601⁄2in strips Three 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips. Sew the strips together end to end with diagonal seams and cut two 21⁄2 x 441⁄2in strips

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From Fabric D (stars) cut one 31⁄2in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into four 31⁄2in squares, for border cornerstones.

From Fabric E (red) cut: Three 11⁄4in x width of fabric strips. Sew the strips together end to end with diagonal seams and cut two 11⁄4 x 49in strips Two 11⁄4 x 301⁄2in strips Two 3in x width of fabric strips and sub-cut into eight 3 x 51⁄2in strips and two 3in squares One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into fourteen 3in squares

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Heidi Pridemore

From Fabric F (blue) cut: One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into four 3 x 51⁄2in strips One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into eight 3in squares

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From Fabric G (yellow) cut: Two 3in x width of fabric strips and sub-cut into eight 3 x 51⁄2in strips and two 3in squares One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into fourteen 3in squares From Fabric H (green) cut: Two 3in x width of fabric strips and sub-cut into eight 3 x 51⁄2in strips and two 3in squares One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into fourteen 3in squares

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From Fabric I (purple) cut: One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into four 3 x 51⁄2in strips One 3in x width of fabric strip and sub-cut into eight 3in squares

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From Fabric J (stripe) for binding cut six 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips.

MAKING THE CENTRE PANEL

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Sew a 31⁄2 x 43in Fabric B strip to each side of the Fabric A panel. Fig 1. Sew a 31⁄2in Fabric D square to each end of a 311⁄2 x 23in Fabric B strip. Repeat to make a second strip. Sew the strips to the top and to the bottom of the panel to make centre block A.

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SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 112 x 162.5cm (44 x 64in) MATERIALS One panel 60cm (24in) of Fabric A (8335/R) for quilt centre 60cm (3⁄4yd) of Fabric B (big red hearts – 8336/R) for border and cornerstones 1.2m (11⁄4yd) of Fabric C (small hearts – 8337/R) for block backgrounds 10cm (1⁄8yd) of Fabric D (stars – 7673/X) for cornerstones 50cm (1⁄2yd) of Fabric E (red – 3476/R) for border and blocks 25cm (1⁄4yd) of Fabric F (blue – 3476/B), for blocks 25cm (1⁄4yd) of Fabric G (yellow – 3476/Y), for blocks 25cm (1⁄4yd) of Fabric H (green – 3476/G), for blocks 25cm (1⁄4yd) of Fabric I (purple – 3476/P), for blocks 132 x 183cm (52 x 72in) of wadding 132 x 183cm (52 x 72in) of backing fabric (stripe – 3474/M) 50cm (1⁄2yd) of Fabric J (stripe – 3874/M) for binding Suitable piecing and quilting threads WHERE TO BUY Fabrics used are from the I Love You range by Eric Carle for Andover Fabrics. PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

Fig 1 Adding the first border to the centre panel

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Fig 2 Adding the second border to the centre panel

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QUILT PROJECT cuddle bugs

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MAKING THE HEART BLOCKS

Sew a 21⁄2 x 601⁄2in Fabric C strip to each side of the quilt. Sew a 21⁄2 x 441⁄2in Fabric C strip to the top and to the bottom of the quilt to finish piecing the quilt top.

Sew a 11⁄4 x 49in Fabric E strip to each side of centre block A and press. Fig 2. Sew a 11⁄4 x 301⁄2in Fabric E strip to the top and to the bottom of block A and press. This pieced section should now be 301⁄2 x 501⁄2in and will be called the centre block.

Sew six assorted blocks together. Repeat to make a second strip. Sew a 51⁄2in Fabric B square to each end of the strips. Sew the strips to the top and to the bottom of the centre block.

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There are thirty-two heart blocks in total in the quilt. Make one block as follows. Place a 3in Fabric C square on the right-hand side of a 3 x 51⁄2in Fabric F strip, right sides together. Sew across the diagonal of the square from the upper right corner to the lower left corner. Fig 3. Flip open the triangle formed and press. Fig 4. Trim away excess fabric from behind the triangle, leaving a 1⁄4in seam allowance.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

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Press your quilt top and backing and remove any stray threads. Layer the quilt by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a clean flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the quilt top, centrally and right side up. The backing and wadding are larger than the quilt top. Pin, tack or spray baste the layers together.

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Repeat this process and follow Fig 5 to add another 3in Fabric C square to the left-hand side of the Fabric F strip. This makes one CFC unit. Fig 6.

2

Quilt as desired. Hilary quilted in-the-ditch, and then stitched a vermicelli free-motion design on the main panel, and a heart design in the border.

3

Place a 11⁄2in Fabric C square on the top left corner of a 3in Fabric F square, right sides together Fig 7. Sew across the diagonal of the smaller square from the upper right corner to the lower left corner. Flip open the triangle formed and press. Fig 8. Trim away excess fabric from behind the triangle 1⁄4in away from the sewn seam.

4

Repeat this process and follow Fig 9 to add a 11⁄2in Fabric C square to the upper right corner of the 3in Fabric F square. This makes one F unit. Fig 10.

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Sew two F units together as shown in Fig 11. Sew these units to the top of one CFC unit. This makes one Block One. Check it is 51⁄2in square.

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Repeat this whole process to make four of Block One in total.

To make the remaining twenty-eight heart blocks follow the same process described above, using Figs 12 to 15 for fabric identification. Make eight of Block Two, eight of Block Three, eight of Block Four and four of Block Five.

ASSEMBLING THE QUILT

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Refer to Fig 16 when assembling the quilt top. Sew ten assorted blocks together (see quilt picture). Repeat to make a second strip. Sew one strip to each side of the centre block.

make 8 C C

make 4

C Fig 3 Sewing a square to a rectangle

Fig 4 Corner triangle formed

Block One make 4

Fig 11 Assembling Block 1

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Fig 5 Adding another square

Block Two make 8

Fig 12 Block Two – make eight

F

F

C

Fig 6 Second corner triangle formed

Fig 7 Sewing a Fig 8 Corner Fig 9 Sewing Fig 10 small square to triangle the second Finished a large square formed square F unit

Block Three make 8

Block Four make 8

Block Five make 4

Fig 13 Block Three – make eight

Fig 14 Block Four – make eight

Fig 15 Block Five – make four

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QUILT PROJECT cuddle bugs

C B

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B Fig 16 Assembling the quilt

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When you have finished quilting, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges and square up the quilt ready for binding.

completing your stitching, neaten the short raw end of the starting piece and insert the ending piece into it. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

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To bind the quilt, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges. Join the binding strips together at right angles, pressing the seams open to reduce bulk. Trim away the ‘ears’ and fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Working from the right side and starting part-way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the quilt and sew in place, folding a mitre at each corner. Before

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Add a label, including at least your name, location and the date the quilt was made.

WIN! We have a Cuddle Bugs kit to give away! To enter visit popularpatchwork.com and click on WIN! Good Luck!

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BOOK EXTRACT patchwork holdall

patchwork holdall Raid your remnants box to make this spacious patchwork holdall. THIS PROJECT IS AN EDITED EXTRACT FROM SEWN BAGS FROM GMC

Use up scraps of shirting stripes to make this sturdy and stylish holdall. It makes a great carry bag for your shopping or, looking ahead, it’s an ideal beach bag.

GMC Editors

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BAG PANELS Draw three right-angled triangles of the following sizes onto paper (the measurements are the length of the long (diagonal) edge): 63⁄4in (large), 41⁄2in (medium), 21⁄4in (small). Draw a 3⁄8in seam allowance all around and then cut out roughly. Glue the paper templates onto card (cereal packets are ideal) and then cut out neatly on the outer drawn lines.

Use the templates to cut out your fabric pieces. You need to cut four triangles (one set) of the same fabric for each tile block. Try to ensure your stripes are always running in the direction of the longest side of the template; this will generally leave the two shorter sides cut on the bias. Cut pieces for: Four large tile blocks Twelve medium tile blocks Sixteen small tile blocks

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Take one set of triangles and place two of the triangles right sides together. Join on one short edge with a 3⁄8in seam. Try to make all the stripes align, but don’t worry if they are a bit uneven. As you are working on the bias the fabrics might stretch and lose their shape slightly, but any quirkiness will add character to your unique patchwork. Fig 1. Join the corresponding pair of triangles in the same way. Press both seams open with a hot iron.

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Place the pairs of triangles right sides together and join on the long edge with a 3⁄8in seam. Try to keep the two seams from step 3 aligned. Fig 2. Press the seam open with a hot iron. Fig 3. Trim away the ‘ears’. A large tile block should measure 71⁄2in, a medium one 51⁄4in and a small one 3in (these are unfinished sizes). Repeat steps 3 and 4 to make all of your tile blocks.

Take two large tile blocks, six medium tile blocks and eight small tile blocks and arrange as shown. Fig 4. Take your time to get a good colour balance and pattern distribution of the fabrics across the panel. First join all the pairs of small tile blocks. Press the seams open with a hot iron. In columns one and three, join a medium tile block to the top and bottom of each pair. In column two, join a medium block to the right-hand edge of the pair, and then join a large tile block to the top edge. In column four, join a medium block to the left-hand edge of the pair, and then join a large tile block to the top edge. Finally, join all the columns, pressing the seams open. Remember to use 3⁄8in seam allowances.

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Repeat step 6 to make a second patchwork panel.

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10

SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 55cm (213⁄4in) wide x 37cm (145⁄8in) x 15cm (6in) deep MATERIALS Scraps of striped fabrics for the patchwork tile blocks 50cm (11⁄2yd) natural linen for lower main bag 1.2m (11⁄4yd) floral fabric for lining Two 241⁄4in wide x 191⁄4in high rectangles of heavyweight fabric stiffener 3m (31⁄4yd) of 3cm (11⁄4in) wide bag handle webbing Paper, card and glue General sewing supplies WHERE TO BUY If you don’t have suitable scraps, look in charity shops or car boot sales for striped cotton shirts and blouses. Similar fabrics are also available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. PREPARATION All measurements include 3⁄8 seam allowances, unless otherwise stated. Press the seams open unless instructed otherwise.

Take one 241⁄4in wide x 191⁄4in high rectangle of stiffener and place it on your worktop. Right side up, place one patchwork panel on top. Place the patchwork panel centrally along the top edge, matching up the top raw edges. You will have an excess of approx 1⁄2in of stiffener on both sides and at the bottom edge of the patchwork panel. Right side down, place one lining rectangle on top, matching up its top and side edges with the patchwork panel – the lining will extend 3⁄8in beyond the patchwork panel at the bottom edge. Pin or tack the pieces in place and then join along the top edge with a 3⁄8in seam. Flip the lining upwards and fold it over the top edge of the stiffener so that its wrong side is against the other side of the stiffener. The stiffener is now sandwiched between the patchwork panel and lining, and the lining has created a mock binding along the top edge. Press with a hot iron. Tack or pin along the top edge and then topstitch along the lining side of the seam. Fig 6. Stay stitch by machine around the three raw sides and trim away the excess stiffener. This completes one bag panel

11

Repeat step 10 with the remaining stiffener rectangle, patchwork panel and lining rectangle to complete a second bag panel.

FINISHING THE BAG

1 2

Cut the bag handle webbing into two equal lengths for the handles.

From the linen cut two 231⁄4n wide x 71⁄2in high rectangles. Join one rectangle to the bottom edge of each patchwork panel. Press the seam towards the linen with a hot iron. Topstitch along the linen side of this seam. Fig 5.

Take one bag panel and place it patchwork side up on your worktop. Take one handle and position it so the short ends are aligned with the bottom edge of the panel, with each inner edge of the webbing approx 31⁄2in from the midpoint of the bottom edge. Pin or tack in place through all of the layers at the top and bottom edges of the panel. Make sure the tape isn’t twisted at the top where it forms the loop of the handle. On each side of the handle that is against the bag panel, stitch in place, sewing approx 1⁄8in in from the edge of the webbing. Start at the bottom edge, stitch along the top edge and then back down to the bottom edge. Fig 7.

9

3

8

From the lining fabric cut two 231⁄4in wide x 191⁄8in high rectangles.

Fig 1

Repeat step 2 with the remaining bag panel and handle.

Fig 2

Fig 3

Fig 4

38 February 2017

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BOOK EXTRACT patchwork holdall

handy hint For extra strength, stitch back and forth a few times across the top of the handles where they are against the top edge of the panels.

4

Place the two panels together, wrong sides facing. Machine stitch a 3⁄8in seam down one side, along the bottom edge and up the other side. Reverse stitch at the beginning and end of the seam to give it extra strength. Trim the seam allowance to approx 3 ⁄16in and then turn the bag wrong sides out. Press the seamed edges with a hot iron and then pin or tack before stitching a 3⁄8in seam down one side, along the bottom edge and up the other side. This creates a French seam, enclosing the raw edges of the seam on the right side of the bag. Reverse stitch at the beginning and end of the seam to give it extra strength. You can also zigzag stitch a few times back and forth across either end of this seam it if looks messy. Use an iron to press the seam at the bottom of your bag to one side.

5 6

From the remaining linen fabric cut two 43⁄4 wide x 11⁄2in high rectangles.

With the bag still wrong side out and working on one bottom corner, refold the bag so the side and bottom seams are aligned – this creates a point. Take the medium-sized triangle template and place it on the corner as shown. Fig 8. Mark the long edge with tacking stitches or pins.

7

Take one of the linen rectangles and on one long edge fold ⁄8in over to the wrong side and press. Open out the fold and then, right sides together, place the linen rectangle centrally on the bag corner. The crease line should match up with the marked line on the corner, with the majority of the linen rectangle’s width towards the centre of the bag. Make sure you have the same overhang at each short end of the rectangle. Pin or tack in position, then machine stitch a seam along the crease line through all of the layers. 3

Fig 5

Fig 6

Fig 8

Fig 9

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SEWN BAGS. Stylish Bags for Every Occasion. Published by GMC Books. Available from bookshops at £9.99 or visit thegmcgroup.com

8

Cut off the triangular corner tip 3⁄8in from the stitched line, i.e. to align with the outer long edge of the linen. Fold the short ends of the linen in to neaten those edges and then fold 3⁄8in over to the wrong side on the remaining long edge. Fold the strip over the to the other side of the corner to encase all the raw edges. Pin or tack and stitch down either by hand or machine. Fig 9.

9

Repeat steps 6–8 on the other bottom corner. Turn your bag right side out.

Fig 7

February 2017 39


QUILT PROJECT jewelled curves

jewelled curves Plain fabrics sewn together in curved pieces creates a lovely, jewel-like quilt. DESIGNED BY SUZANNE FISHER QUILTED BY CAROLYN CLARK

Tempted by some plain fabrics, I designed a way of displaying the jewel-like colours in blocks that had no straight lines.

Suzanne Fisher CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

1

From each of the ten solid fabrics cut one 12in x width of fabric strip. Sub-cut each strip into three 12in squares (for a total of thirty squares). Sort the thirty squares into sets of five, with each set consisting of five different fabrics (six sets of five in total).

2

From the binding fabric cut six 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips.

MAKING THE BLOCKS

1

Make a pile of five 12in squares, aligning the edges exactly. Fig 1. Press the stack together – this will help keep the fabrics together when you start cutting. Fig 2.

2

Place the stack of five fabrics on a cutting board and make a curved cut through all layers, about a third of the way up. Fig 3. Don’t make the curve too tight.

handy hint A sharp blade on your rotary cutter is essential to cut through five layers of fabric. Using spray starch will also firm up the fabrics and help create a stack that holds its shape well.

4

Label each pile from 1 through to 5. Now shuffle the fabrics as follows: Fig 5. Pile 1 – take the top piece of the pile and move it to the bottom of the pile Pile 2 – take the top two pieces and move them to the bottom of the pile Pile 3 – take the top three pieces and move them to the bottom of the pile Pile 4 – take the top four pieces and move them to the bottom of the pile Pile 5 – leave this as it is and do not shuffle

5

Begin piecing by working with two adjacent pieces. Fig 6. Take one piece, fold it to mark the centre of the curved edge, and finger press. Fig 7. Take up the neighbouring piece and finger press its centre too. Fig 8.

6

Place the two pieces right sides together, with the centre creases aligned. Fig 9. Pin at the crease if you wish. Line up the start of the seam as best you can – due to the nature of the curves this isn’t always exact. Sew a 1⁄4in seam along the curve, easing the fabric as you go and keeping the two curved edges together. Fig 10. Press the seam in the direction it wishes to lie – using some steam can help ease out any wrinkles.

3

Carefully make three more curved cuts, dividing the square into five segments. Fig 4.

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February 2017 41


QUILT PROJECT jewelled curves

SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 127 x 152.5cm (50 x 60in) MATERIALS 30.5cm (12in) x width of fabric strip of ten different solid fabrics 147 x 173cm (58 x 68in) of wadding 147 x 173cm (58 x 68in) of backing fabric 50cm (1⁄2yd) of binding fabric Suitable threads for piecing and quilting A 12-inch square quilting ruler for trimming blocks (optional) WHERE TO BUY Suzanne used ten bright coloured Kona solid fabrics. Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

7

Using the same process, join all the pieces together to piece one block. Fig 11. The block will not be evenly joined at the edges and will need trimming. Trim the block to 101⁄2in square. Fig 12. Press the finished block. Fig 13.

8

Follow this process to make five blocks from each set of colours, for a total of thirty blocks.

ASSEMBLING THE QUILT

1

Lay out the thirty blocks in six rows, with five blocks in each row. Mix the blocks up, rotating them as needed so the same colours are not touching.

2

Sew each row of five blocks together, pressing the seams of rows 1, 3 and 5 in one direction and rows 2, 4 and 6 in the other direction. Now sew all six rows together. If you wish, stitch all the way around the quilt a 1⁄4in from the edge to secure all the seam ends and keep the quilt square.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

1

Press your quilt top and backing and remove any stray threads. Layer the quilt by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a clean flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the quilt top, centrally and right side up. The backing and wadding are larger than the quilt top. Pin, tack or spray baste the layers together.

Fig 1 Making a pile of five fabrics

Fig 2 Align all edges of squares before pressing

Fig 3 Cutting the first curve

Fig 4 Making three more curved cuts

Fig 5 Shuffling the pieces

Fig 6 Working with two neighbouring piles

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February 2017 43


QUILT PROJECT jewelled curves

2

Quilt as desired. The quilt shown was quilted by Carolyn Clark, with irregularly spaced curving lines across the width of the quilt. When you have finished quilting, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges and square up the quilt ready for binding.

3

To bind the quilt, trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges. Join the binding strips together at right angles, pressing the seams open to reduce bulk. Trim away the ‘ears’ and fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together,

and press. Working from the right side and starting part-way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the quilt and sew in place, folding a mitre at each corner. Before completing your stitching, neaten the short raw end of the starting piece and insert the ending piece into it. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

4

Add a label, including at least your name, location and the date the quilt was made.

Fig 7 Marking the centre with a crease

Fig 8 Crease marking the centre on the neighbouring piece

Fig 9 Placing two pieces together, with centre creases aligned

Fig 10 Sewing the pieces together along the curve

Fig 11 All curves sewn for one block

Fig 12 Trimming the block square

Fig 13 A finished block

44 February 2017

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Dulwich Quilters – Thirty years and counting Member Khurshid Bamboat reflects on the history of the group, and shares the story of their 2016 celebrations. In 1984, Pat Salt and Dinah Travis advertised and ran a ten-week Sampler Quilt course in South London; five weeks at Pat’s house and five weeks at Dinah’s house. A few ladies joined this class and not only did they learn the foundations of patchwork and quilting but they became firm friends. At the end of this course in 1985, they decided to carry on quilting together and in 1986, Dulwich Quilters was officially born. This year marks our 30th anniversary and what a journey it has been. We still have five founder members in the group; sadly Adele Corcoran, an American who grew up with quilting and quilters in Pennsylvania, passed away in 2003 but her spirit and love for her craft have remained with those of us who were privileged to know her. Her close friend, Joyce Tunna, continues to host the monthly Monday evening meetings and has looked after the DQ archives since the very beginning - it is thanks to her that we have our history recorded in minute detail. From inception the group has always been very international, our members have come from America, Canada, Spain, Brazil, Pakistan, Scotland and three of our members lived in Uganda and Kenya as children and even went to the same school! Since we began, the group has always supported a chosen charity including Cancer Research, St. Christopher’s Hospice and even Battersea Dog’s Home! In 2005, the Kimono quilt raised over £2,000 for the earthquake fund in Pakistan and two of our members work very hard to organise the donation of quilts to Kings College Hospital Children’s Wards for Project Linus UK. We have also supported Fine

46 February 2017

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QUILTING WORLD thirty years and counting

"So what about the group’s future? How does anyone know what the future entails but I am quite confident that Dulwich Quilters will continue to exhibit and will always strive to go the extra mile as long as they can. We are definitely older, there is more grey in our hair and we probably all have pain in our joints. But give us some fabric, some thread and whatever tool we enjoy using and the spark will ignite again." Cell Work as one of our founder members, Caroline Wilkinson, has volunteered for this very worthwhile cause for many years, teaching patchwork and quilting to male prisoners. Over the years, our group quilt has doubled up as the charity raffle quilt - in 2000, we made Spaced Out – the Millennium Quilt which is now part of our treasured collection. Only God is Perfect – designed and coordinated by Ann Rutherford was accepted into the American Quilters Society show in Paducah in 2004 and got as far as the semi-finals and it also won a prize over here. Our group quilt in 2006, Paxton’s Stars, was a commission and now hangs in one of the local Health Centres. Every year, the Chairman sets a challenge for the group and it has become very popular with the public at our exhibitions. The first year it was ‘A Slice of Life’ – and this year it was ‘Through the Lens’. These quilts showcase the imagination and skill of each member and has become an integral part of the exhibition. Now let’s fast forward to 2016 – our 30th anniversary year – and what a year it has been. In July we held our Pearl anniversary party. Past as well as present members were invited – the only proviso was to wear some pearls and have a good time! We had great food, great company, sang (thanks to Lindsay’s clever tweaking of the Policeman’s song) and it was such fun to see ladies going home clutching their own party bag filled with goodies (who says only children can have party bags?). In the party bag was a small pearly brooch – they were asked to wear it to the exhibition in November, and we all did just that.

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We had a lot to do over the next few months. Not only did we have to get our individual quilts ready, we also had to finish off the raffle quilt, A Quilt of Many Colours as well as the Pearl Anniversary hanging. As it was a very special year we had decided to raffle the quilt for a different but very worthwhile charity – Hands Up for Uganda, which was started by Bobby and Martin Britnell to help the people of Kisaabwa in Southern Uganda. The money raised will be used for many projects including the creation of a self sustaining model farm. The other reason we chose this charity was because three of our members – Caroline, Sue and Lindsay - grew up in Uganda and have very happy memories and links to that country. The quilt is machine pieced, using Oakshott and Kaffe Fassett fabrics, and is big-stitch quilted using hand-dyed threads and is a very colourful and striking piece. Pearl Anniversary is very different – there are thirty 6in blocks - each representing a year – in cream and white fabrics and it had to include a circle. Each block is different and they have been made by present as well as past members – a very special hanging to commemorate a very special milestone. We also put together our Anniversary book – thanks to Joyce’s meticulous archives, Lindsay and I were able to produce a visual history of our thirty years as a group and it was to be shown for the first time at the show. A CV book was also put together by Ann Revell and that too would be ‘aired’ for the first time in November. Finally the week of the show was upon us and the Old Library at Dulwich College was transformed. We hung the larger quilts down the

February 2017 47


"There was such a variety of subject matter – whether it was traditional or contemporary, thoughtful or joyful – miniature to king size – there was something for everyone."

Clockwise from above: Barriers, Elspeth Facer; Blue and White China, Joyce Tunna; Not Much Sunshine miniature, Caroline Wilkinson; Japanese Fantasy, Jill Alexander; Kiwi Dreaming, Lindsay Symmes; Star Quilt, Brenda Ferns; Family Tree, Lindsay Symmes.

48 February 2017

middle and along the sides of the main room, while smaller quilts were hung on the walls of this room as well as in the smaller ‘tea’ room. The entrance was dominated by our Raffle quilt, the Pearl quilt, the Chairman’s Challenge, the sales table, the revamped History Board/ Anniversary & CV books and our very popular Children’s Quiz. It is true to say that we utilised every inch of available space. Because it was such a special year, we wanted every member to exhibit something and we had invited past members, especially those who had contributed so much to our group, to exhibit a piece. There was such a variety of subject matter – whether it was traditional or contemporary, thoughtful or joyful – miniature to king size – there was something for everyone. It was a pleasure to walk down the aisles and see the workmanship and thought that had gone into these pieces. I have always admired Caroline Wilkinson’s work and her great sense of colour and placement. Not Much Sunshine Plenty of Shadow - both miniature and normal size were one of my favourite pieces. It was equally a pleasure to see Joyce’s Blue and White China and Averil’s Trailing Leaves for their workmanship and beautiful hand quilting. There were so many quilts that each time I went around, I found something else to interest me and not enough room to mention them all. Barriers by Elspeth Facer is a small but very clever piece – I don’t think a photograph would do it justice. Jill Alexander and Lindsay Symmes had made two large quilts using the same pattern, but there the similarity ended. Jill had used Japanese fabrics on a white background in Japanese Fantasy and Lindsay had used New Zealand fabrics on a black background in Kiwi Dreaming. They were both very striking and would have been even more of a talking point had they been hung next to each other – that’s the only way people would have realised they were the same

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QUILTING WORLD thirty years and counting

pattern. Brenda Ferns’ Star Quilt was very dramatic and a crowd puller – she told me that her original design was much larger (it was pretty huge already). It was a prime example of how striking traditional quilts can be. Small quilts can be just as interesting and I was particularly intrigued with Maggie Jarman’s Are Basalts Black? Maggie always makes slightly off-the-wall work and this was no exception. It was beautifully executed and intriguing as well and it was my favourite of her pieces. It is true to say that the quilts were of a very high standard (as always) and I know that some viewers who had not been to our previous shows were pleasantly surprised at the quality of our work. It takes hours to put up an exhibition and it would not be possible without our team of male helpers and so it goes without saying they deserve our gratitude for their work as do our families and other ‘backroom’ people for their support and help.

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We insert a voting slip in our catalogue for the public to choose their favourite quilt and this year they were spoilt for choice. In the end the winning quilt was Star Quilt by Brenda Ferns, Caroline Wilkinson’s Not Much Sunshine Plenty of Shadow came second and Jill Alexander’s Japanese Fantasy was a well deserved third. So what about the group’s future? How does anyone know what the future entails but I am quite confident that Dulwich Quilters will continue to exhibit and will always strive to go the extra mile as long as they can. We are definitely older, there is more grey in our hair and we probably all have pain in our joints. But give us some fabric, some thread and whatever tool we enjoy using and the spark will ignite again. We owe it to those six ladies who began their quilting lives in a sampler class and started Dulwich Quilters to continue and keep the quilting flame alive. See you in 2018....

February 2017 49


HOME ACCESSORY PROJECT staggered placemats

staggered placemats Cheer up meal times with these bright and simple placemats. DESIGNED BY LOUISA GOULT SEWMOTION.COM BLOG.SEWMOTION.COM

Use left-over jelly roll strips from your stash and a clever tube technique to make these quick and easy mats to give as a gift or keep for yourself.

PIECING THE PATCHWORK

1

Cut each of the three 21⁄2in x width of fabric strips in half across the width and sew these six shorter lengths into one strip-pieced unit, sewing alternate seams in opposite directions to stop the work from ‘bowing’ (also see handy hint). Fig 1. Lightly press the seams in one direction from the front.

handy hint You will be cutting across the long seams, so reducing the stitch length on your machine to about 1.8 is a good idea, so your stitches won’t come undone when you cut the segments.

Fig 1 Sewing the strips together

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Louisa Goult

2

Fold the sewn unit in half, right sides together and sew across the top seam, making a tube unit. Fig 2. Use a ruler and rotary cutter to trim off an end neatly. Cut the tube unit into seven 21⁄2in segments. Fig 3.

3

Lay these units out in a row all facing the same way, with the same block at the top and any directional prints all in the same direction. Take the first tube unit, unpick the top seam and lay it out on a cutting mat. Take a second tube unit and move up a square from the first unit and unpick the seam. Lay this next to the first strip on the mat. Fig 4. Carry on like this with the remaining tube units, always moving up by one square, and checking that the squares are staggering upwards towards the right. Once you have all the units flat on the mat, check the pattern placement is correct. Fig 5.

Fig 2 Folding the unit in half to make a tube

February 2017 51


HOME ACCESSORY PROJECT staggered placemats

SKILL LEVEL

4

Take rows 2, 4 and 6 and re-press these seams in the opposite direction to rows 1, 3 and 5 and 7. Now pin and sew the strips together, matching seams neatly. Fig 6. Press seams open to reduce the bulk.

FINISHED SIZE Approx 30 x 48cm (12 x 19in) MATERIALS For one mat: Three 6.4cm (21⁄2in) x width of fabric strips in co-ordinating fabrics One 31.8 x 14cm (121⁄2 x 51⁄2in) rectangle of a contrasting solid/blender Two 5.7cm (21⁄4in) x width of fabric strips of the same solid/blender for binding 36 x 54cm (14 x 21in) of wadding 36 x 54cm (14 x 21in) of backing fabric Suitable threads for piecing and quilting WHERE TO BUY Louisa used fabrics from Dashwood Studio’s Fablewood and Twist ranges, together with an Essex Dyed Linen in Graphite by Robert Kaufman. Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

5

Sew the solid/blender rectangle to the right-hand side of the patchwork unit and press the seam towards the rectangle.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

1

Layer the mat by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a clean, flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the mat, centrally and right side up. The backing and wadding are larger than the mat. Pin, tack or spray baste the layers together.

2

Quilt as desired. Louisa used a walking foot to sew curved lines across the whole width of the mat. Trim the excess backing and wadding level with the mat.

3

To bind the mat, join the 21⁄4in binding strips together at right angles, pressing the seams open to reduce bulk. Trim away the ‘ears’ and fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Working from the right side and starting part-way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the mat and sew in place (leaving the first couple of inches unsewn). Fold mitres at each corner. Before completing your stitching, neaten the short raw end of the starting piece and insert the ending piece into it. Fold the binding over to the back of the mat and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

Fig 3 Cutting the tube into segments

Fig 4 Unpicking the segments to arrange the pattern

Fig 5 Laying out the pieced strips into a staggered pattern

Fig 6 Sewing the pieced strips together

52 February 2017

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THE SPRING QUILT FESTIVALS 2017 Find Us on Facebook

ARDINGLY 27 - 29 January 2017 Norfolk Pavilion, ARDINGLY, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17 6TL Advance ticket deadline: 13 January 2017

EDINBURGH

www.facebook.com/grosvenor NEW SHOW

HARROGATE

DUXFORD 3 - 5 March 2017 Conservation Hall, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, CAMBRIDGE CB22 4QR Advance ticket deadline: 17 February 2017

EXETER

17 - 19 February 2017

24 - 26 February 2017

31 March - 2 April 2017

Lowland Hall, Royal Highland Centre, Ingliston, EDINBURGH EH28 8NB

Exhibition Hall 2, Great Yorkshire Showground, HARROGATE HG2 8NZ

Westpoint Exhibition Centre, EXETER EX5 1DJ

Advance ticket deadline: 3 February 2017

Advance ticket deadline: 10 February 2017

Advance ticket deadline: 17 March 2017

Edinburgh Special ticket offer: see website or ring for details

Left: ‘Art Deco Study 1’ by Roz Rossiter (Radiance Quilters)

All displays are subject to change

❋ RADIANCE CHALLENGE 2015:

MIRROR IMAGE by Radiance Quilters – Longarm Learning Curve ❋ SASHIKO FROM SCOTLAND by Susan Briscoe’s Students ❋ THE FABRIC & FIBRE OF NATURE by Karen Lane ❋ AN ONGOING JOURNEY by Annelize Littlefair ❋ PAISLEY RENAISSANCE by Sandie Lush ❋ QUILTING MY GUILTY PLEASURE by Diane Abram ❋ ALCHEMY by Gilli Theokritoff ❋ JOURNAL QUILT CHALLENGE 2017: Let’s Dance ❋ SOUTH WEST QUILTERS’ CHALLENGE: UP, UP AND AWAY

Above: ‘Nature’s Treasures’ by Diane Abram

Above: Detail of ‘When Rainbows Dance’ by Annelize Littlefair Left: ‘David’ by Gilli Theokritoff

(Exeter only)

❋ MADE IN CORNWALL by Cornish

Members of South West Quilters

(Exeter only)

❋ ENCHANTED ISLANDS by Exe Valley Quilters (Exeter only)

Above: ‘Yellow Poppies’ by Karen Lane Right:‘Melin Wynt (Windmill)’ by Sandie Lush

QUILTING SUPPLIERS STANDS Shop with all of our dedicated patchwork exhibitors. Fabrics, books, sewing machines and notions to cover all your needs.

Above: ‘Riverside Trees’ by Karen Lane

WORKSHOP PROGRAMME

Participate in our workshops by quilting experts. Telephone for a list or download from the website. (Not available at Ardingly)

❋ OPEN 10am-4.30pm (4pm Sunday) ❋ FREE CAR PARKING ❋ DISABLED ACCESS ❋ RESTAURANT BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE & SAVE MONEY! BOOK ON-LINE, BY POST OR BY PHONE* Advance Tickets: Adults £7.00, Senior Citizens £6.00, Children (8-16) £2.00 On The Door: Adults £8.00, Senior Citizens £7.00, Children (8-16) £3.00 ENQUIRIES: Grosvenor Shows Ltd, 282 High Road, Whaplode, Spalding, Lincolnshire PE12 6TG Tel: 01406 372600 & 01406 372601 Fax: 01406 372602 E-mail: grosvenorshows@btconnect.com Office Hours : Mon - Fri 9.00am - 5.00pm Website: www.grosvenorshows.co.uk *All card bookings are subject to a 50p booking fee

Deadline for advance ticket bookings: 2 weeks prior to the show


THE SPRING QUILT FESTIVAL HARROGATE Hall 2, Great Yorkshire Showground, Harrogate, HG2 8NZ Friday 24th - Sunday 26th FEBRUARY 2017 10am-4.30pm (4pm Sunday)

FEATURE DISPLAYS

Find Us on Facebook

NEW SHOW

www.facebook.com/grosvenor

❋ RADIANCE CHALLENGE 2015: MIRROR IMAGE by Right:‘Kioni Harbour’ by Karen Lane Radiance Quilters – Longarm Learning Curve ❋ SASHIKO FROM SCOTLAND by Susan Briscoe’s Students ❋ JOURNAL QUILT CHALLENGE 2017: Let’s Dance ❋ THE FABRIC & FIBRE OF NATURE by Karen Lane ❋ PAISLEY RENAISSANCE by Sandie Lush ❋ AN ONGOING JOURNEY by Annelize Littlefair ❋ QUILTING MY GUILTY PLEASURE by Diane Abram ❋ ALCHEMY by Gilli Theokritoff All displays are subject to change

Above:‘Three Tall Trees’ by Karen Lane

Above:‘28 Petals’ by Adrienne Quinlan (Radiance Quilters)

Above:‘Lelog Gloyw (Lustrous Lilac)’ by Sandie Lush

Patchwork & Quilting Suppliers Stands WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Above: Detail of ‘Sea Urchins’ by Annelize Littlefair

Participate in our numerous workshops by quilting experts. Telephone for a list or download from the website.

Above:‘Magpie’ by Gilli Theokritoff

❋ OPEN 10am-4.30pm (4pm Sunday) ❋ FREE CAR PARKING ❋ DISABLED ACCESS ❋ RESTAURANT BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE & SAVE MONEY! BOOK ON-LINE, BY POST OR BY PHONE* Advance Tickets: Adults £7.00, Senior Citizens £6.00, Children (8-16) £2.00 On The Door: Adults £8.00, Senior Citizens £7.00, Children (8-16) £3.00 ENQUIRIES: Grosvenor Shows Ltd, 282 High Road, Whaplode, Spalding, Lincolnshire PE12 6TG Tel: 01406 372600 & 01406 372601 Fax: 01406 372602 E-mail: grosvenorshows@btconnect.com Office Hours : Mon - Fri 9.00am - 5.00pm Website: www.grosvenorshows.co.uk *All card bookings are subject to a 50p booking fee

Deadline for advance ticket bookings: 10th February 2017


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Malvern

Three Counties Showground, MALVERN, Worcs. WR13 6NW Thursday 9 - Saturday 11 March 2017 10am - 4.30pm

Papercraft

Glass Creations Image: Tracey Quinn

● Shop with a huge variety of craft exhibitors ● Demonstrations & Workshops List available online www.grosvenorshows.co.uk

Knitting

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Book in advance online, by post or by phone and SAVE £2

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(Discount available until 24 February 2017) 50p booking fee per transaction applies to credit / debit cards

Jewellery Making

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Image: Kelanash Designs

Image: Ann Pickard

Sewing Fabrics & Notions

Quilting Above: Detail of ‘Sea Urchins’ by Annelize Littlefair

Beading Image: The Bead Selection

ENQUIRIES: Grosvenor Shows Ltd, 282 High Road, Whaplode, Spalding, Lincolnshire PE12 6TG Tel: 01406 372600 & 01406 372601 Fax: 01406 372602 E-mail: grosvenorshows@btconnect.com Office Hours : Mon - Fri 9.00am - 5.00pm Website: www.grosvenorshows.co.uk


56 February 2017

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QUILTING WORLD penrose patchwork

Penrose Patchwork

Lindsey and Stuart Malin share their mathematical adventures into Penrose patchwork design. After many years of faithful service, the patchwork quilt on our bed was deemed to be beyond further repair and was pensioned off. As, indeed, we also had been, though it would be for our former employers to say how faithful they considered our service to have been. Lindsey had been a Curator of Pictures at a National Museum and had spent her leisure time learning new crafts, among them rug hooking and patchwork, both a wonderful way of expressing a love of colour and design in a practical way. Much of her retirement had been spent in this way, and also painting, principally botanical illustrations. But the quiltless bed moved her to put down her paint-brush and take up her needle again. She based the design for the new patchwork quilt on blue and white patterned squares of two sizes. Having just spent two years completing a Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt by hand for a friend, Lindsey was in need of a quick make and decided to take to the sewing machine to piece and quilt our new bed cover. To complement this we felt the need for two cushions, but not to the same design or we might lose them on the quilt! Five of the quilt fabrics were chosen for the cushion. As a one-time Professor of Mathematics at Cairo University (strange, but true) I looked at Lindsey’s sample book of patchwork designs and was reminded of the mathematically elegant Penrose tiling. From this I proceeded to work out the design for the cushion.

Image 2 A finished sewn Penrose panel

"Among many other things, the distinguished scientist Sir Roger Penrose devised not just one, but three methods of tiling an infinite space, all having the interesting property that, if simple rules are followed, the pattern will be aperiodic, in other words, will never repeat."

Fig 1 The Penrose design

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Fig 2 The next Penrose design we are working

February 2017 57


QUILTING WORLD penrose patchwork

Fig 3

"This is just a taste of the infinite (literally, since the pattern doesn’t repeat) possibilities of Penrose patchwork." Most patchwork is composed of regular polygons of 3, 4 or 6 sides – the equilateral triangle, square, or hexagon. Five-fold symmetry is a bit trickier, since three pentagons, with their 108 degree internal angle, don’t tessellate. The simplest way of achieving 5-fold symmetry is with a rhombus (diamond) with the sharper angle chosen to be 72 degrees. Five of these meet up happily at a point and provide a further five slots of 144 degrees into which the next two diamonds can fit, and so on, to produce a pleasing starburst. But that has been done before, so we were looking for something a little less usual, necessarily involving more than one basic shape. Among many other things, the distinguished scientist Sir Roger Penrose devised not just one, but three methods of tiling an infinite space, all having the interesting property that, if simple rules are followed, the pattern will be aperiodic, in other words, will never repeat. Two of these tilings each require only two shapes of tile. If you are interested in the details, search for Penrose tiling on the internet, but be warned, it gets quite heavy. The floors of at least two mathematical institutes are tiled in this way, but, so far as we knew, it had never before been used for patchwork. We have since found that we were not the first to do so, but there is still pleasure in an independent discovery. Not having an infinite cushion, we settled for a simple medallion of Penrose tiling based on Fig 1. This involves four fat and three skinny rhombuses for each of the five different materials selected from those used in the quilt, making a total of 35 pieces. The fat rhombus is the same shape as that used for the starburst, having interior angles of 72 and 108 degrees. The interior angles of the skinny rhombus are 36 and 144 degrees. The lengths of the outside diamonds are 4cm. The result is shown in the photograph at the top of page 57, which has been designed so that no colour shares an edge with the same colour. This small sample of the infinite tiling has 5-fold rotational symmetry, but a larger sample would show that this is not, in general, the case. The second cushion, when it is complete, will be based on Fig 4, which uses kite and dart shapes, but this is more complicated because the dart has a re-entrant angle, so it will need to be made of two joined triangles to avoid the awkward Y-seam. As with the earlier pattern, this small sample shows a non-typical rotational symmetry. Lindsey has been colouring copies of the Fig 1 pattern to produce alternative designs. The hope was that a ‘tumbling block’ pattern could be made, using the 3D appearance of the tessellations. It was not found possible, however, to get a symmetrical tumbling-block design although a version was attempted using three colours Fig 3. You may like to experiment yourself as there seems to be potential for many interesting arrangements and shapes within shapes. The colour arrangement of the finished cushion appears slightly uncomfortable as the colours are dotted around with no obvious symmetry, but one simple coloured design, Fig 4, shows clearly that the tessellations in this small sample are indeed symmetrical, and this would also make a pleasing self contained design for a cushion cover, again using five colours. Fig 5 shows yet another coloured variation of the design. This is just a taste of the infinite (literally, since the pattern doesn’t repeat) possibilities of Penrose patchwork. And there is no penalty for breaking the above-mentioned rules to create yet more patterns if you find infinity a bit restrictive. In case you should be moved to try it for yourself, Fig 6 shows the geometry of the four shapes, so that they can be reproduced with a ruler and protractor. The completed cushion is on my side of the bed and enables me to have beautiful mathematical thoughts both inside and outside my head while dozing.

58 February 2017

Fig 4

Fig 5

Figs 3, 4 and 5 Different colour ways of the original Penrose design

Fig 6

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See pattern sheet for village playmat templates


QUILT PROJECT village playmat

village playmat Use this versatile design to create your own village – perhaps a little helper would like to help with the layout! DESIGNED AND MADE BY MANDY MUNROE MANDYMUNROE.WORDPRESS.COM

When my children were small, I painted a piece of chipboard for them with leftover paint samples. One side had streets and parking spaces for cars, on the other, fields and lakes for toy animals. I was reminded of them playing happily together when I saw this village print and it occurred to me that a playmat which doubled as a quilt would be much nicer!

Mandy Munroe stay safe Babies and young children can overheat very quickly and there is a risk of smothering, so don’t leave them unattended with a quilt.

CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS Cutting instructions are not included for the foundation-pieced tree units. See ‘Tree blocks’ for details.

1

From the large-scale village print cut the following: Seven 61⁄2in squares Nineteen 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles (Mandy cut ten horizontal and nine vertical) One 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangle (Mandy cut this vertically) One 21⁄2in square

The cutting instructions provided give the pieces you need to make the blocks for the quilt as shown here. As the design is made up of different blocks you may wish to make more or fewer of some of the blocks, or remodel the designs given. Note also that with directional prints, for some blocks you need to choose whether you need horizontal or vertical pieces. So you may prefer to cut out pieces as you go, but if you use more or less of some of the fabrics then you might need to buy more or less of some of the prints.

4

From the cream/white print cut the following: Nine 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles Seven 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangles One 21⁄2in square

2

5

3

6

From the grey print cut the following: Forty-two 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles Thirteen 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangles One 21⁄2in square From the mottled turquoise cut the following: Two 61⁄2in squares Seven 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles One 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangle

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From the turquoise print cut the following: Three 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles One 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangle Seven 1 x 61⁄2in strips (inserts) From the green print cut the following: Two 61⁄2in squares Fourteen 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles Nine 1 x 61⁄2in strips (inserts)

February 2017 61


B

C1

A

B

B1

B

A

C

D TREE

C

B1

A

B2

B1

B1

B

A

B1

B

C

B

C

A

B

C TREE

A

B

B1

B

B1

B

B

C1 TREE

B

B

B

A

B2

A

A

A

B

A

B1

B1

C

C

B1

B

SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 115.5cm (451⁄2in) MATERIALS 75cm (7⁄8yd) large-scale village print (allows for fussy cutting) 60cm (3⁄4yd) grey print (roads) 30cm (3⁄8yd) mottled turquoise (water) 30cm (3⁄8yd) cream/white print (sand/gravel) 10cm (1⁄8yd) turquoise print (pond/stream foliage) 40cm (3⁄8yd) green print (fields/foliage) Scraps of red/brown (tree trunks) 40cm (3⁄8yd) binding fabric 125.5cm (491⁄2in) of backing fabric 125.5cm (491⁄2in) of wadding Threads for piecing and quilting Paper for foundation templates WHERE TO BUY Mandy used fabrics from Dominicana by Vanessa Vargas Wilson for Timeless Treasures: www.ttfabrics.com. Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. Don’t worry about being too specific when choosing prints – leave something to the imagination! PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

Block layout

A BLOCKS The A blocks are simply 61⁄2in squares. Take care with the orientation of the village print blocks. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

1

B, B1 AND B2 BLOCKS B, B1 and B2 blocks are made from three 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles. Some are plain (B), some have a single insert (B1) and some have a double insert (B2). The inserts, made from 1 x 61⁄2in strips, create a 3D effect of pond foliage (turquoise print) and foliage.

1

handy hint If you have one, you will find a design wall useful for playing with arrangements of your blocks, or for building up the design as you go along if you are varying the blocks as given here. If you don’t have a design wall then a large sheet pinned to a curtain works well as alternative, or you could hang a large piece of wadding on the wall.

Fig 1 Insert strip stitched in place 62 February 2017

Fig 2 A vertical B1 block

2

B blocks. Take three 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in strips and join them on their long edges to make a 61⁄2in square (unfinished) block. There are sixteen B blocks in total, nine horizontal and seven vertical. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

3

B1 blocks. Take the 1 x 61⁄2in insert strip of your choice and, wrong sides together, fold it in half lengthways and press. Right sides together and matching up the long raw edges, place

Fig 3 A vertical B2 block

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QUILT PROJECT village playmat

the folded insert strip on top of one of the 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangles the strip will be inserted between. Sew the insert strip in place within the 1⁄4in seam allowance. Fig 1.

3

Take the second 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle the strip will be inserted between and place it right sides together with the unit made in step 3. Join on the long edge where the strip has been inserted to ‘trap’ the insert between the two rectangles. Join the third 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle to one of the remaining long raw edges to complete a B1 block. Fig 2. Mandy has made a total of ten B1 blocks, some horizontal and others vertical, some with turquoise print inserts and others with green print inserts. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

Cut the following fabric pieces: Five 21⁄2 x 3in green rectangles (A1) Three 21⁄2in wide x 41⁄2in high background rectangles, then cut from top left to bottom right to give six triangles (A2) – you need five, so one triangle is spare (Fig 4) Three 21⁄2in wide x 41⁄2in high background rectangles, then cut from top right to bottom left to give six triangles (A3) – you need five, so one triangle is spare (Fig 4) Five 1 x 11⁄2in red/brown rectangles (B1) Two 11⁄2in background squares (B2 and B3) Mandy used village and cream/white prints for the background pieces (A2, A3, B2 and B3).

5

4

4

B2 blocks. The inserts are added as described in steps 2 and 3, but have been inserted between both long seams of the block. Fig 3. Mandy has made a total of two B2 blocks, one horizontal and one vertical, both with two green print inserts. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

Foundation paper piece five tree body sections and five tree trunk sections. Join a tree body and tree trunk to complete each tree unit. Each tree unit should measure 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in (unfinished). Fig 5. At this stage, remove the paper foundations from the seam allowances only. See ‘Foundation piecing tips’ on page 64 for details.

C AND C1 BLOCKS

1

C and C1 blocks are made from three 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangles and one 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle. Most are plain (C) but one has a single green insert (C1).

2

C blocks. Take three 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in strips and join them on their long edges to make a 41⁄2 x 61⁄2in unit. Take the 21⁄2x 61⁄2in strip and join it to one of the 61⁄2in edges to make a 61⁄2in square (unfinished) block. There are six C blocks in total, three with the 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle running horizontally and three with it running vertically. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

3

C1 block. Make the block as in step 2. Mandy has added a green insert down one of the outer edges, so at this stage the insert has just been stitched in place and will be trapped in place when the blocks are joined. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

TREE BLOCKS

1 2

There are three tree blocks: C tree, C1 tree and D tree. Before making the blocks, you need to foundation piece the tree units.

Using the foundations provided on the pattern sheet, trace five foundation A (tree body section) and five foundation B (tree trunk section) templates.

Fig 4 Cutting A2 (right) and A3 (left) pieces

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5

C tree block. Join a 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangle either side of one tree unit, and then join a 21⁄2in x 61⁄2in rectangle to the top edge. Remove the paper foundation. Fig 6. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

6

C1 tree block: Take one 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in rectangle and join a tree unit to each side. Take a 1 x 61⁄2in insert strip and join it to the top edge, and then add a 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle to the top edge to trap the insert. Remove the paper foundations. Fig 7. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

7

D tree block. To the top edge of one tree unit join a 21⁄2in background square. To the bottom edge of the remaining tree unit join a 21⁄2in grey print square. Join these two pieced rectangles, and then to one remaining 61⁄2in raw edge join a 21⁄2 x 61⁄2in rectangle. Remove the paper foundations. Fig 8. See Block layout, but vary as you wish.

QUILT TOP ASSEMBLY

1

Arrange the blocks into seven rows of seven blocks each. You can follow Block layout or arrange in a layout of your choice.

Fig 5 A completed tree unit

February 2017 63


QUILT PROJECT village playmat

2

Once you are happy with your layout, join the blocks into rows and then join the rows. Press the seams of each row in the same direction and the seams of alternate rows in the opposite direction. The seam intersections will then nest when you join the rows. Press the long seams joining the rows to one side in the same direction each time.

foundation piecing tips Remember that the marked side of the foundation (the side you will be stitching) is the reverse of the finished block. If you are new to this technique, you may prefer to cut your fabric pieces a bit bigger than listed in step 3. Use a smaller stitch than usual so that the seams don’t come apart when you remove the foundation. Extend your stitching by a few stitches at each end of the seam line. When trimming the seam allowances, take care to ensure that the darker fabrics don’t show through the background fabric on the right side. To piece, place fabric piece 1 right side up over section 1 on the unprinted side of your foundation, making sure that the edges extend equally around the edges of marked lines – you can hold it up to a window to check – and then pin in place. Place fabric piece 2 right side down on top of fabric piece 1, matching up the raw edges on the side they will be joined, making sure that when folded back along the seam line section 2 will be covered by fabric 2. Pin in place and then turn the foundation over and stitch on the marked line between sections 1 and 2. Fold the foundation away from the seam and trim to 1⁄8–1⁄4in. Fold the foundation back, turn the work to the fabric side, flip fabric 2 open and press. Continue working in this way in numerical order until all the pieces have been added to the foundation. Give the foundation a good press and trim on the marked outer line, i.e. trim to include the seam allowance.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

1

Give your quilt top and backing a good press. Layer the quilt by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a clean flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the quilt top, centrally and right side up; the backing and wadding are slightly larger than the quilt

Fig 6 The C tree block

64 February 2017

Fig 7 The C1 tree block

top. Working from the centre outwards, pin with quilters’ safety pins or tack to secure.

2 3 4

Quilt as desired. Mandy stitched in the ditch to anchor each row. She then outlined the road (grey print) strips.

Trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges.

From the binding fabric cut five 21⁄4in wide strips across the width of the fabric. Join the strips at right angles. Press the seams open to reduce bulk and then trim away the ‘ears’. Fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press.

5

Working from the right side and starting part way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the quilt and sew in place, folding a mitre at each corner. Join the ends neatly. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

Fig 8 The D tree block

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Stuart's Surgery

Each month Stuart Hillard answers your quilty questions!

We all love fabric, that's a given, but there are other elements to our quilts, bags and stitcheries which often cause consternation and confusion. Ruth from Porthcawl emailed me recently asking about interfacings, fusibles and stabilisers, so this month let's talk about what lies beneath! Anyone who's ever done fusible appliqué will be familiar with fusible web, that fine mesh of dried glue attached to a paper backing that we use for appliqués. The brand we are most familiar with is Bondaweb although it's now universally branded as Vliesofix... rest assured only the name has been changed. Other brands of fusible web are available such as Heat 'n' Bond and Steam 'a' Seam and they all do a great job of fixing appliqué shapes in place whilst we stitch around them for fast, raw edged appliqués. Some brands have a ‘light’ or ‘lite’ version which creates a rather less stiff finished fabric but these must be sewn around to finish. Others labeled ‘ultra’ can be left un-sewn and are washable following the manufacturer’s instructions. Always cover your ironing surface with baking parchment to protect the surface from glue and do the same to protect your iron's sole plate. Cover the appliqué with baking parchment and iron through the paper. I always take a roll of baking paper to workshops as the irons are almost always ruined with glue residue. So easily avoided! I sometimes use a thin (less than quarter inch) strip of light fusible on the back of my quilt bindings to fuse the binding to my quilt. I then stitch ‘in the ditch’ from the front of my quilt to attach the binding completely by machine and it's much faster than pinning or using clips. Interfacings are a completely different product and do a very different job to fusible web, but they are often muddled together in the same section of a haberdashery, leading to confusion. Interfacings, familiar to dressmakers in particular, are used to add weight, body or stiffness to a fabric. Consider the collar and cuffs of a shirt or blouse. They are made of the same fabric as the main body of the garment yet they are firmer and stiffer, that's because they are interfaced. Interfacings come in a variety of weights depending on the degree of firmness you require and the fabric you are applying them to. You should generally choose an interfacing that is the same weight or lighter than your chosen fabric, if it is heavier it can ‘dominate’ the finished project. Interfacings are available in fusible and sew-in versions. I generally choose the fusible version as it is easiest to use, unless the fabric I am using would be spoiled by pressing (for instance, if it is textured, or has heat sensitive elements like sequins). You can also buy interfacing in woven, non-woven and knitted versions. Non-woven interfacing is perfect for fabrics with little or no stretch,

66 February 2017

'Welcome Home' appliqué wall hanging by Stuart Hillard

like quilt weight cottons, or when you want to prevent stretching, for example using T shirt panels or baby grows for a memory quilt. Interfacings are most useful for quilters when we are mixing different weights and types of fabrics in a quilt project, for example a memory quilt, crazy quilt, landscape wall hanging or art quilt. Choose interfacings which will bring all fabrics to a similar weight and control any fabrics with stretch in them. Use heavier interfacings in bags and purses to create more structure and body. Stabilisers are the final group and are most commonly used when we are doing machine embroidery, heavy thread embellishing and some machine appliqué. Stabilisers are an extra layer added to the back of our chosen fabrics which often heavily reinforce or ‘stabilise’ it whilst we add

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STUART'S SURGERY

Stuart's 'Bali Butterflies' appliqué throw

intense machine sewn details to the fabric. Try this without a stabiliser and your fabric will simply buckle and distort under the strain of all that stitching. With a stabiliser attached to the back, the machine embroidery, free motion embroidery and embellishing will sit beautifully and the underlying fabric will not distort. Once the embroidering or stitching is complete the stabiliser may be removed or left in place - this very much depends on the type of project and the stabiliser you have chosen. Some are ‘leave in’ so be prepared for extra stiffness and an extra layer in your finished piece or use a different stabiliser. Others are ‘tear away’ or are water or heat dissolvable... these are particularly useful if your stitching is of a delicate and easily damaged nature. Fusibles, interfacings and stabilisers are like the

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understudies, backstage hands and tech support on a movie or theatre extravaganza. They rarely make it ‘on-stage’ and don't get the applause like the stars do but they play a vital ‘supporting’

keep in touch.. Have a wonderful month sewing and write to me at stuarthillard@me.com with your questions for Stuart's Surgery. You can also follow me on Instagram @ stuarthillardsews and catch me on Create and Craft TV for more top tips, projects and inspirations!

February 2017 67


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QUILT PROJECT sweet valentine

sweet valentine Rows of sugar sweet candy hearts make this Valentine quilt something special! DESIGNED AND MADE BY DEBBIE VON GRABLER-CROZIER SALLYANDCRAFTYVAMP.BLOGSPOT.CO.UK

I love how pretty pinks team so well with a low-volume, almost industrial-style, print. The grey and white stops the pink from being, well, too pink. Hearts are a fabulous motif for saying what needs to be said at any time of the year. But the beauty of this quilt is that apart from a few simple measurements it’s maths free! I love the look of a stripy binding. To get the same striped effect as me you need a print with diagonal stripes, which is cut on the opposite diagonal to the printed stripes to make the binding.

Debbie Von Grabler-Crozier CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

handy hint

1

From the low-volume background print cut the following: Seven 73⁄4in wide strips across the width of the fabric, and then subcut to give thirty-two 73⁄4in squares (background blocks) Three 4in wide strips across the width of the fabric, and then subcut to give thirty-two 4in squares

2

From the remaining (heart) prints, cut 41⁄4in wide strips across the width of the fabrics. See ‘handy hint’. Debbie cut the following 41⁄4in wide strips: Posy Chain Freshlilly: two Posy Chain Pinktense: two He Loves Me Plum: three Tire Swing Bubble: two Chopsticks Rainbow: one Buttercup Blossoms: two

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For the heart print fabrics, one 41⁄4in wide strip cut across the width of the fabric is enough to make three blocks. That is, 1 ⁄8yd will give you enough for three blocks. You need to make thirty-two heart blocks in total, so need at least eleven 41⁄4in wide width-of-fabric strips.

MAKING THE HEART BLOCKS

1

Take a 41⁄4in wide heart fabric strip and place it vertically and right side up on your worktop. Take a 4in background square and, right sides together, place it at the top of the strip, matching up the top and right hand edges. You will have 1⁄4in excess heart fabric on the left-hand side of the square. Stitch the square in place. Fig 1.

February 2017 71


2 3

Trim the bottom of the heart fabric strip level with the bottom of the background square. Open out the unit and press. Fig 2.

SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 147.5cm (58in) square MATERIALS Based on fabrics with a usable width of 44in. See ‘Where to buy’ for more details. 1.8m (2yds) Collide Purity (low-volume background print) 25cm (1⁄4yd) Posy Chain Freshlilly 25cm (1⁄4yd) Posy Chain Pinktense 40cm (3⁄8yd) He Loves Me Plum 25cm (1⁄4yd) Tire Swing Bubble 15cm (1⁄8yd) Chopsticks Rainbow 25cm (1⁄4yd) Buttercup Blossoms 50cm (1⁄2yd) binding fabric 157.5cm (62in) square backing fabric 157.5cm (62in) square wadding Threads for piecing and quilting WHERE TO BUY The background print is Collide Purity from the Lagom Collection. The heart prints are from the Playground by Amy Sinibaldi Collection. Both collections are by Art Gallery Fabrics: artgalleryfabrics.com. Similar fabrics are also available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services. PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

Take the remaining heart fabric strip and place it vertically and right side up on your worktop. Take the unit made in step 2 and, right sides together, place it at the top of the strip, matching up the top and right hand edges. You will have 1⁄4in excess heart fabric on the left-hand side of the unit. Stitch the unit in place. Fig 3.

4

Trim the bottom of the heart fabric strip level with the bottom of the unit. Open out and press. This completes one heart block, which should measure 73⁄4in square (unfinished). Fig 4.

5

Repeat steps 1–4 to make a total of thirty-two heart blocks. You should be able to make three heart blocks from each heart fabric strip. Debbie made the following heart blocks: Posy Chain Freshlilly: four Posy Chain Pinktense: five He Loves Me Plum: eight Tire Swing Bubble: six Chopsticks Rainbow: three Buttercup Blossoms: six

ASSEMBLING THE QUILT TOP

1

Take your background blocks and heart blocks and arrange them into eight rows of eight blocks each. Alternate the plain and hearts blocks, and place the heart blocks in the same orientation each time. Try to get a good mix of prints and colours across the quilt top.

2

Once you are happy with your layout, join the blocks into rows and then join the rows. Press the seams of each row in the same direction and the seams of alternate rows in the opposite

Fig 1 Background square stitched in place

Fig 2 Background square and trimmed heart fabric strip

Fig 3 Unit stitched in place

Fig 4

72 February 2017

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QUILT PROJECT sweet valentine

direction. The seam intersections will then nest when you join the rows. Press the long seams joining the rows to one side in the same direction each time.

QUILTING AND FINISHING

1

Give your quilt top and backing a good press. Layer the quilt by placing the backing fabric wrong side up on a clean flat surface, followed by the wadding and then the quilt top, centrally and right side up; the backing and wadding are slightly larger than the quilt top. Working from the centre outwards, pin with quilters’ safety pins or tack to secure.

2

Quilt as desired. Debbie quilted a pattern of meandering wavy lines. She stitched diagonally across the quilt so that the lines went across the heart shapes.

3

Trim the excess backing and wadding level with the quilt top edges. Debbie then rounded each corner using a tea plate. Make sure you do each corner the same.

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4

If you have rounded your quilt corners you will need to use binding that has been cut on the bias so that you can ease it around the curves. From your binding fabric cut 21⁄2in wide strips on the bias which when joined end to end create a length approx 244in long. Join the binding strips at right angles. Press the seams open to reduce bulk and then trim away the ‘ears’. Fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press.

5

Working from the right side and starting part way down one edge, match the raw edges of the binding to the raw edges of the quilt and sew in place, easing the binding in place around the curve of each corner. Join the ends neatly. Fold the binding over to the back of the quilt and neatly slipstitch in place by hand.

6

Add a label, including at least your name, location and the date the quilt was made.

February 2017 73


Olympia, London 2nd – 5th March 2017 Royal Highland Centre, Edinburgh 27th – 30th April 2017 The definitive event for anyone with a love of textile based crafts. Supplies, workshops and textile art.

• • • • •

200 Specialist Exhibitors Over 150 Workshops The Creative Living Theatre The Dressmaking Studio Features, demonstrations & inspirational galleries

Products to help you with: Knitting – Sewing – Dressmaking – Quilting – Crochet Cross Stitch – Interiors – Textile Art – Crafts

Quote POPA17 for £2* off! *Valid on adult tickets in advance or £1.00 off concessions. Terms and conditions and £1.50 fulfilment fee applies.

To book tickets visit www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com or call 0844 581 1319 (+44 (0) 121 796 6165 from outside the UK)

UPPER STREET EVENTS

Image: Louise Baldwin – Did we really


GET CREATIVE carve out a design

carve out a design Elizabeth Betts shares her technique for using Softcut to print onto fabric.

MATERIALS NEEDED TO PRINT Softcut or lino – available from art shops in different size pieces. Printing ink suitable for fabric – I like using Speedball printing ink that is suitable for fabric as it has the sticky consistency needed to roll it out smoothly. You can use fabric paint, but the texture is loose and so makes it trickier to get it to adhere to the Softcut and so achieve a good print. I have also known textile artists to use acrylic paint, but again it can run into problems due to the loose consistency. It can make the fabric change its handle – although this may not matter if you are making an art quilt which is going on the wall. Roller – I use a printing roller with my Speedball ink. If you are using fabric paint use a sponge roller as this works better with the loose consistency. Roller tray – It is best to use a printing tray like the one pictured in Fig 2, or you can improvise. Thick glass is an ideal surface to roll the ink onto, however after shattering a piece on my way to a class a few years ago I discovered that unwanted laminated posters from work were ideal. Free, light, unbreakable and in plentiful supply, as long as they have a smooth surface they work. Fabric – The prints come out best on a smooth surface so I use quilting cottons. Paper – This is good to have to hand if you want to test your print before you work on fabric. Lino cutter – I use a cheap one from my student days, and it is still going strong. It has a handle into which you insert the nibs, which have a selection of V’s and U’s shapes at the cutting end. The nibs do blunt after a while, so it is worth replacing them if you find cutting is not going as well as it usually does. You can also buy cutters that have the tips fixed in place. Printing mat – To get a good print the fabric needs to have something with a bit of ‘give’ underneath it so the Softcut can ‘sink’ into the fabric. My mat is made from two layers of wadding with a piece of calico on top. See what you have around at home to make a cushioning surface, an easy option is two layers of felt under your fabric. Also handy to have - table covering to protect your work area, thin plastic gloves and an apron.

When I was at university my tutor was a huge fan of lino printing and I fondly remember being shown to heat lino on an old radiator, and create multi-layer prints. Nearly two decades on I have revisited the craft, but have been printing onto fabric instead of paper. One of the things I enjoy about this method of printing is that you don't need a huge amount of space to do it, and that you only need to spend a small amount of money on supplies to get started. Lino printing works by using tools to cut away surface area on the lino to create a relief, then the ink only adheres to the raised areas which transfers to the surface of paper or fabric. The term 'relief printing' covers lots of methods, including woodblock and metal. The technique dates from the early twentieth century, and over the years many artists have worked with lino, including Pablo Picasso, and more recently Angie Lewin. My preferred material to print with is not actually lino, but something called Softcut. It works in a similar way to lino, but as its name suggests, it is much easier to cut into, and so quicker to use. The instructions here refer to Softcut, but can also be used for lino.

CHOOSING A DESIGN This is often the hardest part. I love drawing but can get intimidated by a large piece of plain paper, and when looking at a shiny new piece of Softcut I often get the same feeling. I find the easiest way to start is by doodling onto paper. I will often draw around the pieces of Softcut onto the paper, and then sketch into these frames. To start with I try simple abstract designs, such as lines. Once my drawing skills have warmed up it is much easier to start designing placement prints (such as my umbrella design) and all-over prints, such as my dice design. If you are nervous about drawing a design yourself, but want to make a particular motif such as an animal, look online for royalty free clip art.

Doodling design ideas onto paper

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February 2017 75


Fig 1 The dice design after it had been cut

Fig 2 Putting a line of ink in the roller tray

Fig 3 The ink spread out using the roller

Fig 4 The Softcut covered in ink

Fig 5 The Softcut placed onto the fabric

Fig 6 A print

SAFETY FIRST Be safe with the cutter as the tips are as sharp as a knife. Always cut away from you and take a break if your wrist or fingers start to ache.

TRANSFERRING THE DESIGN You can draw straight onto the Softcut with pencil, or you can transfer the image using carbon paper. The most important thing to remember is the image will be mirrored, so if you wish to print something such as text use a photocopier to mirror the image first.

MAKING THE PRINT

1 2

Cover the area where you are to be working.

Look at the tools, and decide on the best shape for your design. If using a cutter like mine, you will need to place the nib into the handle and turn it to securely fix it in place. I tend to start with a V nib to create the outline, then I go back with different shaped/sized nibs to add in details. Using the tool, gently cut the Softcut along the lines, trying to cut in one movement. Fig 1.

76 February 2017

Fig 7 A tile design made using the flower design

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GET CREATIVE carve out a design

Far left: The hearts in a line. I plan to use these at the centre of Log Cabin style blocks Left: The hearts printed in a grid. I want to add a border and stitch some embroidery into this design before making it into a cushion

Two heart designs before printing

Single Scratchy TV print

3

When the design is finished put the Softcut to one side and get out your roller tray. Put a line of ink in the tray and then roll it out till it is smooth. Put the inked roller onto the Softcut and cover it in an even layer of ink. Figs 2, 3 and 4.

4

Place the Softcut face down onto the fabric and gently press. Fig 5. You can use the back of a spoon, or buy a brayer to add even pressure, however I usually use my fingers. The more pressure that is applied, the more ink will transfer to the fabric. Note, if I am printing onto paper I usually do this step the other way round putting the paper on top of the Softcut, however I find this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work with fabric as it moves.

handy hints If you want to make lots of prints you can glue the Softcut onto a piece of wood to create a stamp. My examples use square pieces of Softcut, however you can use a craft knife to cut it into any shape. Play around with different repeats, such as half-drops. If you enjoy this technique then visit your local bookshop or library to find a book that goes into more depth. With options such as multicolour and reduction prints the only limit is the hours in the day! Using the same block lots of times in a half-drop repeat

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February 2017 77


GET CREATIVE carve out a design

A simple line design can be very effective, especially when cut up for patchwork

This sample shows the difference made by the amount of pressure applied

5

Pick up the Softcut and you will see your print. Fig 6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to add as many prints to the fabric as you wish. Try changing the direction, in Fig 7 you can see a tile layout made from the flower design.

6

Put the fabric to one side to dry. If using the Speedball ink you will find it is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tackyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, not wet. It should dry overnight, and then once it has been left for a week it can be washed. For other inks follow the manufacturers instructions.

7

Use water to clean the Softcut, roller and tray as soon as you finish using them. Dry and put away to re-use at a later date.

78 February 2017

My dice design

WHERE TO BUY lawrence.co.uk

handprinted.com

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quilted leaves – part two Join us in this quilt-along to make a wholecloth using different quilting techniques. DESIGNED AND MADE BY GRETA FITCHETT

This wholelcloth of twenty-five quilt-as-you-go blocks is a great way to try out different techniques and as they are a manageable size they’re easy to quilt. The ready-quilted blocks can then be joined together with narrow sashing.

Greta Fitchett

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QUILT PROJECT quilted leaves

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2

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4

5

6

7

8

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18

19

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SKILL LEVEL FINISHED SIZE Approx 105cm (411⁄2in) square MATERIALS Based on fabrics with a usable width of 42in. Note, this list is to make the whole quilt. 1.8m (2yds) for the quilt top 1.8m (2yds) for the quilt backing 70cm (3⁄4yd) of two different fabrics for the front and back sashings and binding 1.2m (11⁄4yds) low-loft 2.3m (90in) wide wadding (1.8m (2yds) of 114cm (45in) wide) Tear-away stabiliser Stuffing for the trapunto blocks Machine embroidery threads: we’ve used cream, light green mid-green Cotton threads in the same colours as your machine embroidery threads Hand embroidery thread, e.g. perle or coton a broder (not stranded cotton) Couching thread, e.g. stranded cotton Sewing machine feet: walking, free-motion or darning, couching Twin needle, 2mm Hand embroidery needle Erasable fabric pen Masking tape, optional Paper and pencil

Layout guide

USING A TWIN NEEDLE

1

Twin needles are two needles attached to one shaft, which creates two rows of stitching at the same time. The needles are available in different sizes and with different spaces between the needles: the information is shown on the packaging. For this project, we used a twin needle with 2mm between the needles.

WHERE TO BUY We recommend calico, white-onwhite or a pastel solid for the block tops so that the quilting shows up. You could use the same fabric for the tops and backings. Similar fabrics are available from quilt fabric shops or see our advertisers for mail order services.

2

You need to use two spools of thread on top. Modern machines usually have two spool pins, but if yours doesn’t place the second spool in a cup at the right-hand side of the machine. You need just one bobbin thread. A web-like pattern is created on the back of the work.

PREPARATION All measurements include 1⁄4in seam allowances, unless otherwise stated.

3

Set the machine to straight stitch and elongate the stitch slightly. Work with the feed dogs up and a darning (open toe) foot. You need to make sure that both needles go through the holes in the stitch plate or the needles will break when you start to sew.

The blocks are referred to as blocks one to twenty-five, running left to right from the top row to the bottom row. So row one is blocks one to five, row two is blocks six to ten, and so on. Refer to the Layout Guide for guidance.

4

Use a reduced speed when sewing with a twin needle. You may have a speed setting on your machine which will allow you to pre-set a slower speed.

PREPARATION

TWIN-NEEDLE BLOCKS

1 2

1

3

2

The quilt top, quilt backing and wadding pieces were cut out in part one.

This issue we will be making blocks two, four, six, eight, ten, twelve, fourteen, sixteen, eighteen, twenty, twenty-two and twenty-four. It’s a good idea to label (sticky or pinned) each block with its block number so you can keep track of everything as you follow the instructions.

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Six blocks have been stitched using a twin needle: Block two: horizontal wavy lines Block eight: incomplete overlapping circles Block ten: one complete and incomplete overlapping circles Block fourteen: vertical wavy lines Block eighteen: concentric circles Block twenty-two: wavy diagonal lines, top left to bottom right From your tear-away stabiliser cut six 91⁄2in squares.

February 2017 81


QUILT PROJECT quilted leaves

3

For the wavy line designs, take three pieces of paper and on each one mark out a 91⁄2in square. Then draw your designs freehand (see step 1 and the photographs). You need to mark around six to eight lines, roughly evenly spaced. When looking at the photographs, note that only the green lines have been stitched with a twin needle – the cream lines will be added later.

4

When you are happy with your designs, use an erasable fabric pen to transfer each one onto the right side of a 91⁄2in calico square set aside in part one. (See part one for more details about transferring designs.)

5 6 7 8

Matching up the raw edges, pin a square of tear-away stabiliser against the wrong side of your wavy design calico squares.

11 12

Swap to a single needle and cream thread.

For the wavy line blocks (two, fourteen and twenty-two), use a walking foot to echo-quilt lines between the green twin needle lines. (See part one for details about quilting with a walking foot.)

13

For the circle blocks (eight, ten and eighteen), free-motion echo-quilt around the green twin needle lines. Big-stitch hand quilting has also been added to blocks eight and ten. (See part one for details about free-motion quilting and handstitched details.)

Referring to the panel for details, set up your machine for using a twin needle, using two shades of green thread on top.

COUCHING

1

Couching is where thick decorative thread or yarn (trim) is applied to fabric surface. It’s stitched in place with zigzag stitch, set at a width to cover the trim so that the thread goes in and out of the fabric just either side of the trim, which will hold it firmly in place.

Stitch along the marked lines. When you have finished, tear away the excess stabiliser.

For the circle designs, take three pieces of paper and on each one mark out a 91⁄2in square. Then draw your designs (see step 1 and the photographs). For block eight, six, double-line incomplete circles, approx 61⁄2in in diameter, have been overlapped. For block ten, the complete and smaller incomplete circles have a diameter of approx 51⁄4in and the larger incomplete circle a diameter of approx 61⁄2in. For block eighteen the inner circle has a diameter of approx 21⁄2in and outer (fourth) circle approx 7in in diameter, with two roughly evenly spaced circles in between. You don’t need to be precise with the sizes and can probably find saucers, tea plates, etc which you can use as templates.

2

The technique is easier if a couching foot is used; this has a bar across the top that will hold the trim whilst it is stitched in place. If you don’t have a couching foot, use a darning (open toe) foot and hold the trim in one hand to keep it tensioned whilst sewing it in place.

COUCHED WAVY LINE BLOCKS

9 10

Follow steps 4–7 to stitch your twin needle circle designs.

Layer the stitched designs made in steps 7 and 9 with 91⁄2in quilt backing squares and 91⁄2in wadding squares set aside in part one. (See part one for more details about layering your quilt sandwiches.)

1

Three blocks have couched wavy lines: Block four: horizontal wavy lines Block twelve: vertical wavy lines Block twenty-four: wavy diagonal lines, top right to bottom left

2

From your tear-away stabiliser cut three 91⁄2in squares.

Block 2

Block 8

Block 10

Block 14

Block 18

Block 22

Block 4

Block 12

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3

Follow ‘Twin needle blocks’ steps 3–5 to prepare your squares for couching. If you wish, you could use mirror-images of the designs you made for the wavy line twin needle blocks.

4

Referring to the panel for details, set up your machine for couching and then couch your trim along the marked lines. When you have finished, tear away the excess stabiliser.

5

Follow ‘Twin needle blocks’ steps 10–12 to layer and quilt the blocks.

FREE-MOTION QUILTED CIRCLES AND SPIRALS BLOCKS

1

Three blocks have free-motion quilted circles or spirals: Block six: spiral Block sixteen: spiral Block twenty: circles

2

Draw and mark your designs in the manner described in ‘Twin needle blocks’ step 8. You might need to have a few goes at drawing spirals to achieve pleasing designs.

3 4

Follow ‘Twin needle blocks’ step 10 to layer the blocks.

Free-motion quilt the designs, stitching over the marked lines. The spirals are stitched from their centres outwards and then a second line is stitched to go back to the centre, creating two rows of stitching. For block sixteen, another line of stitching in a different colour thread has been quilted between the first two rows of stitching. The lines of the circles have been stitched over twice. (See part one for details about free-motion quilting.)

5

Big-stitch hand quilting has also been added to blocks six and twenty. (See part one for details about hand-stitched details.)

NEXT ISSUE Join us next issue when we will finish and join the blocks. Don’t miss out – subscribe today! See page 68 for our latest subscription offer. If you missed last month's instalment, back issues can be ordered from mags-uk.com

Block 24

Block 6

Block 16

Block 20

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February 2017 83


Interview with

Victoria Findlay Wolfe On a recent visit to NYC, Mandy Munroe met up with Victoria at her new quilt shop on 38th street.

How did you get into quilting?

When did you make your first quilt?

I started sewing as a young child on the farm in Minnesota. My mother was a seamstress and my father had an upholstery business. My grandmother Elda Wolfe was the quilter. Everyone sewed! My skills three dimensionally were pretty good from a young age. No one was using patterns, so I learned to look and make things up as I went along from watching my parents. I was always a maker and knew I’d be an artist when I grew up. I loved making all kinds of crazy things and using fabric was one thing that was always accessible to me.

I started sewing when I was four and made lots of patchwork pillows, doll quilts and so on. I believe I made my first finished quilt when I was thirteen. It’s a pretty sad looking thing now but it’s still in one piece! I started making many larger quilts, most of which I abandoned - I was cutting shapes and sewing them together and I couldn’t figure out how to make them perfect! They stayed quilt tops and were never finished. I find it funny now when I look back at them and see that creative free spirit who was just cutting and sewing without thinking about seam

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QUILTING WORLD interview with Victoria Findlay Wolfe

allowances and such like. Now I think they are very charming quilts and I’m really happy I still have a couple of them at home. Later, after I was married, I stumbled upon quilt blogs and saw these beautifully made quilts. I thought, ‘mmm, I could do that’ and I started to learn everything I could about making quilts. It had never occurred to me to get a quilt book as I did not learn that way. So blogs were a huge source of skill building for me, as far as finishing skills, like binding and facings were concerned. Ultimately, I design the same way I paint - on my design wall or my painter's canvas. Add a bit of red paint here, put a bit of red fabric there… I don’t sew anything until I have it designed on my design wall.

Who were your early influences? My family and my grandmother are my influencers. My grandmother was making scrap double knit polyester (crimplene) quilts all through the 1970s, which is what we slept under on the farm. These bright amazing colours, which will never fade, made a huge impact on me. I thought that was how you made beautiful quilts, by cutting up fabrics and sewing them all back together willy nilly. Hence, my love of scrap quilts, and ‘made fabric’ - sewing all my scraps together and using them as made fabric in my quilts. What I learned from this traditional scrap process that has been around for hundreds of years, was how it influences my process and how I look at building a quilt. I start with scraps, sew them together, and I’m looking to make my inspiration. I then wait for the fabrics to tell me what’s next. What do I have in front of me? What do I like, what colours do I see? What can I do with it? What new pattern can I come up with…. It’s that exploring of design, pattern and colour that excited me the most in quilt making. I’m always looking for a way to shake up my creative process so I’m not just doing the same thing over and over.

I have to thank you for inviting me into your home to join the Metro Mod quilt group. How did the group start? A friend of mine asked me when she found the Modern quilt guild when it first started up, if I wanted to do a gathering with her. I said sure, completely blind to what it was. I then invited perfect strangers into my home for the first meeting, fifteen people, which has grown to over a 100! It was so much fun those early days, meeting perfect strangers in my home.

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You always use an interesting palette, when did you realise‘ 'cheddar'’ was your thing? Is ‘cheddar’ my thing? I love all colours, and all fabrics, I’m not a fabric snob. I love repros, civil war, traditional, modern, contemporary fabrics, and all colours and styles of fabrics. I buy it all including more of the double knit polyesters… it’s lovely to sew with! I do think my colour sense was formed early by the luscious colours of the 1970s. I like palettes to have a slightly off colour palette norm. I guess I’m nostalgic.

Your double wedding ring quilt Double Edged Love won Best in Show at QuiltCon 2013. Was your book already underway? No, the quilt came first! The book came after the entire series of quilts were made. I had not intended on writing another book, so Double Wedding Ring Quilts: Traditions Made Modern came about after the exhibit was organised at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts & Textiles. I made the first twelve double wedding rings as a very personal journey to explore the relationship about where I came from, where I live now, my happy memories of my grandmother’s quilt, my sewing background and my family’s background.

You're on the board of the Quilt Alliance and have been very involved with their Quilters Take Manhattan event. How did that come about? I have just finished my term on the board of the Quilt Alliance. I sit on the board of many organisations, including the International Quilt Study Centre and Museum and the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts & Textiles. I joined the Quilt Alliance in 2011. I was asked to do a Q.S.O.S. (Quilters Save our Stories) interview as part of the first event here in NYC and I offered up my home to help support the event. I admire the work they do to document, share, and preserve the stories of quilts and quilters. I think it’s an important part of Women’s History here in the U.S. and globally. In the quilt community historically it’s just as important for both men and women and also to show how quilts have been used as an artistic form.

Your charity Bumblebeans has been running for a few years now. Tell us little about it. I feel it’s important when you get to do something you love that you share with others in any way you can. I’ve run several quilt drives over

February 2017 85


QUILTING WORLD interview with Victoria Findlay Wolfe

the years for Transitional Housing projects for homeless families, for Hurricane Sandy victims, for women’s domestic violence and recovery centres. Currently I am sending out quilts to those affected by cancer, illness, or the loss of someone very close. The programs change and I try to help where and when I can, either through finished quilts or quilt blocks that can be made up quickly to share with others.

Tell us about the three collections you have with Marcus Fabrics. I started designing for Marcus Fabrics two years ago. Mostly Manor came out first, then Meadow Storm. Light Works was shipped in January and in May, Green & Red, a holiday line that shares my obsession with green and red seasonal quilts! I’m having a blast diving back into using my Fine Art degree and producing lines that include all the styles of fabrics I love to use in my quilts.

You recently opened a quilt store in NYC. What are your plans for that? Yes! My store, VFW Quilts, opened in September so add it to your ‘Quilt Shops to Visit in NYC’! I humbly call it my ‘shipping department’

"The scariest part of the writing process was having to leave all my precious pieces behind with the photographer in London so the photos for the book could be taken." WIN! Victoria kindly gave Mandy a goodie bag to give away to one lucky reader. It contains a bundle of fabric, a Star Storm Quilt pattern and a Bow Tie template pack. To enter, and to read terms and conditions, visit popularpatchwork.com and click on WIN!

as in the past, all my products - my own fabrics, books, templates, patterns, threads, and sewing goodies - were shipped from my home. Now I get to have all of it in their own space and allow quilty friends from all over the globe to come in and say hi, talk & shop quilts! Strangely, my husband was so happy when I moved it all out of our house, hmmm… It’s been wonderful for me too, I can’t run in and fill web orders at 8pm now, I can relax and work on hand projects in the evening with my family. I do tend to work non-stop, so having the store now open to the public in its own space, has helped me regulate my workload. Family comes first for me no matter what, so this has been a great move. Conveniently my studio is in the same building as the store, which is one building over from where I live, so my commute is perfect!

So what's next? I have several Double Wedding Ring exhibits again this year. MQX New England, Paducah, and Festival of Quilts in the UK. Many new quilt patterns will be coming out, my Star Storm pattern which released in winter, 2016, has been very popular. My next book Modern Quilt Magic will be out in August! I’m still traveling around to teach and lecture but I will be doing more retreats from my home in NYC. You can sign up for my newsletter for those details at vfwquilts.com. My daughter will be graduating in 2018 and I don’t want to miss a thing, so I plan on staying closer to home.

VICTORIA FINDLAY WOLFE QUILTS 325 West 38th St Suite 811, New York, NY 10018 Store opening times: Monday to Thursday 10am -1pm, Friday and Saturday Midday - 6pm. Victoria also teaches small groups from her studio, so if any readers are travelling to New York with friends and would like to take a workshop get in touch. vfwquilts.com

86 February 2017

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Threads and Patches

15 Watli Watling ing SStreet (Highh St) St St), Fenny Stratford, Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Bucks MK2 2BU. • Tel: 01908 649687

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SHOW &TELL

Please send your emails and good quality (jpg) photos to editor.pp@mytimemedia.com or write to Elizabeth Betts, Popular Patchwork, My Time Media Ltd, Suite 25, Eden House, Enterprise Way, Edenbridge, Kent, TN8 6HF

Double Inspiration

Family Links

I enclose two photographs of the projects I have made from Popular Patchwork putting my own ideas into each pattern. For my large Log Cabin quilt (featured in the December 2015 issue), I used batiks and a panel of horses, incorporating the panel into the quilt using the same measurements. Felicity loves it. In the May 2016 issue I followed your Floral Tumblers pattern in red, black and white fabric, putting sashing between two lines of Tumblers. It was made as a gift for a wedding in August. Lorraine Yates, Leicestershire As someone who loves to tinker with a pattern I loved reading your letter. Panels are not always easy to use and so it is a brilliant idea to feature in the centre of a Log Cabin. Your Tumblers quilt is great, I love the way you have used the red spot in both the tumblers and sashing, the happy couple must have been delighted with it.

I thought you might be interested to see this quilt. The hexagons are paper pieced by hand, but the portraits were made on my embroidery machine. The central one is my late mother, my two sisters are at the top, my daughter on the bottom right and I am bottom left. We are linked by our genes and our love of textiles, and so I have called it Stitched Together By Our Genes. The quilt is machine quilted with a fleece back, and I have added a label. Sue Dewsbury, Lincolnshire I have never seen a quilt like this before. A true one-off, it is a beautiful tribute to the women in your family, and a lovely way of linking you all together through stitch.

". .the happy couple must have been delighted with it " 88 February 2017

Star Lette

r

"We are linked by our genes and our love of textiles" www.popularpatchwork.com


READERS' LETTERS

SHOW US YOUR PROJECT AND WIN! Each month we give away quilting goodies for every letter or email and photograph published on our Show & Tell pages. This month’s prize is a pack of 20 Clover Mini Wonder Clips worth £11.50! These are a great alternative to pins particularly when working with vinyl, velvet and other fabrics that can be damaged by pins. The new mini clips have a wide opening and a firm grip so they are ideally suited for small scale projects that require holding multi-layers securely in place such as for miniature patchwork and making dolls clothes. They are also a great way to hold curves for machining accuracy and, as an added bonus, the bright colours make it easy to find them if dropped – putting an end to the worry of treading on pins that have gone astray! Clover products are available nationwide from all good craft, knitting and hobby shops. For stockist details email clover@stockistenquiries.co.uk or telephone 01453 883581.

Soothing Sewing I was suffering from stress and sliding into depression when one day, by sheer chance, I walked into a local quilting supplies shop and workroom stacked high with fabulously colourful fabrics and was welcomed in by the group of women who talked as they sewed. I quickly got hooked on the quilting and was amazed at how I was able to concentrate on the sewing, leaving everything else outside, and for a few hours at a time, was able to switch off from the stress that I had found so crippling. At first I wanted to finish my quilt as soon as possible but now I can see that the company and the generosity of the other ladies who sewed whilst talking openly about their lives, sharing their troubles, triumphs, tragedies and comedies and with who have now shared my own stories, is far more important to me than the finished article. The process, not just the vision of the finished project, has been so therapeutic that I wondered what I would do when I finish my current project. The answer is obvious now; I will just have to start on another! This craft has allowed me to slow down and it works far better than medication. Jacqueline Cross, Suffolk I really enjoyed reading your email and completely agree with you. One of the reasons I started quilting, and continue to quilt, is that it relaxes me. I find that when I am concentrating on a quilt it quietens any worries, and I enjoy sewing with others and talking about anything, from Poldark to bargains in the supermarket. I can’t wait to see what you make next…

Pretty Pouch Here is a photo of the Tulip Ruler Pouch from the July 2016 issue that I have just completed. The timing of this project was perfect for me as I have just started quilting this year and I was definitely in need of something to store my growing selection of rulers! I really enjoyed making it and found it was great for some appliqué practice too. Angela Hind, Cumbria You have done a fantastic job of making this pouch. I really love your choice of fabrics, it would also make a great make-up bag!

".. I was definitely in need of something to store my growing selection of rulers! "

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February 2017 89


BOOKSHELF The Popular Patchwork team share their favourite February reads

ADDICTED TO SCRAPS, 12 VIBRANT QUILT PROJECTS Bonnie K Hunter

"If you're a scrap addict, it’s definitely one for you to read and enjoy. "

Kansus City Quilts, £19.99. ISBN 978-1-61745303-8 (P96 S/B) I have scraps for sure but I wouldn’t call myself a scrap addict. I know people who at the end of a quilt class go through the rubbish pots seeking out unwanted scraps for their stash - and after reading this book, I can now understand why. In the first chapter, author and ‘scrap expert’ Bonnie Hunter provides a comprehensive guide to the sewing techniques used throughout the book, which include methods of sorting and cutting scraps so that they are ready to use. I am thinking this may be the answer to my ‘scrap drawer’ issues of overcrowding and rumpled fabric. This chapter also explains how to make half-square triangles, quarter-square triangles and flying geese using quick piecing methods that are used throughout the quilt projects. The remaining chapters each host a project. The quilts are very colourful and as scraps are used the pieces tend to be quite small. The quilts have a very ‘traditional American’ look to them but they would suit any colours in your scrap box. I think the challenge of scrap quilts is to just go with the colours you have and trust that it will work, this certainly seems to be Bonnie’s philosophy. Each project starts with a summary of the colour choice and design from Bonnie, explaining why she chose the scraps and how she sorted them. The instructions for making the quilt blocks are very clear and there is a handy section called ‘at a glance’ that illustrates each block part and the pressing instructions. The projects are completed with the assembly of the quilt with no specific guidance given for the quilting. I am not sure I’d want to make twelve scrap quilts but think it more likely I will start to sort my scraps to make one or two. The book is very colourful, well written and certainly makes you think about the scrap pile in your stash. If you are a scrap addict, it’s definitely one for you to read and enjoy.

Suzanne Fisher

PERFECT PATCHWORK BAGS Sue Kim with Veronica Yang Stash Books, £17.99. ISBN 978-1-61745145-4 (P66 S/B) Learning to make bags has been on my to-do list for quite a while now, but the construction process and fiddly seams have always put me off. However, having read this gorgeous book by authors and makers Sue Kim and her daughter Veronica Yang, I now feel a lot more confident to have a go. Perfect Patchwork Bags includes fifteen projects, from small clutch bags and purses to larger travel bags – there’s even a cute hexie backpack. The first chapter starts by explaining how to insert internal zips and pockets, as well as fitting the fasteners and buckles, and it is these techniques that you will refer back to for each of the projects. The instructions are well written, with clear accompanying photographs. I love the use of different patchwork techniques throughout the book, including strip piecing, log cabin, hexagons and even curves, all of which are used to create whole pieces of cloth from which the templates are then cut. Thankfully, the templates at the back of the book are full size, so no messing around at the photocopier. These smaller projects are great for using up the stash, and with my own growing larger by the day, I think I know what everyone will be getting for their birthdays this year!

Louisa Goult

"These smaller projects are great for using up the stash.."

90 February 2017

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BEST READS

SENTIMENTAL HEARTS TO QUILT Tricia Cribbs Leisure Arts, £5.99. ISBN 978-1-46475395-4 (P42 S/B) This booklet contains two quilt designs with a theme of love and friendship, designed by Tricia Cribbs of Turning Twenty. They both use subtle colourways which suit the traditional designs, and I felt the appliqué motifs would be ideal for using up scraps. The first quilt, Garden Hearts, will be popular with quilters who have ‘green fingers’. The piecing of the 71 x 73in quilt is fairly straightforward, with the more complex appliqué hearts being the focus of the design. Each one is created by fusible appliqué and blanket stitch, with embroidery and buttons added for embellishment. It is a beautiful quilt, and the type of project that I would cut out, fuse, and then keep in a box next to the sofa to hand stitch during the evening. The second quilt, Peace in my Heart, measures 71½ x 86½in and features hearts laid out in a chain Nine-Patch setting. I love the way the appliqués are constructed – each one is made from a foundation pieced square cut into the heart shape. The booklet has full size templates, so there is no playing around with scale on the photocopier, and the lovely close-ups of the blocks and quilting make both of these projects look easy to follow.

Elizabeth Betts

"The booklet has full size templates, so there is no playing around with scale on the photocopier, and the lovely close-ups of the blocks and quilting make both of these projects look easy to follow. "

SEWING ROOM ACCESSORIES Debbie Shore

"If one of your new year’s resolutions was to be organised when you sew, then you will find lots of inspiration in this book." www.popularpatchwork.com

SEARCH PRESS, £7.99. ISBN 978-1-78221335-2 (P66 S/B) I am a great fan of the Love to Sew series, with previous titles including Quilted Flowers, Mug Rugs and Teddy Bears. They are well priced, and if your bookshelf is starting to groan under the weight of craft books then the handy size will be welcomed! This latest title, Sewing Room Accessories, has been written by Debbie Shore, a name that may be familiar to readers through her YouTube channel and previous books. Her new book contains fifteen projects, all made in the practical style Debbie is known for. It starts with pincushions, and then goes on to patterns for a sewing case, sewing machine covers, a tool roll - everything you could think of that you need to make sewing easier. My favourite is the Ironing Stand which is based on the foldable TV tables found in homeware shops. It looks fairly easy to make, and would be very handy to have around the house when I sew. The book opens with a short introduction of techniques, but the clear step-by-step photos for each project make it suitable for all abilities. Many of the projects have details such as pockets and zips to create clever storage ideas, which I have to confess make me slightly nervous, but the photographs are clear and so I am not put off from making any of the projects. The patterns are written in inches and centimetres, so will keep both quilters and dressmakers happy. If one of your new year’s resolutions was to be organised when you sew, then you will find lots of inspiration in this book.

Elizabeth Betts

February 2017 91


WHAT'S ON

WHAT'S ON Diary entries are published free of charge and are subject to space. Events must be open to the public or non-members and any admission charges stated. Please include a full location address including postcode, opening hours, contact details, and high-resolution photographs of exhibited work or raffle quilts. Your listing should be submitted to katy.purvis@mytimemedia.com four months in advance of the event for publication. Please visit popularpatchwork. com/events to see a complete list of all current and future 2017 listings.

ENGLAND CHESHIRE

YORKSHIRE

25 March STALYBRIDGE PATCHWORK AND QUILTING GROUP 8TH BIENNIAL EXHIBITION St Paul's Church, Huddersfield Road, Stalybridge, SK15 2PT 11am to 4pm Entry £2.00 E: anne.goslingco@btinternet.com Extra info:Refreshments available, free parking and disabled access.

24–26 February  SPRING QUILT FESTIVAL Hall 2, Great Yorkshire Showgrounds, Harrogate, HG2 8NZ 10am–4.30pm (Sun 4pm) Adult £8.00, Senior Citizen £7.00, Child £3.00 W: grosvenorshows.co.uk Extra info: Wonderful displays of quilts, patchwork and quilting. Restaurant, disabled facilities and free parking.

HERTFORDSHIRE 18 -19 March MIMRAN QUILTERS 12TH PATCHWORK AND QUILTIING EXHIBITION Welwyn Civic Centre, Prospect Place, Old Welwyn, Herts AL6 9ER Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 10am - 4pm Entry £3.50; children free E: mikindex@btinternet.com Extra info:Exhibition of quilts and wall hangings, raffles, refreshments.

LONDON 2–5 March THE SPRING KNITTING AND STITCHING SHOW Olympia London, Hammersmith Road, W14 8UX Thur 10am–7pm, Fri and Sat 10am–5.30pm, Sun 10–5pm Advance tickets: Adult £14.50, Concessions £13.00, Child £7.00 W: theknittingandstitchingshow.com

SUSSEX 27–29 January  SPRING QUILT FESTIVAL Norfolk Pavilion, Ardingly, Haywards Heath, Sussex, RH17 6TL 10am–4.30pm (Sun 4pm) £8.00 Adult, £7 Concession, £3 Child Extra info: Disabled facilities, easy access and free parking.

92 February 2017

SCOTLAND EDINBURGH 17–19 February SPRING QUILT FESTIVAL Lowland Hall, Royal Highland Showgrounds, EH28 8NB 10am–4.30pm (Sun 4pm) Adult £8.00, Senior Citizen £7.00, Child £3.00 W: grosvenorshows.co.uk Extra info: Displays of patchwork and quilting, demonstrations, traders, refreshments, parking, disabled access. 

GLASGOW 2-5 March THE SCOTTISH QUILTING SHOW / HOBBYCRAFTS SECC,Glasgow, G3 8YW 10am–5.00pm (Sun 4.30pm) Advance tickets; Adult £8.50, Senior Citizen £7.50 W: hobbycraftshows.co.uk Extra info: Traders, workshops and displays. Includes the exhbition Borders, Boundaries & Beyond from the group It Happens. The work is a creative response to the title and includes 2D and 3D work from the three textile artists who have been working collaboratively for ten years.

Yellow Poppies by Karen Lane. Spring Quilt Festival, Ardingly, Sussex

WALES DENBIGHSHIRE 8 –19 February QUILTFEST 2017 On the Edge and 1001 Nights Royal International Pavilion, Abbey Road, Llangollen LL20 8SW 10am–4pm Free, donation welcome Extra info: On the Edge, a collection of quilts from the 2016 Contemporary Quilt challenge, and 1001 Nights, a textile challenge with Kazakhstan fabrics. 12 February QUILTFEST TRADING DAY 10am–4pm £3.50 Extra info: Light refreshments and free parking. 1 –28 February WREXHAM TAILOR’S QUILT CHALLENGE Llangollen Museum and Art Gallery, Llangollen LL20 8PW Free, donation welcome 10.30am–4pm 8 –19 February MINIATURES Llangollen Museum and Art Gallery, Llangollen LL20 8PW Free, donation welcome 10.30am–4pm Extra info: A collection of small quilts by the Miniature Quilt Group of The Quilters’ Guild of the British Isles. W: www.quiltfest.org.uk  

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The

COTTON PATCH

The One-Stop Shop for Patchwork & Quilting

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Februry 2017 93


7th - 9th April 2017 Uttoxeter Racecourse Staffordshire ST14 8BD West Midland's favourite patchwork & quilting show! Join us for the fifth British Quilt & Stitch Village... We have lots of traders, exhibits, demonstrators & workshops! Take part in our Quilt & Embroidery competition... All levels welcome! To find out more or to download a form visit www.quiltandstitchvillage.com

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MEET THE MAKER NEXT ISSUE IN

MARCH 2017 ISSUE On sale 10th February

RAINBOW FAN Update your home with Louisa Goult’s English paper-pieced cushion

PLUS

FLORAL SPLENDOUR

Make a fresh and modern quilt in time for spring

CRAZY ABOUT PIN CUSHIONS Amanda Ogden shares her love of these super sewing assistants

Contents subject to change

Published by MyTimeMedia Ltd Unit 25, Eden House Enterprise Way, Edenbridge, Kent TN8 6HF Phone: 01689 869840 From Outside UK: +44 (0) 1689 869 840 www.popularpatchwork.com SUBSCRIPTIONS UK - New, Renewals & Enquiries Tel: 0344 243 9023 Email: help@pp.secureorder.co.uk USA & CANADA - New, Renewals & Enquiries Tel: (001)-866-647-9191 REST OF WORLD - New, Renewals & Enquiries Tel: +44 1604 828 748 BACK ISSUES & BINDERS www.mags-uk.com 01733 688964 EDITORIAL Editor: Elizabeth Betts Email: editor.pp@mytimemedia.com Sub-editor: Louisa Goult

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© MyTimeMedia Ltd. 2017. All rights reserved ISSN 0969-6946 The Publisher’s written consent must be obtained before any part of this publication may be reproduced in any form whatsoever, including photocopiers, and information retrieval systems. All reasonable care is taken in the preparation of the magazine contents, but the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for errors in the contents of this magazine or for any loss however arising from such errors, including loss resulting from negligence of our staff. Reliance placed upon the contents of this magazine is at reader’s own risk. POPULAR PATCHWORK, ISSN 0969-6946, is published monthly with an additional issue in May by MYTIMEMEDIA Ltd, Unit 25, Eden House, Enterprise Way, Edenbridge, Kent TN8 6HF, 6HF UK. The US annual subscription price is 58GBP (equivalent to approximately 96USD). Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica NY 11431. US Postmaster: Send address changes to Popular Patchwork, Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Subscription records are maintained at dsb.net 3 Queensbridge, The Lakes, Northampton, NN4 7BF. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.

February October 2016 2017 97


LET'S VISIT

Let's visit... Leicester

Images © Nicola Lisle 2016

Journalist and author Nicola Lisle takes us on a tour of the historic city of Leicester.

The Great Hall, Leicester Guildhall

King Richard III statue

Ever since the discovery of Richard III’s remains beneath a car park in 2012, you could be forgiven for thinking that this momentous find is all that Leicester has to offer. It is certainly fascinating to follow in his footsteps, and it’s possible to spend a whole weekend just exploring all the Richard III connections. But there is a lot more to discover in this historic East Midlands city – not least the fact that for centuries it was famous for its woollen and hosiery industries. There are now museums, statues and other relics to remind us that during the 19th century Leicester was one of the fashion capitals of Europe.

Heritage The Romans settled here in around AD48 and you can see the foundations of the Roman baths which were excavated in the 1930s. The original entrance to the baths, the magnificent Jewry Wall, is one of Britain’s largest surviving examples of Roman architecture. Find out more at the Jewry Wall Museum, which houses artefacts from Roman and medieval Leicester. A visit to the well-preserved medieval Guildhall is a must, particularly for its painted ceiling murals in the Great Hall and the ornate overmantel in the Mayor’s Parlour. Opposite the Guildhall is the 900-year-old Cathedral, where Richard III’s remains were reinterred in March 2015. His tomb lies in a newly-created ambulatory and is inscribed with his motto, ‘Loyaulte me lie’ (loyalty binds me), and coat of arms. You can also see the Pall, a beautifully-embroidered cloth designed by Jacquie Binns to cover Richard’s coffin at his reinterment. The figures around the cloth tell the story of Richard’s life and the rediscovery and reburial of his body. A short distance away is one of Leicester’s most famous

98 February 2017

Newarke Houses Museum

statues, The Seamstress, which celebrates Leicester’s hosiery industry. Another famous sight in Leicester is the Clock Tower, which features statues of local benefactors, among them wool merchant William Wyggeston and woolcomber Gabriel Newton, both also former mayors of the city. You can find out more about Leicester’s woollen, hosiery and footwear industries at Newark Houses Museum, close to Leicester Castle.

Shopping Leicester Market is over 700 years old and is the largest outdoor covered market in Europe. Situated close to the Clock Tower, it is open Monday to Saturday and sells just about everything you can think of, from fruit and vegetables, clothes and books to jewellery, bric-a-brac, fabrics and haberdashery. There are many independent fabric and craft shops in the city, including Crafty Sew & So which opened in St Martin’s Square in 2015 and is a treasure trove for needlework enthusiasts. Here you can buy fabrics, patterns, quilting cotton, sewing kits and haberdashery. They also run sewing workshops and a sewing café! Find out more at craftysewandso.com. Also worth a visit are The Button Boutique in High Cross and Material Magic in the Market Place.

Eating and Drinking Wherever you are in Leicester, you are never far from somewhere to eat and drink. If you’re after a light lunch or snack, I recommend the White Rose Cafe in St Martin’s House, next to the Cathedral, where you can get sandwiches, baguettes and cakes as well as hot and cold drinks. If you’re looking for something a bit more substantial, there’s The Boot Room – housed, as its name suggests, in a former footwear factory.

www.popularpatchwork.com


The Horizon Memory Craft 15000

iPad

Smart » iPad® connectivity with AcuEdit™, AcuMonitor™ & AcuDesign™ apps PLUS wireless communication to your laptop or PC

When you create with fabric and thread, every project is a journey. Where you end up and how you get there is all up to you... and your machine. Connect with wireless via your PC or iPad® and with our fastest processor to date, you’ll be there in no time. The Horizon MC15000 has a new automatic needle threader, five hoops including our largest come as standard and it has the largest, most vivid touch screen we’ve ever made! No matter which direction you head, with hundreds of new built-in designs, including Designer exclusives the Horizon MC15000 can take you there.

For further information: Telephone 0161 666 6011 or visit our website www.janome.co.uk

The World’s leading sewing machine manufacturer


For more information on local stockists contact 01793 834304. Our latest brochure can be downloaded now from;

www.hornfurniture.co.uk

The Quilter’s Delight mk2

Need space to create?

Designed by you! Developed over many years of feedback from Quilters & Patchworkers. For instance; rounded non-catch corners on the top working surface, support all around you, centre of the needle sewing position - to name a few advantages. Go take a look for yourself you’ll not be disappointed!

Whether you’re a Sewer or Quilter...

We’ve got it covered!

Fitted with our ‘Maxi– lifter’ air-lift system that can be customised to fit almost all brands of sewing machine. With this lift you may never need to lift or carry your sewing machine again.

Have a look at our full range online now... ...or contact us for a brochure

An inset, cut to fit your exact machine, is included. This gives you a perfect flat sewing position making the free arm of your machine level with the rest of the table top. Imagine– An ideal working height & NO MORE NEEDLE DRAG! 7 Large twin wheeled, lockable, soft rolling, castors on the main unit and 4 on the separate drawer caddy.

Due to its ingenious, practical design the QDmk2 takes very little room closed.

in a fresh Now available ! all white finish

Built in long lasting, quality construction giving you many happy years of service.

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Possibly the best scissors you’ll ever get to use! Ask us about our new range of precision made German scissors….. a perfect companion for your new cabinet.

Every sewing machine should have one!

£849

Horn Crafting… Quilting… Sewing Furniture

www.hornfurniture.co.uk (Pease note: The sewing machine and accessories are not included)


Popular Patchwork - February 2017